Welcome to ManageWP.org

Register to share, discuss and vote for the best WordPress stories every day, find new ideas and inspiration for your business and network with other members of the WordPress community. Join the #1 WordPress news community!

×

17 min read Aline
Editorials | kinsta.com | Nov. 24, 2017

How to Start Your Food Blog - Complete Guide to Kickstart and Promote It

Great guide on how to start, promote and run a successful food blog with WordPress.

How to Start Your Food Blog - Complete Guide to Kickstart and Promote It

Editorials | kinsta.com | Nov. 24, 2017

There’s a blogging niche for just about every topic, with some topics dominating the popular interest moreso than others. And people flock to certain niches as they come into fashion. Speaking of fashion, sometimes niches evolve to take on new meanings. Fashion has become lifestyle, has become travel—you get the idea. While some niches are trendy, others are timeless. The perfect example is the niche of food blogging, which seems to never quite go out of style thanks to a super receptive audience of hungry patrons. Everyone’s gotta eat and many flock to the internet to seek out information regarding how to do it with regards to certain dietary restrictions, allergies, and ideas for improving on dishes you already know.
Thanks to the popularity of food blogging (both in terms of available resources and audience size), those with specific dietary needs and preferences don’t have to settle—they can consult the blogosphere to empower the creation of a meal that tastes amazing regardless of what restrictions they have.
Let’s go through the process for how to start a food blog, starting with the all-important why.
Why Start A Food Blog
It seems clear as

Editorials | wptavern.com | Jun. 4, 2017

Open Sourcing Mental Illness Surpasses $50K Fundraising Goal

Open Sourcing Mental Illness (OSMI), a non-profit organization that raises mental health awareness raised over $50k fundraising goal, and companies like Github, Digital Ocean, and Laravel help, and WebDevStudios & WP Elevation helped from WP Community as well.

Open Sourcing Mental Illness Surpasses $50K Fundraising Goal

Editorials | wptavern.com | Jun. 4, 2017

Open Sourcing Mental Illness (OSMI), a non-profit organization that raises mental health awareness in the tech community, has surpassed its $50K fundraising goal for 2017. Ed Finkler, who founded OSMI in 2013, left his position as CTO of Graph Story to work full-time on speaking, educating, and providing resources to support mental wellness in the tech and open source communities. As of today, the campaign has raised more than $58,000. In addition to donations from individuals, OSMI has added several corporate sponsors, including CakeDC, Github, Digital Ocean, and Laravel. CakeDC has designated $1,000/month for 12 months to support Finkler’s salary. Finkler works together with a board of directors and a team of volunteers who also speak at conferences about mental health in tech. Several WordPress companies have also been involved in raising support for OSMI, including WebDevStudios and WP Elevation.
OSMI conducts an annual Mental Health in Tech survey as part of ongoing research. Last year’s survey received more than 1,500 responses and the results underscore the great need for removing the stigma surrounding mental illness in the tech industry. A few examples Finkler highlighted

16 min read Scott Winterroth
Editorials | swinterroth.com | Oct. 11, 2017

The possibilities of WordPress for the non designer, non coder.

This is my personal story of my journey into WordPress. I hope you find this inspirational but, if you're trolling, don't expect to learn anything except maybe more about how WordPress helped me.

The possibilities of WordPress for the non designer, non coder.

Editorials | swinterroth.com | Oct. 11, 2017

For those with experience in programming and design, the desire to conquer WordPress makes perfect sense. It provides a fantastic pre-built platform to build and maintain all sorts of websites. My history with the project comes from a slightly different angle. It maybe wasn’t the most profitable or logical path. I didn’t start a theme company or provide hosting services at a large scale. I’m not even a member of the developer or designer categories, although sometimes I’m grouped in with them because I offer WordPress services to clients and they just assume that I know a bunch of code. While I have learned quite a bit of code by osmosis over the last 10 plus years, I’m very proud to say that I am simply a WordPress user and I’m so grateful for everything that I have achieved with WordPress. My journey from idea to WordPress.
It was July 19, 2008, in a farm field turned makeshift concert venue somewhere in the middle of Illinois. I and four of my friends had just experienced what would become one of the most life-altering music concert of my life (Okay, I was 20 something) By the end of the concert, and after a few fishbowl drinks, it became crystal

2 min read Codeinwp
Editorials | codeinwp.com | Nov. 11, 2016

Divi vs Avada vs X Theme: Ultimate Comparison (2016)

Karol spent 1 week doing real tests and gathering feedback from the community on the topic, this is not about a winner, but a well-researched article.

Divi vs Avada vs X Theme: Ultimate Comparison (2016)

Editorials | codeinwp.com | Nov. 11, 2016

This is an in-depth comparison of Divi vs Avada vs X Theme – what you’ll learn here is which of the three is the optimal solution for building client websites (or feature-rich websites of your own too). We’ve really come a long way since WordPress ver. 1.5 when themes were first introduced. For a long time themes were just skins – simple packages that took care of displaying what’s in the database. The most basic WordPress theme used to be, I don’t know, 100kB (that including the 50kB screenshot)?
Now, however, things are different. Very different!
Although I wasn’t expecting any particular package size when I first downloaded Divi, I was still quite surprised to see 25MB of WordPress theme on my desktop. For the record: more than twice the size of WordPress itself. This at least deserves a “wow!”
But, more importantly, what do we get in those huge two-digit megabyte-sized themes exactly?
Let’s find out.
What you’re about to read is an in-depth comparison of three of the most popular mega themes on the market: Divi, Avada, and X.

11 min read Ben Gillbanks
Editorials | content.nanobox.io | Apr. 1, 2017

Why Developers Hate WordPress

An interesting opinion piece about why developers hate WordPress. I find it interesting that the WordPress code is not directly managed. No mention of OOP (or other code practices) that normally rear their head when talking about what could be improved in WordPress.

Why Developers Hate WordPress

Editorials | content.nanobox.io | Apr. 1, 2017

This article is the opinion of the author and does not represent the official stance of Nanobox. I have a feeling that if you're here, you either strongly agree or disagree with the title of this article. That's fine. This is an opinion piece, so feel free to feel however you'd like. But I have data to back me up! According to the 2017 Stack Overflow Developer Survey, 64.5% of respondents said they dread WordPress. It's the 3rd most dreaded platforms of those they included in their survey.
I want to talk about why developers – the people who are knee-deep in the code; who could and would rather build a custom solution; those who are expected to make it work and work well – hate WordPress. This list is by no means exhaustive, but represents common pain-points I've found from my own personal experience and experiences others have shared with me.
First, the Redeeming Qualities
Before getting into the pain-points, I feel I have to mention the things WordPress does well.
To start, it's dead simple to install and setup. With a basic Apache/MySQL/PHP stack in place, you can be up and running in a matter of minutes.
WordPress is really easy to customize. The catalog of themes and

6 min read John Locke

GoDaddy Is Doing Everything Right - Sure Fire Web Services

Jonathan Perez explains why GoDaddy is positioning itself to be one of the biggest players in the WordPress space.

GoDaddy Is Doing Everything Right - Sure Fire Web Services

I gotta be honest. GoDaddy is blowing my mind right now., especially when it comes to the WordPress community. Just a few years ago, they were the bane to any developer who made websites. Today, things are looking quite different. Even though many people still won’t like them, usually based on some bad experiences that just leave a bad taste in the mouth, you have to respect what they’re doing. Today, things are looking quite different. Even though many people still won’t like them, usually based on some bad experiences that just leave a bad taste in the mouth, you have to respect what they’re doing.
The genius of GoDaddy
Acquisitions. Plain and simple. GoDaddy is buying up the WordPress market left and right!
Let’s be honest, a few years ago, GoDaddy sucked. I mean it was the worst. Just take a look at the post I wrote, and you’ll see it flooded with comments of how much people do not like GoDaddy.
They launched a new WordPress hosting initiative, and that’s when things really started to take off. I had the honor of having one of their accounts, and I had no issues with it at all. It was pretty solid, and very easy to use.
Then they acquired

23 min read Ivan Jurisic
Editorials | winningwp.com | Sep. 10, 2016

What Is Managed WordPress Hosting and When Is It Worth Paying For?

Your WordPress site is a valuable asset. As with any asset, you want to make sure it’s secure, it runs efficiently, and is in the best possible hands. Managed WordPress hosting can be the solution, but it isn’t an absolute cure-all! Learn more about it.

What Is Managed WordPress Hosting and When Is It Worth Paying For?

Editorials | winningwp.com | Sep. 10, 2016

Your WordPress site is a valuable asset. As with any asset, you want to make sure it’s secure, it runs efficiently, and is in the best possible hands. Managed WordPress hosting can be the solution, but it isn’t an absolute cure-all! In this article, I’ll explain exactly what managed WordPress hosting is, when you should choose it, whether it’s worth the additional cost, and the various things to keep in mind when choosing a hosting service (plus a few recommendations). Let’s get started…
But First: The Basics Of Hosting
Let’s begin at the beginning — always a good place to start! To make the best decision possible, you have to understand what various hosting packages contain and how they affect your site. Let’s start with a broad definition of hosting.
“Hosting (or web hosting) is a type of service required to both store data and make websites accessible online (i.e. publicly accessible to people using the internet).”
Hosting is a service you buy from a company. In some cases this service includes only the absolute bare minimum — really just a publicly accessible place to store your website online. Other packages

6 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | mediatemple.net | Feb. 1, 2018

The WordPress Philosophy: What Is It and Why Should ... - Media Temple

This is the first of a series on the WordPress Philosophy. What is it and why does it matter. A new article will be published each month of this year.

The WordPress Philosophy: What Is It and Why Should ... - Media Temple

Editorials | mediatemple.net | Feb. 1, 2018

Have you ever installed a plugin into your WordPress website and thought, “Ummm… that’s different”? Something about it just stood out as not quite right. The settings felt strange, or there were way too many settings, or maybe it changed parts of your site in ways you didn’t expect. Most often this experience involves a plugin or a theme that doesn’t do things “The WordPress Way.” If you’ve ever heard that phrase, it probably sounded a bit mysterious. That’s because while “The WordPress Way” does have a definition, it’s still a bit fuzzy; it’s not so simple to boil it down to a sentence or two. It’s not merely about the settings interface, or where to put the menus — it’s a whole philosophy of understanding user experience, development, and even freedom itself.
This series is about the WordPress Philosophy. Yes, WordPress has an actual philosophy! This simple document will hold a lot of sway over everything that you interact with in your WordPress admin.
By the end of this series, you’ll have a stronger grasp of the WordPress Philosophy. You’ll be empowered to make more

10 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | mediatemple.net | 28 days ago

The WordPress Philosophy: The Four Freedoms - Media Temple

Second of the series on the WordPress Philosophy. We start at the end: The Four Freedoms, or the Bill of Rights. These I believe are fundamental for all the other freedoms.

The WordPress Philosophy: The Four Freedoms - Media Temple

Editorials | mediatemple.net | 28 days ago

This is the second post in a series on the WordPress Philosophy. Last month I described why WordPress has a Philosophy and why WordPress users should care about that and understand it. This article is the first of 8 that will explore the tenants of the WordPress Philosophy. We’re going to start at the end. The most foundational tenant of the WordPress Philosophy is the last one: “Our Bill of Rights”. I believe this is foundational to understanding all the previous tenants of the philosophy.
Similarly to the United States of America’s Bill of Rights, this Bill of Rights is all about freedom. This is often called “The Four Freedoms”:
The freedom to run the program, for any purpose.
The freedom to study how the program works, and change it to make it do what you wish.
The freedom to redistribute.
The freedom to distribute copies of your modified versions to others.
The Four Freedom’s come from what is often called the GNU Manifesto by Richard Stallman. This is one of the foundational documents that launched the Open Source movement. It’s a valuable and insightful read that I highly recommend everyone read.
The WP Bill of Rights opens by acknowledging

16 min read Tevya
Editorials | wptavern.com | 29 days ago

Why Gutenberg and Why Now?

The question "why Gutenberg and why now?" Doesn't seem to be one that I've seen answered clearly anywhere. I attempt to answer it clearly in this guest post on the WP Tavern.

Why Gutenberg and Why Now?

Editorials | wptavern.com | 29 days ago

Tevya Washburn has been building websites for more than 20 years and building them on WordPress for 10. He bootstrapped his website maintenance and support company, WordXpress, that he’s worked on full-time for more than seven years. Late last year he launched his first premium plugin, and presented at WordCamp Salt Lake City. He lives in Caldwell, ID and is the founding member of the WordPress Meetup group in Western Idaho.
It was only a few months ago that I knew almost nothing about WordPress’ new Gutenberg editor. I had a basic concept of what it was and this vague annoyance that it would mean I’d have to learn new things and probably put a lot of effort into making some sites or projects work with it.
I kept hearing all of the frustration and issues with Gutenberg itself and the lack of information on how to integrate with it. At WordXpress we recently pivoted away from designing websites. When we designed them in the past, we used premium themes. I figured Gutenberg was the theme developer’s problem.
I still had this feeling of dread though, knowing many of my favorite plugins might not add support for it. I also felt some apprehension that even if the

16 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | wordimpress.com | Jun. 30, 2017

What Does Gutenberg Mean for Plugin Authors?

I decided to take a deep-dive into what Gutenberg might mean for the broader WP ecosystem. Content authors, plugin authors, and page builders all have different ways they may have to pivot once its in Core.

What Does Gutenberg Mean for Plugin Authors?

Editorials | wordimpress.com | Jun. 30, 2017

I chatted with some prominent plugin authors, page builder authors, and Gutenberg contributors to understand how Gutenberg could impact the broader WordPress ecosystem. This article discusses how it can impact content authors, plugin authors, and page builder plugins in the near future. Gutenberg is the proposed new content editor for WordPress Core. It is currently in beta development. It is a radical departure from the simple WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) approach WordPress has traditionally had for content creation. As with any major change in WordPress, this will inevitably have ripple effects throughout the WordPress marketplace. With that in mind, here’s my take on how Gutenberg will affect the broader WordPress ecosystem.
The Awesome for WordPress Content Creators
From everything I’ve seen, the main motivation — primarily from WordPress co-creator Matt Mullenweg — is to dramatically improve end users’ experience with content creation in WordPress. With the advent of website builders like Squarespace and Wix, a cleaner WYSIWYG in Medium, and the plethora of full-featured page building WordPress plugins, the simple post editor has started

8 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | givewp.com | 26 days ago

Auditing Your WordPress Plugin for Gutenberg – GiveWP

Insights from the internal process we've been going through at GiveWP for integrating with Gutenberg.

Auditing Your WordPress Plugin for Gutenberg – GiveWP

Editorials | givewp.com | 26 days ago

With its growing list of features and blocks, it’s difficult to know where to begin in preparing an existing WordPress plugin for Gutenberg. That’s why we’re going back to the start to focus on the one change that has kept us most excited about Gutenberg since day one—the block and its ability to unify the content creation interface. Unifying Content Creation in WordPress
Before reimagining how our Give plugin will integrate with Gutenberg, it’s important to first understand the focus of the new editor and the problems it aims to solve. Like most of the WordPress community, we got our first glimpse of the Gutenberg vision through Matt Mullenweg’s early description of the project:
“The editor will create a new page- and post-building experience that makes writing rich posts effortless, and has ‘blocks’ to make it easy what today might take shortcodes, custom HTML, or ‘mystery meat’ embed discovery.” —Matt Mullenweg
For all of their quirks, the shortcodes and “mystery meat” that Mullenweg mentions represent some of the most powerful and relied upon functionality of Give and thousands of other plugins

Editorials | woorkup.com | Dec. 15, 2017

Why You Should Wait to Update WordPress Plugins and Themes

We love shiny new things, but sometimes it's better to wait a week or two to update plugins/themes. Unless of course there is a security update! WordPress life :)

Why You Should Wait to Update WordPress Plugins and Themes

Editorials | woorkup.com | Dec. 15, 2017

I have used WordPress going on 10 years now. It’s awesome, and I couldn’t imagine myself working with anything else. However, just like with every platform, there are ways to go about forming what I call “good and safe” habits. Today I want to discuss a little bit about updating WordPress plugins and why I typically recommend users to wait before updating to the shiny new version. Trust me, this will cause you less stress in the long run.

6 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | calderaforms.com | Jan. 30, 2018

Why Not To Create A WordPress Contact Form Without A Plugin

While you absolutely could paste in an HTML form into your WordPress site; you really shouldn't. There's much more that goes into forms that you really don't want to worry about.

Why Not To Create A WordPress Contact Form Without A Plugin

Editorials | calderaforms.com | Jan. 30, 2018

It’s not uncommon for me to be asked why you shouldn’t just write your own form, without a plugin using PHP and JavaScript code to add a form to your WordPress site. This is one of the things that happens since I create a WordPress form builder plugin for a living, all totally normal. Also, it’s a totally reasonable question and I’m a nerd, so let’s do this. Technically speaking, to process a form you need an HTML form — something you can write in your page template and an endpoint to process the form request and WordPress provides a lot of options for creating custom endpoints on a site. Here is a nice long article I wrote about four of those options.
But don’t. Making a WordPress contact form without a plugin is, most of the time, not worth it.
Look — I’m the guy who makes a form builder plugin so I have a bit of an interest in people using a WordPress form builder. But, I also spent the last few years obsessing over a web form that creates other web forms. This is something I’ve thought a lot about. Probably thought too much about.
Faster to Prototype & Faster to Finished Product
A form, no matter how you build it, is

5 min read Eric Karkovack
Editorials | speckyboy.com | 6 days ago

Why the Gutenberg WordPress Editor Excites Me

We'll see how the execution of the release goes. But what Gutenberg represents has grown on me quite a bit.

Why the Gutenberg WordPress Editor Excites Me

Editorials | speckyboy.com | 6 days ago

Those of us who work with WordPress on a daily basis have been keeping close tabs on Gutenberg, the completely revamped editor scheduled to be released with version 5.0 of the world’s most popular CMS. It looks like it will be a monumental change to the way we create and edit our web content. And, that of course has led to a ton of concern about existing sites breaking – either due to an unsupported plugin or some other code gremlin that feasts on our hard work.
But the optimist in me (sometimes I have to dig really far down to find it) is actually excited for this change – or, at least what it represents. Here’s why:
WordPress Needs More Layout Flexibility
I’m very much into customizing WordPress through various methods, with custom fields being my favorite. I also refuse to use a page builder plugin because of the (perceived) bloat. That leaves me between a rock and a hard place when trying to do something more than a standard one column layout.
Doing this with custom fields works well enough. But there is some setup involved that takes time away from other tasks on my to-do list. It’s a process of setting up the fields and then adding code to my

17 min read Matt Medeiros
Editorials | mattreport.com | Nov. 14, 2017

The blue-collar WordPress worker and the 2,500+ websites built to grow the CMS

Recently, I've been fascinated with the growth of WordPress influenced by consultants. I published 20 quotes from consultants that total 2,000+ WordPress websites.

The blue-collar WordPress worker and the 2,500+ websites built to grow the CMS

Editorials | mattreport.com | Nov. 14, 2017

I’m not foolish enough to think that the entirety of WordPress’ growth is driven by our love for the software, but that we consultants are responsible for a sizeable portion of it. A portion that shouldn’t be ignored and one that should be welcome to the discussion more often. Under-represented. Perhaps.
You can listen to the audio version
I know many of you are like me, we don’t run 100+ person agencies, we don’t have 1mil+ plugin downloads, and we haven’t been contributing code to core for the last decade. However, what we do share in common is a life of servicing customers in the online business space. Servicing customers or our local community by way of building websites — helping organizations amplify their message.
This act of service is deeply rooted in using our favorite tool, WordPress.
Sure, we’re talking less and less about the tech side of things lately, but we know that it delivers a massive advantage as a platform to our customers. An advantage that might not matter to them in the short-term, but in the long-term sustainability of their business.
While many might join the ranks of offering WordPress services simply for the

13 min read Aline
Editorials | arrayinternet.com | Dec. 15, 2017

Why use WordPress: Reasons and tips for using the most popular CMS

Good reasons why WordPress is the most popular CMS and why you may want to give it a try for your next website.

Why use WordPress: Reasons and tips for using the most popular CMS

Editorials | arrayinternet.com | Dec. 15, 2017

Why use WordPress for your website? WordPress is a popular content management system recommended by some of the biggest names in the blogging industry. Whether you’re a beginner or an advanced user, WordPress allows you to create either a simple weblog (blog) or you can use WordPress as a comprehensive CMS for advanced high-volume websites and all kinds of purposes with comparative ease. If you’ve never used WordPress, you may be wondering what all the fuss is about. This is especially true if you’re getting ready to build your first website or if a client is interested in using this CMS. You could use a free blogging platform as well as another CMS or an all-in-one site builder, so why use WordPress? That’s what we’re going to cover in this post. Let’s get started digging into why WordPress is the most popular CMS.
What is WordPress?
Before we get into the Why use WordPress section of this post, let’s go over what WordPress is and who uses it. WordPress is what’s known as a “content management system”. The technical definition says it’s “a web-based application that allows multiple users to manage content, data

Editorials | wordfence.com | Sep. 13, 2017

The Man Behind Plugin Spam: Mason Soiza

Just your average snitch post showing who the bad guys are.

26 min read Donna Cavalier
Editorials | wpshout.com | Dec. 6, 2017

This Changes Everything: Gutenberg is Good Now

It seems a bit like a mama crocodile eating her babies—certainly that’s how I’d feel right about now if I’d worked hard on a page builder.

This Changes Everything: Gutenberg is Good Now

Editorials | wpshout.com | Dec. 6, 2017

At WordCamp US, it became clear that the Gutenberg editor is a tangible improvement to WordPress—and, more importantly, is really going to happen. We’ve just returned from this year’s WordCamp US. In addition to the wonderful opportunity to catch up with the community, we also got to be there for one piece of colossal news: Gutenberg is actually good now.
In two tech demos (by Morten Rand-Hendriksen, and then by Matt Mullenweg at the State of the Word), Gutenberg live-demoed as a feature-rich content editor that has made astonishing progress since I last looked closely at it several months ago.
At that time, along with much of the community, I was very skeptical about what Gutenberg was going to be, and whether it would be a meaningful improvement over doing nothing. At WordCamp US, it became very clear that Gutenberg is a Real Thing that is a tangible improvement to WordPress—and, more importantly, is really going to happen.
This article takes a look at what Gutenberg is, what it aims to be, and its vast implications for WordPress as a software ecosystem.
How Gutenberg is Right Now
As of early December 2017, Gutenberg is okay. It’s probably better overall

9 min read Aline
Editorials | arrayinternet.com | Oct. 26, 2017

A beginner's guide to start podcasting on your WordPress site

Introduction to podcasting for beginners including some helpful suggestions and tools to implement podcasts on WordPress sites.

A beginner's guide to start podcasting on your WordPress site

Editorials | arrayinternet.com | Oct. 26, 2017

No matter what niche or field you’re passionate about, you can probably find a podcast in it. And maybe you’ve even already thought to yourself, Hey, I could do that…. Well, you probably can do that. While podcasting can be a technically complex undertaking, it’s really not all that difficult. There has never been a better time to dive into podcasting than it is right now. You simply need to understand the basics, be willing to work hard (especially at first), and be consistent about it. And judging by the auto-fill suggestions in Google, more people than ever are interested in creating their own podcasts. So we’ll cover the basics & best practices for podcasting in WordPress in this article.
What is podcasting, anyway?
Let’s start by defining the term podcasting – or rather, by letting Google pick a definition for us:
That’s really all there is to it – a streamable, downloadable audio file in episodic format to which listeners can subscribe. However, there’s quite a lot of variation in modern podcasting. Probably the most familiar podcast recently was the insanely popular Serial podcast, which helped to win a convicted

10 min read David Bisset
Editorials | torquemag.io | Sep. 29, 2017

Blockchain Technology Will Change WordPress

Josh shows off cool applications of Blockchain Technology. It's a question of how, not when. Ready for the next tech leap?

Blockchain Technology Will Change WordPress

Editorials | torquemag.io | Sep. 29, 2017

Bitcoin — the first decentralized currency — has been around for over eight years now. In the past, I was dismissive of it and other cryptocurrencies. The fact that cryptocurrency like Bitcoin has the potential to radically reform banking is not lost on me but is way outside of the scope of this article. Yes, that’s exciting to me. No, I don’t think crypto is a magical cure for what is wrong with global capitalism, but that’s really not the point here.
When I started looking into things further, and I’m super excited about the technology behind Bitcoin, blockchain.
What Is A Blockchain?
My conceptual misunderstanding of Bitcoin when I first became aware of it, was I thought of coins as being awarded for doing computation. Yes, that is is how Bitcoin works, coins are distributed amongst those providing processing power to verify transactions. It’s a smart way to incentivize adding the computational resources the system needs.
While the coins are created through “mining” they can be exchanged for Dollars, Euros or other traditional currencies. This gives them value and an incentive to convert old currency into Bitcoin.
The mechanism

Editorials | yoast.com | Oct. 3, 2017

An alternative approach to Gutenberg • Yoast

Some great, simple (in the scheme of things) suggested improvements to Gutenberg from the team at Yoast. One of the biggest plugin authors is saying they're concerned about the timeline and scale of changes.

An alternative approach to Gutenberg • Yoast

Editorials | yoast.com | Oct. 3, 2017

There’s a lot of discussion in the WordPress world right now about a new editing experience that’s in the making. It’s called Gutenberg. While some of that discussion is technical, every user that uses WordPress regularly should be aware of what’s coming. At Yoast, we are quite excited about the concept of Gutenberg. We think it could be a great improvement. At the same time, we have our worries about the speed in which the project is being pushed forward. And, we’re not excited about all the changes. In this post I’ll first try to explain what Gutenberg is. Subsequently, I will tell you about the things that are problematic to us. Finally, I will tell and show you what we think should be done about the problems.
What is Gutenberg?
Gutenberg is a new approach to how we edit posts in WordPress. It’s basically a new editor. It tries to remove a lot of the fluff that we built up over the years. The intent is to make the new experience lighter and more modern. The end-goal is to make WordPress easier to use. That’s something we really appreciate at Yoast.
Gutenberg introduces the concept of “blocks“. The new editor will be a block-editor:

14 min read Aline
Editorials | hermesthemes.com | Sep. 13, 2017

The Current State of Hotel Websites (September 2017)

Dumitru Brinzan has analyzed over 705,000 websites and published extensive research data about the current state of hotel websites.

The Current State of Hotel Websites (September 2017)

Editorials | hermesthemes.com | Sep. 13, 2017

At the beginning of 2017 I wanted to do a very specific analysis of HermesThemes client websites. I was curious to see how many customers keep their WordPress websites up to date. One thing lead to another and I ended up creating my very own search engine that is able to achieve some interesting things.
During July-September 2017 I have analyzed over 705,000 hotel websites from 150+ countries.
I am publishing the results of my research ~2 months ahead of the Digital Strategies for Travel Europe 2017 conference that will take place in Amsterdam (29-30 November), a conference that I will be attending. Get in touch if you would like to meet and have a quick chat there.
About This Research
Who Is This For?
I believe that this data will be mostly useful to the following categories of people:
IT and Marketing people working in/for the lodging industry;
Web developers and web designers;
Hotel owners and hotel managers;
Social Media Experts;
The Search Engine Optimization Community.
Content Management Systems (CMS)
There are a lot of ways to build websites: static HTML files, free content management systems (CMS), licensed content management systems, proprietary (custom) website engines, etc.

11 min read Aline
Editorials | arrayinternet.com | Dec. 23, 2017

WordPress Backup: Regularly backup your WordPress site and database

It’s better to be safe than sorry. An article on WordPress backups and why it's important to ensure that you have a regular WordPress backup routine. Remember: The most expensive backup is the one you never did!

WordPress Backup: Regularly backup your WordPress site and database

Editorials | arrayinternet.com | Dec. 23, 2017

Site maintenance and management are essential and crucial aspects of running a WordPress website. One important element is a regular WordPress backup routine. In the early days of the internet there were mostly simple HTML sites tailored together, and back then – backups were not really something that people thought much of. Nowadays times have changed and nearly every website, blog, or professional news magazine out there is relying on some sort of database management for storing and accessing data. Your valuable content and data is what makes your website worth visiting. In case of server crashes, hard drive failures, natural disasters, hacker attacks or other major issues with your website, that data can easily get lost. You can avoid this by backing up your WordPress site.
5 Common mistakes when dealing with WordPress backups
It’s better to be safe than sorry. If you dig deep enough, you can find plenty of stories circulating the web where webmasters were dealing with server crashes or other issues that caused all their data to disappear. It’s really not that uncommon! Although these days reliable hosting companies usually perform daily backups for their customers,