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7 min read WebDevStudios
Development | webdevstudios.com | 17 hours ago

3 Design Tips for Call-to-Action Buttons

WebDevStudios Creative Lead, Cameron Campbell, shares three hot design tips for call-to-action buttons. Use his guidance to improve the conversion rates of your CTA buttons.

3 Design Tips for Call-to-Action Buttons

Development | webdevstudios.com | 17 hours ago

Let’s start by briefly defining what a call to action is. A call to action, commonly referred to as CTA, can describe any piece of content on your website that you want users to take action on. This could be a simple “Read More” link on a blog post or a large, stylized banner asking users to sign up for your newsletter or other service. Virtually every website and app has some type of CTA, and it’s important to give them proper design considerations in order to make them as effective as possible. For the purpose of this article we’ll focus specifically on design tips for call-to-action buttons. CTAs are important because without them you’re leaving it up to users to find things they need (or worse, leave your website). Your aim should always be to reduce the cognitive load on users by making things simple and easy to execute. A successful CTA should be succinct, well-designed and accessible to users with a wide range of experience and abilities in order to maximize the amount of people who can see and interact with them.
Now that we have a bit of a foundation, let’s dive into ways you can maximize the effectiveness of your call-to-action buttons.

12 min read Codeinwp
Development | codeinwp.com | 3 days ago

15 Front-End Tools You Should Know About - Louis Lazaris' Favorite Finds

Louis Lazaris shares his favourite finds with the developer community: 15 front end tools to add to your workflow. Hotkey, Freezeframe.js, ARC Toolkit, Scene.js, Commento, Git History, CSS Feature Toggles, Create App, CSSJanus, Color Thief, RegexGuide,

15 Front-End Tools You Should Know About - Louis Lazaris' Favorite Finds

Development | codeinwp.com | 3 days ago

Another year has passed and if you’re like many web developers in the industry, you’ve probably discovered a whole slew of new front-end tools that you’ve considered incorporating into your workflow. I’m in the same boat, especially since I’m deeply involved in regularly researching what’s new in the tools landscape. In this post, I’m going to round up (with some screenshots and demos) some of the most interesting front-end tools I’ve found that I think you’ll find useful in 2020. These aren’t necessarily the most popular tools or the hottest tools, but I think each of them is unique in their use case and deserve a little more attention. These are essentially my favorite finds of the year in front-end tools.
Detecting keystrokes with JavaScript isn’t an overly complex task, but this little utility from the team at GitHub makes it super simple.
With it you can trigger an action on an element with a keyboard shortcut.
The types of shortcuts include a key, key combo, or even key sequence. You can also have multiple shortcuts for a single action.
The JavaScript is just one declaration along with an import:
import {install}

7 min read Eric Karkovack

What Is "Headless" WordPress?

An introduction to headless configurations, along with some helpful resources to get you started.

What Is "Headless" WordPress?

There are plenty of reasons why WordPress is the most popular CMS on the planet. Chief among them are its general ease-of-use and flexibility. Both of these attributes are keys to the rise of the “headless” WordPress trend. That is, using a WordPress back end to feed content to an outside, non-WordPress application. While that may sound a bit confusing – not to worry! Today, we’ll introduce you to the headless concept and the types of things you can do with it.
From WordPress to Anywhere
Think of a headless WordPress setup the same as, well, any other installation of the CMS. You install it just as you normally would. You log into the Dashboard and create pages or posts the same as always.
The main difference? You aren’t depending on WordPress to display the public-facing front end of your website. Instead, the content you create is meant to be used somewhere else. In essence, this could be just about anywhere. But among the most popular uses are:
Mobile apps;
Progressive web applications using JavaScript libraries such as React;
Static websites;
There are several advantages to this approach. For one, it allows content creators to use a familiar tool. They

6 min read WebDevStudios
Development | webdevstudios.com | Dec. 3, 2019

Sass Tips to Take Your Skills to the Next Level

Frontend Engineer, Marty O'Connor, shares 10 Sass tips to take your skills to the next level.

Sass Tips to Take Your Skills to the Next Level

Development | webdevstudios.com | Dec. 3, 2019

If you’ve been using Sass for a while, but find yourself writing seemingly basic code that doesn’t look very different from vanilla CSS, then this article is for you. We’ll explore ten ways to put Sass to use, taking advantage of some of its more intermediate to advanced features. Year after year, I continue to be impressed with the language’s capabilities and would like to share some of the tricks I’ve learned. This article assumes you have at least some working experience with Sass. If not, get your hands dirty with one of the many great resources on the internet. The Sass documentation is a great place to start. They don’t call them Syntactically Awesome Style Sheets for nothing, so let’s get started on these 10 Sass tips created to take your skills to the next level. 1. Parent Selector
Select a parent from within the child selector.
SCSS
Instead of having to make a new selector for .container .text outside of the .text block, you can just write your selector inside of .text, followed by the &.
Compiled CSS
HTML
2. Suffixes
Here’s a cool way to generate suffixes based on a particular class. Use &- followed by the desired suffix.

9 min read WebDevStudios
Development | wds.af | Oct. 22, 2019

Headless WordPress: Taking Posts Anywhere

What is headless WordPress and what does it look like in practice? Our backend engineer wrote this blog post to explain it all.

wds.af |

Headless WordPress: Taking Posts Anywhere

Development | wds.af | Oct. 22, 2019

What Does Headless WordPress Mean? WordPress as a content management system (CMS) is a platform for creating and managing your digital content. Your digital content can take the form of blog posts, events, products, team members, locations, and essentially anything you consider content that you wish to store and share. As an all-in-one system, WordPress is equipped with a backend admin interface to manage all your content as well as a frontend to display content to your users which leads us into what it means to go “headless” and what it has to do with WordPress.
When you take your website headless, you are separating the backend (admin interface) and frontend (user interface) or ‘heads’ from each other. With a separated backend and frontend, you gain the freedom to continue to manage and author content in WordPress while freeing up your content to be available for use in other applications that are written in Angular, React, and Vue.JS, or integrated into mobile apps.
When You Should Go Headless
One of the primary reasons to consider going headless is if you plan on having your content available across multiple websites and platforms at the same time. This is

2 min read Jakub Mikita
Development | btb.works | 4 days ago

How to access the WordPress admin without password

Logging in as an administrator, the easy way with a short snippet. Site files access required.

How to access the WordPress admin without password

Development | btb.works | 4 days ago

How many times you forgot the password or login to the website you managing. I forgot a lot of times, mostly because I didn’t save the password in the Password manager. Or I don’t get the credentials from my client. Luckily, there’s an easy way to login to the WordPress admin panel, having only the file access. The short answer is: use the wp_set_auth_cookie() function! It will save a session cookie for the provided user ID. Session cookie means you are logged in.
Here’s the snippet I’ve been using for a long time if I don’t know the user ID (plot twist – it’s not always 1).
add_action( 'send_headers', function() {
if ( ! isset( $_GET['secure-hash-295g785j46v-change-this'] )

6 min read Eric Karkovack
Development | 1stwebdesigner.com | Dec. 6, 2019

What to Look for in a Gutenberg-Compatible WordPress Theme

Gutenberg has its own specific features and needs. Here's how to pick a theme that takes full advantage.

What to Look for in a Gutenberg-Compatible WordPress Theme

Development | 1stwebdesigner.com | Dec. 6, 2019

With the Gutenberg block editor now the default option within WordPress, it’s important to think about how it works with the other components of your website. Themes are of particular concern, as they directly display the content you create. In a broad sense, most themes (even older ones) are likely compatible with the new editor. At least in terms of avoiding breakage. However, that doesn’t mean that your theme can take advantage of every feature.
So, how should a Gutenberg-compatible WordPress theme work? What features can you expect to find? Today, we’ll introduce you to some basics that you can use as a guide when shopping for your next theme.
Cover the Basics
In the Classic editor, all of the content within a post was more or less considered a singular entity. While there may be various HTML elements included in that post, they are still tied together within the editor itself. That’s why adding goodies such as multicolumn layouts were so difficult. You had to be extra careful when making changes, as the whole thing could easily break.
Getting around this used to require either a page builder or even custom fields to create layouts that were more flexible

4 min read WebDevStudios
Development | webdevstudios.com | Sep. 12, 2019

Hashing a Custom Taxonomy

When an engineer has amassed a collection of Pokemon cards, what does he do? Build a WordPress-based database site for cataloging it, of course!

Hashing a Custom Taxonomy

Development | webdevstudios.com | Sep. 12, 2019

I have a confession. I like Pokémon. It’d really be more accurate to say I never stopped liking it. Sure, there was that point when it wasn’t “cool” anymore and I was too busy trying to be “cool,” but this is the kind of thing that just sticks with me. So, naturally, I’ve built up a collection of Pokémon cards. And what does someone like me do when they have a collection of something?
Build a WordPress-based database site for cataloging it, of course! This is where hashing a custom taxonomy comes into the picture.
My current plan revolves around taking the card information from the third-party Pokémon TCG Developers API and combining it with the pricing information from TCGplayer. This will allow me to store information of not just every card I have, but every version of every card I have. The most common version is the reverse holographic printing (shown below). Other versions, especially rare, powerful cards, can include full-art versions, alternate-art printings, and even rainbow-colored “secret rare” cards.
The trick, however, is that in addition to being collectibles, Pokémon cards are also part of

6 min read WebDevStudios
Development | webdevstudios.com | Oct. 8, 2019

Get Started Making Your Own WP-CLI Commands

With WP-CLI you can generate hundreds of user accounts or publish thousands of posts to your blog without ever logging into your WordPress dashboard!

Get Started Making Your Own WP-CLI Commands

Development | webdevstudios.com | Oct. 8, 2019

Have you ever wanted to generate hundreds of user accounts or publish thousands of posts to your blog without ever once logging into your WordPress dashboard? You can do that and so much more with WordPress Command Line Interface (WP-CLI). What is a command-line interface (CLI)?
A CLI, put simply, is a way to interact with a computer program using commands in the form of successive lines of text instead of using a graphical interface. For example, to install the plugin Hello Dolly instead of going to your WP Dashboard > Plugins > Add New > Search “Hello Dolly” > Click Install > and finally Click Activate, you can simply run the command wp plugin install hello-dolly --activate and it does it all at once.
Our First Command
Now that we know what a WP-CLI command is, let’s get started with our first Hello World! To create your first command, use the command WP_CLI::add_command('IDENTIFIER', 'CLASS_NAME') where the identifier is what you’ll use in the CLI to call subcommands and class name being the class containing all your CLI commands.
With our CLI registered, any public function declared in our class will be made accessible as a subcommand under

6 min read WebDevStudios
Development | webdevstudios.com | Sep. 17, 2019

Creating, Extending, and Upgrading Custom ACF Fields That Use Select2

Senior Backend Engineer, Justin Foell, has published a blog post about creating, extending, and upgrading Custom ACF Fields that use Select2.

Creating, Extending, and Upgrading Custom ACF Fields That Use Select2

Development | webdevstudios.com | Sep. 17, 2019

Advanced Custom Fields (ACF) has been around for quite a while now, and it’s super popular. We’re on version 5.x now, and the earliest dated reference documentation I could find was for ACF 2.0 in 2011. There have been some bumps along the way. One of the more recent issues was compatibility of the Select2 JavaScript library versions. It was mostly because two other popular plugins, Yoast’s WordPress SEO and WooCommerce, also use Select2. What is Select2? It’s the kick-ass library that lets you transform boring dropdowns to amazing searchable and formattable ones:
So what’s the big deal with ACF? Well, Select2 has gone through some major revisions as well, most notably the latest Select2 Version 4, which is not backwards compatible with Select2 version 3.x. So, if ACF brings in Version 4 and WooCommerce brings in Version 3, we’ve got problems.
Thankfully, ACF came up with an elegant way to deal with these incompatibilities by checking to see if another plugin had enqueued Version 3 and falling back to using a Select2 Version 3 adapter.
acf.newSelect2 = function( $select, props ){
Future-proof it or just fix it?
So, what does this have to do with custom

7 min read Donna Cavalier
Development | elementor.com | May. 21, 2019

Introducing Hello Theme: The Fastest WordPress Theme Ever Created

It's very exciting to have the very developer-friendly and Elementor-focused Hello theme in the WordPress repository now. So much easier for users now.

Introducing Hello Theme: The Fastest WordPress Theme Ever Created

Development | elementor.com | May. 21, 2019

Many of you already know, love and use Elementor’s Hello theme, but this week, our starter theme was officially added to the WordPress repository, so we figured our baby deserves a formal baby shower.

9 min read Donna Cavalier
Development | elementor.com | 16 days ago

Best Online Courses for Web Design

Love this article. I didn't know the details of some of these, and now I'm amped to take some courses.

Best Online Courses for Web Design

Development | elementor.com | 16 days ago

Web design is a rapidly changing environment — new techniques and technologies are constantly emerging, and as a web designer or developer, you have to be constantly learning to keep up. When it comes to education, web designers don’t have a shortage of online and offline courses. But there is one thing that makes online education great — it lets you learn at your own pace.
In this article, we’ve decided to create an overview of the best places to take web design courses online as well as a list of courses you should consider. We’ve listed the courses in the context of educational platforms because you are likely to try other classes while you’re already on the platform. So it’s vital to know what that platform is capable of.
Coursera is a platform that doesn’t require any introduction. It gives you access to online courses covering almost anything you can think of. Coursera provides a nice filtering mechanism that allows you to tailor the options according to your preferences (define a level of proficiency, educational institute, or type of program).
Coursera offers more than 250 courses for web specialists. Most of the courses are focussed

8 min read Augustin Prot
Development | blog.weglot.com | Apr. 19, 2019

How to prepare your WordPress plugin for a critical update

Updating a plugin can quickly become a nightmare for both the users and developers. Discover how we proceeded to make a smooth transition from Weglot v1 to v2.

How to prepare your WordPress plugin for a critical update

Development | blog.weglot.com | Apr. 19, 2019

Why did we need a new version? Before explaining how we proceeded with a new version, it’s important to understand “why” we had to make a new version of Weglot. The main reasons were to improve the “adaptability” of our plugin and to reduce our technical debt.
An increasingly long and difficult support
The first version of Weglot did not contain any WordPress filters or actions: the so-called hooks. It was thus very difficult to change the default behavior of our plugin and adapt it to specific customer needs. We had to provide custom patches to our customers while taking into account the changes for our next updates. It was quite tedious and delicate. The more customers we had, the longer the technical support was. Of course, we could have simply added some filters and actions as we went along, but we were faced with other problems.
A growing technical debt
Here is the quality score of the Weglot WordPress plugin code at the time of the last update of version 1 (v1.13.1): 6.53 / 10
Generally speaking, we can’t say that it’s a terrible score but it’s clearly not great either. The mediocre score was partly due to some of the dependencies

7 min read Donna Cavalier
Development | mor10.com | Aug. 29, 2018

Gutenberg, Forks, and the need for an LTS version of WordPress

This... this is absolutely the right solution. Hope it happens.

Gutenberg, Forks, and the need for an LTS version of WordPress

Development | mor10.com | Aug. 29, 2018

Over the past week, developments which I predicted back in December last year have come to fore, and I am deeply concerned about the effects they will have on WordPress (the application) and the community unless we take decisive action. Short version: For various reasons, many WordPress users will be faced with a complex dilemma when 5.0 and Gutenberg comes out:
a) Get the latest version of WordPress and risk compatibility issues / costly retraining, redesign, or entire rebuilds, and/or other problems, or b) choose not to upgrade and end up running an old and eventually insecure version of the content management system.
So far, the response from WordPress leadership has been to install the “Classic Editor” plugin which as the name suggests reintroduces the classic WYSIWYG editor once the Gutenberg Block Editor becomes the default. This is, in my opinion, a dangerous road to go down both for the end-user and WordPress itself.
Classic Editor as a permanent solution won’t work
Classic Editor is a bit like using a band-aid to plug a hole in a ballon as you are inflating it. It may work right now, but as the balloon continues to grow, the band-aid not only won’t do

19 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Development | kinsta.com | Jun. 17, 2019

What’s New in PHP 7.4 (Coming Soon)

PHP 7.4 is scheduled to be released on November 21, 2019. It’s the next PHP 7 minor release and should significantly boost performance and increase code readability.

What’s New in PHP 7.4 (Coming Soon)

Development | kinsta.com | Jun. 17, 2019

PHP 7.4, the next PHP 7 minor release, is expected to be released to the General Availability on November 21st, 2019. So it’s time for us to dive into some of the most exciting additions and new features that will make PHP faster and more reliable. Actually, even if PHP 7.4 should significantly boost performance and increase code readability, PHP 8 will be the real milestone for PHP performance, as the proposal for JIT inclusion has already been approved.
Anyway, today we’re going through some of the most interesting features and changes we’re expecting with PHP 7.4. So, before you read over this post, make sure to save the following dates:
June 6th: PHP 7.4 Alpha 1
July 18th: PHP 7.4 Beta 1 – Feature freeze
November 21st: PHP 7.4 GA Release
You can check out the full list of features and additions on the official RFC page.
PHP 7.4 Release Date:
PHP 7.4 is scheduled to be released on November 21, 2019. It’s the next PHP 7 minor release and should significantly boost performance and increase code readability.
What’s New in PHP with PHP 7.4?
In this post we’re covering several changes and features that should be added to the language with the

6 min read WebDevStudios
Development | webdevstudios.com | Jul. 18, 2019

Cross Browser Compatibility Testing

STOP! Before you launch a website, conduct cross browser compatibility testing to ensure it looks and operates correctly on all major browsers.

Cross Browser Compatibility Testing

Development | webdevstudios.com | Jul. 18, 2019

The Scenario It’s the Friday before a major holiday and an urgent email hits your inbox. Your client, who has been a dream to work with over the past few months, has a problem.
Two seconds ago you were thinking about kicking your feet back and relaxing, but now your adrenaline is surging. The CEO (who has never been mentioned before now) is finally taking a look at the new site you’ve developed, and the menu is “completely broken.”
Did you actually think the corporate executives were going to look at the new site with a Mac? A dizzying array of questions zip through your mind. “How could this happen? I checked the site on all of the major browsers!” you say to yourself as the world around you spirals.
After some deep breathing exercises and a bit of inquiry, it becomes apparent that the browser in question is Microsoft Edge on Windows 10. To make matters worse, the site wasn’t actually tested on any browsers beyond the boundaries of your Mac devices. You’ve been loyal to Apple for as long as you can remember, but that won’t help now.
Although this story is anecdotal, it’s based on real events that happen to developers every

11 min read WebDevStudios
Development | webdevstudios.com | Feb. 7, 2019

Building a WordPress Theme: Things to Consider in 2019 (And Beyond)

When building a #WordPress theme in 2019, there are certain things to consider. Learn what's required, what's new, and some ways to clean up WordPress for the frontend and for users.

Building a WordPress Theme: Things to Consider in 2019 (And Beyond)

Development | webdevstudios.com | Feb. 7, 2019

WebDevStudios (WDS) is working to improve our theme framework wd_s based on Automattic’s _s; although at this point, it’s resemblance is only vaguely similar. WDS is dedicated to keeping up to date with the web development industry and making educated decisions about which new things to pursue and which to ignore (for now). In my private time, I’ve been building a starter theme from scratch to better educate myself about what is required by WordPress to build a theme-repo-approved theme but also to make my own informed decisions based on what others are doing, how people typically use the internet, and what of WordPress core feels antiquated.
I started writing this blog post to try and build a custom theme from scratch, but that proved too problematic for a few reasons. The time commitment wasn’t small. Any theme I built would require more than just one blog post and there’s a world of information out there to help you on your way already. Also, before any opinionated decisions had been made, the outcome was essentially any other theme out there already. The biggest reasons I thought I’d circle back and rethink this post was because a lot of those

9 min read WebDevStudios
Development | webdevstudios.com | Nov. 30, 2018

Filtering ACF Content Blocks with WordPress Hooks & Filters

We recently discovered a situation where we were able to find some fun and interesting ways to extend our standard ACF Flexible Content Blocks. Let's dig in and find out what we did!

Filtering ACF Content Blocks with WordPress Hooks & Filters

Development | webdevstudios.com | Nov. 30, 2018

Here at WebDevStudios, we do quite a bit with Flexible Content Blocks in Advanced Custom Fields (ACF). If you aren’t familiar with the plugin, ACF allows for the creation of a multitude of custom meta field types using a graphical user interface (GUI) in the WordPress Dashboard. You can do almost anything with these fields—from simple text and URL inputs to searching for posts and pages and building image galleries. ACF allows you to power your site with robust customization options, which you can use to create and manage dynamic pages. Instead of being locked into a set of page templates where the functionality and layout are tied directly to the theme’s files, building pages with ACF Flexible Content Blocks puts the power of customization into your hands as a site manager and editor. You can add, remove, and rearrange blocks as needed and have full control over the content within each of those blocks.
Sometimes, though, simply customizing the content within those blocks isn’t enough. Sure, it’s nice enough to be able to edit the title of a block or select a different set of Featured Posts to display. But, what if you don’t want to have to get that

4 min read WebDevStudios
Development | webdevstudios.com | Aug. 15, 2019

Fixing oEmbed with a Custom Provider

In his first-ever blog post for WebDevStudios, Backend Engineer, Evan Hildreth, tells us what's exciting about oEmbed and shares a fix he learned during Five for the Future.

Fixing oEmbed with a Custom Provider

Development | webdevstudios.com | Aug. 15, 2019

The story of my blogging career over the past few years could be summed up as, “How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Reblog.” There’s something that’s so much fun about finding something cool and sharing it on my blog without worrying about saying something poignant or ultimately meaningless in an effort to “add to the conversation.” Sometimes it’s enough just to amplify the conversation, or share that video. This is why I’m so excited about oEmbed. It’s a standard API that takes a given link and turns it into an embeddable… thing. It’s most commonly known as “that thing that turns a YouTube link into a video,” but the underlying technology can be used for any web page. This includes sites like Reddit, Twitter, and Imgur, as well as blogging sites like Tumblr and, yes, WordPress.
WordPress has built-in support for oEmbed, both as a consumer and a provider. This means that not only can you embed other posts into your WordPress post, but other people can embed your posts into their posts!
WordPress already has built-in support for several sites. If you want to branch out of those, it’s a simple

Development | kinsta.com | Feb. 25, 2019

We Analyzed 13 Billion Log Entries - Here's What We Learned

We analyzed 13 billion log entries. Here's what we learned about the WordPress hosting industry.

7 min read Eric Karkovack
Development | speckyboy.com | Jul. 8, 2019

Building WordPress Websites That Better Respect User Privacy

Some privacy-related items to consider when building your site, including the data collected by third-parties.

Building WordPress Websites That Better Respect User Privacy

Development | speckyboy.com | Jul. 8, 2019

In recent years, privacy has become one of the most important topics in our society. With the rise of services that use and sell user data, serious discussions have been taking place regarding best practices and the rights of users. In some cases, they’ve led to government-based regulations such as the EU’s GDPR. However, worldwide there still seems to be quite a lot of confusion, which tends to result in inaction. Unfortunately, web designers seem to be caught in the middle.
What makes things even more difficult is how much we rely on third-party providers that enable all manner of different functionality. Each provider is another link in a privacy chain that may or may not be collecting/using data in an undesirable way.
Nowhere is this more of a challenge than when it comes to building sites with WordPress. That’s not because the CMS doesn’t take privacy seriously – it does. Rather, it’s a combination of being the web’s most-used platform and its ability to tie in with an untold number of services via plugins and themes.
That begs the question: How do we build WordPress websites with privacy in mind?
The WordPress Toolbox
Unlimited Downloads:

11 min read WebDevStudios
Development | wds.af | Jan. 17, 2019

Web Design and Development Myths: 2019 Edition

Face 2019 with some new knowledge of your website. Read over these design and development myths and learn what you can do right in the new year.

wds.af |

Web Design and Development Myths: 2019 Edition

Development | wds.af | Jan. 17, 2019

I’ve written about New Year website prep before and how this is a popular time to give your website a good once-over for the new year. You can read Get Your WordPress Site Ready for the New Year: What to do Now! for some helpful ideas on getting things running smoothly. Every client that I work with has ideas about what their new or existing website needs without really thinking about what it means for their website in the long term. New or potential clients have their own misconceptions around their potential websites as well, so I thought it might be helpful to talk about some design and development myths or misconceptions and address them so you can face 2019 with some new knowledge. Myth: Sliders and Hidden Content Are a Must
At some point in the 2000s, movement became popular in websites. The increasing adoption of JavaScript and libraries like jQuery and MooTools made things like carousels, modals, sliders and other hidden and dynamic content possible. At that time, the internet was concerned with making a splash and pushing the boundaries, not with user experience or accessibility.
Let’s make a resolution right now: no more carousels, sliders, modals or accordions.

19 min read Brian Jackson
Development | kinsta.com | Aug. 29, 2018

What’s New in PHP 7.3 (Coming Soon)

PHP 7.3 is knocking on our door and with it comes new useful features, functionalities, deprecations, and a good number of bug fixes. This release is definitely all about developers!

What’s New in PHP 7.3 (Coming Soon)

Development | kinsta.com | Aug. 29, 2018

PHP 7.3 is knocking on our door and with it comes new useful features, functionalities, deprecations, and a good number of bug fixes. This release is all about web developers. The current Beta 2 version was released on August 16, coming perfectly on time with the PHP 7.3 timetable. You can download the current PHP 7.3 version for your development and testing, but keep in mind that, this shouldn’t currently be used in production environments.
In this post, we’ll provide an overview of the features and changes that we personally consider most relevant. But you can always check the full list of features, changes and bug fixes in PHP 7.3 upgrade notes and PHP 7.3 Requests For Comments.
What’s new in PHP with PHP 7.3?
In this post we’re covering the following PHP 7.3 changes:
Flexible Heredoc and Nowdoc Syntaxes
This is probably one of the most relevant improvements coming with PHP 7.3, and we think it deserves a little more attention. So, before diving into PHP 7.3 heredoc/nowdoc changes, we’ll provide a quick overview of this useful core feature. If you are already confident with nowdoc and heredoc, feel free to jump to the PHP 7.3 changes.
An overview of

8 min read WebDevStudios
Development | webdevstudios.com | Mar. 19, 2019

Tools to Boost Remote Work Productivity

If you work remotely or manage a team of remote workers, these are the tools that we use and/or recommend. Check them out and boost your productivity!

Tools to Boost Remote Work Productivity

Development | webdevstudios.com | Mar. 19, 2019

Any job requires planning, organization and communication, but remote work needs all of those things ten-fold. Working remotely comes with its own set of distractions, depending on how and where you work. Distractions might happen in the form of the hustle and bustle from your favorite coffee shop or the attention needed by your pets or young children. In my experience, working from a home office tends to have a series of challenges to overcome day-to-day problems that could prevent me from getting work done, if I wasn’t otherwise prepared to handle it. It’s important to get yourself working in a way that makes sense for you so that you remain organized, working efficiently and well-connected. Here are a set of recommended tools doing just that, while you work remotely. These are, admittedly, the ones we use or that I like best, but I’ll list a few alternatives with each, too.
Slack
This recommended tool is probably not a surprise. Communication, in my book, is the most critical aspect of any successful relationship—work or personal—it makes no difference. Slack is an excellent chat-like environment for teams. It permanently removes the needs for email