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Best local WordPress development environment?

Community | Oct. 2, 2017

Need to do a WordPress site for a hobby and am wondering what do you use nowadays to develop WordPress locally? I remember tools like WAMP back in the day. Also do you still develop sites locally or latency is not an issue any more for most purposes?

I have a dev server on the net. I use that, not local. Works fine.

via Donna Cavalier

I've been using Laragon. Pretty easy to get setup and going:

www.webtng.com/best-wamp-server-for-local-wordpress-laragon-is-easy/

via David McCan

Been using local.getflywheel.com/ and it's easier :)

via Phpbits Studio

A lot of us was used to in VV, but now I find Local By Flywheel is the best for Mac or Windows. Its interesting that you have asked this Vladimir, I have a planned blog post about this from last month!

via M Asif Rahman Ⓦ

Please do that. Is the number #1 reason people still use local dev. env. just speed and performance of development or is there something else now?

via Vladimir Prelovac

I would say stability and community around it (means support). And Local is made solely for WP, and it does not crash like VVV if you restarted your System without turning off Vagrant properly. And the way it binds WP-CLI and others tools built-in I can't expect anything else for a free tool, if you ask me I would have paid $100 for this.

via M Asif Rahman Ⓦ

All articles about Gutenberg (ever?)

Community | Sep. 7, 2017

In case you missed one or looking for a specific one:

https://managewp.org/search?q=gutenberg

That is a lot of posts. Interestingly every single one received at least 18 votes. If you want guaranteed first spot you know what you need to do :)

Lol. That makes perfect sense. Thanks for sharing this search url. Though given how important this topic is, still I feel we are seeing too many conversations, and I feel, it will still happen as planned, not as people give feedback, and later the logic like beyond 80-20 will come. Sadly!
That is the reason, I do see its pretty pointless to discuss, rather better to get involved in development, or start making the cope-up plan!

via M Asif Rahman Ⓦ

Something's wrong with your search functionality, because I immediately noticed that mine isn't in the list, though it is here (although it ONLY received 12 votes). Gutenberg Will Confuse The Crap Out of Almost Everyone. (Maybe you have a "crap" filter in place, LOL).

via Donna Cavalier

You are right, it seems that load more for searches does not work.

via Vladimir Prelovac

It's a hot topic. :)

via Ahmad Awais

Is everyone done writing about Gutenberg yet?

Community | Sep. 8, 2017

Asking for a friend.

Not yet, but hopefully soon.

via Rod Austin

I have not even started yet! Lol! But I stopped sharing it here though!

via M Asif Rahman Ⓦ

Of course not. There have been two new versions in two weeks and there will be plenty to write about as it evolves. Yes, it seems tiresome to see "all Gutenberg, all the time" news, especially if multiple people post similar articles, but each new version has addressed concerns raised with earlier versions, so the people who have already written about it need to go back to it, check on it, and perhaps write something again (or not, if they don't think the newer version changes what they said before).

As with any popular topic, don't write about it if you don't have something new to say, but at present I'd rather see new people's impressions of a newer Gutenberg than the same "Ultimate Guide to WordPress Security/SEO/Whatever" with exactly the same points in it regurgitated by a new author/agency once a month.

via Sallie Goetsch

Have written four times about it. Three more getting published this month.

via Ahmad Awais

It's a massive change to the core of the thing many of us use daily/ earn a living from. I imagine the articles will keep on coming long after it's released.

via Ben Gillbanks

Top WordPress brands (Sep 2017 update)

Community | Sep. 6, 2017

http://www.prelovac.com/vladimir/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/download-2.png

Previous status and methodology:

https://managewp.org/articles/12627/current-rankings-for-wordpress-brands

Congrats to WPEngine for keeping the title of the strongest WP brand!

Notably, WPTavern overtook WooThemes for #2 spot, ManageWP overtook WPMUDev for #6, and Pagely made the biggest jump in terms of gaining brand equity.

As a side note, all these brands together follow less than 12,000 unique people.

What does this mean though? Brand strength on ManageWP.org?

via Jeff

It is a general measure of brand strength measured by using Twitter.

Methodology is explained here:

managewp.com/simple-way-of-using-your-twitter-for-measuring-your-brand-strength
managewp.com/scientific-search-biggest-wordpress-brand

Short version:
We assume that the top brands will jointly follow all the influencers in the market. Percentage of those influencers following each brand back is the measure of that brands' strength.

via Vladimir Prelovac

Do you have this tool to be used by the public? I'd love to take a stab at it for my Twitter profile twitter.com/mrahmadawais/

via Ahmad Awais

Nope, twitter api limitations make it unusable for anything more than these 13 brands basically.

via Vladimir Prelovac

Would I be correct in guessing that the results might be different if you were getting the data from other sources (Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, Snapchat)? Presumably we wouldn't have 100% influencer overlap, or brand overlap, or followership overlap.

Also, though Woo is still a distinct brand, in terms of total influence we'd probably have to say that Automattic-owned companies when combined take up the major share of that list. And Matt Mullenweg owns WP Tavern, too, though it's Audrey and not Automattic that employs the staff there.

via Sallie Goetsch

Twitter followers is a suboptimal metric to measure brand strength. Too easy to buy a bunch of followers (not to imply that anyone on this list has doing that).

via John Locke

Commenting on blog posts is dying

Community | Jun. 4, 2017

I have a problem finding a blog with meaningful comments section nowadays. 10 years ago comments on blogs flourished, while today even once comment-heavy blogs have their comments sections virtually empty.

Have the Web moved on? Is taking time to write a comment, time that we do not have any more?

Absolutely true. Though there are very engaging content and specially controversial conversation has more engagement like always, but its really not what we have seen a decade ago. Few things came into my mind.

1) Our behavior and specially web experience is more maturing(not sure if that the right word), and its shifting towards a different kind of conversation.
2) Even from the rise of Snapchat its proven we are hugely changed. Now people are careful what are they saying and who are seeing it.
3) Though it might sound a little different but you see the way we became too conservative about do-follow, no-follow, link back, previously if somebody just read a good article would have left a comment saying that you, courtesy and also a simple link back, now there are so many conversation whats right, whats wrong, whats blackhat and whats not.
4) Even commenting without login (with social login exp: Facebook Comment) still not much engagement. Maybe different breed of people are coming online now, they are shy, or dont have much to add.

via M Asif Rahman Ⓦ

I think twitter affected our commenting behaviour, 10 years ago twitter wasn't used as effectively as it is today.

Btw, is there any intensedebate users these days? just curious :)

via Mustafa Uysal

There are multiple reasons why the trend is dying. I believe the diversification of contents is one of these. Previously, engaging visual contents like infographic, GIF or slides were not as plenty as it is today. Now readers have umpteenth times more social media exposure and easily consumable contents than before. Concentration and density falls as the quantity and rapidity of the blogs increases.

Another major factor is creating nice or establishing yourself as an expert in a certain category. People these days do not respond to contents that are not positioned strongly. It is more like building a brand. And when there is one overpowering brand in a particular field, it produces an unfavorable situation for competitors. Because even if the others are offering high quality contents, people will remember that one brand that had first-mover advantage.

And somehow that is where most of the enthusiastic readers are going to comment.

via Rafi Nizamee

Your perception is correct, as far as I can see on blogs, although, I not sure it is accurate to say that we have "moved on" from commenting. Or that we don't take the time to do that anymore. It seems to me that commenting on content is simply done elsewhere, outside of the blogs' comments section.
With the growth of content being published on blogs - many people find it hard to "follow" only several favorite blogs, and do not discover new content via their RSS feed or something like that. Rather, they get exposed to it on social media, and that's where they express their opinions on the content, as well.

via Kobe Ben Itamar

I think it's a combination of less time, and the proliferation of Like/Share buttons that killed comments. It's so much quicker to click a like button or a share button, than it is to type out a comment. I can express my gratitude for what I just read, without having to take the time to put words to "paper", so to speak. And if I do share, I'm more likely to place any comment I have in the share itself.

via Donna Cavalier

I think you are right. Twitter also changed how users use the web, but let's not forget that in the last 10 years the content available online has been multiplied. We produce more content in a day than we did 10 years ago during a whole year. And let's be honest, most of the new content you see today doesn't worth commenting, it's about quantity and not quality. When you produce something cool, useful and you have an engaged audience (+ promote the hell out of it) users will start leaving comments.

One interesting fact : Copyblogger removed comments a while back because it took them a lot of time to manage it and told users to continue the conversation on the social media. The marketing world was full with this story. Now if you check the site you can see that comments are enabled again :)

via Tom Zsomborgi

How do you perceive GoDaddy as your (potential) partner and provider of tools and services?

Community | May. 19, 2017

Hey everyone

I am interested in how do you perceive GoDaddy's brand giving it a simple score from 1 to 100 (100 being best) and why?

Looking to gather as much as feedback possible. Don't be shy, open up :)

Thanks!

95/100

I've been a GoDaddy customer for a little over 10 years. It started with domain names, then hosting a few small sites on their shared Linux hosting, and now having referred a handful of clients to their Managed WordPress hosting platform.

I used to despise their old brand, and the advertising that went along with it. But I've seen all the changes happening with the new leadership that came in a few years ago.

One of their senior VPs commented on a blog post I did comparing their speed with that of WP Engine's. I've had numerous fantastic interactions with members of their support team, where they've given me their direct line & email, and gone above and beyond to help. And my cousin got a job on their security team about a year ago, and raves about what it's like to work there (and he has pretty high standards).

Their UI has been continually improving for the better part of two years. Their managed WordPress product is incredibly easy to use. They are very active in the community, participating here on this site, commenting on WP-related blogs/forums, sponsoring prominent WordPress folks to contribute to core.

They are aware of the negative perceptions people have from how they did things in the past, and they aren't afraid to acknowledge them. From what I've seen, they are listening to the community, and trying to improve.

With all that being said, I think their product offerings still leave a little to be desired. They don't support PHP 7 yet, nor do they offer free SSL certs via Let's Encrypt. I realize selling SSLs is probably a large part of their business, but it's tough to compare free vs. $70/yr. when I'm trying to recommend hosting to my clients & colleagues.

But in terms of their BRAND, which was the initial question, I'd give them very high ratings. I hope to see them continue down the path they are currently on, and hopefully never turn into something like that of EIG.

via Dave Warfel

12 out of 100 - Brand is bad enough in my experience to walk away from ManageWP when they purchased it. I was happy for you, but couldn't bring myself to use a Godaddy product or service. And it's not just their history, though that certainly plays a huge part in it. But even recently (a few months ago, maybe, don't remember exactly), I had to deal with a client whose PHP version was very old, and it was the highest available. Again, I don't remember the details right now, but it was frustrating, and just typical of all of the Godaddy issues over the years. There's no point in rehashing all of the past woes. Bad company, bad product, bad service. Just can't get past all of it. Sorry.

via Donna Cavalier

I don't have much opinion of them either way now. I had a couple of domains with them and using their old admin interface was horrible. It was hard to find the simple things I wanted to do, and they were spending more time upselling new stuff than letting me get on with managing my domains. Then there's all the ethics and stuff - dodgy adverts that were all about boobs rather than the product, the ceo who was a scumbag etc.

Over the last couple of years they seem to have been making big steps to improve their image (presumably why you have asked this). I no longer use their service but the adverts have improved massively, and their participation in the WordPress community appears genuine.

I think it will take a lot to get past the negative feelings people had of them in the past but they are heading in the right direction.

via Ben Gillbanks

2 -
They are a direct competitor
They have a dire reputation, which while have had some brand reputation improvements still to many horror services
They are a US based company which immediately opens up data protection issues
Their purchasing strategy while positive in that they are picking good companies (High ManageWP peeps) hasn't yet shown how they will gut those companies long term.

We would have been interested in working with several of their now subsumed companies historically prior to being bought. However there is no amount of assurances about their independence that I think we would trust given who the parent is.

via Tim Nash

No thanks

via JazzFan Junkie

Thanks Dave. SSL is a big pain and a large business on its own but I think we are about to solve that. It goes without saying that next generation WordPress hosting will support PHP7. Stay tuned.

via Vladimir Prelovac

Migrating ManageWP.org to new hosting!

Community | Mar. 13, 2017

Hello everyone,

This is a quick notification to let you know that tomorrow March 14th between 10am and 2pm CET ManageWP.org will be down. We are migrating to GoDaddy infrastructure, so for the duration of the migration approx. 4 hours the site will be unavailable.

You can expect it to be up and running as normal after 2pm CET. This will not affect any of your personal details.

Thank you all for your understanding. If you have any questions or doubts, just drop us a message below.

Regards,

Nevena

Thanks for informing.

via Mustaasam Saleem

Thanks for the heads up!

via Joseph H. Howard

Migration has been done successfully! Welcome back everyone, if you have any issues, just drop us a line on this thread and will fix it for you.

Thanks!

via Nevena Tomovic

Seems a bit fast now :)

via Ahmad Awais

Not the first thing that comes to mind about Godaddy hosting, isnt it? :)

via Vladimir Prelovac

Yeah, but I state what the facts here :)

via Ahmad Awais

[ManageWP.org] Submitting new sites and flagging new articles now earn more than double karma points

Community | Nov. 6, 2016

Three years when the site was designed we decided to give a bonus of 25 karma points when you submit an article from a site that has never been submitted (in effort to promote diversity and discovery).

Similarly when you flag an article and it gets removed you would get 5 bonus karma points.

This worked well, especially for new users who start with 100 karma points so these two activities could provide an easy karma boost early on.

As site matured, these bonus points have become less relevant relative to member's total karma. Also finding new sites has been increasingly difficult.

So today we have the following changes to the karma algorithm.

- New site submitted earns 50 bonus karma points plus 2% of members' total bonus karma points
- Article flagged and removed - 10 bonus karma points to everyone flagging the article. Additionally 1% of members' total bonus karma points to the member who flagged it first.

These changes at least double the effect and for more active members can triple or quadruple the effect. Pay attention next time you submit a new site or when an article you flag gets removed to the number of points you won - can be significant.

Hi Vladimir,

Thanks for the post and changes. I had noticed recently that some members were sharing articles just to gain more traffic.
Some were sharing articles containing several affiliate links.

I hope things will get better with these changes and ManageWP will remain to be a source of the "Best" WP updates :)

Thanks!
Puneet S.

via Puneet Sahalot

Awesome, very logical.

Sadness, after many months I got new site discovery karma just yesterday! :S

via M Asif Rahman Ⓦ

Members can and should Flag any posts that include affiliate links IMO. Everyone in the community working together can very effectively minimize & control behaviors that do not match the spirit of sharing that is dominant in this community.

via Neil Murray

I don't see anything inherently wrong with affiliate links. They're a valid source of revenue for publishers. Problems arise when the authors don't disclose affiliate links, or when affiliate commissions influence the content in a way that's detrimental to the audience.

via Andy McIlwain

That's a good move. I am not so sure about the algorithm for this site, but what I don't like is that MWP algorithm doesn't like people who post a lot, even if 99% of their posts are valid posts, community coverage and if they receive appreciation for that as well.

I think that my stats and contribution towards MWP.org is not bad. At the time of writing I have
12335 KARMA
1193 UPVOTES
294 SHARES
3042 UPVOTES RECEIVED
237 COMMENTS
10 FOLLOWING
67 FOLLOWED BY

About 300 shares and 3000+ upvotes were received. (Considering I only found out about this site in Feb 2015). Yet the MWP algorithm treats me as a spammer! At the end of 2015, I was at the 8th place, I guess, and now I am at the 12th place on the leadership board. Which is a huge factor of demotivation?

How? Well, I share and contribute more, last two posts I shared were three and four days ago. 90% of my posts get good votes (that is these posts are a much-needed news for WP community members)... while the profiles that rank higher than me on the leadership board have shared their last posts two or three months ago.

Don't get me wrong; we are all friends here, and there is no posting or ranking competition. I love data! I contribute a lot and the data being fed to this algorithm makes it like people who (after a certain amount of shares i.e. 30 to 40) stop sharing. Which is inherently against the concept of MWP. MWP is the most up to date news portal for the WP community. (For me it is). And it's algorithm doesn't like people who share more.

So, as of now, there is a price I pay for sharing everything or anything here. How? Let me tell you a vague prediction (not backed by data — ironic?)

→ Right now I have two options for 2017!

OPTION #1: Share at least four posts per month and give back/contribute my fair share to MWP to help the community and what not.
PROBABLE RESULT → Yup, if I do that, then by the end of next year I might not be there on the leadership board at all (not in the top 20). Bummer!

OPTION #2: I do NOT share anything for one complete year and just sit, watch and get the benefit from the posts being shared or from who share them (= pay the price)
PROBABLE RESULT → I might roughly end up in the top 5 to 7 users on the leadership board.

THERE! I said it!
MWP's current algorithm is broken. It favors not contributing back! It supports inactive users. Those who want to contribute pay the price.

And if anyone is thinking about responding back to this comment with "But dude, you shared that old Survey by mistake, and it got deleted, you gotta pay for that" OR "Dude stop sharing everything out there, but I do like what you share. OK now I am confused too" — twin paradox anyone?

Then let me just say, — this is just a dev's opinion and nothing else. IMHO this algorithm considers me as a spammer, and I don't like that. And as they say about opinions — they are like assholes and that everyone has one!

So, chill :) No one is pointing out any fingers, just providing honest feedback, sharing some late-night-7hours-car-drivin'-developer's frustration.

OK, that was fun. Time to sleep!

Cya!

via Ahmad Awais

You are among top 0.01% users by vote strength on the site - so you can hardly say that MWP algorithm treats you as a spammer. Maybe you have high standards (anything but first place is bad :) but just wanted to throw that reality check.

The algorithm takes into account how you spend your karma. Each time you submit an article or upvote an article, you are making a bet that it will get upvoted by others after you (as your score benefits only from votes submitted after your own). If it doesn't, it will negatively affect your overall score (which is there by design as a mechanism to 'punish' people submitting or voting on lower quality stories, their vote strength will essentially go down with time).

The inverse is true too - if every story you submit or upvote gets a lot of upvotes after you, you are guaranteed to build your vote strength fast - and that's also built into the algorithm by design.

I recommend taking a look at Omaar Osmaan's profile managewp.org/members/7506/omaar-osmaan as he came out of nowhere and managed to secure a #1 position on the leaderboard. I think it is all about submitting high quality stories and up-voting articles that are truly good. I'd like to get Omaar for an AMA one day too, curious if he found a way to game the algorithm or he is just a natural match for this website :)

ps. As explained by this discussion, discovering new sites and flagging bad articles is a great way to earn karma at a faster pace

via Vladimir Prelovac

How can we improve ManageWP.org?

Community | Jan. 4, 2017

It's the time of the year to start drafting plans for all the cool stuff we want to build in 2017, and the ManageWP.org website deserves a lot of love. We've got a couple of ideas how to make it better, but we want to hear your thoughts.

How can the ManageWP.org website improve, so it could be more useful to you?

I had few stuffs in mind, I will add those later, its kind of too late in my timezone.

1) How about start with adding a Pocket button on share?

2) Show little more texts (descriptions) on the front page.

3) Add option for uploading (linking custom image) in the submit post forms.

4) Maybe adjust the pointing system a little bit. Now person who almost never contribute could still be top vote strength holder, and stay on top without really submitting any good content, by just playing safe, and upvoting!

via M Asif Rahman Ⓦ

From mobile devices, the site doesn't work properly- may be fix and improve to make it fully working on mobile devices?

via Omaar Osmaan

Just sharing my thoughts, when I submit links my first priority is to bookmark things that I've interests on and possibly helpful to the community.. Same priority goes when I press the vote button for stories submitted by others.

Hope that helps- :)

via Omaar Osmaan

Thanks for your feedback!

1) I like the Pocket idea, but I'm not sure how well it would be used (more than G+, that's for sure :D).

3) Already on the list :)

via Nemanja Aleksic

Can you tell me a bit more about the mobile problems? Because AFAIK it's working fine on a couple of devices I use it on.

via Nemanja Aleksic

Ah- last time I'd checked it been couple of months. Will check it out again and see how things are now. :)

via Omaar Osmaan

How to find great articles to post on ManageWP.org?

Community | Dec. 9, 2016


First idea I am going to share is to use nuzzel.com

It will aggregate the best links from all the stories your twitter friends tweet. If your twitter friends are in the WordPress community, chance is this will surface some good stories.

You can also check out other people's nuzzel feeds, like for example Brian of poststatus.com:

http://nuzzel.com/Krogsgard

The second idea is wpmail.me newsletter which is a pretty old newsletter which is still pretty good:

http://wpmail.me/

I also sometimes use twitter search for #WordPress and that usually finds less known sources.

If you have your own "secret" sources, share them here :)

I really like Pocket and there's quite a few WPers on there as well.

getpocket.com/

via Matt Cromwell

+1 for Pocket - managewp.org & getpocket.com give me 80% of the tech news I read each week.

via Neil Murray

I just have a large number of friends, pretty active at Facebook, several Slack channels Groups and sometimes Feedly!

via Ahmad Awais

I subscribe to both Nuzzel and WPmail.me, as well as the WP Elevation WordPress Wednesday newsletter, Webdesigner News, and The Daily Bolt. Sometimes I find articles in one place that aren't in another (or that no one has posted here yet), but not that often. This is usually where I go first to see what's happening in the WP world.

via Sallie Goetsch

I curate my list, and track them in Feedly, and more stuff in Flipboard. It seems that enough. And Twitter is always there, just little too crowded.

via M Asif Rahman Ⓦ

If your vote is not registering, here is a quick fix...

Community | Sep. 16, 2016

If you sometimes notice that your vote is not registering (ie you refresh the page and its not there) it is because of a some weird bug that we have. Dont know when are we able to find it but if you notice that behaviour simply log out and log in into your profile and it will be gone.

I've had this happen a few times. Is a bit weird. To me it seems like the cookie on my computer still exists but the session on the server has expired.

Can confirm the logout and login work around :)

via Ben Gillbanks

Thank you for your sacrifice for the good of the community :)

via Nemanja Aleksic

Had to vote this one up twice ;)

via Mark Root-Wiley

#WordPress is 13, Happy Birthday!

Community | May. 27, 2016

May 27th is the anniversary of the fork created by Matt and Mike. Thank you, and big thanks to all WordPress contributors over the years for making it a great platform for everyone!

Happy Birthday, WP.

via M Asif Rahman Ⓦ

Dofollow links from your ManageWP.org profile

Community | Oct. 7, 2016

TLDR; If you have vote strength 5.0 or more we'll be dofollowing links to your social media profiles and if you have 10.0 we will be dofollowing links to your personal website.
---

I recently stumbled upon an article that showed how to get a hassle free dofollow link from this very site. And having checked it, it was real. We forgot to nofollow the links in user profiles, so basically the site was diluting its hard earned page rank juice to links on over 8000+ member profiles, some of them created just for this very spammy purpose.

Ouch!

The way I decided to fix it is to nofollow all member profile links by default.

And then apply following logic:

1. If your vote strength is 5.0 or more you will receive dofollow links to your social media profiles
2. If your vote strength is 10.0 or more (currently only 18 people qualify https://managewp.org/members ) you will receive dofollow links to your website

This way link juice is distributed to a much smaller group of people, making each contribution more powerful. It is our way of saying thanks for being an active member of this community.

While I agree with the basic logic behind it, and it should discourage spammers from signing up if they only get a nofollowed link, the idea that you're preventing the site from "diluting its hard earned page rank juice" by doing this is flawed.

In the first few years of PageRank this would have worked; it'd almost be a form of PageRank Sculpting, I suppose. More recently, since around 2009 I think, PageRank still flows out of your site through nofollow links -- they simply don't get credit for them.

This article from WooRank explains it well: www.woorank.com/en/edu/seo-guides/link-juice

Thus, the idea of "This way link juice is distributed to a much smaller group of people, making each contribution more powerful." really isn't true at all.

Again, I like the idea, as new users (such as me) don't deserve link juice flowing to their links, but this won't help you hold on to any of that link juice.

via Mickey Mellen

Thanks Mickey for refreshing my SEO mojo. I think it's fair to say that nobody knows how exactly this works and that the new policy is definitely an improvement over the old one.

via Vladimir Prelovac

That is probably a good move. Ya if you google "dofollow backlinks" it is crazy how many lists come up. I have seen ManageWP in a lot of them.

I somewhat agree with Mickey above as well, but still think your new policy is better than the old one. Definitely don't want members signing up just for the backlink if they aren't going to contribute to the community at all.

via Brian Jackson Ⓦ

Good move! Without any debate it will stop the spam profiles.

via Ahmad Awais

I think It's Great Move, I have just joined this wonderful Community, Looking forward to learning new thing here

via Saurabh Tiwari

Next on the ManageWP AMA: Michael Torbert

Community | Apr. 25, 2016

As we all know the one of the most important things for the blog or a website is SEO or Search Engine Optimization. To make your life easier WordPress is offering various plugins that should help you out in this not so easy job. Therefore, it is not surprising that the next WordPress developer on our AMA will be Michael Torbert.

Michael is an author of 14 plugins and the flagship of the fleet is All in one SEO. He is also in the WordPress translation team and WordCamp Raleigh organizer and sponsor.

All in one SEO has more than one million active installs and the 4,4 rating which puts it high on the SEO plugins and the plugins in general list.

AMA with Michael Torbert will take place on April 28th, from 12 pm to 6 pm East Coast time. He will be happy to answer any questions regarding WordPress, entrepreneurship, the first WordPress Audi S4 Edition and more.

Check out the AMA in your time zone:
http://goo.gl/7qrKKz

Find out more about Michael Torbert here:
http://michaeltorbert.com/
http://semperfiwebdesign.com/
http://semperplugins.com/

Freelancers – what tools do you use to work faster and work less?

Community | Nov. 16, 2016

Been thinking about this a lot as I've reached capacity having started freelancing full time two-and-a-bit months ago, but figured unless I change something the end game here is just repeating working at capacity until it becomes boring.

Curious what people's approaches to working faster and working less are:

- Is this a priority for you?
- What tools do you use? Anything WP specific?
- Do you outsource?

Also working on a blog post and wanted to get some outside opinions. Thx :)

I can only recommend Trello to manage ongoing projects. It has a free version and works great. At Kinsta, we are using it to manage our blog content, guest posts and other projects.

via Tom Zsomborgi

This Wednesday on ManageWP AMA: Troy Dean, co-founder of WP Elevation

Community | May. 9, 2016

The second season of our AMA is going global! After opening with James Farmer, CEO of WPMU DEV, we have another great Aussie lined up.

Troy Dean is co-founder of Video User Manuals and WP Elevation, the world’s largest business community for WordPress Consultants. He is also the host of the WP Elevation podcast. He has a background as a WordPress consultant and now operates a very successful membership community helping over 350 WordPress consultants with their business. He speaks at WordCamps regularly and is a professional singer, guitar player and voice over artist.

You name a subject, and he'll give you valuable insight: consulting, freelancing, recurring revenue, membership sites, proposals, lead generation, winning clients, project management, lean methodology, presenting, public speaking, podcasting and of course WordPress.

You'll find Troy on these links:
http://troydean.com.au/
http://www.videousermanuals.com/
http://www.wpelevation.com/

The AMA will be held on Wednesday, 8 am to 6 pm Melbourne time. Don't forget that Australia is so far away from us, their Wednesday is our Tuesday :D Check out the AMA in your timezone here:
http://bit.ly/24Hzm2L

Slight correction to the timing sorry folks, I'll be online from 9am Melbourne time.

Here's a converter for you all :)

www.worldtimebuddy.com/

via Troy Dean

That looks like 4pm Tuesday for me (pst). Looking forward to it!

via Robby McCullough

Next on the ManageWP AMA: Remkus de Vries

Community | Apr. 11, 2016

WordPress has made a huge impact in the world by helping people set up online platforms to express their opinions and share their experiences. A big part of this is the fact that WordPress is actively translated into 75 languages. It's fitting to invite to our AMA one of the people that helped coordinate the Polyglot community, especially with Global WordPress Translation Day coming on April 24. It gives me great pleasure to announce that the next person on our AMA will be none other than Remkus de Vries.

Remkus is a Dutch designer and developer who contributes to WordPress in many ways. He's the co-founder and one of the organizers of WordCamp Europe, an event that will draw 2,200 people to Vienna this year. He has lead the WordPress translation team, contributes to core, administrates the Dutch WordPress site, co-founded WordCamp Netherlands and was the lead-organizer four times and a lot more.

He is also a living proof that time is indeed relative, because he somehow managed to squeeze in extra time to start a happy family, have three kids, found a successful WordPress agency called Forsite Media and is about to launch ThemeMix, a theme store, with his wife.

Due to scheduling conflicts we moved the AMA to Thursday, April 14, 14:00 to 21:00 CET. Remkus will be happy to answer any questions about WordPress, entrepreneurship, haircuts and anything else you're interested in.

Check out the AMA in your time zone:
http://bit.ly/23wzjTi

Find out more about Remkus de Vries here:
http://forsitemedia.nl
https://remkusdevries.com
https://thememix.com

Join the Global WordPress Translation Day:
https://wptranslationday.org

Future of ManageWP.org: Post GoDaddy Acquisition Scenarios

Community | Sep. 4, 2016

I am just super shocked this morning, reading the acquisition news on PostStatus, while I am in here for the WordCamp Singapore.

There is no official announcement from ManageWP or GoDaddy yet, but I am concerned what will happen with our ManageWP.org.

It would be great if they left our this out of the deal. What do you think? I know we will hear from Vladimir, but want to start the conversation from the community as well.

I think it is being left out, they said it belongs to the community. Look for comments on the post about acquisition.

via Ahmad Awais

I'll also be glad if it is left out. But the acquisiton??? leaves me with a scratched head, for sure...

via Samedi Amba

Next on the ManageWP AMA: Beth Soderberg

Community | May. 30, 2016

Beth is an independent developer and digital communications strategist based out of Washington, DC. She is also involved with the WordPress Training Team, helps organize the WordPress DC Meetup, and is a co-organizer of the annual DCFemTech Hack for Good in Washington, DC.

AMA with Beth Soderberg will take place on June 1 from 7pm to 1am East Coast Time. She will be happy to answer any questions about learning to code, inclusion in technology, working with non-profit clients, and more.

Check out the AMA time in your time zone:
http://bit.ly/22ugyiC

Find out more about Beth Soderberg here:

http://bethsoderberg.com/
https://twitter.com/bethsoderberg