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10 min read Donna Cavalier
Development | make.wordpress.org | Sep. 21, 2015

WP REST API: Merge Proposal

It's that time! Proposal to merge into core. A 2-parter though. Whatcha think?

WP REST API: Merge Proposal

Development | make.wordpress.org | Sep. 21, 2015

Hello everyone! This is the post you’ve all been waiting for. We on the REST API team (myself, @rachelbaker, @joehoyle, @danielbachhuber, and newest member and core committer @pento) would like to propose merging the REST API into WordPress core. We’ve been working a while on this, and think it’s now ready to get your feedback.
This is our first iteration of the proposal, and we’re actively looking for feedback. If you have thoughts on the project, or on this proposal, let us know! Only with your feedback can we make progress.
What is the REST API?
The REST API is a nice and easy way to get at your data in WordPress externally, whether that’s from JavaScript in a theme or plugin, mobile and desktop applications, or importing and exporting data. The API offers up all core data types (posts, terms comments, and users), plus support for meta and revisions; we’ve got plans to eventually have access to everything the admin and frontend have access to.
The REST API differs from existing WordPress APIs in that it is explicitly designed from the ground up for modern mobile and browser usage, using the lightweight and widely-supported JSON data serialization format with a modern REST interface.

6 min read Donna Cavalier
Development | ma.tt | Nov. 23, 2015

Dance to Calypso - New opensource front end from Automattic

Wait, what???!!! New, javascript-based front end, open sourced and, and...I need to re-read this a few times to even know for sure what it is. But, definitely worth reading several times!

ma.tt |

Dance to Calypso - New opensource front end from Automattic

Development | ma.tt | Nov. 23, 2015

One of the hardest things to do in technology is disrupt yourself. But we’re trying our darndest, and have some cool news to introduce today. When I took on the responsibility of CEO of Automattic January of last year, we faced two huge problems: our growth was constrained by lack of capital, and the technological foundations of the past decade weren’t strong enough for the demands of next one.
The first has a relatively straightforward answer. We found some fantastic partners, agreed on a fair price, issued new equity in the company to raise $160M, and started investing in areas we felt were high potential, like this year’s WooCommerce acquisition. This “war chest” gives us a huge array of options, especially given our fairly flat burn rate — we don’t need to raise money again to keep the company going, and any capital we raise in the future will be purely discretionary. (Since last May when the round happened we’ve only spent $3M of the investment on opex.)
The second is much harder to address. The WordPress codebase is actually incredible in many ways — the result of many thousands of people collaborating over 13 years — but some of WordPress’ greatest strengths were also holding

2 min read David Bisset
Development | ma.tt | Nov. 8, 2015

Seventy-Five to Go

WordPress officially hits 25% - will be a solid 25% by WordCamp US.

ma.tt |

Seventy-Five to Go

Development | ma.tt | Nov. 8, 2015

People are abuzz because it looks like the W3Techs survey of the web now has WordPress at 25% market share. Sometimes it goes up and down through the course of a month, but it’s still a pretty fun milestone that we can now say about one in four websites are now powered by the scrappy open source underdog with its roots stretching all the way back to a single person in Corsica, France. We should be comfortably past 25% by the end of the year.
The big opportunity is still the 57% of websites that don’t use any identifiable CMS yet, and that’s where I think there is still a ton of growth for us (and I’m also rooting for all the other open source CMSes).
If you want to celebrate with us come to the first-ever WordCamp US event next month in Philadelphia (tickets still available) — it’s shaping up to be an amazing event. We just published the schedule and there are some amazing speakers and sessions.

2 min read David Bisset
Development | poststatus.com | Dec. 10, 2016

Exclusive: Matt Mullenweg Interview on New WordPress Dev Cycle

Nice interview (with audio-only or video) of Matt by Brian Krosgard at WordCamp US 2016. Nice one-on-one moment, usual great content from Post Status (this is public, open to all).

Exclusive: Matt Mullenweg Interview on New WordPress Dev Cycle

Development | poststatus.com | Dec. 10, 2016

I had the opportunity to interview Matt Mullenweg at the end of WordCamp US 2016, and we chatted about the new WordPress development cycle, the WordPress REST API, and more. During contributor day of WordCamp US in Philadelphia, I was able to interview Matt Mullenweg to follow up on several items he announced in the State of the Word.
We mostly discussed the new WordPress development cycle and how it will work with the three focus areas. We also discussed how that will affect other non-major updates and WordPress features.
Matt also talked about the WordPress REST API, how he defines success for it, what he hopes to see out of it, and what he thinks would cause it to revert to a plugin only feature.
And as this was the second and final year of WordCamp US in Philadelphia, we reflected on the event, and talked about what there is to look forward to in Nashville for WordCamp US 2017 and 2018.
You can listen to just the audio, also on our podcast, which you can find on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and via RSS for your favorite podcatcher.
Or just watch the video on YouTube, or below for the full experience. And don’t forget to subscribe to my new channel on YouTube.

8 min read Ahmad Awais
Development | remkusdevries.com | Dec. 8, 2015

Learning JavaScript in WordPress, Deeply - Remkus de Vries

A must-read (and maybe you end up wanting to learn JavaScript):

Learning JavaScript in WordPress, Deeply - Remkus de Vries

Development | remkusdevries.com | Dec. 8, 2015

If you’ve followed the development of WordPress the last couple of years, you couldn’t help but notice that more and more parts of WordPress, such as the Customizer, are using primarily JavaScript instead of PHP. With WordPress 4.4, the latest version available currently, the amount of JavaScript used has increased once again. During the State of the Word 2015, Matt Mullenweg made it very clear that this trend will continue to grow in the years to come and urged every single WordPress developer out there to start learning JavaScript. I’ve been thinking about learning JavaScript properly, deeply, for quite a few years now, but not knowing where to start made the first step so big that I actually got around to it.
The purpose of this post
For a couple of months I’ve been carefully preparing to dive into JavaScript and the purpose of this post is to outline the steps I’m going to take, which books I’m going to read and which sites I’m going to use to start learning Javascript.
With the REST API being scaffolded into WordPress in 4.4 and with live examples such as Calypso demonstrating how we can build applications on top of WordPress in new ways with JavaScript libraries such as React,

5 min read Ahmad Awais
Development | make.wordpress.org | Nov. 12, 2015

WordPress 4.4: Field Guide

A must read! If you are a WordPress developer, you must read this post to find out about what's new in WordPress 4.4 releasing this December.

WordPress 4.4: Field Guide

Development | make.wordpress.org | Nov. 12, 2015

WordPress 4.4 is the next major release of WordPress and is shaping up to be an amazing release. While you have likely discovered many of the changes from testing your plugins, themes, and sites (you have been testing, right?), this post highlights some of the exciting

8 min read David Bisset
Development | wordpress.org | Dec. 6, 2016

WordPress 4.7 “Vaughan” Is Released!

It's here! Version 4.7 of WordPress, named “Vaughan” in honor of legendary jazz vocalist Sarah “Sassy” Vaughan.

WordPress 4.7 “Vaughan” Is Released!

Development | wordpress.org | Dec. 6, 2016

Version 4.7 of WordPress, named “Vaughan” in honor of legendary jazz vocalist Sarah “Sassy” Vaughan, is available for download or update in your WordPress dashboard. New features in 4.7 help you get your site set up the way you want it. Introducing WordPress 4.7Get Link to Video
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Play Video
Presenting Twenty Seventeen
A brand new default theme brings your site to life with immersive featured images and video headers.
Twenty Seventeen focuses on business sites and features a customizable front page with multiple sections. Personalize it with widgets, navigation, social menus, a logo, custom colors, and more. Our default theme for 2017 works great in many languages, on any device, and for a wide range of users.
Your Site, Your Way
WordPress 4.7 adds new features to the customizer to help take you through the initial setup of a theme, with non-destructive live previews of all your changes in one uninterrupted workflow.
Theme Starter Content
https://wordpress.org/news/files/2016/12/starter-content.mp4
To help give you a solid base to build from, individual themes can provide starter content that appears when you go to customize your brand new site. This can

4 min read David Bisset
Development | make.wordpress.org | Sep. 9, 2016

Say Hello to Twenty Seventeen

Every year there's a brand new default theme, and Helen Hou-Sandi post gives us a preview. Designed by Mel Choyce.

Say Hello to Twenty Seventeen

Development | make.wordpress.org | Sep. 9, 2016

It’s that time again: time to build a new default theme for WordPress! WordPress 4.7 will launch with a brand new theme – Twenty Seventeen. Designed by Mel Choyce (@melchoyce), Twenty Seventeen sports a modern look and will make a good base for any business website or product showcase.
Check out the gallery below to preview our next default theme at full-size: Higher resolution mockups
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In addition to having a wide appeal, Twenty Seventeen will focus on providing a seamless initial theme setup so anyone can set up a website for themselves or their business with minimal hassle.
Twenty Seventeen aims to show off some new core features and enhancements, such as:
A better flow for using a static page as your front page.
Visible edit icons in the Customizer, replacing the current hidden shift+click method.
Expanding custom header images to include video (think: atmospheric video headers!).
Dummy content for live previews.
Mel will keep an eye on all things design during the creation of Twenty Seventeen. Laurel Fulford (@laurelfulford) and David Kennedy (@davidakennedy) will assist her, leading the theme’s development. Lots of opportunities exist this year for getting

6 min read Mark Gavalda
Development | kinsta.com | Dec. 8, 2015

The Definitive PHP 7.0 & HHVM Benchmark

We put the final version of PHP 7 to the test! We ran benchmarks for WordPress, Drupal, Magento, OctoberCMS and PyroCMS on a bare metal box comparing the performance with HHVM and PHP 5.6 and the results are non-ambiguous.

The Definitive PHP 7.0 & HHVM Benchmark

Development | kinsta.com | Dec. 8, 2015

It’s been in the works for quite some time and after a long wait PHP 7 was released on December 3, 2015. We tested the most popular PHP based frameworks to see how they perform with PHP 7! It’s a great day for all of us who use PHP every day and that doesn’t just include developers (and web hosting companies) but end users as well. It will speed up the most popular web development language in the coming weeks and months which means faster websites and web services for everyone!
We’re addicted to optimizing the load times of websites and we’ve released numerous guides on the topic previously, take a look at A Beginner’s Guide to Website Speed Optimization, Best Free Website Performance Testing Tools, and more.
To see how much of an improvement we can expect from this new PHP interpreter we put the public release version of PHP 7.0 to test and compared a couple of popular software suites’ performance using PHP 5.6.16, PHP 7.0 and HHVM 3.10.1 on a bare metal server (so virtualization doesn’t interfere with the results). Tested software include WordPress 4.3.1, Drupal 8, Magento 2.0 CE, OctoberCMS build 309, PyroCMS v3 beta2, and Flarum v0.1.0-beta.4.
Long story short, HHVM wins hands down.

6 min read Ahmad Awais
Development | wptavern.com | Feb. 5, 2016

WP REST API Delayed, Contributors Facing Gridlock

While some delay makes sense but converting everything in the wp-admin before merging doesn't. IMHO that's not the core purpose of WP REST API. Progressive enhancement makes more sense.

WP REST API Delayed, Contributors Facing Gridlock

Development | wptavern.com | Feb. 5, 2016

The WP REST API team met yesterday in the #core-restapi Slack channel to discuss the status of the existing post, term, user, and comment endpoints. There are a few outstanding issues with these four core objects, which the team wants to tackle via a feature plugin approach instead of holding the API back from merge. These outstanding items include things like password-protected posts, autosaves and post previews, and meta handling. “For now, we’re not going to support them, and will be working on them in a separate feature plugin instead,” WP REST API project lead Ryan McCue said. “Again, this will be an enhancement to the API in the future, and doesn’t block compatibility here.”
In September 2015, McCue and contributors outlined a merge plan for the REST API which brought the infrastructure into the 4.4 release with the endpoints on deck to follow one release later in 4.5. Contributors to the REST API believe that the project is still on track for this goal.
“Our proposal is that we ​merge the four core objects​ in the REST API with full read, create, update, delete support, with the more peripheral features to come ​when they’re ready,” McCue said.
Several WordPress contributors,

4 min read Matt Cromwell
Development | wpsteward.com | Apr. 22, 2016

Why WordPress users should update their version of PHP.

More folks need to be advocating for hosts to update their PHP versions. This is a fun post on the pitfalls of outdated PHP versions and it's impact on WordPress.

Why WordPress users should update their version of PHP.

Development | wpsteward.com | Apr. 22, 2016

Recently in a facebook group someone posted this image, asking for clarification: This is what’s wrong with web hosting in 2016.
I thought I’d use that as a jumping-off point to talk about “bargain” hosting. This user is on a large (Super-Bowl-ad-budget large) hosting company’s “shared” plan. The irony is that the user would have no way of knowing what version of PHP they are running, were it not for this gently-worded (ahem) encouragement from a plugin developer. This warning didn’t come from the host. It came from a 3rd party plugin developer.
Allow me to be a little more blunt.
But first, a related personal story: some time in 2015, after about 1,000 active users had installed my plugin, I had a user get in touch with me in the support forums saying that they were getting a strange “fatal error” upon activating Better Click To Tweet.
The short and non-technical explanation of the problem my user was having is that the version of PHP they had installed did not include support for a function my plugin needed to function correctly.
The even-shorter explanation: this user used the same large web host as the original picture-sharer above.
For some web hosts, service and security clearly

Development | freemius.com | Jul. 27, 2016

WordPress Frameworks Get A New Cozy Home - IncludeWP

The plugins review team has announced that WordPress frameworks are no longer allowed in the official plugins' repository. So we created IncludeWP.

WordPress Frameworks Get A New Cozy Home - IncludeWP

Development | freemius.com | Jul. 27, 2016

Earlier this year (March 2016), the plugins review team issued a statement on make.wordpress.org that frameworks are no longer allowed in the official plugins repository. We decided to take it upon ourselves to create a worthy repository for WordPress frameworks and created IncludeWP. A home, or rather, a leaderboard, to display all open-source frameworks for WordPress plugin & theme developers. A one-stop-shop for developers to evaluate what’s currently out there in the market.
It had started as a fun & refreshing weekend side-project that the team had decided to pull together three weeks ago, and the plan was to release it right away. But, during the years I adopted a habit of not releasing anything before getting some feedback on it from people whose opinion I trust, so I decided to poke a few of my friends from the WordPress community first.
We got great feedback and some UI suggestions, but one comment drew most of my attention: Luca Fracassi from Addendio said: “Vova, it would be super-cool if I could click on a framework and see what plugins & themes are actually using it.”
“Hell yeah! That would be amazing.” I thought to myself. But

5 min read David Bisset
Development | make.wordpress.org | Mar. 30, 2016

WordPress 4.5 Field Guide

Great overview of many of the features coming to WordPress 4.5 from Aaron Jorbin

WordPress 4.5 Field Guide

Development | make.wordpress.org | Mar. 30, 2016

WordPress 4.5 is the next major version of WordPress and with it come some bang bang changes. This guide will describe many of the developer-focused changes to help you test your themes, plugins, and sites. So grab a ☕️ ,

3 min read Primož Cigler
Development | make.wordpress.org | Nov. 3, 2016

Post Type Templates in 4.7

WordPress has supported custom page templates for over 12 years. With WP 4.7 the same functionality is coming to all post types, using "Template Post Type" in the file header.

Post Type Templates in 4.7

Development | make.wordpress.org | Nov. 3, 2016

WordPress has supported custom page templates for over 12 years, allowing developers to create various layouts for specific pages. While this feature is very helpful, it has always been limited to the ‘page’ post type and not was not available to other post types. With WordPress 4.7, it will be. By opening up the page template functionality to all post types, the template hierarchy’s flexibility continues to improve.
In addition to the Template Name file header, the post types supported by a template can be specified using Template Post Type: post, foo, bar. Here’s an example:
1234567
<?php/*Template Name: Full-width layoutTemplate Post Type: post, page, product*/// … your code here
That way, you’ll be able to select this full-width template for posts, pages, and products.
When at least one template exists for a post type, the ‘Post Attributes’ meta box will be displayed in the back end, without the need to add post type support for 'page-attributes' or anything else. The ‘Post Attributes’ label can be customized per post type using the 'attributes' label when registering a post type.
Selecting the post template
Selecting

7 min read Jonathan Wold
Development | make.xwp.co | Mar. 10, 2016

Running PHPUnit Tests Outside VVV

Ideas for improving workflow and encouraging more PHPUnit test writing.

Running PHPUnit Tests Outside VVV

Development | make.xwp.co | Mar. 10, 2016

We use Varying Vagrant Vagrants (VVV) as the development environment for as many projects as we can. It provides a great foundation not only for developing client projects but also for core development itself. One great thing about VVV is that it installs all of the tools needed to run the core unit tests right out of the box. Our wp-dev-lib project has a PHPUnit plugin bootstrap that makes use of the core unit tests as installed by VVV, and we have a pre-commit hook which can run the plugin PHPUnit tests inside the VM even when making a commit from outside (on the host machine). This ability to run PHPUnit tests inside the VM makes it easy for getting developers quickly set up to run PHPUnit tests, and it’s also something that is suggested for core’s PHPUnit Grunt task (#36190).
Nevertheless…
Tests running outside of the VM are a fast and happy place.
— Jeremy Felt (@jeremyfelt) March 10, 2016
Even though VVV lets you run core’s PHPUnit tests right out of the box, the tests can run more slowly in the box. If you have a pre-commit hook that runs unit tests with each commit, your workflow can be really slowed down (especially since the tests should eventually by run by Travis CI after

6 min read David Bisset
Development | deliciousbrains.com | Aug. 3, 2016

WordPress REST API Performance VS admin-ajax.php

From a performance standpoint, there appears to be a slight advantage. This isn't a topic i've seen covered before, good read!

WordPress REST API Performance VS admin-ajax.php

Development | deliciousbrains.com | Aug. 3, 2016

Since the introduction of the WordPress REST API, many plugin developers have started converting their plugins to use the REST API instead of the older AJAX API (admin-ajax.php). Aside from the REST API simply being newer technology, rumor has it that the REST API is also faster and more reliable than the older endpoints due to the fact that not as much of WordPress is loaded during a typical REST request. In this article, we’ll be looking at the life of a typical REST request as well as a similar request made over admin-ajax.php to see how they compare.
The Life of an admin-ajax.php Request
Let’s start by breaking down what happens when we make a typical AJAX request to admin-ajax.php. When your browser makes a request to that file, it loads a few other core WordPress files in order to be able to serve the request with core functions loaded:
/wp-load.php
/wp-config.php
/wp-settings.php (which loads most core files, all active plugins and themes, and the REST API)
/wp-admin/admin.php
/wp-admin/includes/ajax-actions.php
After loading these files, WordPress calls the admin_init hook, which several core functions hook into. The below core functions were called on this hook

4 min read Matt
Development | shopify.com | Mar. 15, 2016

Introducing Shopify for WordPress – Shopify

3 new themes and a Shopify ecommerce plugin for integration between WordPress and Shopify.

Introducing Shopify for WordPress – Shopify

Development | shopify.com | Mar. 15, 2016

If you’ve been waiting for the right time to start selling on WordPress, the wait is over. Now, it’s easier than ever to add ecommerce to your WordPress site, and give it all the features and security that come with Shopify.

8 min read Omaar Osmaan
Development | webdevstudios.com | Feb. 9, 2016

10 WebDevStudios Development Resources To Up Your Game!

WebDevStudios just published a list of their development resources- bookmark to get them in one go.

10 WebDevStudios Development Resources To Up Your Game!

Development | webdevstudios.com | Feb. 9, 2016

Some people make health a focus of their New Years Resolutions–not that being healthy shouldn’t be on a persons mind, but I like to use the New Year as a way to clean out the cobwebs of development. To think over the past year and decide what processes worked and didn’t and then wipe away those that failed. I usually start by cleaning out my git repos and local development. I like to think about any frameworks/libraries that I didn’t fully use over the past year and evaluate their worth. Some may have been used others are kicked to the curb. Now that I have a cleaned up development environment I like to see what new open source frameworks/libraries I could benefit from. 2015 was defiantly the year companies open sourced their code.
Its beneficial to create reusable code in projects so future projects can be more efficient. Over time we have created some open source development resources that you can add to your development tool belt. The list below contains plugins, frameworks and libraries that you can get from the WDS Github or WordPress plugin repo.
WDS Image Class library can be used in your theme template files to get an image whether it be a featured image, the first image in

10 min read Donna Cavalier
Development | make.wordpress.org | Nov. 18, 2015

WordPress Importer Redux

Finally, the WP importer is getting some love! Major renovations have already been made. Download and play with it. Yay!

WordPress Importer Redux

Development | make.wordpress.org | Nov. 18, 2015

Hi, I’m Ryan McCue. You may remember me from such projects as the REST API. I’m here today to talk about something a bit different: the WordPress Importer. The WordPress Importer is key to a tonne of different workflows, and is one of the most used plugins on the repo.
Unfortunately, the Importer is also a bit unloved. After getting immensely frustrated at the Importer, I figured it was probably time we throw some attention at it. I’ve been working on fixing this with a new and improved Importer!
If you’re interested in checking out this new version of the Importer, grab it from GitHub. It’s still some way from release, but the vast majority of functionality is already in place. The plan is to eventually replace the existing Importer with this new version.
The key to these Importer improvements is rewriting the core processing, taking experience with the current Importer and building to fix those specific problems. This means fixing and improving a whole raft of problems:
Way less memory usage: Testing shows memory usage to import a 41MB WXR file is down from 132MB to 19MB (less than half the actual file size!). This means no more splitting files just to get them to import!
Faster parser:

6 min read Joshua Strebel
Development | pagely.com | Aug. 24, 2015

We benchmarked Amazon's new Aurora database for use with WordPress. Results within.

Amazon's new Aurora database is on average 3x faster then RDS MySql for WordPress. Granted this compares 2 Amazon services.. Locally run MySql may be on par as you'd have next to zero latency, but we all know that does not scale as well.

We benchmarked Amazon's new Aurora database for use with WordPress. Results within.

Development | pagely.com | Aug. 24, 2015

As an Amazon advanced technology partner we get a first look at Amazon’s new products and tools. At last year’s RE:Invent Amazon announced a new database product called Aurora, which promised up to 5x performance gains on the same hardware AND would act as a drop-in replacement to MySQL. While we did see impressive gains across the board, on average Aurora RDS is 3x faster than MySql RDS when used with WordPress. Aurora is now in full production at Pagely and we’d like to share some data and thoughts on how it has improved performance for our WordPress hosting customers. Aurora Delivers Operational Improvements
Aurora features Fast failover which means things like a DB upgrade can be done without noticeable down time
Improved data in AWS dashboard (DDL/DML/Select throughput and latency, result set cache hit ratio) We have some of this in 3rd party monitoring, but it makes the day to day dashboard more useful.
Features built-in lag reporting/monitoring
Auto-scaling of underlying storage
Faster metadata access
Lower and more consistent slave lag
Our Testing Methodology.
Before moving Aurora into production use we wrote a custom script that logged every database action on 100 of our hosted

5 min read David McCan
Development | wptavern.com | Dec. 18, 2015

How Bruce Wampler Migrated 600 Theme Options to the WordPress Customizer

The Weaver Xtreme theme is a free theme that has hundreds of style options. This article looks at the experience of the developer in porting these options to use the WordPress customizer.

How Bruce Wampler Migrated 600 Theme Options to the WordPress Customizer

Development | wptavern.com | Dec. 18, 2015

When the WordPress theme review team announced it would require theme authors to use the customizer to build theme options, many voiced their displeasure in the comments. Bruce Wampler, lead developer of the Weaver Xtreme WordPress theme, commented that his theme received a death sentence due to the requirement. Eight months later, Wampler has changed his tune and is now in favor of the customizer to display theme options to users, “I must admit that I was among the many objectors to this requirement. After all, my theme has over 600 options, and that is a lot of code conversion,” he said.
In a case study published on the Weaver Xtreme website, Wampler describes why he’s now a fan of the customizer and explains the process of migrating 600 options to it.
Live Updates
One of the most compelling reasons he adopted the customizer is experiencing the live preview feature, “It is the WYSIWYG design paradigm, especially with ‘live update’ options, of the Customizer that have become totally compelling to me. Moving the mouse over the color selector and watching it change instantly on the site preview is just something you can’t give up once you’ve seen it,” he said.
Serious Performance Improvements

Quality WordPress Code by Design - Sniff Out PHP Smelly Code

Tonya from WP Developers Club makes a case for writing quality code

Quality WordPress Code by Design - Sniff Out PHP Smelly Code

tl;dr In this live presentation, which I gave this past weekend at Genesis Camp, you will learn what comprises "quality" WordPress and PHP code, which you will learn to do by design. You want to learn to sniff out that smelly code and refactor it. There are plenty of code examples too.
As a web developer, our code is our craft, our art. Our profession is not just a job. We craft and breath life into websites through the code that we create. It is an artform. With any artform, there are techniques to learn and master. In this live presentation, which I gave this past weekend at Genesis Camp, you will learn what comprises “quality” WordPress and PHP code, which you will learn to do by design. You want to learn to sniff out that smelly code and refactor it.
What You Gain
I can hear you through this monitor saying, “What’s in it for me.” When you write quality code, your code and projects are:
More predictable results and behaviors
Easier to maintain
Easier to edit and extend
Easier to test
And for you, here are your benefits:
Elevates your craft
Maximizes your fun factor!
Gain Respect
Gain Recognition
Projects take less time
And you gain more money.
What You Will Learn
ALWAYS Start with

4 min read David Bisset
Development | jeremyaboyd.com | Nov. 21, 2016

That Time I Brought Down Millions of WordPress Sites

We all make mistakes, and sometimes we need to hear about other's (larger potentially) mistakes to feel good.

That Time I Brought Down Millions of WordPress Sites

Development | jeremyaboyd.com | Nov. 21, 2016

I’m going to take you guys back to a time when I was doing some client work. I was at the time working on becoming a somebody in the WP Dev community. I attached myself to a really awesome designer George Wiscombe, and started working on a theme he designed called Handgloves. I began by widgetizing it (which was just starting to catch on — that probably dates me a little) then added a couple of built in social media hooks. I emailed him and told him I was working on it, and he released my changes, and because he is an AWESOME dude, gave me a byline on it.
We (Humankind) had a client that wanted a WordPress Multi-User (yep, before multi-site — dating myself yet again) installation for their interior design network, with an asset catalog that lived under the main root, but all the designers’ sites as sub-domains. We ran into a little problem, Handgloves used TimThumb, and TimThumb’s wordpress implementation at the time had a small problem. It was hard-coded to use only the local uploads folder by prepending the website URL to the uploads directory, then appending the image name.
I decided to do a quick fix for this, and post it up on my old personal blog.

Development | wptavern.com | Aug. 16, 2016

WordPress 4.6 “Pepper”: Streamlines Plugin and Theme Management

Smell That? It's the new fresh smell of WordPress 4.6. WPTavern does the walkthrough of features (good to share with clients).