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I'm Pippin Williamson, founder of numerous plugins, a reviewer for WordPress.org/plugins, a cyclist, and avid craft beer lover. Ask me anything!

Oct. 14, 2015

Hello!

I am a WordPress plugin developer living in Hutchinson Kansas.

6 years ago I began my journey working in WordPress and today I am the owner and CEO of three companies and the founder of several large eCommerce based plugins, including Easy Digital Downloads, AffiliateWP, and Restrict Content Pro. I have also written well over 200 plugins, I help review plugin submissions on WordPress.org, and frequently contribute back to WordPress core. I also co-host a podcast about WordPress development called ApplyFilters

Outside of WordPress and development, I love cycling, hiking, great coffee, and craft beer. I'm an avid homebrewer and a lover of sour beers.

My wife and two daughters are the heart soul of everything I do.

Ask me anything!

Comment
47 votes   Flag
Clifton Griffin

When building a new product, do you have any recommendations for how to find and approach influencers to help spread the word and help make new releases successful?

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Pippinsplugins

I've never been one to "hunt people down" and ask for them to help promote a product launch. While it can obviously be a very successful strategy, it is just not me.

I have never entertained the idea of someone promoting my product just because they might be able to earn a few affiliate dollars on it. Instead, I want people to promote it because they truly love and support the product.

To answer your question, I think one of the best things you can do is try and get a few influencers to not only promote your product but to back it 100%. I promote plugins like SearchWP avidly because it is a truly great plugin, not just because I consider Jonathan a good friend.

How do you get it into influencers hands and attention? That's a harder issue, but I'd start with reaching out directly. Tip: be short, to the point, and honest. People that get hundreds or thousands of messages everyday hate reading yet-another-spammy-help-me email. Keep your email or message less than 300 words or less.

Another tip: write, write write. Write on your own blog, write guest posts, write on Twitter, write on Facebook. Put material out there. While people won't always find it, you're guaranteed to be more successful if you have writing out there than if you have none.

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Joe Casabona

What's a big issue that you see while doing plugin reviews for WordPress.org? Not necessarily the most common, but common enough to be worth mentioning.

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Pippinsplugins

Biggest: people not following directions.

We get submission after submission where people have copy and pasted some code into a file and uploaded it. Even after we email them to inform them of various issues, we will still get the same exact code submitted with zero changes.

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Mizner

Serious: Do you #FeelTheBern?

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Pippinsplugins

Yes. He's one of the first candidates I've been excited about in a long time. It's so refreshing to see one that is genuine and not driven / funded by big money.

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Brian Krogsgard

I'm currently contemplating my next move, and your ability to balance multiple time consuming projects at the same time inspires me. What tips do you have for someone going from running one thing to running two, if financially it's not viable to hire someone full time yet?

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Pippinsplugins

Drink more coffee?

I'm not sure I have a good answer for this, so I'll just be bluntly honest.

Since before college, I found that I had a knack for balancing multiple things at one time. During college I discovered I could put this skill to good use, allowing me to take 18-22 credit hours each semester, work two part-time campus jobs, and build the foundations of the business I run today. Oh, I was also trying to convince my now-wife to marry me by driving an hour three days a week to visit her.

If you want to run multiple time-consuming projects at one time, you have to be prepared for the task. It's not even remotely easy, but it can be exceptionally rewarding, and I don't just mean financially.

One aspect that I believe has helped me juggle several companies at one time is that they are all closely related. Each of my primary projects (EDD, RCP, AFFWP) are related to each other. That helps a lot as work that's done on one may benefit the others.

You mentioned that it's not viable to hire someone fulltime to help yet, but what about part time? Bringing others in to help with daily tasks is by one of the best things I've ever done to help propel my business forward. See if you can bring someone on for a few hours a week. If they don't work out, the financial loss is significantly smaller.

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Juanfra Aldasoro

How do you see WP in 3/5 years from now. Did the WooCommerce acquisition by a8c affected in any way your decisions about the future of EDD, and trying to give more importance to your other plugins?

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Pippinsplugins

WP will be the backbone that drives many larger non-WP specific applications, entirely due to the introduction of the REST API.

The Woo acquisition absolutely affects how I look at the future of EDD. I'd be a fool not to take that into consideration. Exactly how it affects our future is yet to be determined. Woo being acquired is not what has caused the revitalization of some of my other plugins, that has just been a natural occurrence as the company has grown.

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Kyle Maurer

How do you feel being homeschooled affected your adult life, career choices and capabilities as an entrepreneur? And do you homeschool your own children?

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Pippinsplugins

It shaped the very core of who I am. Would I be where I am today if I wasn't homeschooled? I have no idea, but I do know that the freedom to play and learn in my own ways as a child fundamentally affected the way I view things today.

Yes, my children will be homeschooled, at least up until the point they are old enough to make their own decisions about school. If they want to go to public or private school like many of their peers, that is up for them to decide. It's a decision my parents allowed me and my siblings to make around the age of 15. My children will have the same option.

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Gilbert Pellegrom

How do you market your products? How important would you say product marketing is in the current WordPress plugin market?

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Pippinsplugins

While not always successful, I try to write, write, write. On blogs, Twitter, and email blasts. I also occasionally promote them on my podcast.

I also strive to build products that largely market themselves. I don't mean that they have any kind of automated system that emails people; I mean products that are able to stand on their own and easily display their value to potential users. If a potential customer can't understand the value a product provides in a few minutes or less, they're unlikely to become a customer.

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Kyle Maurer

You've said you want to one day open your own brewery. What might it be called and what might you do to make it special and give it your own unique flair?

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Pippinsplugins

Sandhills Brewing (or similar) after the region I called home as a child. The sandhills of Kansas.

I have very little interest in making run-of-the-mill beers, but I have great interest in the true craftsmanship that is required to make great wild / sour / spontaneously fermented ales. There is a true beauty and majesty to the prospect of making beer that comes wholly from the land around the brewery. Wild yeast from the fields, fruit from the local orchards, grain from the local farmers. Everything necessary to make great beer in the traditions of old European farmers is right here around us.

If you're not familiar with them, I'd highly recommend you check out Jester King in Austin, TX. They are the epitome of the brewery I hope to create in the next 10 years.

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Kyle Maurer

If you had Rogue from X-Men's super powers and could steal the super powers of anyone else in the WordPress community (development, management, marketing, speaking, etc.), what powers would you leach and from whom?

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Pippinsplugins

The people and communication skills of Cory Miller.

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Charlie Livingston

What do you see as the future direction of the theme market? What would you be doing/thinking about if you ran a theme shop?

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Pippinsplugins

In my mind, the future of the theme market is entirely dependent upon plugins and other "applications" built on top of WordPress.

The most successful themes today are those that work directly with large-scale plugins (think eCommerce primarily) to help provide customers with a turn-key solution.

Marketplace themes are a great example of this. They, along with a few mandatory plugins, help customers setup their own online marketplace. These are greatly successful.

Large-scale niche themes are the ones that will succeed, with a few rare cases of wildly successful "standard" themes.

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Vova Feldman

Hey Pippin, thank you so much for doing this. Something I asked you on March when we met in PrestigeConf, I wonder if anything changed. Do you have any plans to go SaaS with your plugins? Or with a new product?

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Pippinsplugins

Yes there are plans but I can't say too much about them. I believe SaaS is one of the only logical steps for helping to truly propel a business forward.

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OpenTute+

Hello Pippin,
What drives you to make EDD when Woo-Commerce was there? What to consider while working on a new plugin Idea? Whether it will work. People really need it!!. How to make sure that we are heading in a right direction. Thanks

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Pippinsplugins

WooCommerce, nor any of the other eCommerce plugins at the time, provided enough focus on digital products. While they could all handle digital sales reasonably well, their focus was (rightly so) on physical products. This meant that a lot of the features that could benefit digital sales were either left out or built only to a minimal.

For me, the biggest deciding factor on where I should build a new plugin is the identification of pain points. Is there a challenge that I face frequently that I can solve with my plugin? Good, build it.

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WPGlobus

Well, when I was choosing between WC and EDD, I had to go with WC. Most of my sites sell digital. But some - tangibles, so the choice was not to restrict myself.

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Brad Williams

What are your thoughts on WordPress.org promoting premium themes yet doing nothing to promote premium plugins? Do you think this is something that will change in the future?

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Pippinsplugins

It has to change. For some reason that still eludes me, it seems there are some that don't want to admit it, but plugins power the success of WordPress, not themes. Period. Plugins will be (and already are) the foundation of the "WordPress as an application framework" movement.

Plugins are what has given WordPress most of its most powerful features today. Why are the efforts of commercial plugins largely ignored by WordPress.org? I still can't wrap my mind around it.

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Ahmad Awais

It's a $50-$100 Billion industry if WordPress.org adopts premium plugins and themes (Hints: Apple's and Google's App Stores).

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Vladimir Prelovac

$50-$100mn maybe, bn not a chance :)

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Ahmad Awais

Talking about valuation here. :)

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Peter Cralen

Hello Pippin,
What are changes/features what you like to see in WordPress core, on other side, what you like to completely remove from it? Thank you.

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Pippinsplugins

I'd love to finally see a decent settings API. A settings API doesn't need to be complex and adding just a few tiny enhancements could make the existing API magnitudes better to work with: core.trac.wordpress.org/ticket/21488

I'd love to see Pointers changed. They're the most obnoxious and overused UI feature, and they're mostly worthless, at least in their current iteration.

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Angie Meeker

Word.

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Ryan Love

Hey Pippin, thanks so much for doing this.

As it is I've already had the two questions I had for you asked and answered, so instead my question is this, what problems are you facing right now? And when faced with a problem, do you have a framework you use to solve them?

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Pippinsplugins

One of the biggest challenges we have right now is improving our renewal rates for EDD extensions. It can be time consuming for customers to renew all of their licenses, especially if they are a development shop with several dozen license keys, so we're trying to make that easier. We're also working on ensuring customers know they have license keys that are up for renewal.

There's only one framework for solving problems: identify, plan, act.

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Ajay D'Souza

Hi Pippin, Firstly, I'm highly impressed at your ability to find time to juggle all the projects yet respond to emails that people like me have sent you in the past.

In the WordPress world, I've seen that people tend to jump on the next big thing released by an influencer, which is pretty much expected. Could you please suggest ways for regular plugin and theme developers to get contributors to projects?


Also, in an hypothetical world where WordPress would have never come to be, do you think what direction / role your life would have taken?

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Pippinsplugins

Easiest way to get contributors to your project: ask for it. I asked for help with EDD over 3 years ago and it worked out quite well: pippinsplugins.com/help-develop-edd/

It's really hard to say what I'd be doing if I wasn't working in WordPress. I due think it's likely I'd still be in a development role in some form, but maybe not. Before WordPress I wanted to do humanity work with language restoration for indigenous populations of Central America. A wonderful organization that I was interested in at the time is WuKuKawoq: www.wuqukawoq.org/

Today, when looking at possibilities for the future, I'm mostly interested in the prospect of opening a micro brewery in my area.

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Ajay D'Souza

Thanks for the response Pippin. I think I'm going to go about asking for help :) Right now my plugins are almost a one-man development effort. Not ideal when you're not working full time on this.

It's quite interesting to learn about what you'd do in a non-WP World. Hopefully, you still have the chance (and time) to open and run the micro-brewery!

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Ross Johnson

Hey Pippin, thanks for sharing.

From my discussions with other premium plugin providers, support is a constant challenge. Some of the more common problems I've run into include unruly customers, difficulty diagnosing problems "blind" (i.e. No access to the site or server to run tests) and managing quality when you can't test for every possible variable that could cause a problem.

I imagine you've learned ways to optimize and improve support over the years, are there any tips you can share?

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Pippinsplugins

A few things:

1. Forums are inefficient. I love forums but when it comes to support, stop wasting time trying to pit a square peg in a round hole. Start using a real help desk system like HelpScout or Zendesk from day one.

2. Work on your documentation from day 1. Even if customers don't start by reading your documentation, it provides you a valuable resource to direct them to when their questions could be answered by it.

3. Don't be afraid to tell a customer they are wrong or that they must work with you if they want their issue resolved.

4. Charge more. High value customers are nearly always easier to work with.

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Boba

Hi Pippin,

What takes up most of your work day, team management or development?

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Pippinsplugins

Development is only a small part of my day now. Team management, planning, and support take up most of it. When I get to write code, it's mostly in the evening for some "me time".

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Ahmad Awais

Hey, Pippin!

First of all, I'd like to appreciate and thank your efforts in the WordPress community. It's amazing how you find time to do a lot while running successful WP products.
Here are few questions

1. Do you have any plans, to start or partner up and build a themes marketplace for themes with EDD, AWP, RCPro?
2. Do you get bored by working on the same plugin (since EDD is the biggest of all other products)?
3. What niche/area/gap do you think can be potentially covered by a new plugin (Where you feel like someone should build this thing)?
4. What is your advice for developers who want to jump start building plugins (while they have a theme portfolio E.g. Elite/Power Elite etc)? Would you suggest 'em to build something big or start small?
5. Who'd you hire/prefer?
A— (Full-time) A resource who will work 40 hours a week with you.
B— (Part-time) A resource who will work 20 hours a week with you and ask for 20 hours a week for building his own products.

— Looking forward!

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Pippinsplugins

1. EDD already has a themes marketplace. RCP and AFFWP do not, though they are not quite as suited to having themes built specifically for them. Is there something about the existing EDD theme marketplace that you would like to see improved (there are many I'd like)?

2. Every project loses its magic at some point. I've found one of the best ways to avoid losing interest is to jump between projects frequently enough that I don't get bored of them but still give me enough time to focus on the current task at hand.

3. There's not nearly enough being done with mobile integrations for big plugins. We need more mobile apps!

4. Small projects are great because they can give you a good chance to get experience with plugins, but they are also typically far less rewarding financially. Though they also have far less cost involved. I would avoid big projects until you're confident you're ready for one.

5. I'd rather hire A and B. Both types have their advantages and disadvantages. A person working 40 hours per week is going to get a lot of work done. A person working only 20 hours per week, while working 20 hours per week on their own project(s), will have less time to put in, but the 20 hours they do put it will almost certainly be more value hour-for-hour than the hours put in by the 40 hour person. The 20 hour person also brings the insights and experiences from their projects to the table, something that is always valuable.

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Ahmad Awais

Thank you for the valuable answers. As far as the theme market goes, I think more can be done in that area. I'll make sure to create a list and send you email, once I have something solid.

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Subharanjan

Thanks Pippin for doing this !!

Do you have any favorite boilerplate for plugins ? What do you suggest about using any plugin boilerplate to start creating any new plugin.

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Pippinsplugins

Not really, simply because I've never used a boilerplate that I really liked. The one that Tom McFarlin built (and then passed on to someone else) always looked excellent though: wppb.io/

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Daniel Milner

What advice would you give someone who is interested in creating a marketplace of add-ons around their plugin?

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Pippinsplugins

There are a few things I've learned over the last 3.5 years of running an add-on marketplace:

1. Be very critical and conscious of the 3rd-party vendors you accept into your marketplace. It's tempting early on to accept anyone and everyone. That can come back to hurt you badly in the future.

2. Build the primary and most important add-ons yourself. You want to control all aspects of the add-ons that are going to be your bread and butter.

3. Setup a system for managing add-ons from submission to launch to post-launch. You need to have a way of knowing what the status of each add-on is. Which ones need updates? Which ones are ready to go live? Which ones need pulled? We use trello.com for this.

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Jovana Bozic

I'm about to start building my first commercial theme with intention to put it on Themeforest. I'm still thinking should I create a multipurpose theme, or a niche theme. And today it's even hard to find a niche theme idea, cause market is saturated and many things have already been done. What would be your tips on finding a good Themeforest niche?

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Pippinsplugins

If you target a niche, target one that you like and have experience with. Going after a niche just because it's "where the money is" is probably one of the fastest ways to become disenfranchised with a product or project. You need to have passion for what you do too.

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Jovana Bozic

Excellent response Pippin, I just realized what niche that would be, thank you so much! :)

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Vladimir Prelovac

Hey Pippin

Let's see if we can set a new record for number of comments here :)

- You exposed your revenue numbers a while ago. Lema had a good post against doing that chrislema.com/downside-transparency-reports/

What do you think about that now and what kind of benefit do you think that brought to your business?

- What is a difference between a WordPress developer and say a Laravel or Symfony developer?

- Your most precious possession is?

- Workdesk screenshot!

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Pippinsplugins

I'll do my best to break the record :)

1. Ultimately I believe it comes down to why someone chooses to share their revenue. If numbers are being shared to brag (or point out failure), I believe that's the wrong reason. I've chosen to always share my revenue numbers because I believe they can help to serve as inspiration for others and that they can help to set accurate expectations.

So often we look at companies or individuals and think "wow, they must be killing it" or "dang, there's no way they're doing well with that product". We judge companies and individuals based purely on what we can see and know. By putting out our revenue numbers, I'm letting others know exactly where we are (good or bad) without the necessity of guess work.I do plan to continue sharing numbers.

2. The most prominent difference is pay grades. WordPress developers are paid far less on average. There are a multitude of reasons for this but it has a lot to do with historical impressions of WordPress being this "crappy blogging platform that's not good for real websites". We all know that is not a truthful description of WordPress today, but it's historical presence has greatly impacted the greater world's view of "WordPress developers".My tip would be to not just classify yourself as a WordPress developer. Classify yourself as a developer that knows WordPress, among many other things.

3. Probably my bicycle.

4. Currently:

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Vladimir Prelovac

Great answers and a great way to consume this AMA!

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Rahul Bansal

Glad to see you are using Macbook Air. I hope it's your main machine. ;-)

We have a war going between Macbook Air v/s Pro here.

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Ajay D'Souza

I've got both and I ended up favouring the Air simply because it's easier to cart around when I'm travelling. But I do love having the bigger screen of the Pro or using it as a machine for non-dev work.

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Steve Styx

Hey Pippin! Can you make a comparison between starting premium themes business vs starting premium plugins business, in terms of: what's more work, what's better financially, what requires more support and similar questions...

Are there any main differences between those two or it primary depends of success of your theme/plugin, and the development/business model is pretty much the same for both?

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Pippinsplugins

I believe plugins hold the future to commercial products in the WordPress space.

If you're interested in themes, see my answer above regarding turn-key solution themes: managewp.org/articles/10954/i-m-pippin-williamson-founder-of-numerous-plugins-a-reviewer-for-wordpress-org-plugins-a-cyclist-and-avid-craft-beer-lover-ask-me-anything#comment_2990

The business model of themes and plugins are largely the same, but the products you build are vastly different.

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Kyle Maurer

Do you have any home brew horror stories of your own?
Or any special tricks you've learned that really make a big difference for your brews?
Who's your favorite Game of Thrones character?
Which band do you most wish would get back together and make an album and tour?

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Pippinsplugins

Yep! Just the other night I discovered that I failed to tighten one of the posts (where the beer comes out) on a keg of Flanders Red that was 11 months old. I discovered it by finding 3-5 pints of sour beer in the bottom of my freezer.

I also successfully made the worst beer imaginable. It smelled exactly like a dirty diaper. After that beer, everything has been great by comparison!

There's no one-thing I've done that has truly elevated the quality of my beer, rather it has improved through a combination of various things. To list a few: temperature control, healthy yeast cultures, accurate measurements, fresh grain (going all grain alone will most likely change your beer quality a lot).

The other big thing that has helped a lot is reading. Lots and lots of reading. Brewing books, podcasts (okay that's listening), reddit.com/r/homebrewing, etc.

Favorite GOT character: Tyrion by far.

Band that needs to get back together: System of a Down.

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Scott Hack

It seems like you go involved with the community aspect of WordPress in the beginning and you've stayed engaged and continue to contribute, which I truly thank you for. As someone who makes their living outside of the WordPress ecosystem, but uses WordPress daily ( I'm a residential real estate broker ) I'm more of a deeply submerged hobbyist. I also organize the monthly meetup in my town and help and organize our WordCamp ( which you graciously spoke at a few years ago ) -- Now on to my question... how do I go about getting more local people involved with the meetup and the camp? We are attracting lots of people who want to learn more or maintain their own small business online presence, but most of the people who have your skill set aren't engaging. I understand that *this* is what they do all day and it might not be how they want to spend their evening as well... but I'm looking for ways to overcome that. I do some coding, but would never describe myself as a developer, but the group needs some developer resources. I've been teaching from the middle for nearly 2 years, but I'm only 1 person. Any suggestions on getting that group of people to participate?

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Pippinsplugins

Hi Scott!

WordCamp Louisville was a lot of fun :)

Probably the easiest and most successful way to get them involved is to simply ask them directly. People are far less likely to turn down a direct invitation than a non-direct one. If you put a notice out "looking for more people interested in WordPress", you probably won't have as much success getting those specific individuals you're after. If you, on the other hand, reach out to them directly and ask them to present on a subject or help with a work shop, they're far more likely to take you up on it.

While not everyone is comfortable in the spotlight, people inherently want to be important. Tickle their inner dreams of being a super star, even if just to a small group of 20 people.

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Joshua Strebel

Biggest lesson learned in the context of brain switching from "I'm a developer" to "I'm a CEO"

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Pippinsplugins

"It's oaky for me to not review every line of code. That's not my job anymore."

That was a big one.

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Ahmad Awais

It's really hard to stay disconnected with code.

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Brad Williams

How did you get into sour beers? I'm a huge beer fan, but have never quite loved sour beers. Any amazing sour beer out there that can change my mind?

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Pippinsplugins

I honestly don't remember. I wish I did though.

If I had to pick out a sour that probably made me go "whoa" the first time, it's Love Child from Boulevard: www.boulevard.com/BoulevardBeers/love-child-no-5/

With sours, you have to go into it not thinking of it like any other beer. If you're in the mindset of "this is like an IPA" or "this is like a stout", you'll be thorough put off.

Think of it, instead, as something entirely different from any other beer you've ever drank. It's closest relative (at least for red sours) is probably a red wine, but even that is world's apart.

Drink it in small sips and let it warm up. Sour beers are usually better on the warmer side. They're definitely not a drink-them-ice-cold type of beer.

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Evan Herman

Hi Pippin,

Did you receive formal training in any programming languages? Or was it something you picked up a long the way and taught yourself as you progressed?
Have you ever worked in an office for a dev job? If so, what benefits do you see working in an office over working remotely.
Do you have any difficulties staying motivated on a day to day basis? Sort of along those lines, do you work a standard 9-5 (or what is an average schedule look like for you)?
What advice would you have for someone looking to hire a remote support team/team member?


Thanks!

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Pippinsplugins

I've only taken one programming class and that was a C++ class in college. It was almost worthless.

I worked part time as the "web developer" for a department on my college campus. That mostly entailed updating a few pieces of text in Dreamweaver two or three times a week.

Motivation is always a challenge. Putting myself in a routine and sticking to that routine helps a lot. For example, I start work at approximately the same time every day.

For hiring remote teams, first and foremost: you MUST trust the person. You will not be in contact 100% of the time (nor should you be). You, as the boss, need to trust the remote worker to do their job. The remote worker also has a responsibility of helping to ensure you that they are doing the job they're hired to do.

Clear, frequent communication is key.

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Evan Herman

Awesome! Thanks for the feedback.

I think we're in the same boat in regards to that C++ course in college. That's actually what turned me off writing code completely, for 3 years. Glad I gave things another chance and joined the WordPress community. Now I'm getting paid to do what I love.

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Ivana Stojcev

Hi Pippin!

Thank you for Easy Digital Downloads!! :)

What would you recommend someone who's already established WordPress freelance developer to do as a next logical step? I've been creating custom WordPress themes for clients for years, got some nice money, got some regular clients/reputation, but now want to move up to the 'next level'.

I've been thinking about creating Themeforest themes, but not sure if it's a bit too late for that since it's getting harder and harder to get inside and be successful (too many elite names, more and more themes submitted, more and more complex requirements more suitable for large companies than single developer like me etc..). So it might happen that I work on my framework and theme for months and don't get accepted or get accepted and sell 100 items. After months of work. So I really want to get into that but I'm not sure what chances are even if I'm very good developer/designer. Again, I really would like to do that! :) Any tips?

Also, if I go that route, do you recommend multipurpose or niche themes? Multipurpose are much more work and harder to get accepted. So maybe niche for a start?

Second option could be creating my own sites/projects that could bring some money...
Any ideas how to approach this? Deciding what to do next? I know it might be a question without a simple answer and I might just be thinking out loud :)

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Pippinsplugins

I don't really subscribe to "the next logical step" philosophy for industries. Let me clarify. What you need to do is whatever you find is important and meaningful to you. Just because you're in the WordPress world and it's common for freelancers to move into the product space, does not mean you should also move into the product space.

Do what YOU want to do and do it as best as you possibly can.

If that means building themes and selling them on ThemeForest, awesome!

If it means building plugins and becoming the next big name in the plugin world, superb!

Regarding niche vs generic themes, I would always recommend you go with niche. Focus on a niche that you know and love and own it.

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Charlie Livingston

Hey Ivana,

I'm in the theme business. Shoot me an email if you want (charlie[at]athemes.com).

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Roy Sivan

You have a number of plugin besides EDD, how many have you created (as a premium plugin for monetary reasons) and had them been sub-par performance wise? Have you ever stopped supporting a premium plugin? If so, how long do you think the ideal time frame is to call it quits and move on?

or do you move on while still maintaining and supporting plugins you may be losing money on.

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Pippinsplugins

I don't have an exact count but I'd estimate that I've made at minimum 50-60 commercial plugins.

I have stopped supported several of them. Anytime I do, however, I always discontinue the plugin or I transfer ownership to someone else. If I sell a plugin, even if only once every few months, I support it.

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gelwp

Hey, Pippin! I just released my first big plugin today! (plug: wordpress.org/plugins/kanban/ ) It took me two extra weeks to release it, because I was a little afraid of how people would judge my code. I've been told I shouldn't care, that only the user experience matters. How much do you worry about people judging your code? Thanks!

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Pippinsplugins

I used to worry a lot, then I realized everyone has written code that is utterly horrible at some point in their development career.

Don't worry about, just keep learning and improving.

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Pippinsplugins

Thank you everyone for your questions. It was fun!

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Vladimir Prelovac

Thank you for your time and thoughtful answers. And yes we did set a new record for number of comments in an AMA :)

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Codeinwp

Thanks for doing this Pippin! I wasn't online to ask questions, but I enjoyed reading what other asked :).

Ionut

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christopher carfi

Pippin, thanks for doing this! Wasn't able to tune in (or whatever it is that you'd call it for a real-time-but-asynchronous-text-based-scheduled-event-type-thing) at AMA time, and totally appreciated all the consideration you put into every response. Just had a chance to read the full thread and it's stellar.

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Elliot (Raison)

Fantastic! Thanks for sharing this - lots of nuggets here!

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