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I'm Matt Cromwell, Head of Support at WordImpress.com. AMA!

Oct. 26, 2016

I'm Matt Cromwell, I have a wild and crazy job history and educational background that magically landed me at WordImpress [0] as Partner, Head of Support, co-author of the Give Donation Plugin [1], and more.

I'm obnoxiously proud of the fact I began web development by building websites for churches with Notepad in pure HTML and CSS. My first exposure to WordPress was when they released the Kubrick theme [2] -- I was in AWE of its fancy rounded border with subtle gradient background.

I started building sites for churches to fund my education. First for my Master of Arts in Theology at Fuller Theological Seminary and then for my Master of Arts in History at San Diego State University, which of course made perfect sense to go with my Bachelors in Music Education .

Miraculously, I understood web development pretty well. I loved teaching, but I also wanted to get paid and provide for my family. So while I kept studying and paying for my education, I also built sites and earned more. The tipping point happened when I looked into a PhD in History and what that would cost my family compared to taking the offer to build-out the products at WordImpress. I haven't looked back since.

I'm also the Lead Organizer of our Advanced WordPress Meetup in San Diego. We started the Advanced WordPress Facebook group back in 2012 and it now has over 23K members and over 30 admins from all parts of the globe. We recently did the largest WordPress giveaway in history with over $100K in prizes given away to over thirty lucky winners. Our little Facebook group has come a long way in a relatively short time.

Through it all, I also blog regularly about Religion, Politics, and WordPress at my personal site [3].

So, what do you want to know? Ask me anything! Don't forget to refresh the page to see answers and other questions.

Also, #hiroy.

LINKS
[0] - wordimpress.com
[1] - givewp.com
[2] - binarybonsai.com/kubrick/
[3] - www.mattcromwell.com

Comment
28 votes   Flag
Michal Bluma

Hi Matt,
Long-time reader, first time caller.

Would you say that Rainn Wilson stole your look or is it the other way around?

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Michal Bluma

Also, what do you feel are currently the biggest challenges in the WordPress ecosystem?

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Matt Cromwell

Biggest challenge in the ecosystem is not fracturing or losing the open nature of the community. WordPress definitely is a legacy product and if it was done from scratch today it would look dramatically different. That makes new developers not want to adopt it, and longstanding WordPress devs just tired and ready to move on. On the other hand, actual WordPress users continue to be excited about the power WP gives them to create their own sites beautifully and well. I'm really proud of a friend of mine who put this site together with a lot of hard work, but pretty much all on his own: www.woodstockalbums.com/ -- testimonies like that don't happen in Jekyl or Drupal or any other platform.

So between those two moods or feelings about the project, I hope people continue to remain focused on the end-user and what's best for them rather than whether or not they feel "cool" when they code for WP or not.

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Michal Bluma

Excellent points.

It'll never be a #shinyNewThing.
Hopefully, it'll remain a mature platform that finds the balance between meeting the end users' needs for ease of use and remain an extremely easy platform to dev for.

Thank you for your thoughtful response.

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Matt Cromwell

I have no idea what you're referring to. I am an Island. An uncopiable figure. Though if he wanted great fame, looks, and humor I wouldn't blame him if he did emulate me a bit. [/end sarcasm]

We have a running joke in the office that I look like Rainn and Devin looks like Drago from Rocky IV. See here:

twitter.com/learnwithmattc/status/671911228676005888

Thanks friend!

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Michal Bluma

That's awesome.
...as are you.
I've been following your evolution over the years.
You put so much heart and passion into everything you do and put out there.

Do you miss working more on the production side or is product/service/support where you love being the most?

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Matt Cromwell

I try to keep my production side active (don't take that wrong!) by adopting the new WordPress default theme on my site each year and either forking it or making a great child theme, and re-thinking how I direct folks to my most important content.

I also help out with some local San Diego nonprofit sites here and there on the side. It honestly "keeps me honest" with my Support work as well as developer chops, so that work is both fun and important to me.

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Roy Sivan

Hi Matt,

Curious what you planned for the next WordCamp San Diego you are going to organize? I am thinking of organizing one, any tips you have after planning 2 awesome camps?

PS Hi!

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Matt Cromwell

#hiroy

I'm NOT an organizer of WordCamp San Diego. I organize our local Meetup and that's plenty for me. But I sit directly next to Devin Walker who has been on the organizer team for the past two years. I personally LOVE WordCamp San Diego. It's awesome every year, they (not me!) do a really great job.

For those who haven't heard, Roy plans to buy me a shirt that says "I do NOT organize WordCamps". He's promised it to me many times.

Also, anyone reading this should make sure to say #hiroy everyday. People have said #hiroy over 3,000+ times now and counting. If we hit 10,000 by WordCamp US this year, I'd personally give a substantial donation (**) to the WP Crowd because that would make me very happy.

hiroy.club/

** By substantial, I mean giving Roy a Give T-Shirt.

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Josh Pollock

Hi Matt, thanks so much for organizing WordCamp San Diego, it's a great WordCamp! Also, Hi Roy.

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Roy Sivan

Hi Matt, agree to disagree. You put on a great camp.

Hi Josh.

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Josh Pollock

Hi Roy

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Michael Terndrup

I don't know if this is the right place to ask this or not but! Who should write the content for the website The client or us the people who are designing maintaining and keeping the website up to date?

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Matt Cromwell

Well, it could be either, it depends on the contract you work out with the client. But if they hire you the write content then they need to understand that you are still going to need a lot of their time in order to understand their business well and get content that is accurate and compelling.

The most important thing is to really make it clear to the client that the CONTENT of their website is the most important thing. Period. Before they pay anything for a website, they should invest either their personal time, or money and resources into creating a content strategy for the website. Without that, the website will never be effective.

Thanks Michael!

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Michael Terndrup

Thank you I now know what to do

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Kevin Hoffman

What advice can you offer to a new WordPress meetup organizer in terms of growing awareness and appealing to the wide spectrum of WordPress users and developers? Is there a certain structure to your meetups that you find encourages participation and discussion (presentation, Q&A, etc.)?

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Matt Cromwell

Hey Kevin!

Our Meetup is a little unique. From its inception we decided that it was going to be a "niche" Meetup, with that "niche" being "AdvancedWP". So we never intended to appeal to broader audiences. Fortunately, Michael Bastos, (aka the AWP Godfather) was well connected in the WP scene in SD and just got WordPress devs interested and it grew organically from there.

But I can't overstate this enough. The Facebook group was a HUGE factor in the success of our Meetup. So much so that it now is it's own BEAST of a global organization. But whenever I chat with other Meetup organizers, they all echo how beneficial a Facebook group is for gathering people and organizing talks and whatnot. It's helpful to be able to point new Meetup attendees to your FB group so they can keep connected with your members in-between Meetups. It fosters loyalty and anticipation.

Also, be VERY active on the actual Meetup.com page. Post frequent updates, keep your calendar continually updated and current. Triple-check all the details, get sponsors for the year or per meeting. It's a valuable resource to not be overlooked -- it's just not awesome for day-to-day collaboration in the way a FB group is.

Good luck!

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Michael Terndrup

So I am planning on changing my business from design to website maintenance and support any suggestions?

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Matt Cromwell

Maintenance and support is a great business model because it's based on recurring revenue. But making it happen really depends a lot on having a large audience to target so that when you roll it out people come immediately.

The most important feature of a business like that IMHO is how they interact with you through your website. You have to spend some real development time to get the interface right, to make sure they can signup easily, that they have a good overview of their status with whatever service they are getting from you. And you want to make sure that your system serves your purposes well as well, that you can see all your ongoing tasks easily and respond quickly and effectively to new requests.

It's not easy, it's not just a flip of a switch. It'll take a long time and a lot of effort to do it right. If you can, reach out to Ryan Sullivan at WP Site Care. They are the Pro's at that model.

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Omaar Osmaan

Hi Matt,

What do you look for to hire support stuff- say from 3 eligible stuff, how will you prioritize and pick one?

What strategy should a product company maintain to keep a strong support team? What's the right balance in between the number of stuff, and quality of support, for example for a popular/pro plugin?

Thank you!

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Matt Cromwell

Hi Omaar,

With regard to hiring support staff, there's really just a couple primary qualities that are paramount:
1. Likeability balanced with Professionalism
2. Technical skills and Troubleshooting skills
3. Strong ability to collaborate with a team and give/take constructive feedback

Those are paramount. Without those, other skills/abilities just can't compensate.

With regard to maintaining a strong support team, I presented on that at WordCamp LA. My #1 there is knowing and understanding your "capacity". Take a read/watch here:

wordimpress.com/my-formula-for-scaling-our-support/

Thanks!

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Omaar Osmaan

Awesome- thank you for the article/video!

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Vladimir Prelovac

Hey Matt

Welcome to the hot seat.

- What is it like to start, run and a grow a new business in the WordPress ecosystem (referring to GiveWP)? Can you describe biggest wins and challenges?

- I loved your old hairstyle better, can you bring it back?

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Matt Cromwell

Hey Vladimir! Thanks for chiming in!

Well, small point of clarification, Give is our product, but WordImpress is the business. Devin Walker and Jason Knill started WordImpress and brought me on as employee #1 with the intention to become a partner -- which I am now. The three of us launched Give in April 2015. Honestly, Give has been one of the most exciting things I've done in my professional career. When we first discussed the idea I was hesitant because it's basically e-commerce and supporting folks who say "I'm loosing money every minute you don't respond to my request!!" is not fun support. But we knew we could build it right and well.

We often say that we got some things right, and were really lucky with a lot of other things. It helped a ton that very influential people looked at Give and immediately loved it and embraced it and have been champions of it on our behalf -- for that we're really fortunate. That points to the biggest thing we feel "lucky" with. The name and branding just really went really well. You can't help but feel happy and GENEROUS when you look at that logo. Though it took tons of time and energy and money to build this brand we feel "lucky" that we were right with our instincts, that people really resonate with it and respond positively to it.

Some of the most exciting stuff has been in the last few months honestly. It's been SO GREAT to be growing and having the funds to start hiring new people. Ben Meredith is my right-hand guy and I'm crazy thankful for him every. single. day. We hired Ravinder Kumar in India and he's been absolutely amazing as a developer on Give and our Add-ons. Rami Yushuvaev (founder of GenerateWP) has been working part-time with us, helping us level up our a11y and i18n code in Give Core and Add-ons. We also just hired a new developer which we'll announce before WCUS. AND... all our US-based folks are attending WCUS this year together as a team. That's going to be such a fun event for us as a company.

The biggest things I think we're learning as a team and company with Give is how important it is that marketing, support, and development all interact with each other and influence each other. Those departments can't be silohed at all, or else the product suffers.

Regarding hairstyles... I've had a lot. Do you mean this old creeper look!? www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=4113032742621&set=t.1187242815&type=3&theater -- that one's NEVER coming back :-) But the beard comes and goes a lot. Might be bringing back the "Blincoln" soon, I kinda hate having hair on my lip.

Thanks!

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Matt Cromwell

Oh! And I trust you'll give me a heads up next time you're in SD. We need to recreate this event here:
www.meetup.com/Advanced-WordPress/photos/17401202/#284634752

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Vladimir Prelovac

So good to hear this success story.

And yes I mean that hairstyle :)

ps. that was good times in San Diego, loved that brewery ! :) Cant believe that was already three years ago :)

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Roy Sivan

Hi Matt,

this is Roy again, been a while.

Curious what you think about Pumpkin Spiced things during this miraculous holiday season. I personally am indifferent, but think a pumpkin spiced plugin could do really well. How would you support it? Any recommendations for premium add-ons?

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Matt Cromwell

#hiroy

Anyone reading this should make sure to say #hiroy everyday. People have said #hiroy over 3,000+ times now and counting. If we hit 10,000 by WordCamp US this year, I'd personally give a substantial donation (**) to the WP Crowd because that would make me very happy.

hiroy.club/

** By substantial, I mean giving Roy a Give T-Shirt.

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Roy Sivan

I'm sorry that is clearly a canned response from earlier. What kind of support service is that? Boo. Phony!

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Josh Pollock

#psl

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Matt Cromwell

Roy. If there was a plugin that could deliver the glory that is #PSL I think I'd be building that right now instead of everything else in life. But alas. All our plugins do is plain drip coffee. There's an occassional espresso here and there, and they occasionally have Add-ons with Vanilla Cream or whatnot, but generally, the #PSL's of the world exist far into the future. Just keep waiting with bated breath, I'm sure it'll pan out.

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Roy Sivan

Thank You.

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Josh Pollock

Hi Matt.

What do you think we are biggest mistake or bad assumption y'all made when launching Give?

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Matt Cromwell

Hey Josh!

I actually have a simple answer: We gave dates to customers.

After we launched Give, we knew that the #1 requested feature would be Recurring Donations. We thought we knew exactly how to build that. So to build anticipation, we started telling anxious customers that we'd release it in July 2015... then August, then "Fall 2015"... then we had customers with pick axes and torches at our office window.

Sometimes, the really big, really important features or Add-ons or development challenges just need time and dedication and the willingness to say "NO. I'm not releasing this until it's awesome, no matter what."

Moral of the story is. Don't give dates. Build. Say you're working on it, say you have NO Timeline whatsoever. Just keep building. But whatever you do, don't set a date because that's when you set yourself up for disappointment and failure.

Thanks!

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Josh Pollock

Thanks Matt that's a good answer. I've given the "no timeline" and I know it can be frustrating, but it's better then giving a misleading answer.

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Matt Cromwell

Ya. It's also the truth at the end of the day. Saying "Unfortunately, I can't give you a timeline but we are working on it because it's a great idea and we want to do it right" affirms the need and the customers input and reassures them that it's important to us too, but we just can't operate on their timeline. Too many timelines makes a dev team DEAD.

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Mendel

Hey Matt,

Congrats on growing the Advanced WordPress Group to over 23k members. I'm curious what changes you've seen in questions / discussion topics / issues as you've moderated the group over the years. Do those changes or trends sync with changes and trends within the greater WordPress community?

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Matt Cromwell

Hey Mendel! Congrats to YOU on growing the group. Really appreciate all you do as an Admin.

The group content has definitely evolved over time. In the early days it really was very much focused on "I'm building out this site with this cool functionality and what to share it, but also have a question about how you'd approach this." That was natural and easy because that's how the group was formed originally.

As we grew, we noticed that Facebook doesn't give us a lot to go on for when people request membership. So as admins we started letting pretty much anyone in that didn't look like an obvious spam account, or had questionable profile pics (by that I mean nazi symbols and whatnot).

That meant that a lot of WordPressers were attracted to the group because of it's title: "Advanced". Many saw it as a place to get feedback from more "Advanced" and knowledgable users. That's a real need in WordPress and one that we still fill for a lot of people.

But that meant that the nature of comments and posts started to turn a lot more aggressively towards "Why doesn't my widget show up?" or "What theme should I use for a Real Estate site?" -- which led to a lot of "Advanced" folks scoffing at the quality of the group.

In the middle of all of that, we -- as admins -- thought we should be a little more clear and direct about the kind of content we'd love to see more of in the group. That's when we created our "Contribution Wizard":
advancedwp.org/awp-contribution-wizard

That's something I'm still proud of. It's a conditional Gravity form with styled divs, that basically help people understand the kind of stuff we'd like to see. Even with that in place, it's very hard to moderate based on what's "Advanced" or not. So instead, the rule -- from the beginning -- has always been that we have admins that we trust intrinsically. These people are top-caliber folks. They know WordPress really well, and know the community really well, and are good spirited and good natured folks who act on behalf of the whole and VOLUNTEER their time for it.

One way I kind of push back to folks who complain about AWP content is "Ok. Give value instead. Don't gripe. Post something valuable." I stand behind that statement 200%. The group is only as beneficial as those who CONTRIBUTE to it. And it waxes and wanes. We have spurts of continual constant "What theme..." type questions that we delete and have to make Pinned Posts about... then suddenly everyone is building something with the REST API and needs input and it's great. If you drop your bucket into AWP at any one time and judge it based on that, you have a high probability that you'll be disappointed. But if you just hang out and abide (the dude abides....!) over the span of a year you'll see the great benefit it offers.

Lastly, if you ever want to get a pulse on what A LOT of WordPress users think about any given subject, AWP is a PERFECT test-case. A LOT of the majorly #wpdrama type stuff gets covered in AWP and those threads get hundreds of replies with a lot of vitriol and also nuance and variety. It's a very good barometer of the general, GLOBAL WordPress community.

I think somewhere in the midst of all of that I answered your question. Thanks, Mendel!

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Rachel Carden

Who would you say has the best hair in WordPress?

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Matt Cromwell

Hey Rachel. You know... most folks say Alex Vasquez, and I've never shared this publicly, but...

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Mendel

This. Is. Amazing.

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Rachel Carden

I'm so happy I met you, Matt Cromwell.

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alex vasquez

Matt, does Alex Vasquez have the best hair in WordPress?

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Matt Cromwell

See reply to Rachel. :-)

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alex vasquez

I'm dying rn

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Matt Cromwell

As you would say: "I aim to please" :-)

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Ben Fox

I'll take this one Matt.

Hi Alex, the answer is sim...OH LOOK! Something Shiny!

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Ben Fox

Matt, first of all, congratulations on the enormity of your success. Seriously. Ok, facetiously, but also seriously!

My questions are:

1. If you could go back and change one choice on your path in WordPress or your career as a whole, would you and what would it be?

2. What is the one thing you're most proud of in our community? (It doesn't have to be something you've done but something that makes you proud to be associated)

3. 1,000,000 duck sized horses? OR 1 horse sized duck and why?

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Matt Cromwell

1. I wouldn't change a thing. I'm happy and messing with the past is bad for the future. Haven't watched any sci-fi movie ever!?

2. That's a good one. Everyone should have to answer this question, not just me. I'll kick myself later because there's probably a lot more obvious things, but the ways in which WordPress is focusing on #i18n and #a11y lately have made me really proud. I mean, what other website platform is translated automagically into so many languages? And works so hard to make website accessible for so many people with disabilities? Folks generally don't recognize how awesome it is, despite the fact that there's soooo much further to go in both areas, the progress already is amazing.

3. 1,000,000 duck sizes horses of course. Because 1,000,000 presents for friends is awesome!

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Carl Alexander

Matt would you consider getting CarlBoard tatoo? And where?

Also congrats on all your work with AWP. Can't imagine where I'd be without it! :D

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Matt Cromwell

Carl2016!!! Carl, I love you to death, but I'll never tatoo my body or get piercings. I have nothing against it in general. It's looks amazing on some folks and tattoo artists nowaday are geniuses, but there's something pure and sublime for me personally to choose to never wear anything other than my wedding ring, and never purposely pierce my body. It's just a personal choice I've made.

Carl, I want more of CARL thoughts in AWP. Not just Carl links to articles. You should crowdmind some of your articles in AWP. If you did that, I'd push it hard in the group. We need that. DO EET!

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Vova Feldman

Hey Matt, thanks for doing the AMA.

A bunch of business questions related to Give:
1. What was the reason you chose the add-ons model vs. plans?
2. Since you guys started, you developed more and more add-ons. Did you see a growth in the lifetime value of a customer? (concrete numbers/percentage in growth would be awesome) Or is the primary value in developing more add-ons is more about capturing a larger market share?
3. What percentage of your customers are purchasing bundles?
4. If you had a time machine, would you still choose add-ons over plans?
5. Based on other add-on powered plugins, 2-3 add-ons drive most of the revenues. Is it the case with Give? (what are your top sellers) If so, wouldn't it be easier to dump the rest of the add-ons and focus only on those? If not, why?
6. Give is already over a year old. What renewal rate do you guys see with the automatic renewals?
7. What are your main acquisition channels?
8. If there was one thing you could change in the WordPress.org guidelines that could benefit your business, what would that be?

Thank you so much for answering!

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Matt Cromwell

OK... gimme a couple hours... sheesh, Vova!? ;-)

1. What was the reason you chose the add-ons model vs. plans?

Well, we've evolved a bit and have "Bundles" now too, which are groups of our Addons you can buy together for an annual subscription. I read your piece on annual vs monthly very closely, and I can see how monthly would make sense for some products for sure. For ours, and similarly WooCommerce and EDD people typically are committing to our platform for the long-haul, and there's a level of trust and loyalty that we have to foster over the year. As long as we continue to prove our value to them over the year, they'll jump up and down to renew in the coming years.

And honestly, one factor I think your article didn't address is "Average Job Size" (I could be wrong), but being able to estimate the value of that customer by their purchase size is important in valuating a business. Also, Full Disclosure: All of this type of business talk is pretty new for me. I'm a quick learn, but Jason is the guy who crunches all our numbers. I'm VERY interested in the details and I definitely advocate for our customers whenver we discuss pricing and subscription plans, but at the end of the day, that's why we have Jason on the team -- and he's amazing.

2. Since you guys started, you developed more and more add-ons. Did you see a growth in the lifetime value of a customer? (concrete numbers/percentage in growth would be awesome) Or is the primary value in developing more add-ons is more about capturing a larger market share?

Our Bundles increased our lifetime value of the customer by quite a bit. And -- surprisingly -- it didn't increase support all that much. I just did some quick numbers from the three months before we rolled out Bundles to the three months after and just creating the Bundles increased our Average Job Size by 20%.

At this stage we don't consider WooCommerce or EDD competitors at all, or really any other WordPress plugin as a competitor. We consider third-party platforms as competitors because they take nonprofits out of the WordPress ecosystem. So, in order to be competitive with them, we need to build Addons that compete with their features, that are targeted specifically at doing donations better, reporting better, managing donors better. With the added benefit of Bundles, when we roll out new Addons (like we just rolled out 4 news ones over the past 3 weeks) we add those to our Bundles automatically. This also creates a lot of loyalty because customers get free Addons basically.

So it's not as much about just releasing new Addons in general, but more about adding value to what our customers get and positioning ourselves as real competition with GoFundMe or Classy or others so that nonprofits can choose WordPress with confidence.

3. What percentage of your customers are purchasing bundles?
Roughly 50% -- again, just took a quick look at most recent sales. But that sounds about right as well.

4. If you had a time machine, would you still choose add-ons over plans?

So far, yes. If I think of the closest WordPress product to ours that does "plans" of some sort, it'd be Gravity Forms. Add-ons allow our customers to dig into our site more deeply, choose what they really need, and come back later and get more and grow with us as they grow. I don't yet see a real benefit -- for US -- with plans over Add-ons and yearly auto-renewals.

5. Based on other add-on powered plugins, 2-3 add-ons drive most of the revenues. Is it the case with Give? (what are your top sellers) If so, wouldn't it be easier to dump the rest of the add-ons and focus only on those? If not, why?

If I exclude Bundles, the meat and potatoes Add-ons are Recurring Donations, Form Field Manager, Stripe, Authorize.net, and other payment gateways.

We'd never dump the other Add-ons, for one: They add a lot of value to the Bundles which are the REAL meat and potatoes. Customers want the big Addons, but they choose the Bundle because they get the extra smaller Add-ons for a reasonable difference. Further, some organizations will simply ignore Give all together if it doesn't have their "must-have" feature, which is niche for the majority of users, but required for them. PDF Receipts is a good example of that. It's not an amazing seller, but there's some folks who require it and wouldn't have chosen Give if we didn't have it.

6. Give is already over a year old. What renewal rate do you guys see with the automatic renewals?

While Give is over a year old, we didn't launch with automatic renewals. Unfortunately, we only got that going this past April. Mostly because we waited until Pippin was done with his biggest update to Recurring Payments for EDD -- which we helped build in part. So we haven't yet seen how automatic renewals impact our business. But we're estimating that it will take us from around 35% (which we have now) to up to 75 or 85%. With a plugin like Give, organizations really NEED to stay updated. It's just necessary, just like WooCommerce.

7. What are your main acquisition channels?

Jason likes to qualify his answer on this, and I agree with him. Just because the last click-to-purchase came from Google, or Facebook doesn't mean that's where the customer found us, or what made them choose to purchase from us.

That said, we still see a lot of traffic coming from wp-admin, meaning the links in our plugin to our documentation and Addon pages. We also see solid conversion traffic from Facebook and Twitter. We tend to focus on those three. WP-Admin, Facebook, and Twitter.

Organic Google does just fine as well, but Jason's caveat really resonates with that traffic. Most likely they are just using Google to find us because they discovered us elsewhere first and decided to buy and just simply don't type g-i-v-e-w-p-.-c-o-m into their browser, but into a Google search instead.

8. If there was one thing you could change in the WordPress.org guidelines that could benefit your business, what would that be?

I don't think this is a change so much as a feature. I want them to care about anonymous user data and provide a system for all of us to understand WordPress users better. The basic info they provide here: wordpress.org/about/stats/ really isn't sufficient. WordPress as a platform would benefit greatly by knowing what cURL version users were running, and MySQL versions, and generally how much traffic they generate.

But even the stats page I linked to. Why couldn't that be provided to plugin authors to be plugin specific? If they already have that info, I'm sure it could also be processed to be plugin specific as well. All of that would be a start.

I don't imagine they would ever have an opt-in service like Freemius -- which is why I'm SOO glad Freemius exists. That still seems to be clearly in the responsibility of third-party businesses like yourself. But being more granular about the data that is available and how it's parsed to plugin authors would be a great first step for sure.

Thanks so much, Vova! Hoping to see you again at WCUS!

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Matt Cromwell

Folks, it's been real. Obviously people are most interested in getting me to be silly, which is great, but there's a few gems in here as well. Proud of all these folks here, and their passion and creativity. Proud of our community that we continue to host such open and transparent conversations like these. Thanks ManageWP for all you do for this global and generous community!

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Ahmad Awais

Hey, Matt :)

I have only one question for you :)

What do you thing you people did right which helped Give grow to where it is today? What is the prime factor that directly influenced your revenue growth?

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Matt Cromwell

Hey Ahmad, thanks for the question.

There's several small things that add up into one big thing that led to the success of Give. I think if there's a "name" for the big thing it would be: "We knew the Market"

Basically, there was a large and obvious need for Give. Anyone who had done donations in WordPress knew this, and complained about it, but no one had really stepped up to address it. Devin and I both built sites for nonprofits as freelancers before WordImpress so we both knew this.

We also knew how to tackle the problem. Between my insights and skills, and Devin's coding and foresight we knew we could build a really good product if we just put all our efforts behind it. We didn't know for sure how successful it would be, but we knew that WooCommerce owning 30%+ of the E-Commerce Market meant that there was A LOT of room for something like Give to own a huge portion of the Online Donation Market. We're not there yet -- by a long shot -- but we're on our way.

Thanks!

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Ahmad Awais

Thanks for the response!

Good luck with, Give ;)

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