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2 min read Donna Cavalier
Development | wordpress.org | 2 days ago

The Official WordPress Gutenberg Handbook

This is where the all of the Gutenberg documentation, guidelines, and development details are being kept.

The Official WordPress Gutenberg Handbook

Development | wordpress.org | 2 days ago

“Gutenberg” is the codename for the 2017 WordPress editor focus. The goal of this focus is to create a new post and page editing experience that makes it easy for anyone to create rich post layouts. This was the kickoff goal: The editor will endeavour to create a new page and post building experience that makes writing rich posts effortless, and has “blocks” to make it easy what today might take shortcodes, custom HTML, or “mystery meat” embed discovery.
Key take-aways from parsing that paragraph:
Authoring richly laid out posts is a key strength of WordPress.
By embracing “the block”, we can potentially unify multiple different interfaces into one. Instead of learning how to write shortcodes, custom HTML, or paste URLs to embed, you should do with just learning the block, and all the pieces should fall in place.
“Mystery meat” refers to hidden features in software, features that you have to discover. WordPress already supports a large amount of blocks and 30+ embeds, so let’s surface them.
Gutenberg is being developed on GitHub, and you can try an early beta version today from the plugin repository. Though keep in mind

14 min read Aline
Development | ithemes.com | 2 days ago

The Gutenberg WordPress Editor: 10 Things You Need to Know

Solid overview from iThemes of things you need to know about Gutenberg.

The Gutenberg WordPress Editor: 10 Things You Need to Know

Development | ithemes.com | 2 days ago

Very soon, the Gutenberg WordPress editor will become part of the WordPress core. What does that mean for you? What if you’re already using a page builder? In this post, we’ll walk through the basics of the new Gutenberg editor for WordPress and what you need to know. What is the Gutenberg WordPress Editor?
The Gutenberg WordPress editor is a new page builder that is being designed to integrate with WordPress core.The Gutenberg WordPress editor is a new page builder that is being designed to integrate with WordPress core. Gutenberg will add content blocks and page builder-like functionality to every up-to-date WordPress website. When in use, it will replace TinyMCE as the default content editor. With Gutenberg, content is added in blocks of various types from the WordPress backend.
Gutenberg is slated to be released with WordPress 5.0. Thankfully, there’s a lot of healthy debate going on around Gutenberg involving many people who develop and use WordPress.
1. The Purpose of Gutenberg
“The goal of the block editor is to make adding rich content to WordPress simple and enjoyable.”
– From the Gutenberg plugin description on WordPress.org.
“Gutenberg

11 min read David Bisset
Development | wordpress.org | 6 days ago

WordPress 4.9 “Tipton”

Named “Tipton” for the jazz musician and band leader Billy Tipton... Featuring design drafts, scheduling, and locking, along with preview links... over 443 contributors!

WordPress 4.9 “Tipton”

Development | wordpress.org | 6 days ago

Major Customizer Improvements, Code Error Checking, and More! Version 4.9 of WordPress, named “Tipton” in honor of jazz musician and band leader Billy Tipton, is available for download or update in your WordPress dashboard. New features in 4.9 will smooth your design workflow and keep you safe from coding errors.
Featuring design drafts, scheduling, and locking, along with preview links, the Customizer workflow improves collaboration for content creators. What’s more, code syntax highlighting and error checking will make for a clean and smooth site building experience. Finally, if all that wasn’t pretty great, we’ve got an awesome new Gallery widget and improvements to theme browsing and switching.
Customizer Workflow Improved
Yes, you read that right. Just like you can draft and revise posts and schedule them to go live on the date and time you choose, you can now tinker with your site’s design and schedule those design changes to go live as you please.
Collaborate with Design Preview Links
Need to get some feedback on proposed site design changes? WordPress 4.9 gives you a preview link you can send to colleagues and customers so that you can collect

3 min read Aline
Development | wptavern.com | 6 days ago

Gutenberg 1.7 Adds Multi-Block Transform Functionality, Drops iframes Implementation of Meta Boxes

Post on WP Tavern that covers the latest changes in Gutenberg.

Gutenberg 1.7 Adds Multi-Block Transform Functionality, Drops iframes Implementation of Meta Boxes

Development | wptavern.com | 6 days ago

Gutenberg 1.7 was released today, two weeks after version 1.6, with a fresh round of new features, design updates, and the groundwork for nested blocks and block extensibility. Last week contributors began exploring an alternative to using iframes for meta boxes. This experiment has landed in 1.7 so that the plugin now renders meta boxes inline. Gutenberg engineer Riad Benguella, who wrote and merged the code, said that it doesn’t fix all the meta box issues and might create some new ones, but it “gets us closer to where we want to go.” Pre-rendering meta boxes and creating a migration path for existing ones is next on the agenda.
One of the most exciting new features in 1.7 is the multi-block transform functionality that allows users to select multiple blocks and instantly transform them into other block types. It works like a little bit of Gutenberg magic. By default, users can select multiple paragraphs and transform them into a list or select multiple images and transform them into a gallery.
After selecting two or more blocks, the user can click on the block’s settings in the toolbar to transform them. They can also be easily changed back to single blocks.

4 min read Iain Poulson

Announcing X-Ray For Mergebot: Visualize Your Database Changes

Something new is coming to Mergebot, our solution for making merging database changes easier. One of the hardest things during site development is seeing what has been done to the database so you can replicate it on the live site. Well, with what's coming to Mergebot, you could. Introducing X-Ray for Mergebot - a new way to visualize the changes made to a database. Check out the post to find out more about our plans for X-Ray.

Announcing X-Ray For Mergebot: Visualize Your Database Changes

Something new is coming to Mergebot, our solution for making merging database changes easier. One of the hardest things during site development is seeing what has been done to the database so you can replicate it on the live site. Well, with what’s coming to Mergebot, you could.
Introducing X-Ray for Mergebot – a new way to visualize the changes made to a database. Let’s take a look at the what we do in Mergebot already and how X-Ray will work.
If you aren’t familiar with Mergebot, here’s a quick recap. Mergebot records all the changes made on a development site and allows you to safely apply them to a live site without overwriting data. To do this, Mergebot records queries executed on the development site and sends them to our app so we can do all the ID replacement and other clever stuff before deployment. When you are ready to deploy your changes you can view and control which queries will be deployed with our Query Selection view.
This functionality is pretty powerful, but it’s not the easiest way to visualize the actual changes being made to the database on deployment. Even if you’re fluent in SQL, reading lines and lines of queries is

A WordPress + React Starter Kit

Just a starter kit for those who like to combine WordPress with React.

A WordPress + React Starter Kit

People who publish on the web love WordPress. Engineers love React. With some research, configuration, and trial and error, you can have both — but we’d like to save you the work. Meet Postlight’s WordPress + React Starter Kit, a free, zero-to-hero toolkit for engineers and product tinkerers who want to try out headless WordPress on their own computer with minimal effort.
This starter kit spins up a WordPress backend with a React frontend talking to the WP REST API in two steps. To use it, clone the repository, and check out the README. The first command installs and starts WordPress on your computer, and the second starts a process that serves a React frontend. From there, you’re ready to start importing data from your own WordPress site, and customizing the backend and frontend for your own needs.
Postlight has shipped several headless WordPress projects with a React frontend for our clients in the past year or so, and we got tired of repeating the initial legwork every time. This starter kit automates all the manual steps of setting up headless. We use it internally to start new WordPress projects, and we made it generic enough for you to do the same.
The

Development | initab.com | 8 days ago

A Chrome New Tab Extension for Software Developers

A new tab Chrome extension that has everything a developer could need, with integrations with GitHub, Stack Overflow, Reddit.. very useful

A Chrome New Tab Extension for Software Developers

Development | initab.com | 8 days ago

Initab is a Chrome new tab extension for software developers that offers a solution to continually having too many tabs open. It also offers several useful tools to make your job as a developer easier with a quick view of your GitHub Issue activity, Stack Overflow activity, and much more… Features
Getting started with Initab is easy. Open the SETTINGS panel and configure your preferences. Don’t forget to try the optional TAB LIMITING feature. It automatically keeps your browser tabs limited to the number you choose by closing older tabs. Some like it, some don’t…so be careful.
Do you find yourself constantly hunting around for the GitHub Issue you’re currently working on? Initab pulls your GitHub activity directly from your history, so you don’t have to worry about closing the tab associated with that issue. Simply open a new tab and you’ll see the issue right there in your GitHub Issue Activity.
Whoops! You accidentally closed the tab with the Stack Overflow answer that could help you out of the mess you’re in… Don’t worry, Initab has you covered. Click this button to toggle the Stack Overflow panel which is populated with

14 min read David Bisset
Development | gschoppe.com | 15 days ago

Misconceptions About Gutenberg Are Not Valid Criticism

Reaction posts would be expected on this subject... Greg distills down the “block” paradigm and what's it all about, and why it is crucial to WordPress’s future.

Misconceptions About Gutenberg Are Not Valid Criticism

Development | gschoppe.com | 15 days ago

I am generally seen as a critical voice to WordPress’s Gutenberg editor. It is true that I feel there are many places where criticism of Gutenberg is valid, such as in timeline, scope of initial releases, and methods of post storage. However, there has been a lot of criticism of Gutenberg recently that is based on misunderstandings or miscommunication of the project goals and the definition of a “block.” To that end, I’m going to try to distill down what the “block” paradigm is all about, and why it is crucial to WordPress’s future. Note: I am not a core part of the Gutenberg team, and have as much chance of misinterpreting things as anyone else. To that end, upon publishing this, I will be reaching out to the team leads, Matias Ventura, Joen Asmussen, Tammy Lister, and Matt Mullenweg to fact check me and correct anything I have gotten wrong.
Blocks are not the visual editor
Blocks, conceptually, are not a visual way to represent and edit post content, they also don’t have to be part of a content-picker menu, or drag/droppable. They can be used for those things, of course, and that is the workflow that much of the visible parts of Gutenberg

10 min read Iain Poulson

SQL Query Optimization for Faster Sites

We’ve written a lot about performance on the blog in the past, but never down in the weeds at the MySQL query level. In this post, I’ll take you through identifying slow queries, understanding the bottlenecks and how to fix them up.

SQL Query Optimization for Faster Sites

You know that a fast site == happier users, improved ranking from Google, and increased conversions. Maybe you even think your WordPress site is as fast as it can be – you’ve looked at site performance, from the best practices of setting up a server, to troubleshooting slow code, and offloading your images to a CDN, but is that everything? With dynamic database-driven websites like WordPress, you might still have one problem on your hands: database queries slowing down your site.
In this post, I’ll take you through how to identify the queries causing bottlenecks, how to understand the problems with them, along with quick fixes and other approaches to speed things up. I’ll be using an actual query we recently tackled that was slowing things down on the customer portal of deliciousbrains.com.
Identification
The first step in fixing slow SQL queries is to find them. Ashley has sung the praises of the debugging plugin Query Monitor on the blog before, and it’s the databases queries feature of the plugin that really makes it an invaluable tool for identifying slow SQL queries. The plugin reports on all the database queries executed during the page request. It

13 min read Aline
Development | yoast.com | 22 days ago

User-testing Gutenberg • Yoast

Very interesting insights from 40 people of diverse backgrounds and technical experience testing Gutenberg.

User-testing Gutenberg • Yoast

Development | yoast.com | 22 days ago

At Yoast, we organize a company-wide user testing session each month, where we ask our employees to take a look at a product or feature. On October 12th we focused on user-testing Gutenberg. We did this to gain a better understanding of how different users work with Gutenberg. This knowledge is sure to help us in our own contributions to the Gutenberg project. Today we’re publishing the test results for reference. We will discuss these outcomes with the Gutenberg team and create issues on the Gutenberg repo for the things that need fixing. We hope others will be inspired by this document to organize their own user tests around Gutenberg. Fixing some of these usability issues isn’t even that difficult, but they have to be found in the first place. We have to keep looking. And when we do, we can make sure Gutenberg becomes the best web content editor around!
We gathered 40 people of diverse backgrounds and technical experience, from absolute beginners to experts and WordPress contributors, and divided them up into teams of two, who were tasked with recreating this post from The Next Web in Gutenberg v1.4.0. We chose that post because it has a bit of everything; It contains

23 min read Donna Cavalier

New Features and Enhancements with Customizer Changesets in 4.9

Glad they went with linear changeset mode. Git-like forks and merging would have been too confusing for sure.

New Features and Enhancements with Customizer Changesets in 4.9

In WordPress 4.7 the concept of changesets was introduced in the Customizer (#30937). To understand the new Customizer improvements in 4.9, you must first go back and review what was proposed and implemented a year ago: 2016-11-15: Updated the description for how and when setting changes are written into the changeset, and also how the iframe window is loaded during a refresh when there are pending changeset yet to be written into the changeset. For more see comment. Also included information about storing modifying user with each setting change, among other … Continue reading
Changesets are a way to persistently store changes made via the Customizer framework. Changesets contain the pending changes for any number of settings, and a setting can model any object in WordPress—whether options, theme mods, nav menu items, widgets, or even posts/pages and their postmeta. Changesets are identified by UUID (which is the post_name for the customize_changeset post type that stores the data as JSON in post_content). When a request is made to WordPress with the customize_changeset_uuid request param—whether to the frontend or to the REST API—the Customizer framework will

5 min read David Bisset
Development | yoast.com | 25 days ago

Gutenberg: Concepts for integrating Yoast SEO

Interesting discussion about how Yoast might even build a full SEO mode into Gutenberg.

Gutenberg: Concepts for integrating Yoast SEO

Development | yoast.com | 25 days ago

Gutenberg is the new editing experience coming to WordPress. We’ve talked about it before. While we have some hesitations, we do see Gutenberg as a major step forward and are thinking about how we will integrate Yoast SEO into Gutenberg. In this post, we’ll share some of the ideas we’re excited about. Gutenberg introduces new concepts, like blocks, and new places where we could potentially integrate. The premise behind our integration is that we need to give you feedback as soon as we can, in the right spot. Feedback is most helpful when you can actually do something with it immediately.
Inline is where it’s happening
We started by breaking down all our features, and seeing where we could integrate them into Gutenberg. We don’t think holding on to a single, massive box below the editor will best serve our customers. We’d much rather integrate right where the action happens, and Gutenberg offers us that chance. Let’s take a closer look at what we mean.
For instance, if you don’t fill out an alt text for an image you included, we don’t want to show that bullet point way down below in our metabox, in a long list of possible improvements.

5 min read David Bisset

What’s new in Gutenberg? (31st October)

This is a somewhat larger release, with the focus on the writing experience, including the ability to convert a classic block (post) into several gutenblocks at will.

What’s new in Gutenberg? (31st October)

This week's release has a focus on the writing experience: reducing the visual weight of blocks, improving the behaviour of keyboard interactions, moving the block toolbar to a docked position at the top of the interface, and several little tweaks to the design that cumulatively should have a significant effect on the editor feeling. It also includes the ability to convert a classic block (post) into several gutenblocks at will. This is a very big release so, please, help us test it! Move the block toolbar to the editor's top header. This experiment seeks to reduce the presence of UI obscuring content.
Alternate style for block boundaries and multi-selection. Also engages "edit" mode when using arrow keys (hides UI).
Complete rework of arrow keys navigation between blocks—faster, clearer, and respects caret position while traversing text blocks.
Added keyboard shortcuts to navigate regions.
Implement multi-selection mode using just arrow with shift keys and support horizontal arrows.
Suggest a post format for additional blocks (embeds, gallery, audio, video) and expand on the heuristics to include case of one format-block at the top plus a paragraph of text below as

8 min read Ana Segota
Development | wptavern.com | 14 days ago

Gutenberg Contributors Explore Alternative to Using iframes for Meta Boxes

The discussion about the use of iframes for meta boxes in Gutenberg - contributors exploring alternatives .

Gutenberg Contributors Explore Alternative to Using iframes for Meta Boxes

Development | wptavern.com | 14 days ago

The discussion surrounding the use of iframes for meta boxes in Gutenberg became more heated over the weekend, as concerned developers implored the team to consider the detriments of the current approach. Responses from Gutenberg’s leadership initially deflected concerns, presenting the iframe implementation as an experiment that “works ‘for now'” but isn’t what the team would ship. Instead of getting a response to the specific concerns about performance and accessibility of the iframes approach, Kevin Hoffman was urged to think about the future of meta boxes and “the cases (if any) that would not be converted to blocks.” When the developer community is repeatedly asked to test and offer feedback but is met with deflection on issues that are critical to sites using WordPress as a CMS, the GitHub discussions begin to get more heated.
“People are worried, and getting frustrated and it seems to me that they have every right to do so because the perception is that the team working on Gutenberg has little understanding of how meta boxes are being used, little concern for what the impact will be, and is going to move forward with their vision

2 min read David Bisset
Development | wordpress.org | 21 day ago

WordPress 4.8.3 Security Release

This is a security release adds hardening to an issue related to $wpdb->prepare() and a change in behaviour for the esc_sql() function. Update now!

WordPress 4.8.3 Security Release

Development | wordpress.org | 21 day ago

WordPress 4.8.3 is now available. This is a security release for all previous versions and we strongly encourage you to update your sites immediately. WordPress versions 4.8.2 and earlier are affected by an issue where $wpdb->prepare() can create unexpected and unsafe queries leading to potential SQL injection (SQLi). WordPress core is not directly vulnerable to this issue, but we’ve added hardening to prevent plugins and themes from accidentally causing a vulnerability. Reported by Anthony Ferrara.
This release includes a change in behaviour for the esc_sql() function. Most developers will not be affected by this change, you can read more details in the developer note.
Thank you to the reporter of this issue for practicing responsible disclosure.
Download WordPress 4.8.3 or venture over to Dashboard → Updates and simply click “Update Now.” Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update to WordPress 4.8.3.

11 min read Raelene Morey
Development | robotninja.com | 20 hours ago

How We Built Robot Ninja

Is your checkout working? It’s a question that keeps a lot of store owners and WooCommerce developers up at night. So a couple of developers decided to do something about it. This three-part series delves into the months of work that went into building Robot Ninja, their successful automated checkout testing SaaS for WooCommerce.

How We Built Robot Ninja

Development | robotninja.com | 20 hours ago

Don’t let the title confuse you. This post doesn’t delve into the technical aspects of how we actually built Robot Ninja. Rather, it explores the process and methodology we used to help us come up with a new product. Robot Ninja, if you haven’t come across it already, offers automated checkout testing for WooCommerce stores.
If there is one thing to take away from the process, it’s that from the outset we focussed on identifying problems. We didn’t go straight to working on a solution.
Building Robot Ninja: We Didn’t Reinvent the Wheel
We used concepts, processes and methodology from two best-selling books:
Blue Ocean Strategy by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne
I highly recommend checking them out.
Building a New Product: The Key Steps
Based on our understanding of the concepts presented in the above books, this is the process we followed:
Determining our goals
Determining our target customer
Conducted market analysis and research
Identified underserved customer needs
Defined our value proposition
Specified our MVP feature set
Created an MVP prototype
Tested MVP with customers
This first post in our 3-part series will cover how we worked out

5 min read Aline
Development | wptavern.com | 19 days ago

Gutenberg 1.6 Improves Writing Experience, Moves Block Toolbar to the Top of the Editor

Post on WP Tavern that covers the improvements in the latest version of Gutenberg. It's great to see that the toolbar has been moved to the top so that it's move obvious for users that are used to the current editor in WordPress.

Gutenberg 1.6 Improves Writing Experience, Moves Block Toolbar to the Top of the Editor

Development | wptavern.com | 19 days ago

The Gutenberg plugin’s Halloween release (version 1.6) includes major updates to the writing experience and many performance improvements. The block toolbar has been relocated to the top of the editor, a suggestion that was mocked up and described in detail in a post on the Yoast SEO blog proposing an alternative approach for Gutenberg. Prior to version 1.6, users could inadvertantly end up in a situation like the screenshot below – with tools and toggles popping into view from all sides of a block.
Previously, any small mouse move would pull the block toolbar back into view, which made for a somewhat jarring writing experience. Gutenberg 1.6 makes the block toolbar completely independent of the content by fixing it to the top of the editor. This move reduces the amount of visual distraction in the writing zone, while keeping the toolbar accessible in a way that is familiar to users coming from the Classic Editor.
The toolbar will automatically adjust to display tools specific to the block type that is in focus, so that users don’t have to sift through other tools that are not applicable to that specific type of content. It does not show if no blocks are selected.

5 min read David Bisset

Sneak Peek: Lumin - The Events Calendar

Modern Tribe steps into the world of CaaS - Calendar as a Service. Not dropping their WordPress plugins though, at least not yet.

Sneak Peek: Lumin - The Events Calendar

We’re adding a new member to our family of calendar and event management tools and want you to meet it. For nearly eight years now, our team here at Modern Tribe has been delivering top-notch event management products to WordPress users the world over. And we couldn’t be more thrilled at the support we’ve received. Our flagship calendar product, The Events Calendar, enjoys an active install base of over 500,000 sites, with more than 8 million total downloads on WordPress.org. Users of The Events Calendar are in good company, too–our software is trusted by such established names as Microsoft, Steelcase, and Stanford Law School, so you know it’s dependable enough to be relied on.
We’re fortunate to be recognized as a leader in the event management space, and we regularly field inquiries from users of non-WordPress-based platforms who are interested in working with our plugins. As a WordPress-driven company first and foremost, we’ve crafted all of our existing plugin offerings with the WordPress platform in mind. Our newest product is our first step towards bridging the divide–a WordPress-powered, platform-agnostic solution that’s as

Development | m.youtube.com | 28 days ago

WordPress as a progressive web app

Great talk explaining for many still uncharted territory of pwa

3 min read David Bisset
Development | wordpress.org | 22 days ago

WordPress 4.9 Release Candidate

RC - it's almost done. If you haven't tested, now's the time to jump in. WordPress 4.9 scheduled to be launched on Tuesday, November 14.

WordPress 4.9 Release Candidate

Development | wordpress.org | 22 days ago

The release candidate for WordPress 4.9 is now available. RC means we think we’re done, but with millions of users and thousands of plugins and themes, it’s possible we’ve missed something. We hope to ship WordPress 4.9 on Tuesday, November 14, but we need your help to get there. If you haven’t tested 4.9 yet, now is the time!
To test WordPress 4.9, you can use the WordPress Beta Tester plugin or you can download the release candidate here (zip).
We’ve made almost 30 changes since releasing Beta 4 last week. For more details about what’s new in version 4.9, check out the Beta 1, Beta 2, Beta 3, and Beta 4 blog posts.
Developers, please test your plugins and themes against WordPress 4.9 and update your plugin’s Tested up to version in the readme to 4.9. If you find compatibility problems please be sure to post to the support forums so we can figure those out before the final release — we work hard to avoid breaking things. An in-depth field guide to developer-focused changes is coming soon on the core development blog. In the meantime, you can review the developer notes for 4.9.
Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate

2 min read David Bisset
Development | applyfilters.fm | Oct. 10, 2017

Last Episode of Apply Filters

If you're a developer - regardless if you are a podcast person or not, I would still add this to your list of things to check out. Thanks to Pippin and Brad for 83 great episodes on WordPress developer topics.

Last Episode of Apply Filters

Development | applyfilters.fm | Oct. 10, 2017

This is the last episode before we retire the podcast. Many people have enjoyed the podcast and we’ve had a lot of great feedback and a lot of fun, so we’ve been asked why we’re retiring. Ultimately, we just needed to make a change and it’s time to move on. Be sure to listen to hear about how things have changed over the past couple of years and why those changes have led to us retiring the show. For our last episode, we’ve decided to answer some of our listeners’ questions. Some of the highlights of the show include:
Regrets that Brad and Pippin have had regarding not building a plugin they’ve had an idea for.
Why it’s important for companies to start new projects frequently.
Advice Brad and Pippin wish they could give their younger selves when it comes to development, projects, and processes.
Some thoughts on pricing: How data, psychology, and strategy play into it.
Takeaways Brad and Pippin have learned that have come about by sharing business ideas with others.
Thoughts on hiring developers and setting salaries.
Links and Resources:

1 min read Puneet Sahalot
Development | localsync.io | Oct. 21, 2017

Sync DB and files for your WordPress sites with FTP / SFTP

Local Sync is a new development tool that lets you sync DB & Files for your Local & Remote WordPress sites.

Sync DB and files for your WordPress sites with FTP / SFTP

Development | localsync.io | Oct. 21, 2017

Supports Works great with
Works with
Who are we?
Which is used by 600,000+ WordPress sites. We love WordPress and we work hard for you to save
time with your workflow.
Is it FREE?
Yes, we love freemium. That is the only way to take our products to every users. We will have Pull and Push free for life with unlimited sites. And these pro features will be paid. It will help us to maintain and build cool features.
• Pull and Push changes from local to server and from server to local

6 min read David Bisset
Development | choycedesign.com | 25 days ago

What’s Coming in WordPress 4.9

Straight from Mel Choyce, co-leading the release of WordPress 4.9. Some details that haven't been highlighted in previous 4.9 summaries.

What’s Coming in WordPress 4.9

Development | choycedesign.com | 25 days ago

As y’all might remember, I’m currently co-leading the release of WordPress 4.9. Since we’re winding down toward release, I wanted to take the opportunity to walk through some of the key features of the release. Drafting and scheduling changes in the Customizer
In WordPress 4.9, you’ll be able to draft your customizations before publishing them, or schedule them to go live in the future.
Imagine you’ve just started a new site — you have an introduction post up, but otherwise you’re still working on finishing up the design of your site. Now you can draft your changes and come back to them later, so when you are ready to go live, your site looks perfect.
Another scenario: let’s say your store is having a holiday sale. Rather than staying up until midnight to add a banner about the sale to your homepage, now you can add that new section to your homepage and schedule it to go live later. Once the sale is live, you can hop back in and schedule it’s removal after the holidays. Much less of a hassle!
Additionally, these new features includes a quick way to share a link to preview your changes on the front-end that anyone can view, not just

15 min read David Bisset
Development | matiasventura.com | Oct. 9, 2017

Gutenberg, or the Ship of Theseus

Matias Ventura is the lead of the editor focus for WordPress and talks about how Gutenberg's approach will simplify many of the most complex parts of WordPress, building pages, and theme editing.

Gutenberg, or the Ship of Theseus

Development | matiasventura.com | Oct. 9, 2017

How can a system fundamentally evolve without drastically changing? WordPress can build incredible sites, yet the usability and clarity that used to be a driving force for its adoption has been fading away. The present reality is that many people struggle using WordPress as a tool for expression—they struggle to compose richer posts with media, to get their site looking the way they want, to imitate how a theme demo looks, or to set up and customize a store. There is a disconnect between what is edited in a given field somewhere in the interface with how it will look on the real site. WordPress has always been about the user experience, and that needs to continue to evolve under newer demands. Gutenberg is an attempt at fundamentally addressing those needs, based on the idea of content blocks. It’s an attempt to improve how users interact with their content in a fundamentally visual way, while at the same time giving developers the tools to create more fulfilling experiences for the people they are helping. How can such a vision happen without dismantling, rebuilding, fragmenting, or breaking the WordPress ship that for over a decade has been carrying the thoughts, joys,