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WordPress in Schools?

Jan. 3, 2014

Oli Barrett tweeted a good question some time back about what do you wish you had learnt at school. Scott Barlow replied “learn how to setup a WordPress site”. Imagine if every kid coming out of school could get online with their own website?

I think this is just an interesting view on things.

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22 votes   Flag
Matt Medeiros

I'm working on this :)

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Vladimir Prelovac

In what way?

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Michael Tieso

Not sure how well this would work with WordPress changing so often. What exactly would they even be learning by setting up a WordPress site? Why would it be useful? And at what age?

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Pooria Asteraky

@Vladimir @MattMedeiros I'm also very interested in this concept. WordPress can be a subject for all students, In my new project wpschool.org we'll have a package for schools to run their own WP courses. I like to share and listen about this anyone interested please drop me an email; pooria@wpschool.org

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Joe Can Write

It would be great if everyone started a blog or website in school, and had allotted time each week to update it in a structured/focused way, adding decent content along the way. After a few years you could have a great body of work to use when applying for jobs, or reaching out/networking with possible employers, or even as a side income generating tool.

Or it could just end up being a load of embarrassing photos and cringe-inducing self-absorbed teenage angst-ridden poetry!

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Vladimir Prelovac

That would be actually pretty cool. Not to mention the amount of knowledge they would absorb without even being aware of it.

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Leif Quitevis

Setting up a blog on WordPress.com is a great way to introduce kids to WordPress. They can play around with themes, options, and settings, learn the terminology and get used to the WP environment in a fun, non-technical way. Learning becomes fun when they think they're playing.

But at some point they'll want to personalize - yes, customize - their site beyond what's available in WordPress dotcom. This is when I log them into sites like CodeAcademy.com and Mozilla's Webmaker.org so they can learn some HTML/CSS and a little Javascript first. This turns out to be very useful when they start working on a self-hosted WordPress site.

There seems to be a lot of emphasis these days on "teaching kids to code" (Google that phrase). Yet many of the newest plugins, CMS's, or sitebuilders tout their ease of use that is a result of not needing to know how to code. The rising use of mobile and apps add even more uncertainty as to where the future lies in web development.

For me, the question isn't whether or not my kids should learn WordPress, but whether or not WordPress will still be relevant in their time. Change happens quickly these days.

Any good beginner Node.js tutorials out there? ;)

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Robert Hemstock

I have thought about WP in schools too but not for any reasons mentioned above.

At WordCamp SF 2013 I met a boy of about 12 or 13 and his father was a contributor to WP. When I asked him if he was a developer too and if he had created any WordPress sites he pointed me to: thegreatdepression.thatitis.com/

Turns out this was a school report in the form of a website. Great idea. As you know it can include photos, videos, etc. Every student can "turn in" their report as free passworded WordPress.com website!

What do you think?

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Vladimir Prelovac

Report as websites - brilliant!

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Robert Hemstock

How about:
> A simple "School Report" theme with simple front end editing, the regular back end editing with "help" icons at each section with pop up balloons (like in the Yoast SEO plugin), a "print report" feature for correct page placement and a way for the teacher to "correct" (markup) on top (or next to) content.
Would we need anything else? Index? Bibliography? Cover page?
...and removing the stupid "Protected" inclusion in every post and page title when a site is password protected.

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SSDPress

I remember a teacher who made it his students assignment to register a blog during his lessons, then from his teacher panel, he could see their homework as blog posts. As he was an ICT teacher, he made them blog about IT related news. Clever way to get kids to learn while doing.

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