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Development | comingsoonwp.com | 22 hours ago

Responsive Web Design: All You Need to Know About Flexbox & CSS Grid

This is why CSS Grid & Flexbox are powerful platforms and why they're very much recommended by experts

Responsive Web Design: All You Need to Know About Flexbox & CSS Grid

Development | comingsoonwp.com | 22 hours ago

Flexbox and CSS Grid have both provided web property developers with more convenient ways to do website design from scratch. The amount of control that they give to developers, particularly when customizing and styling complex web pages, is unprecedented and instrumental. More importantly, both these platforms are vital for ensuring that your website would always be able to adhere to responsive design guidelines. Often, comparisons are made between CSS Grid and Flexbox. While there are noticeable differences, what’s sure is that both are reliable and actually work extremely well if used together.
Advantages of Flexbox & CSS Grid
Avoids dependence on third-party libraries
CSS Grid and Flexbox were invented and developed to overcome a major hurdle prevalent in standard CSS layout system: the overreliance on third-party libraries. These libraries were often used to make up for the features that web developers have found to be lacking in the system. These third-party libraries were usually utilized to perform steps that are practically no longer needed to be done thanks to CSS Grid and Flexbox.
CSS Grid, after all, has its own grid layout system, which basically makes it easier

8 min read WebDevStudios
Development | webdevstudios.com | 19 days ago

Leaving Homestead: Finding the Best All-Around Local Development Environment

This Senior Frontend Engineer is leaving Homestead and takes the reader on a journey to discovering the best all-around local development environment.

Leaving Homestead: Finding the Best All-Around Local Development Environment

Development | webdevstudios.com | 19 days ago

Back in 2016, I wrote a blog post about using Laravel Homestead as my local environment. At the time, my only real options were Vagrant or MAMP as an Apple user. Since then, the number of options has increased slightly to include Local by Flywheel, a more significant push to using your computer, and a set of packages like nginx and dsnmasq to run a local environment from a directory on the fly. At the time, Homestead was my local development environment of choice because it was easy to install, quickly configurable, and lightweight—something I appreciated using an older MacBook Air as my daily driver at the time. However, the more robust my sites became, and the more websites I collected on my local, the slower Homestead appeared to run almost certainly because it relies on VirtualBox or a virtual system to run your instance, which caused me to look elsewhere. I avoided MAMP or Vagrant and similar software because they were too resource heavy for my late 2011 setup for many of the same reasons.
Alternative Options
Flywheel offers a solution (at the time called Pressmatic; Flywheel acquired the company in late 2016), which provides individually configurable docker instances in

11 min read Sallie Goetsch

Getting Started Contributing Code to WordPress Gutenberg in Laragon

For those Windows users who use Laragon for their local dev environment (as I do), this article provides detailed instructions on how to set up a Gutenberg development and testing environment.

Getting Started Contributing Code to WordPress Gutenberg in Laragon

This post documents how I setup WordPress Gutenberg for local development on Windows 7, using Laragon instead of Docker, and made my first pull request to the project. Most folks wanting to test and modify WordPress’ Gutenberg use Docker to manage their environment. That’s great because it’s especially consistent. But I’ve been happy using Laragon and wanted to attempt to avoid setting up yet another dev environment.
My Environment
I use Laragon, which runs great on Windows without needing a virtual machine (similar to XAMPP or WAMP). It comes with PHP, Apache and Nginx, Node, NPM, Git, and basically everything you need to run Gutenberg.
Setting Up a Local Test Site and Gutenberg Repo
I forked the Gutenberg GitHub repository.
I created a new local WordPress site using Laragon’s Quick App feature.
Then, in the new site’s wp-content/plugins/ folder, I opened Laragon’s Terminal and ran git checkout git@github.com:mnelson4/gutenberg.git to checkout my fork of Gutenberg
I needed to change the Node version, as the version that came with Laragon was too old. Although Laragon doesn’t come with NVM, there’s a good tutorial showing how to

7 min read Donna Cavalier
Development | mor10.com | Aug. 29, 2018

Gutenberg, Forks, and the need for an LTS version of WordPress

This... this is absolutely the right solution. Hope it happens.

Gutenberg, Forks, and the need for an LTS version of WordPress

Development | mor10.com | Aug. 29, 2018

Over the past week, developments which I predicted back in December last year have come to fore, and I am deeply concerned about the effects they will have on WordPress (the application) and the community unless we take decisive action. Short version: For various reasons, many WordPress users will be faced with a complex dilemma when 5.0 and Gutenberg comes out:
a) Get the latest version of WordPress and risk compatibility issues / costly retraining, redesign, or entire rebuilds, and/or other problems, or b) choose not to upgrade and end up running an old and eventually insecure version of the content management system.
So far, the response from WordPress leadership has been to install the “Classic Editor” plugin which as the name suggests reintroduces the classic WYSIWYG editor once the Gutenberg Block Editor becomes the default. This is, in my opinion, a dangerous road to go down both for the end-user and WordPress itself.
Classic Editor as a permanent solution won’t work
Classic Editor is a bit like using a band-aid to plug a hole in a ballon as you are inflating it. It may work right now, but as the balloon continues to grow, the band-aid not only won’t do

Development | wpreset.com | 7 days ago

How to Force Reload any Cached CSS File (Local, Remote, or on a CDN)

Can not get a CSS file to reload? Are you continuously getting a cached version? Here’s a simple trick to get around even the most stubborn caches.

How to Force Reload any Cached CSS File (Local, Remote, or on a CDN)

Development | wpreset.com | 7 days ago

There’s nothing more frustrating than a machine that refuses to do what you tell it. “Reload the page” – a simple action, that causes so much frustration for developers because it sometimes just doesn’t work. CSS files often don’t get reloaded. Yes, we all know cache is to blame but how to get around it without drastic measures? Years of frustration have led me to this simple one-click solution that works on any page and with any cache type. What causes the problem?
Cache is a wonderful thing. It lowers resource usage on all levels and enables us to surf faster. Problems occur when we want to get around the cache and grab a fresh copy of the file. There are an unlimited number of reasons why cache won’t purge, but they all fall into two categories;
1. The browser doesn’t want to request the new file
Anything browser related is a local problem. The browser has a copy of the file in its cache and continuously serves it to you. It doesn’t want to request a new file from the server. Problematic files are usually CSS, JS, and images, but it’s not limited to any specific file-type as everything depends on the headers which control

19 min read Brian Jackson
Development | kinsta.com | Aug. 29, 2018

What’s New in PHP 7.3 (Coming Soon)

PHP 7.3 is knocking on our door and with it comes new useful features, functionalities, deprecations, and a good number of bug fixes. This release is definitely all about developers!

What’s New in PHP 7.3 (Coming Soon)

Development | kinsta.com | Aug. 29, 2018

PHP 7.3 is knocking on our door and with it comes new useful features, functionalities, deprecations, and a good number of bug fixes. This release is all about web developers. The current Beta 2 version was released on August 16, coming perfectly on time with the PHP 7.3 timetable. You can download the current PHP 7.3 version for your development and testing, but keep in mind that, this shouldn’t currently be used in production environments.
In this post, we’ll provide an overview of the features and changes that we personally consider most relevant. But you can always check the full list of features, changes and bug fixes in PHP 7.3 upgrade notes and PHP 7.3 Requests For Comments.
What’s new in PHP with PHP 7.3?
In this post we’re covering the following PHP 7.3 changes:
Flexible Heredoc and Nowdoc Syntaxes
This is probably one of the most relevant improvements coming with PHP 7.3, and we think it deserves a little more attention. So, before diving into PHP 7.3 heredoc/nowdoc changes, we’ll provide a quick overview of this useful core feature. If you are already confident with nowdoc and heredoc, feel free to jump to the PHP 7.3 changes.
An overview of

1 min read Boba
Development | codismo.com | Sep. 11, 2018

Common Reasons For Theme/Plugin Conflicts in WordPress

Going over the common reasons for plugin/theme conflicts I've ran into too many times.

Common Reasons For Theme/Plugin Conflicts in WordPress

Development | codismo.com | Sep. 11, 2018

Going over the most common reasons for theme/plugin conflicts in WordPress and how to avoid them in your theme or plugin. In this tutorial we’ll cover how to restrict viewing comments and submitting comments based on whether the visitor is a customer.
In this tutorial we’ll cover how to enable comments functionality for EDD downloads and how to add “purchased” and “author” badges to the comments.

3 min read Sallie Goetsch
Development | tommcfarlin.com | Jun. 30, 2018

The Demand for Gutenberg Is Not There. Yet.

TL;DR: Tom McFarlin isn't planning to update any of his own plugins for Gutenberg compatibility until Gutenberg is in core and clients / end users are asking for it. But that's not because Gutenberg isn't necessary, only because clients can't ask for something they don't know exists.

The Demand for Gutenberg Is Not There. Yet.

Development | tommcfarlin.com | Jun. 30, 2018

I’ve been asked, on a few occasions, why I’ve not released anything that’s compatible with Gutenberg or why certain plugins aren’t compatible with the current version of the Gutenberg plugin. In the WordPress economy, I’ve seen few things as divisive as this shift in WordPress (though it seems to be finally have chilled a bit). And I’m not interested in entertaining a position on it on this blog.
But when others ask why I’ve not bothered to write anything about it or make certain plugins compatible with it, I find that it’s worth talking about it at least to a certain degree.
Demand for Gutenberg Is Not There
As far as building solutions for others are concerned, there’s yet to be demand for Gutenberg compatibility at all. This doesn’t mean that people don’t see it on the horizon nor that they don’t see the need to prepare for it.
But customers who pay WordPress developers, designers, and other experts in our field aren’t using it right now, so the demand for building something on Gutenberg is not there.
Another way of looking at is that there’s interest and potentially even a demand for it for those

2 min read JS Morisset
Development | surniaulula.com | 19 days ago

WPBakery (Visual Composer) Bug in Change Handler

A bug in the WPBakery page builder change handler code goes unfixed.

WPBakery (Visual Composer) Bug in Change Handler

Development | surniaulula.com | 19 days ago

The WPBakery (Visual Composer) changeHandler function uses the “vc.accordion” data attribute without first checking for it’s existence. Any plugin or theme using a jQuery show / hide event trigger (for example) will trip this bug and the post editing page will fail to load properly. I’ve posted the bug report to the Visual Composer channel on Slack, but the channel does not seem to be read by WPBakery employees, so this bug may go unfixed. The unminified WPBakery code looks like this. Note that data("vc.accordion") is being used here without first checking if the attribute exists or not.
1234567891011121314
changeHandler = function(e) {var caller;void 0 === (caller = $(e.target).data("vc.accordion")).getRelatedTab && (caller.getRelatedTab = function() {var findTargets;return findTargets = function() {return caller.getContainer().find("[data-vc-tabs]").filter(function() {var $this;return void 0 === ($this = $(this)).data("vc.accordion") && $this.vcAccordion(), $this.data("vc.accordion").getSelector() === caller.getSelector()})}, caller.isCacheUsed() ? (void 0 === caller.relatedTab && (caller.relatedTab

10 min read Web News Insider
Development | wpreset.com | Sep. 11, 2018

Use GeoIP to Transform Boring Data Into a Better User Experience

Without hiring a designer, you can make your web app look 10 times more interesting just by using GeoIP and WhichBrowser to add more human-friendly and useful data to them.

Use GeoIP to Transform Boring Data Into a Better User Experience

Development | wpreset.com | Sep. 11, 2018

People are visual creatures. They like to see pretty things (that go beyond cat videos). I’m not saying this likely or because I enjoy it! It’s a hard, cold fact. Couple it with an ever decreasing attention span and rest assured your application is judged by appearance (in the first 3 seconds) rather than by features or quality. If you’re a developer that can’t afford to pay for a custom GUI design for an app, this is especially devastating. No matter how good, fast or innovative your app is if it looks like it was “designed by a developer” people won’t even give it a chance. Thankfully there are ways around this problem. Using a tried and tested open-source admin template is undoubtedly a good start. Another less-known trick is to turn dull data such as IP addresses and browser user-agent identifier into much more interesting data that can not only provide more information to the user but make it fun and good-looking as well. Best thing is – it’s a free and straightforward feature to add to any app.
The standard, boring & ugly way
Instead of wasting time on theory and made up situations we’ll dive into a scenario familiar

7 min read robert Abela
Development | wplift.com | Aug. 10, 2018

Install WordPress Locally: 5 Easy Tools For Local WordPress Development

A good list of tools developers (and WordPress admins) can use to host a local copy of a WordPress website with links to tutorials on how to set these tools up. The list includes the typical WAMP, XAMP etc, Local, DesktopServer and also Docker!

Install WordPress Locally: 5 Easy Tools For Local WordPress Development

Development | wplift.com | Aug. 10, 2018

Looking for a solution to install WordPress locally? While there are some pros and cons to working on a local WordPress install, I love this approach because:
It’s just plain faster because you don’t have to wait on your network connection.
You can work offline, which is great if you like to develop WordPress sites on-the-go (or live in a developing country with poor Internet, like I do).
It’s private by default. While it’s certainly possible to make a live development site private, it adds extra steps to the process.
If you’re looking for a way to install WordPress locally, you probably don’t need any more convincing on the benefits of this approach.
As someone whose job is to test hundreds of different WordPress themes and plugins, I’ve become well-acquainted with all the different methods available to install WordPress locally. And in this post, I’m going to share them with you, as well as link out to detailed instructions to help you get setup with whichever method(s) piques your interest.
5 Different Ways You Can Install WordPress Locally
Below, I’ll go through all the popular methods that you can use to install WordPress locally

17 min read Sallie Goetsch

Are Mobile Pop-Ups Dying? Are They Even Worth Saving?

Personally, I'd be happy to see all pop-ups go away, but this is an interesting review of the evolution of pop-ups and some ways to make them work (or replace them) on mobile, while still following Google's guidelines.

Are Mobile Pop-Ups Dying? Are They Even Worth Saving?

Smashing Newsletter With useful tips for web devs. Sent 2× a month.
You can unsubscribe any time — obviously.
Are mobile pop-ups dying, or will they simply undergo another adaptation? If they continue to remain effective, how should designers make use of them, especially in mobile web design? Are there alternatives? Let’s see what the research says.
The pop-up has an interesting (and somewhat risqué) origin. Were you aware of this? The creator of the original pop-up ad, Ethan Zuckerman, explained how it came into being:
Specifically, we came up with it when a major car company freaked out that they’d bought a banner ad on a page that celebrated anal intercourse. I wrote the code to launch the window and run an ad in it. I’m sorry. Our intentions were good.
Basically, the client was dissatisfied with having their ad placed beside an article discussing this less-than-savory subject. Rather than lose the ad revenue or, worse, the client, Zuckerman and his team came up with a solution: The car company’s ad would still run on the website, but this time would pop out into a new window. Thus, the pop-up gave the advertiser an opportunity to share

Automatic WordPress Git Deployment with Kernl

According to the most recent Stack Overflow developers survey, more than 85% of developers are using Git. While Kernl was originally being developed this was something I kept at the top of my mind.

Automatic WordPress Git Deployment with Kernl

According to the most recent Stack Overflow developers survey, over 85% of developers are using Git. While Kernl was originally being developed this was something I kept at the top of my mind. I also didn’t want them to install an extra plugin to do so because I wanted the experience for my customers to be seamless as possible. This is how Kernl’s automatic WordPress Git deployment was born!
Why Should I Use Automatic WordPress Git Deployments?
There are a few great reasons to use automatic Git deployments with your premium WordPress plugins/themes.
Productivity – You no longer have to waste time creating a zip file from your plugin/theme, uploading the zip to Kernl, creating your change log, etc. Kernl can automatically do all of this for you.
Everyone can deploy – If the developer has access to Git, they can trigger a deploy by bumping the kernl.version file. The best part is they don’t need to know the gritty details of deployment because Kernl handles those for them.
Reliability – No need to worry if you zipped the plugin/theme correctly, removed files that you don’t want to be distributed, or named things correctly. Kernl will handle all

13 min read WebDevStudios
Development | webdevstudios.com | Jul. 12, 2018

A Guide to Building a Learning Management System with WordPress

In very simple terms, a Learning Management System (LMS) is a website that hosts eLearning programs and provides students and/or employees a way to participate in online training. In this guide to building an LMS with WordPress, learn about common features that you should consider when developing your LMS, as well as plugins to help.

A Guide to Building a Learning Management System with WordPress

Development | webdevstudios.com | Jul. 12, 2018

In very simple terms, a Learning Management System (LMS) is a website that hosts eLearning programs and provides students and/or employees a way to participate in online training. Implementing an LMS with WordPress is something we have done for several clients here at WebDevStudios (WDS). For example, we implemented an LMS for Starbucks for their employee intranet. The corporation needed a platform they could use to train Baristas worldwide on the different drink recipes from their menu, as well as the equipment used to create those yummy treats! In this guide to building a Learning Management System with WordPress, I’ll take you though a plethora of common features that you should consider when developing your LMS, as well as plugins to help. Because WDS built a custom solution that uses WordPress, BuddyPress, BadgeOS and LearnDash, Starbucks’ employee intranet allows Baristas to log in, take quizzes based on training videos they’ve watched, and receive participation badges based on their training progress and quiz scores.
Common LMS Features
An LMS has several different features for online training. When the time comes for you to consider building a Learning Management

12 min read John Locke
Development | blog.bigboxwc.com | Jun. 20, 2018

The State of Gutenberg and WordPress Themes

Intriguing discussion on what Gutenberg will mean for theme development, and have we been here before?

The State of Gutenberg and WordPress Themes

Development | blog.bigboxwc.com | Jun. 20, 2018

…or “A Realistic Look at Using 3rd Party Gutenberg Blocks in Your Theme”
…or
“Keep Your Plugin Blocks Out of My Theme”
…or
“Shortcodes All Over Again”
…or
“The Never Ending Battle to Style a Button Consistently”
…or
“We Still Have a Long Way to Go”
I would like to preface this article by saying that these thoughts and opinions are in no way meant to diminish the amazing work that the Gutenberg team has done (and continues to do). I love writing in Gutenberg. I follow the GitHub repository closely, often reading 100+ notifications each day. I have been testing since early versions. I have left feedback. Things have gotten much better. However this article is meant to take a realistic and somewhat critical look at how Gutenberg is being presented on a grander scale vs. some of the realities that come in to play when implementing these ideas.
What You See is (Maybe) What You Get
WYSIWYG is everyone’s white whale but Gutenberg takes a huge step in the right direction towards helping publishers have a better idea of what their content will look like as they are writing. The previous (technically

Development | wpreset.com | Aug. 16, 2018

How to Add WP-CLI Support to Any WordPress Plugin

By adding WP-CLI support to your WordPress plugin you'll open it up to developers, power-users, and admins.

How to Add WP-CLI Support to Any WordPress Plugin

Development | wpreset.com | Aug. 16, 2018

Adjusting a plugin, to user’s needs is one of the main agendas every plugin owner has to follow. For a front-page slider that means more color-pickers, fonts and similar visual options. However, if you’re catering to developers, admins, and other power-users sooner or later, they’ll want CLI support. They’ll want to ditch the mouse and work only with the keyboard. Thanks to the WP-CLI project adding CLI support to your plugin is a piece of cake. The eternal GUI vs CLI battle
Let’s get something out of the way: GUI (Graphical User Interface) is not better than CLI (Command Line Interface) and vice-versa: CLI is not better than GUI. People prefer one over the other. It’s a matter of personal preference or habit. “Are they the same, are they interchangeable?” With some compromises, yes they can be but, nobody likes to pick colors in a black&white command line interface. That’s simply counterproductive. They each serve a specialized purpose.
“So why do we need both? Isn’t WP more GUI oriented?” It is, WP is more GUI oriented. But not for all users. Some people use WP in a way that’s more suited for CLI, and

2 min read Sallie Goetsch
Development | noti.st | Jul. 30, 2018

Graduating to Grid

Rachel Andrews' presentation about CSS Grid from An Event Apart. Includes slides, code samples, and links to references.

Graduating to Grid

Development | noti.st | Jul. 30, 2018

@rachelandrew Percentages • Ugly • Easy to understand • If they total more than 100% bad things happen. • Can be converted from an ideal pixel size using a straightforward calculation. And percentages, while they look horrible in our CSS, and aren’t exactly fun to calculate are understandable. We can work out what percentage value we need to pop in, based on an ideal pixel size using the method Ethan Marcotte taught us in his seminal piece on responsive design. We understand that if we have more than 100% bad things will happen to our layout.
By doing the work to figure this stuff out, either with a calculator on our desk or allowing some tool or framework to have figured it out for us, we are in control.
One of the nice features of new layout, of flexbox and grid is that they can take away a lot of the pain of calculating this stuff, but in doing so we start to run into the under the hood sizing constructs that they are built upon, and they seem confusing when compared to good old percentages, and the temptation is to return to our familiar methods.

Development | wpreset.com | Sep. 4, 2018

Clean up WordPress Theme HEAD Section and Unneeded JS & CSS Files

WordPress is a great platform to build SaaS sites. But before you do that it requires a bit of cleaning.

Clean up WordPress Theme HEAD Section and Unneeded JS & CSS Files

Development | wpreset.com | Sep. 4, 2018

WordPress core ads quite a lot of code in site’s HTML head section whether you want it or not. That code is far from useless and serves a purpose on most sites. However, if you are a clean-code freak or using WordPress to power a SaaS you’ll want to clean up the HTML. As with most things in WP, it’s just a matter of removing a few actions and filters. Why would I remove those tags in HEAD, CSS or JS files?
There are a couple of reasons. Some people like to keep their code and sites as tidy as possible. Why have a line of code in HTML if you know you don’t need it and know how to remove it. No reason what so ever. Same goes for extra CSS and JS files. If you’re not using emojis on your site why would you include that JS on every page?
Then there’s security. There are a few pieces of HTML that WordPress automatically adds do show URLs that have been exploited in the past. I have to stress out that these URLs (XML RPC endpoint in particular) are not a secret. They should be public. But, changing them to something custom, and hiding them is a known practice. In that case, it’s obvious you don’t want those URLs in your HTML.
Speed is also a

6 min read Igor Benić
Development | ibenic.com | 20 days ago

How to Import Large Databases in Local by Flywheel Sites

A quick tutorial to show the workflow of importing large databases into Local by Flywheel.

How to Import Large Databases in Local by Flywheel Sites

Development | ibenic.com | 20 days ago

Working with clients with WordPress sites can be difficult when you have to migrate their site locally so you can develop on it. If you’re using Local by Flywheel the site is hosted on Flywheel, you will have no problem. If their site is not a big one, you’ll also have no problem using some of the existing solutions such as WP Migrate DB Pro and alike. But what if your site has large databases (read tens of GB), what to do then? In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to migrate such large databases in Local by Flywheel through SSH.
If you don’t have Local By Flywheel, please go download it and install it so you could follow this guide. Also, create a site using it. I mostly use the custom environment. This tutorial will also assume that you have commands such as ssh, tar, scp and gunzip installed on your environment. If not, you can still follow most of it (ignore the downloading part).
1. Get the Database
This is an obvious step, right? You will need to get the database. When we’re working with such large databases, you will probably get them gzipped. If not, your database will be either in .sql or in .zip.
Some hosting providers will have an option to export

2 min read Sallie Goetsch
Development | youtube.com | Jul. 18, 2018

9 Biggest Mistakes with CSS Grid

My favorite quote from this is "You don't need a framework. You're developers. You, yourself can write this code. You just need to spend a little bit of time learning Grid and mastering Grid and getting to know what Grid wants to do. Please let's not create new frameworks." (I admit I'm a little biased against CSS frameworks.)

9 Biggest Mistakes with CSS Grid

Development | youtube.com | Jul. 18, 2018

It's easy to make lots of mistakes with a new technology, especially something that's as big of a change from the past as CSS Grid. Jen lists the 9 Biggest Mistakes she sees people making when using CSS Grid, with advice and tips for avoiding these pitfalls and old habits. Mistake 1: Thinking CSS Grid is Everything
“Flexbox vs. CSS Grid — Which is Better?”: https://youtu.be/hs3piaN4b5I
“Using Flexbox & Grid Together”: https://youtu.be/dQHtT47eH0M
“Obliterate Boxiness with CSS Shapes”: https://youtu.be/pOB75oTNhw0
Mistake 2: Using Only Percents for Sizing
“Min & Max Content Sizing in CSS Grid”: https://youtu.be/lZ2JX_6SGNI
“FR Units in CSS Grid“: https://youtu.be/ZPtpzuRajzM
“MinMax in CSS Grid”: https://youtu.be/mVQiNpqXov8
Mistake 3 : Assuming You Need Breakpoints
“Incredibly Easy Layouts with CSS Grid”: https://youtu.be/tFKrK4eAiUQ
Mistake 4: Getting Confused by Numbering
“Innovative & Practical Graphic Design with CSS Grid”: https://youtu.be/-hmOZU7Zk10
“Basics of CSS Grid: The Big Picture”: https://youtu.be/FEnRpy9Xfes
Mistake 5: Always Using 12-columns
Jen

Development | wpreset.com | Aug. 27, 2018

localStorage vs sessionStorage vs Cookies - a Detailed Comparison

Learn the difference between cookies, localStorage, and sessionStorage. In many situations, they are interchangeable but far from being the same.

localStorage vs sessionStorage vs Cookies - a Detailed Comparison

Development | wpreset.com | Aug. 27, 2018

Cookies have been with us for a long time (Internet Explorer v2 had support for them in October 1995). There’s nothing wrong with them, and they certainly made the web a more pleasant place, but after nearly 25 years a lot has changed. Local Storage (you’ll find it under Web Storage on W3) is and isn’t a replacement for cookies. That’s what’s most confusing about it. In most cases, you can safely use localStorage instead of cookies and get the (wrong) impression that they are the same, while they are not. Read on to see a no-nonsense breakdown of how and when to use localStorage to replace cookies.
Revolution or evolution?
Local storage, or localStorage, or DOM storage or web storage (I’m not making these names up; all of them are in use, and all reference the same thing) got real-world adoption among popular browsers in 2012 as an “HTML5 feature”. It seemed like a godsend replacement for cookies. A fix for bloated requests carrying unneeded data all the time and size limitations. While it does “solve” those problems, it’s not an apples-for-apples replacement for cookies.
As the name implies, the data is stored locally,

9 min read Puneet Sahalot
Development | deliciousbrains.com | Jul. 31, 2018

Hosting WordPress Yourself: Ongoing WordPress Server Optimization & Maintenance

Excellent post about setting up, optimizing and maintaining a server for WordPress sites.

Hosting WordPress Yourself: Ongoing WordPress Server Optimization & Maintenance

Development | deliciousbrains.com | Jul. 31, 2018

This is article 11 of 11 in the series “Hosting WordPress Yourself” Hosting WordPress Yourself: Ongoing WordPress Server Optimization & Maintenance
So you’ve followed our in-depth guide and built yourself a shiny new server that’s secure and tuned for optimal WordPress performance, but what’s next? In this installment of Hosting WordPress Yourself, I’m going to outline a few tasks that should be carried out on a regular basis to ensure that your server continues to run securely and perform well. We’ll look at performing software updates, upgrading PHP, and a few “gotchas” to watch out for that we may have experienced ourselves. Let’s dive straight in!
Keep Plugins and Themes Updated
Let’s start with an easy one that isn’t just applicable to self-hosted WordPress installs. WordPress itself, WordPress themes, and all plugins should be regularly updated. No software is immune to vulnerabilities and updating often will ensure those inevitable vulnerabilities are patched.
While you’re at it, make sure you delete obsolete themes and plugins. There’s no reason to keep them around, other than to provide

Development | wpreset.com | Jul. 16, 2018

How to Customize the wpdb Class by Adding and Modifying Methods & Functions

The WordPress database abstraction layer (wpdb) is class responsible for interacting with the database. But it can always be improved - this article shows you how to expand the functions and make the class even better.

How to Customize the wpdb Class by Adding and Modifying Methods & Functions

Development | wpreset.com | Jul. 16, 2018

The WordPress database abstraction layer, more commonly know as wpdb is a class based on ezSQL responsible for interacting with the database. The wpdb class is also a drop-in – a piece of core WP code that can easily be replaced by another piece of code with similar functionality (an up-to-date list of drop-ins is available in WP Code Reference). This is where a big misconception comes into play. People perceive “replaced” as in “write my own, complete database class”. Fortunately, you don’t have to write the whole database class. You can take the existing class and add, remove or modify only the functions you need. And that’s what we’re going to do.
Why modify the wpdb class?
Surely, wpdb has everything you need!? The whole WP is built on top of it. Technically that’s correct. By using the $wpdb->query() method you can execute any SQL command. But with that logic applied we would never have or need methods like $wpdb->insert() or $wpdb->get_var(). But we do, because they save time, reduce bugs and keep bad queries away. So, what functions are missing? That depends on the project you’re working on. We needed support

2 min read Donna Cavalier
Development | make.wordpress.org | May. 23, 2018

WordPress 5.0 Development Cycle - When Gutenberg Will Appear...

Ok, we don't have an exact date, but at least we know it won't be until after...

WordPress 5.0 Development Cycle - When Gutenberg Will Appear...

Development | make.wordpress.org | May. 23, 2018

Goals (To be posted) | Dev Chat Agendas | Dev Chat Summaries | Dev Notes | Field Guide (To be posted) | All Posts Tagged 5.0 WordPress 5.0 will be the first “major” release of 2018, including the new editor, codenamed “Gutenberg”.
Release Schedule
November 15, 2017
Trunk is open for business. (Post-4.9)
TBD
5.0 Kickoff meeting.
TBD
Last chance to merge feature projects.
TBD
Beta 1 and feature project merge deadline.
From this point on, no more commits for any new enhancements or feature requests in this release cycle, only bug fixes and inline documentation. Work can continue on enhancements/feature requests not completed and committed by this point, and can be picked up for commit again at the start of WordPress 5.1.
TBD
Beta 2.
TBD
Beta 3.
TBD
Beta 4.
TBD
Release candidate and soft string freeze.
TBD
Final release candidate if needed and hard string freeze.
TBD
Dry run for release of WordPress 5.0 and 24 hour code freeze.
TBD
Target date for release of WordPress 5.0.
Contributing
To get involved in WordPress core development, head on over to Trac and pick a 5.0 ticket. Need help? Check out the Core Contributor Handbook. Get your patches done and submitted as