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I am Shane Pearlman, Partner at Modern Tribe. Ask me Anything!

Oct. 5, 2016

Hi, I’m Shane. I’m a partner at Modern Tribe Inc. We’re a fully-distributed agency and products company, working remotely with over 60 talented folks across the globe.

We work primarily with enterprise-level clients, including Fortune 500 companies, universities, government institutions, and the occasional well-funded startup. We’ve had the opportunity to work with brands you all know: from Stanford and Harvard, to eBay, Disney, Nike, Levis, and so many more.

We’re also pretty well known for our suite of events management plugins, including The Events Calendar, Event Tickets, GigPress, and others, which support over 500,000 active users.

I’ve journeyed through all the roles in an agency, starting as a solo developer in 2000, to designer, ux / ui and strategy, project manager, product manager, ops manager, technical director, director of sales and am nearly at the point where I actually spend a lot of my time being a CEO.

I live in Santa Cruz, CA and shape my work around my life. Currently I am learning the art of coaching U8 girls soccer and am starting a new girls surf club for my daughter and her friends. I have some awesome trips this quarter, having just returned from Punta Mita with my leadership team, and heading to Dakar, Senegal in a few weeks, followed by the Canary Islands in December. My wife and I are in the hunt for a city to move to for a year

I’m a surfer, real estate investor, freelance evangelist, Gov 2.0 advocate, speaker, toddler wrangler, intrepid traveler...

Ask me anything.

Comment
32 votes   Flag
Vladimir Prelovac

Thanks for doing this. Great how these AMAs help bring people together. Given I am in the Bay area now I have some 'local' questions for you:

- Is the water ever warm at Santa Cruz? Where do you surf?
- Do you invest in local real estate? What do you think about the prices in the Bay area?

And a WordPress related question.

- What kind of website management tools your agency uses for ongoing website maintenance?

Reply
Shane Pearlman

Hi Vladimir,

> Is the water ever warm at Santa Cruz?



Absolutely. That said, I still never surf "naked" here. Its wetsuit weather pretty much all year round, although I do wear a shorty when I longboard on hot days. Water temp can get into the mid-high 60s at the peek of summer. I love watching the tourist charge across the sand in their bathing suite towards the ocean, put a toe in and then leap 3 feet into the air and turn back.

> Where do you surf?

I'm an east side santa cruz local these days and mostly long boarding at the moment. I surf Pleasure Point and Sharks regularly. I freaking love Privates and Bombora / New Brighton when its really big. I have been a spending a lot of time at the Capitola jetty lately, as my daughter Sassy is getting her surf on and started a girls surf club. They all ride my costco SUP (all 5 of them on the same board) on waves together. Its crazy cute.

> Do you invest in local real estate?

Half of my portfolio in is Santa Cruz County. The other half if in Seattle core. In fact, Peter (partner at Tribe) and I bought a run down duplex with ocean views right below UC Santa Cruz and are in the middle of a remodel right now. I run a local quarterly social real estate meetup (typically between 15 - 40 people show) and just posted the next one if someone wants to come grab beers: www.meetup.com/Santa-Cruz-Real-Estate-Investor-Meetup/events/234635979/. I am actively looking for my next deal if anyone has a lead (small multi family or apartment building). I love Santa Cruz county and would gladly own more property here. Santa Cruz has 5 major economic drivers: large university (UC Santa Cruz), tourism (over 1M visitors a year), agriculture (Driscol, Martinellis), tech (35m drive to silicon valley), action sports (oneill, santa cruz bikes / skate). Each of these is a massive industry and if one suffers, our community keeps on trucking. There is limited expansion space keeping prices strong.

> What do you think about the prices in the Bay area?

They are really quite heated. The base math no longer makes sense for MLS priced deals unless you can find something super unique. I am pretty much looking off market these days. The challenge is that while I look for both upside derived from repositioning (remodel / change of tenant base...) and at least 5-6% cash on cash return, there are people from china and institutional investors who consider 3% cash on cash return a screaming deal compared to a negative 10yr swiss bond.

> What kind of website management tools your agency uses for ongoing website maintenance?

I assume you are asking if we use managewp or a similar service. Nope, we’re bespoke. We have been experimenting with managing AWS servers using ansible to roll out environments (infrastructure as code) when we aren't partnering with the big WP hosts (WPE / Pantheon...). We run our own deployment process pulling from a git branch and basically pay attention to the sites we manage. We don’t provide substantial small-scale maintenance work outside of active engagements, but when we do (and for our internal stuff) we do monthly sprints, and we have tickets on each sprint to go upgrade stuff. Each upgrade batch gets QAed on use specific environments. We never, ever upgrade stuff directly on the live site.

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David McCan

Welcome. From your intro, it sounds like you are living your dream.

* What are your challenges in pitching WordPress for the enterprise?

* If there was one feature that you would like to add to WordPress that would make your life easier, what would it be?

* How do you balance the need for guiding and protecting children with their need and the benefit of a "free range"?

* Read any good fiction lately?

Thanks for sharing.

Reply
Shane Pearlman

> What are your challenges in pitching WordPress for the enterprise?

We've made massive inroads as a community in making the case for WP in the enterprise. I spend less time having to put forth WP and validate it as a player than I used to. That said, the biggest pundits (e.g. Forester's CMS Report / Gartner) really don't back WP as a viable enterprise CMS (yet). Ultimately, my guess based upon conversation with John at 10up and Kareem at Crowd Favorite etc is that there is no advocacy body with funding to push the narrative and pay for studies. Automattic sells to the masses while Acquia spends six figures+ on funding analyst reports targeting enterprise. We don't have a cohesive voice. We have put time and money on a smaller scale; e.g. the higher ed survey with 486 responses from educational organization and a white paper which have had a notable impact in the higher ed space. Probably my biggest challenge is the folks you never hear of within the community. The global agencies are starting to provide WordPress services and we are running into them during the sales cycle in places we never did before. As it continues to be less niche, competition increases.

> If there was one feature that you would like to add to WordPress that would make your life easier, what would it be?

A truly modern and well coded media manager.

> How do you balance the need for guiding and protecting children with their need and the benefit of a "free range"?

Oh man, I'm finding the different between my two children changes that answer entirely. Frankly, before having kids I was 100% in the nurture camp. It was all the parents fault. then I had kids and they came out with genuine personalities out of the box. As one of my buddies said, my job as a parent is to mess you up just enough to ensure that you are interesting. My daughter is extremely cautious. Early on Julie and I agreed that our best tactic was to carefully push her into the widest range of uncomfortable situation possible to expand her comfort zone. My son is super independent (so far - he is just 2) and couldn't be more different. While he isn'r prone to recklessness like many little boys, he need and wants very little shepherding.

> Read any good fiction lately?

Heck yeah. a LOT. When I am not crunched (or derailed by pokemon) I go through about a book a week. While most people play games etc on their phones, I tend to read during those small moments each day and it really adds up. My daughter and I are on the final book of "Alcatraz Vs. the Evil Librarians" and they are so, so good. They bring a nuanced mix of humor and whimsical adventure, with just enough grit to keep me engaged as an adult. I've pretty much read everything I can get my hands on by Brandon Sanderson and am in awe of his ability to produce volumes at quality. My next book is Drifters from Mitchner. I've been on a bit of a streak loving books featuring anti-hero thieves. Both the Legend of Eli Monpress series by Rachel Aaron and Gentleman Bastard series by Scott Lynch were super fun.

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Peter Chester

Shane, what keeps you up at night?

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Shane Pearlman

There are so many direction to take this. Thankfully the answer is no longer my kids.

I live in the future. Viscerally. Things that I see 6 months out for me are very real and I react strongly to them. Which can lead to people thinking I can be overly dramatic (grain of truth). Peter is a heck of a lot more chill than me about a lot of things (his nihilsm certainly helps). Today, managing our growth and building a new layer of leadership is my great challenge and I'm enjoying it greatly. Frankly, Reid is making that happen and without him leading it, we wouldn't be 1/3 as awesome. The growth we have faced has certainly kept me up working late at night more than I would have expected. These are some new adventure, moving from managing projects, to managing people, to managing managers. The level of operations and compliance required for a cross state / international team of 60 people is definitely noteworthy.

In the world I live, I am profoundly worried about the re-emergence of global level mega-corps which have no accountability to anyone, not employees, customers or governments. The fact that corps have rights equal to a human being is nutty. This election has me worried as Trump is a human manifestation of many of my fears.

I live in california and am highly aware of water.

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(((topher1kenobe)))

Where do you find family time? In a day where you work 6-8 hrs, and surf for 2-3, and also eat, how do you find time for your wife and kids?

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Shane Pearlman

Working from home is what makes my life possible. If I commuted 30m - 1hr each direction, I would have to drop things.

I spend time with my kids between 5-7:30pm most evenings. I also have been running with my daughter while she bikes to school many mornings. We spend quite a bit of the weekend together. Right now, Julie and I are having a bit of date night shortage due to travel but that is an anomaly. At the heart of it, I find combining my personal projects / activities with family time when possible has a huge impact. We run as a family, little guy in the stroller, older lass biking. I surf with the kids. Real estate is often collaborated on with Julie.

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Geoff Graham

Shane, Modern Tribe started as a simple partnership with you and one other person but has since morphed into a two-pronged company that does both agency work and product development while employing dozens of people.

I can imagine you've faced a lot of personal and professional challenges in that process--in fact, more than you can likely share in a single reply. However, do you have any tips for others who may be in simple partnerships but might be considering taking the leap into growing a small company?

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Shane Pearlman

There are a number of inflection points in growth. From part time to full time yourself. From partners to including additional team (contractor or employee). To moving from production to management personally. From management to managing managers. Not sure what is next but I'll let you know. Each of these is an adventure!

I often find people who ask me what it takes to grow and I quickly stop them and we have a conversation about lifestyle and life goals. Bigger is not the right answer to all life goals. So I would begin by asking what you want to have, who you want to become and what you want to do with your time? The answers to those will shape if and how you should grow you company. Ultimately the process is usually, you do everything, and then slowly replace one thing at a time. Sales / marketing is commonly the key to me. If you can't sell more, you can't grow, so start by building those skills or partnering well.

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TourKick, Clifford P

Wise words for product owners/coders looking to hire Support?

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Shane Pearlman

#1. Test them: We have a test project we run for each person. It started with me basically grabbing 10 questions from the forums and sending them via email, with a 4hr deadline to reply (obviously pre-scheduled). From there it has evolved to a more balanced list of questions.

#2. Have processes. Go through each step of support yourself. Document the steps. How do you resolve? When do you give refunds? How do you deal with escalation? Have snippets for very common questions to avoid rework. The more you can standardize, the better the outcome.

#3. Have systems. Helpscout, Zendesk, BBPress.. pick your poison, but provide a toolset which helps make the work comfortable.

#4. Skillset. Figure out how technical you want your team to be to best serve your customer. We early on figured out that most of the questions we got required a level of WP code experience that meant we were hiring devs with people skills, not "customer support". It completely transformed our recruiting (and pay scale).

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Shane Pearlman

I asked my support team and they added a bunch of super valid items:

* Zach: demeanor and tone are things we look for pretty explicitly and is a real cornerstone of why I love this team so much
* Geoff: prioritizing support: give the team a seat at the table and make it a key part of the decision-making process.
* George: writing abilities — it seems basic but for us especially it’s a job of letters…all email, forums, etc.
* Nico: the passion to help others is the key... might sound a bit romantic, but at the end of the day it what drives you to do awesome work

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(((topher1kenobe)))

As I understand it MT has three core partners, but didn't always. What drives the decision to accept a new partner at the top level like that, as opposed to simply making someone an employee? Is there anything that would create a fourth partner? Fifth? I assume each one is a unique decision, but it seems like there must be an inherent value in the position over another position, like VP or whatever you might want to call it.

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Shane Pearlman

Reid became a partner because life without him was hard to imagine. He had the experience and earning power that salary was not the long-term solution. While I won't say that there is never going to be a #4+, I think we have grown enough to have other viable paths for career advancement. Profit sharing is being explored (we don't do this today), and as we continue starting new companies internally, there is intrinsic opportunity. This is perhaps one of the places we are least baked as a company. Going from 25 to 60 in the last two years in order to provide people a career path has been successful and kept us quite busy. Rob and I are planing to explore this in more depth in 2017.

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Tyler Golberg

Shane, it was great meeting you at Prestige conference last year! You've already shared tons of insights that have helped me a ton but I do have another question. How and when did you decide to start making premium add-ons for The Events Calendar? Given that a saas business is a much different feel from the bespoke Modern Tribe projects, were you hesitant to go down this path?

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Shane Pearlman

Hey Tyler! Wass up dude. The transition was extremely organic, although also fueled by a personal perpetual restlessness.

Personally, I have a 2-3 year attention span. If I don't find myself faced with new and interesting adventures every few years, I start to manufacture them, whether or not it is to the benefit of the people I am teamed up with. As such, we have shaped MT to support support and fund new business projects. The surf app that we built when the iPhone came out (eventually acquired by surfline), the events calendar business are the two notable successes among others.

For TEC specifically, it grew out of the demand and popularity from the open source project. Three things happened simultaneously. #1. We hit the point where support demands exceeded our available space / good will. #2. I hear Scott Burkun keynote at WCSF 2010. He laid out a challenge he faced to the community. If I don't update, I'll get hacked and it will impact my personal income. When I do update, your freaking free buddy plugins take my site down and it impacts my personal income. Can't you all just make WordPress work?!? I would gladly pay for that. When I heard a valid reason to pay for something which was being given for free (trust) it caught my imagination. #3 I has been actively writing for years for Cyan and Collis across various envato publications and they reached out to see if we had any ideas for products to start a new plugin marketplace (code canyon). The three of these happened within a few months and triggered the journey to a very profitable plugin business.

We are financially gearing up for our next (couple) of products / saas business adventures in early 2017 (itchy feet) and this should get interesting.

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Mykl Roventine

I hear frequently that the culture at Modern Tribe is pretty remarkable. How do you maintain that culture when working with contractors spread all over the globe?

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Shane Pearlman

When I hear that, I get a touch giddy. It is probably one of the best compliments you could give us. In short, because it is the reason we exist. A lot of companies have outward facing missions: "Revolutionize web publishing" or "To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world." Ours has always been to "live well and do good work".

We start every leadership retreat going through the 6 Fs (Fitness, Friends, Family, Finance, Faith, Fun) and checking that the business is aligned with where they want to be in their lives. After all, if the purpose of the company is to be a vehicle for the people it serves, we need to make sure we stay aligned. A huge part of it begins with the words you choose and the people you invite on your journey. We talk about culture. About lifestyle. About the right fit (Happy, Helpful, Curious, Accountable). I look for people who have an outcome they are looking for in life which we can support them in. If you can be fundamentally selfish, do exactly what you want to do, and it aligns with our company needs, then I can trust you to operate independently. Note that while talent matters, I think we can have people at all levels of experience who are a fantastic fit the team.

Now to be fair, we also struggle with the natural balance. Reid and I have a substantial capacity for work personally. We get passionate and we often find ourselves all in. And we get grumpy, and we help pull back. Growing sometimes throws us out of whack. That is why having people you trust and friends to call you on your shit is so important. We treasure that intersection of respect and irreverence.

As for distribution, it simply means that we have to be more intentional. As a leader, you can't depend on facial expression / hallway convos to inform you that challenges are brewing. You have to actively seek them out. We also found that getting together in person annually is key. A chance to build upon the trust we feel for our coworkers.

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Steven Wright

Shane - this is the first time I've heard of you or your company and, I must say, you sound pretty inspiring! I love Tribe's website, your company's outlook and view of everything, it is like a breath of fresh air!

Question Time!

1 - Is there such a thing as 'Digital' vs. 'Traditional' marketing anymore, or as the world is changing, would you perceive this as just the norm in marketing?

2 - What do you perceive to be the most important changes in our society over the next 10 years that technology, and more specifically, what you do, could have an impact on?

3 - Being a part of a small agency, I hear a lot from devs in the industry saying just how overrated WordPress is and the many reasons not to use it. Personally, I love WordPress and the community that goes with it, but what are your reasons for developing primarily on WordPress?

4 - If you were in a super small agency, how would you go about landing larger clients, contacting them, being invited to pitch, showing that you're up to the task?

5 - I live in England, have you been? Do you have a favourite UK City?

6 - I'm planning on honeymooning in CA with my beautiful wife-to-be next year - any places you think we MUST visit :)?

Hope that's not too many questions! >.<

Steven

Reply
Shane Pearlman

> 1 - Is there such a thing as 'Digital' vs. 'Traditional' marketing anymore, or as the world is changing, would you perceive this as just the norm in marketing?

Marketing has more channels every time I look up. I would consider "Traditional" VS "Digital" a hyper simplification. For example, I stepped out of the baggage claim on my way back from Disney yesterday and took a deep breath excited to be home. I always do that and the result is the same. I gag. Have you ever noticed the pick up area outside airport is an awful mix of car exhaust, cigarette smoke and exhaustion. Travis and I then began a discussion on smell-scaping and sound-scaping and the impact it has on behavior. Imagine if the first thing you smelled coming out of the airport on christmas week was fresh baked banana bread. Pizza shops have known for years their best marketing vehicle is a high powered fan pointed at the street. Print. Packaging. Wearables. Popups / Flashmobs / Experiences. Social. Web ...

> 2 - What do you perceive to be the most important changes in our society over the next 10 years that technology, and more specifically, what you do, could have an impact on?

The one that I am waiting for the most though is global, pervasive, blindingly fast internet. I treasure travel and am often frustrated by the impact that broadband quality has on my life. From my perspective, broadband is a utility that is as fundamental to social and economic success as electricity, sewer and water in modern society. Three years ago, I lead a county volunteer board which passed a law stating that every time time street work was done, they would drop conduit to enable further expansion of the network. Over 90% of the cost of installing broadband is the road work.

As for what I / tribe have impact on, I've never been quite so grandiose. When we talk about the things that drive me and the businesses I want to put my time in, it always comes back to living intentionally. I truly believe that the majority of people would live better lives if they were thoughtful about the impact of their choices. Julie and I have allocated a good part of our will for when we pass to setting up a financial literacy program for local school to teach kids about the basics of money management.

> 3 - Being a part of a small agency, I hear a lot from devs in the industry saying just how overrated WordPress is and the many reasons not to use it. Personally, I love WordPress and the community that goes with it, but what are your reasons for developing primarily on WordPress?

Our move to WordPress was primarily dictated by the ease with which our customers created content. We would get calls for Joomla / Drupal / CMSMS ... project asking for retraining because the person who could figure out how to use it moved to another department and could we help train their replacement. That didn't happen on WordPress. Happier customers lead to more projects.

From a code perspective, it has major strength and weakness. Classically trained developers absolutely choke on the loosely structure approach. Long term, I find that WordPress still needs to make it a lot easier for the average person to just make a quick and beautiful site (when competing with square space) and that the editing experience needs to evolve quite a bit to a more fluid, guided front end experience.

> 4 - If you were in a super small agency, how would you go about landing larger clients, contacting them, being invited to pitch, showing that you're up to the task?

Scaling up comes from two things. #1. Case studies. People want to see that you can achieve their vision. #2. Relationships. Ultimately, eBay never hires anyone. Jen does. Saul does. So you need to get one great example of a good brand / project and then leverage the hell out of it. Then you make more relationships. Conferences. Events. Referrals.

5 - I live in England, have you been? Do you have a favorite UK City?

Never been!

6 - I'm planning on honeymooning in CA with my beautiful wife-to-be next year - any places you think we MUST visit :)?

Depends on the time of year. Big Sur might be my favorite hands down. (sorry running out of time or I would go on a while). Time to go coach soccer.

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Ahmad Awais

Hey, Shane!

Glad to have you here. I have been a silent admirer of yours since I read your business advice on Tuts+ about six years ago (the same time I started writing at Tuts+ tutsplus.com/authors/ahmad-awais). It helped me a lot in getting my freelance contracts into some sort of process. But that's a story for another day.

Here're a few questions that I think a person in your position can answer best.

Q#1: Even before reading your bio/summary, I knew I was going to ask this question but when I read the roles you've been in "solo developer, to designer, UX / UI, project manager, product manager, ops manager, technical director, director of sales and a CEO" I knew I should def ask this one. So here it is...
— I have been deeply involved in the WP community, which is why I know for (maybe a fact) that it is hard to get promoted. As it is in the current state of known WordPress agencies (maybe it's the speed at which tech stacks are changing, or maybe it's hard to get promoted from solo/lead to manager or a director level position unless you're a foundational stake owner). Which is why I see folks changing their employers — for the sole purpose of getting promoted per their improved skill set (every two years or so). I'd go as far as to say, how do you, at ModernTribe, address this stereotype (not my words) → "There isn't much room for vertical growth or promotions - more or less you stay doing what you were brought on for in the long haul."


Q#2: I have heard how you folks work with both contractors and full time/part time employees. All that with a remote team — And your team btw talks very highly of the company culture. Which is great! How do you folks manage to do that? There must be an excellent process behind the scenes — I'd love to know more about it.

Q#3: JavaScript & its frameworks are changing pretty fast. Do you have a personal favorite, or what does MT relies on the most? ReactJS, Angular? Vue? —— And why?

Q#4: Do you guys have any plans of ever becoming a WP VIP partner or something. If not, why not?

Looking forward!

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Ahmad Awais

I see now that you have already answered my Q#2 above. So, just ignore that one. - Cheers!

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Shane Pearlman

> Q#1: Even before reading your bio/summary, I knew I was going to ask this question but when I read the roles you've been in "solo developer, to designer, UX / UI, project manager, product manager, ops manager, technical director, director of sales and a CEO" I knew I should def ask this one. So here it is...
— I have been deeply involved in the WP community, which is why I know for (maybe a fact) that it is hard to get promoted. As it is in the current state of known WordPress agencies (maybe it's the speed at which tech stacks are changing, or maybe it's hard to get promoted from solo/lead to manager or a director level position unless you're a foundational stake owner). Which is why I see folks changing their employers — for the sole purpose of getting promoted per their improved skill set (every two years or so). I'd go as far as to say, how do you, at ModernTribe, address this stereotype (not my words) → "There isn't much room for vertical growth or promotions - more or less you stay doing what you were brought on for in the long haul."

That might be one of the best question today. And a brutally hard one to answer. So, to start. As an owner, in 2014, we were at just over 20 people. I was happy. The business created enough income to support a fulfilling lifestyle, and time to enjoy it. I had absolutely no interest in growing. Our team would rotate every 2.5 - 3 year historically. We really really loved the team we had and approached them to ask what it would take to get another 3 years. A career was the answer. The opportunity to grow and take on larger challenges, make more money. To enable them, we would have to get larger. In fact, I am reading a book right now "Managing the professional services firm" where he explicitly states in the first chapter that you should now grow a services company to increase profitability (that is a fallacy), you grow it to provide opportunities for people which builds longevity.

So two years later we have replaced ourselves with PMs, Managers, Directors, an Ops team and will continue to look at what our team needs to achieve their own vision of what it means to live well and do good work.

So how do you end up one of those people who levels up. That is tougher, but I have my own personal opinion. You find ways to be of service. I personally tend to promote people who successfully solve the problems around them (even when they are not asked to). Look for friction in the business, and improve it; without making more work for people. The second part is key as I see some people who try to be helpful but actually just get in everyones way.

> Q#3: JavaScript & its frameworks are changing pretty fast. Do you have a personal favorite, or what does MT relies on the most? ReactJS, Angular? Vue? —— And why?

We are 80% React, 20% Angular. The why comes down to the fact that our team tried both, debated it vigorously and picked react. Sadly, I can't give you specifics. At this point, I am just far enough removed the tech stack that I trust them and put my energy to understand other problems. =)

> Q#4: Do you guys have any plans of ever becoming a WP VIP partner or something. If not, why not?

We debate it every so often. We've worked with VIP on a few projects over the years. We are not currently and probably won't be for a few reasons. These are based upon experiences from a few years back and could be totally irrelevant today
#1. Their processes / workflow make it hard to please our clients.
#2. They wanted us to pay a substantial amount of money to be a partner, with no guarantee of pipeline from them, and requirements of leads from us.
#3. The restrictions they place on the platform often make them a poor fit for the type of projects we get hired to execute on.

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Ahmad Awais

Thanks for your time, Shane. Enjoyed reading your perspective. Hope to meet you at a WordCamp or two next year.
BTW I also have the same perspective when it comes to broadband "the impact that broadband quality has on my life" I gladly agree!

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Taylor Rossmann

Shane,

It's most efficient when you can work each vertical of life into one another. Good for you!

My name is Taylor, and I'm a 19 year old serial entrepreneur. I've been working on a project for quite some time now, and will be launching it very soon! The product is StudyBuddy, a platform where students can embrace campus interconnectivity through various forms of peer-driven interaction. My Co-Founder Aaron Blaser, who is currently enrolled at UCSC, and I have been putting ample amounts of time into making this the best product possible.

We're going to be Beta testing next week, and I would love for you, and anyone's opinion you value, to test our platform. Make suggestions as to how we can implement small changes that may make a big difference! Just 10 minutes of face-to-face time would go a very, very long way.

Thanks for your time,

Hope to hear from you soon!

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