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6 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | mediatemple.net | 18 days ago

The WordPress Philosophy: What Is It and Why Should ... - Media Temple

This is the first of a series on the WordPress Philosophy. What is it and why does it matter. A new article will be published each month of this year.

The WordPress Philosophy: What Is It and Why Should ... - Media Temple

Editorials | mediatemple.net | 18 days ago

Have you ever installed a plugin into your WordPress website and thought, “Ummm… that’s different”? Something about it just stood out as not quite right. The settings felt strange, or there were way too many settings, or maybe it changed parts of your site in ways you didn’t expect. Most often this experience involves a plugin or a theme that doesn’t do things “The WordPress Way.” If you’ve ever heard that phrase, it probably sounded a bit mysterious. That’s because while “The WordPress Way” does have a definition, it’s still a bit fuzzy; it’s not so simple to boil it down to a sentence or two. It’s not merely about the settings interface, or where to put the menus — it’s a whole philosophy of understanding user experience, development, and even freedom itself.
This series is about the WordPress Philosophy. Yes, WordPress has an actual philosophy! This simple document will hold a lot of sway over everything that you interact with in your WordPress admin.
By the end of this series, you’ll have a stronger grasp of the WordPress Philosophy. You’ll be empowered to make more

10 min read Benjamin Bradley
Editorials | webdesignerdepot.com | Sep. 27, 2017

Will Gutenberg Kill Page Builders

An interesting take that Gutenberg is meant to eliminate page builder fragmentation, but I'm wondering if Page Builders will continue on and "out-iterate" Gutenberg.

Will Gutenberg Kill Page Builders

Editorials | webdesignerdepot.com | Sep. 27, 2017

The WordPress content management system has built quite an empire for itself, with a community of passionate fans that help push it to new heights. It’s the customizability of the platform that has everyone so excited about the possibilities, and the fact that WordPress powers over 75 million websites (or 28.5% of the internet) means that the possibilities are all but endless. New plugins, themes, and versions of the WordPress software are released on a regular basis. But WordPress isn’t without its challenges and deficiencies, which the active WordPress community is vocal about calling to the light. To give a few examples, there’s the fact that you can’t duplicate blog posts and the fact that the visual editor hasn’t been updated in a long time.
The funny and awesome thing about the WordPress community is that when they find a problem, they don’t wait for the official fix. WordPress is an open source software program, which empowers members of the community to create all of the functionality they need on their own. The result? Plugins like Duplicate Post, which allow you to duplicate your posts, and Beaver Builder and Divi, which are WYSIWYG page

7 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | ttmm.io | May. 18, 2017

WordPress.com is not WordPress - Things That Matter Most

Skip to the section "WordPress is not WordPress" -- that's the most important read. A controversial opinion but a conversation worth having.

WordPress.com is not WordPress - Things That Matter Most

Editorials | ttmm.io | May. 18, 2017

A story I enjoy retelling is how a friend of mine tricked me into using WordPress. At the time, I was working with him on a career mentorship project. He’d written a book that I was publishing, and we wanted to add a premium video series to go along with it. We just needed a way to host those videos online.
I was still very new to web development. I had built my own portfolio site in PHP, having learned PHP through a series of emails from a good friend in Arizona. My business partner was excited about the prospect of a dynamic website and turned me loose to find the right tool.
I settled on … not WordPress.
A few days later, he invited me to lunch downtown. Having no real job and, since our project wouldn’t be launched or profitable for a few months, I had no money and was thrilled at the thought of a free lunch. I parked downtown and met at an obscure office building … where the first ever WordCamp Portland was being held.
Spending the day with a bunch of WordPress geeks was fun and excited me about the tool. I switched gears and rebuilt our site on WordPress. I rebuilt my own site on WordPress. I started publishing plugins and a few themes for WordPress.

5 min read Ross Johnson
Editorials | 3.7designs.co | Aug. 30, 2017

The Need for NonCamps

Some thoughts on non-WordCamp conferences and how the community might benefit from having more of them.

The Need for NonCamps

Editorials | 3.7designs.co | Aug. 30, 2017

2017 was the year of my foray into non-Camp WordPress conferences. They’ve changed my perspective on the WordPress conference landscape. Years ago when Pressnomics was first announced, I questioned the need for a non-camp focused conference. Couldn’t we discuss business topics at a WordCamp? Is this a way to get around the rules put in place by the foundation? Does WordPress really need independent conferences outside of WordCamps? While many of my WordPress friends attend more WordCamps in a year than I have in my career, I have witnessed an evolution of camps since my first attendance of WordCamp Detroit in 2010. Seven years ago the community was in its infancy, and the platform was much less capable. Since then, the landscape has evolved in a multi-dimensional way. Capabilities, audience, ecosystem, and everything in between has become more sophisticated.
WordCamps, by design, are inclusive of everyone at any level. The idea being you should be able to get something out of a WordCamp regardless if you’ve just discovered WordPress the day prior or you’re a multi-skilled WordPress veteran. This accessibility is a large part of what’s made WordPress so

Editorials | purposethemes.com | Sep. 19, 2016

Visual Page Builder for WordPress Creates More Problems than It Solves

A very fruitful discussion between Pippin Williamson, Syed Balkhi, Bryan Gardner, Nathan Rice happened about the use of Page Builder.

Visual Page Builder for WordPress Creates More Problems than It Solves

Editorials | purposethemes.com | Sep. 19, 2016

Online Market is full of DIY (Do It Yourself) visual page builder for WordPress CMS. Popular ones like Visual Composer, Beaver Builder, Divi Builder, Avada Fusion Builder etc. are having thousands of downloads. It means lot many people are using these plugins or probably themes with which these builders are shipped with. In this article, I am trying to find out whether the page builders are solving a short term problem or may create long term issue on your WordPress site. Why People Install a Page Builder?
The basic feature of any page builder is to allow you create a nice looking, multi-column pages with different elements without writing any piece of code. If you are a non-technical person, still you can use the drag and drop method to create nice landing pages with these builders. Visual Composer plugin is having limited elements whereas Divi builder comes with more elements including Pricing Table, Multiple Circle Counter etc.
So basically people who are not comfortable with coding or don’t want to invest time on designing a landing page, use page builders. It helps in putting call to action button, maps, accordion text, sliders, multi-column feature showcase by just dragging

Editorials | kinsta.com | Mar. 2, 2017

Behind the Scenes - Launching a Premium WordPress Coupon Plugin

Check out this behind the scenes look at some of the decisions and lessons learned from the first attempt at launching a premium WordPress plugin.

Behind the Scenes - Launching a Premium WordPress Coupon Plugin

Editorials | kinsta.com | Mar. 2, 2017

The affiliate marketing space is booming, and has grown into a very important and effective channel for driving sales. Thanks in a big part to WordPress, many internet marketers are now working from home and making a living from their websites. It is typical for a consumer nowadays to lookup reviews online when they are contemplating a new purchasing. And while this might be seen as a good or bad, internet marketers are right there, waiting to capitalize on this traffic. Besides working full-time here at Kinsta, I also develop and support a premium WordPress coupon plugin, specifically targeted towards affiliate marketers. Today I am going to take you on a little behind the scenes look at how it came about and some of the challenges faced when launching a plugin for the first time. Affiliate Marketing Growth
According to a 2016 Rakuten Affiliate Network study, the US affiliate marketing spend will increase at a compound annual growth rate of 10.1% percent between 2015 and 2020, to an estimated $6.8 billion industry. And to put this into perspective, in 2016 the New York Time’s print advertising fell 16%. As the world wide web continues to grow, a lot of advertising is now shifting

5 min read David Bisset
Editorials | tommcfarlin.com | Jan. 17, 2017

WordPress Versus Medium: Does It Really Matter?

Shower thoughts from Tom McFarlin: when it comes to competition should we limit ourselves to a single player in publishing segment of the web?

WordPress Versus Medium: Does It Really Matter?

Editorials | tommcfarlin.com | Jan. 17, 2017

This past weekend, I spent time closing a bunch of sites, exporting content from one service to another, preparing to consolidate a couple of sites, and even shutting some sites down. But the number one thing that has resulted in a weird bit of feedback is the idea that I opted to archive my data from Medium in preparing to move it to a WordPress-based site. This resulted in some weird WordPress versus Medium points from others.
Truthfully, I know this kind of argument will never die. But I digress for now.
And, I suppose, the reason this is weird is that I – like many who use WordPress – want the control that comes with owning your data. Perhaps it’s also about playing in someone else’s sandbox, too, right?
But there’s an inherent problem with sticking only with one CMS and neglecting what the rest of the industry is doing.
WordPress Versus Medium
I don’t know anyone who considers themselves a web developer and works with WordPress and doesn’t like the extensibility that the platform offers.
But take a step back and look at WordPress from 150,000 feet. This piece of software does a lot. And that’s great, right? Even the new [good-looking]

Editorials | kinsta.com | Feb. 8, 2017

An Introduction to a WordPress Multisite Setup

Got lots of sites? No problem. Learn more about WordPress Multisite and how you can utilize it to turn your single WordPress website into a network of independent sites.

An Introduction to a WordPress Multisite Setup

Editorials | kinsta.com | Feb. 8, 2017

WordPress Multisite is a collection of independent websites sharing the same WordPress installation. The sites in the network are virtual sites, meaning that they do not have their own directory on the server, although they do have separate directories for media uploads and separate tables in the database. In this post I will introduce you to WordPress Multisite. It will be a basic user guide aiming to point out the pros and cons of Multisite vs single site installations, and to show you how to turn a single WordPress site into a Multisite network.
First, I will try to give you an idea of the many reasons you may have to install a network, and conversely of the many factors that could prevent you from installing a Multisite. Following, I will provide an overview of the available types of networks, I will describe the main characteristics of each type, and the system requirements that could force you to choose a type instead of another. Finally, we will dive deep into the installation process, and I will show you how straightforward it is migrating from a single WordPress installation to a Network of sites.
Notice: chances are that, after reading this post, you will switch from your

7 min read Aline
Editorials | mhthemes.com | Jul. 19, 2016

Why You Need to Invest More Time on Your Site (Not on Social Media)

Some thoughts why spending time on your website can be more useful than on social media.

Why You Need to Invest More Time on Your Site (Not on Social Media)

Editorials | mhthemes.com | Jul. 19, 2016

Here’s a not-so-radical proposition: You should spend more time on your own website than on social media, if you want to market your brand effectively. There are four primary reasons why that proposition is true, and they’re listed below, but they generally boil down to one truth: What you pay attention to is what grows stronger. If your goal is to generate and capture more leads for your brand, your first priority should be your own content, on your own site – and here’s why: Image Source: Unsplash – Pixabay.com / License: CC0 Public Domain
Social Media’s Best Use is Driving Traffic to Your Site
In property valuation, there’s a concept known as highest and best use. Basically, it says that all things being equal, when a property is put to its most effective natural use, it’s more valuable. Social media marketing also has a highest and best use: Driving traffic to your website.
There’s no doubt there’s a place for social media in a smart inbound marketing plan. After all, HubSpot’s Marketing Statistics page tells us that over 80% of B2B marketers do some kind of social media marketing. If it were worthless, they wouldn’t

7 min read Aline
Editorials | mhthemes.com | Aug. 1, 2016

How to Sign Contracts and Documents in WordPress

Signing contracts in WordPress makes sense. Useful plugins and tools to manage business relationships in WordPress.

How to Sign Contracts and Documents in WordPress

Editorials | mhthemes.com | Aug. 1, 2016

Written contracts just make good business sense, whether you’re providing services to clients or selling products to customers. Consultants, freelancers, web developers – all kinds of businesses benefit from written agreements and provide some certainty for both partners. Image Source: StockSnap – Pixabay.com / License: CC0 Public Domain
Some of those benefits include a reduced risk of disputes, a better outcome and lower costs when disputes do occur, and more certainty in the transaction. Each party knows exactly what their obligations are, and what happens when they don’t perform those duties as they promised they would. Yet, contracts can often be a bit intimidating for small business owners and freelancers.
To make the contract creation and execution process easier, many business owners turn to a third-party contract tool or SaaS application. However, these services usually charge recurring monthly fees. They’re also hosted on someone else’s server, which can raise tricky questions of security and confidentiality. Instead, why not sign your contracts right on your own WordPress site?
Signing Contracts in WordPress Makes Sense
Paper contracts are

Editorials | godaddy.com | Nov. 21, 2016

Q&A with Anders Norén, WordPress theme developer

"You might not recognize Anders Norén by name, but you’ll probably recognize his themes by sight: Hemingway, Hitchcock, Rowling, and Lovecraft are some of the most popular WordPress themes available."

Q&A with Anders Norén, WordPress theme developer

Editorials | godaddy.com | Nov. 21, 2016

You might not recognize Anders Norén by name, but you’ll probably recognize his themes by sight: Hemingway, Hitchcock, Rowling, and Lovecraft are some of the most popular WordPress themes available, and they all make regular appearances on our WordPress Hot 100. I’ve been a fan of Norén’s work for years. His themes are elegant, but not pretentious; minimalist, but not stark. (He’s also one of the few theme authors I know of who makes active use of post formats.)
Wanting to know more about his take on crafting themes for WordPress, I reached out over Twitter and asked if he’d be interested in answering some questions for a blog post. Here’s what he had to say.
What should people know about you?
My name is Anders Norén. I live in Umeå, northern Sweden, where we’re currently edging towards sub-zero degrees in the daytime, which I’m alright with. The sun setting at four in the afternoon, not so much. I work remotely as a web designer and developer for the Stockholm web agency Odd Alice, together with a small, tight-knit group of people who love building great stuff for the web.
A couple of years back, when I was

3 min read Rahul DC
Editorials | make.wordpress.org | Sep. 14, 2016

Why Default Themes Change Each Year

The default theme should show off the latest and greatest features, be flexible enough to gracefully support child themes and encourage customization, work well for a blog or a website, and sport a design that is aesthetically pleasing and a bit different from the last design.

Why Default Themes Change Each Year

Editorials | make.wordpress.org | Sep. 14, 2016

Since Twenty Twelve is coming very soon to the Extend directory, I wanted to share a bit of background on default themes and why they change from year to year. In 2005 Kubrick launched as the new default theme, then didn’t change for five years. It became a punchline for the project. With Twenty Ten a new pattern started, with every single year having a new theme, naming it by the year. Twenty ___. This gives the theme an expiration date and it doesn’t have the pressure to be the end-all theme for the ages, because it’ll be replaced in the next year rather than in five years.
In the time between Kubrick and Twenty Ten the default theme efforts didn’t work too well as there were too many conflicting things. The efforts tried to please everyone: show off everything that’s possible in core, fully educational in every aspect, super nice-looking, and try to solve all the problems a theme can solve.
Big shoes to fill, as it turns out. Even if one theme can’t do it all, though, the default theme can still strive to be as simple as possible while still sticking to important principles. For example, default themes are coded to be fully internationalized and

9 min read John Locke
Editorials | backchannel.com | Oct. 20, 2016

How the Web Became Unreadable

Chronicling the design trend of using increasingly low contrast text in web design. Why this matters: Legibility is part of accessibility. If elderly, handicapped, vision-impaired, (or even people with perfect eyesight) can't read the text in a web page, is it really good design? It wasn't always like this though. What ha changed in recent years that led to this becoming a design trend, and what can we do as designers and developers to do what is best for our users?

How the Web Became Unreadable

Editorials | backchannel.com | Oct. 20, 2016

It’s been getting harder for me to read things on my phone and my laptop. I’ve caught myself squinting and holding the screen closer to my face. I’ve worried that my eyesight is starting to go. These hurdles have made me grumpier over time, but what pushed me over the edge was when Google’s App Engine console — a page that, as a developer, I use daily — changed its text from legible to illegible. Text that was once crisp and dark was suddenly lightened to a pallid gray. Though age has indeed taken its toll on my eyesight, it turns out that I was suffering from a design trend.
There’s a widespread movement in design circles to reduce the contrast between text and background, making type harder to read. Apple is guilty. Google is, too. So is Twitter.
Typography may not seem like a crucial design element, but it is. One of the reasons the web has become the default way that we access information is that it makes that information broadly available to everyone. “The power of the Web is in its universality,” wrote Tim Berners-Lee, director of the World Wide Web consortium. “Access by everyone regardless of disability is an essential

6 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | calderaforms.com | 20 days ago

Why Not To Create A WordPress Contact Form Without A Plugin

While you absolutely could paste in an HTML form into your WordPress site; you really shouldn't. There's much more that goes into forms that you really don't want to worry about.

Why Not To Create A WordPress Contact Form Without A Plugin

Editorials | calderaforms.com | 20 days ago

It’s not uncommon for me to be asked why you shouldn’t just write your own form, without a plugin using PHP and JavaScript code to add a form to your WordPress site. This is one of the things that happens since I create a WordPress form builder plugin for a living, all totally normal. Also, it’s a totally reasonable question and I’m a nerd, so let’s do this. Technically speaking, to process a form you need an HTML form — something you can write in your page template and an endpoint to process the form request and WordPress provides a lot of options for creating custom endpoints on a site. Here is a nice long article I wrote about four of those options.
But don’t. Making a WordPress contact form without a plugin is, most of the time, not worth it.
Look — I’m the guy who makes a form builder plugin so I have a bit of an interest in people using a WordPress form builder. But, I also spent the last few years obsessing over a web form that creates other web forms. This is something I’ve thought a lot about. Probably thought too much about.
Faster to Prototype & Faster to Finished Product
A form, no matter how you build it, is

Editorials | woorkup.com | Dec. 15, 2017

Why You Should Wait to Update WordPress Plugins and Themes

We love shiny new things, but sometimes it's better to wait a week or two to update plugins/themes. Unless of course there is a security update! WordPress life :)

Why You Should Wait to Update WordPress Plugins and Themes

Editorials | woorkup.com | Dec. 15, 2017

I have used WordPress going on 10 years now. It’s awesome, and I couldn’t imagine myself working with anything else. However, just like with every platform, there are ways to go about forming what I call “good and safe” habits. Today I want to discuss a little bit about updating WordPress plugins and why I typically recommend users to wait before updating to the shiny new version. Trust me, this will cause you less stress in the long run.

24 min read Aline
Editorials | arrayinternet.com | 7 days ago

Beginner's guide on how to find reliable hosting for WordPress

Guide to help beginners make an intelligent decision when it’s time for choosing a hosting company to build a WordPress website.

Beginner's guide on how to find reliable hosting for WordPress

Editorials | arrayinternet.com | 7 days ago

If you want to start a blog or WordPress website, you need reliable hosting. Determining the best hosting for WordPress sites can be tricky. There are many different variables that go into what makes a rock solid web host, and many of them have to do with your needs as an individual. You need to worry about budget, whether or not you want a free domain, what type of website you plan on building, how much you plan on growing, and more. That’s what this post is about. We’re going to break down everything that surrounds the best hosting for WordPress. We’re going to help you make an intelligent decision when it’s time for you to choose a hosting company and build your website. Specifically, well be going over:
Finding the best hosting for WordPress
Finding the best web hosting for WordPress can be difficult. We’ve already established that. What we haven’t gone over is why you need to find hosting for WordPress in the first place and how WordPress differs from all-in-one platforms like Squarespace. We felt it was best to explain this so you know why you’re purchasing hosting.
WordPress is what’s known as a “content management system”.

13 min read Aline
Editorials | arrayinternet.com | Dec. 15, 2017

Why use WordPress: Reasons and tips for using the most popular CMS

Good reasons why WordPress is the most popular CMS and why you may want to give it a try for your next website.

Why use WordPress: Reasons and tips for using the most popular CMS

Editorials | arrayinternet.com | Dec. 15, 2017

Why use WordPress for your website? WordPress is a popular content management system recommended by some of the biggest names in the blogging industry. Whether you’re a beginner or an advanced user, WordPress allows you to create either a simple weblog (blog) or you can use WordPress as a comprehensive CMS for advanced high-volume websites and all kinds of purposes with comparative ease. If you’ve never used WordPress, you may be wondering what all the fuss is about. This is especially true if you’re getting ready to build your first website or if a client is interested in using this CMS. You could use a free blogging platform as well as another CMS or an all-in-one site builder, so why use WordPress? That’s what we’re going to cover in this post. Let’s get started digging into why WordPress is the most popular CMS.
What is WordPress?
Before we get into the Why use WordPress section of this post, let’s go over what WordPress is and who uses it. WordPress is what’s known as a “content management system”. The technical definition says it’s “a web-based application that allows multiple users to manage content, data

16 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | wordimpress.com | Jun. 30, 2017

What Does Gutenberg Mean for Plugin Authors?

I decided to take a deep-dive into what Gutenberg might mean for the broader WP ecosystem. Content authors, plugin authors, and page builders all have different ways they may have to pivot once its in Core.

What Does Gutenberg Mean for Plugin Authors?

Editorials | wordimpress.com | Jun. 30, 2017

I chatted with some prominent plugin authors, page builder authors, and Gutenberg contributors to understand how Gutenberg could impact the broader WordPress ecosystem. This article discusses how it can impact content authors, plugin authors, and page builder plugins in the near future. Gutenberg is the proposed new content editor for WordPress Core. It is currently in beta development. It is a radical departure from the simple WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) approach WordPress has traditionally had for content creation. As with any major change in WordPress, this will inevitably have ripple effects throughout the WordPress marketplace. With that in mind, here’s my take on how Gutenberg will affect the broader WordPress ecosystem.
The Awesome for WordPress Content Creators
From everything I’ve seen, the main motivation — primarily from WordPress co-creator Matt Mullenweg — is to dramatically improve end users’ experience with content creation in WordPress. With the advent of website builders like Squarespace and Wix, a cleaner WYSIWYG in Medium, and the plethora of full-featured page building WordPress plugins, the simple post editor has started

17 min read Matt Medeiros
Editorials | mattreport.com | Nov. 14, 2017

The blue-collar WordPress worker and the 2,500+ websites built to grow the CMS

Recently, I've been fascinated with the growth of WordPress influenced by consultants. I published 20 quotes from consultants that total 2,000+ WordPress websites.

The blue-collar WordPress worker and the 2,500+ websites built to grow the CMS

Editorials | mattreport.com | Nov. 14, 2017

I’m not foolish enough to think that the entirety of WordPress’ growth is driven by our love for the software, but that we consultants are responsible for a sizeable portion of it. A portion that shouldn’t be ignored and one that should be welcome to the discussion more often. Under-represented. Perhaps.
You can listen to the audio version
I know many of you are like me, we don’t run 100+ person agencies, we don’t have 1mil+ plugin downloads, and we haven’t been contributing code to core for the last decade. However, what we do share in common is a life of servicing customers in the online business space. Servicing customers or our local community by way of building websites — helping organizations amplify their message.
This act of service is deeply rooted in using our favorite tool, WordPress.
Sure, we’re talking less and less about the tech side of things lately, but we know that it delivers a massive advantage as a platform to our customers. An advantage that might not matter to them in the short-term, but in the long-term sustainability of their business.
While many might join the ranks of offering WordPress services simply for the

26 min read Donna Cavalier
Editorials | wpshout.com | Dec. 6, 2017

This Changes Everything: Gutenberg is Good Now

It seems a bit like a mama crocodile eating her babies—certainly that’s how I’d feel right about now if I’d worked hard on a page builder.

This Changes Everything: Gutenberg is Good Now

Editorials | wpshout.com | Dec. 6, 2017

At WordCamp US, it became clear that the Gutenberg editor is a tangible improvement to WordPress—and, more importantly, is really going to happen. We’ve just returned from this year’s WordCamp US. In addition to the wonderful opportunity to catch up with the community, we also got to be there for one piece of colossal news: Gutenberg is actually good now.
In two tech demos (by Morten Rand-Hendriksen, and then by Matt Mullenweg at the State of the Word), Gutenberg live-demoed as a feature-rich content editor that has made astonishing progress since I last looked closely at it several months ago.
At that time, along with much of the community, I was very skeptical about what Gutenberg was going to be, and whether it would be a meaningful improvement over doing nothing. At WordCamp US, it became very clear that Gutenberg is a Real Thing that is a tangible improvement to WordPress—and, more importantly, is really going to happen.
This article takes a look at what Gutenberg is, what it aims to be, and its vast implications for WordPress as a software ecosystem.
How Gutenberg is Right Now
As of early December 2017, Gutenberg is okay. It’s probably better overall

11 min read Aline
Editorials | arrayinternet.com | Dec. 23, 2017

WordPress Backup: Regularly backup your WordPress site and database

It’s better to be safe than sorry. An article on WordPress backups and why it's important to ensure that you have a regular WordPress backup routine. Remember: The most expensive backup is the one you never did!

WordPress Backup: Regularly backup your WordPress site and database

Editorials | arrayinternet.com | Dec. 23, 2017

Site maintenance and management are essential and crucial aspects of running a WordPress website. One important element is a regular WordPress backup routine. In the early days of the internet there were mostly simple HTML sites tailored together, and back then – backups were not really something that people thought much of. Nowadays times have changed and nearly every website, blog, or professional news magazine out there is relying on some sort of database management for storing and accessing data. Your valuable content and data is what makes your website worth visiting. In case of server crashes, hard drive failures, natural disasters, hacker attacks or other major issues with your website, that data can easily get lost. You can avoid this by backing up your WordPress site.
5 Common mistakes when dealing with WordPress backups
It’s better to be safe than sorry. If you dig deep enough, you can find plenty of stories circulating the web where webmasters were dealing with server crashes or other issues that caused all their data to disappear. It’s really not that uncommon! Although these days reliable hosting companies usually perform daily backups for their customers,

Editorials | deliciousbrains.com | Jan. 10, 2018

Is Gutenberg the End or a New Beginning for WordPress?

Thats an interesting article again on Gutenberg! Author is loving the concept but thinks it does not belong to WordPress, just yet! Keep reading.

Is Gutenberg the End or a New Beginning for WordPress?

Editorials | deliciousbrains.com | Jan. 10, 2018

I’ve been loosely following the noise and #wpdrama surrounding Gutenberg for as long as it has been around and honestly for the most part I’ve had negative feelings around it (I don’t like change at the best of times). However, I recently dived in and tried it out and you will never guess what happened next! But seriously. I came to two conclusions:
It’s a lovely piece of software
It does not belong in WordPress. (Yet. Or WordPress as we know it today)
Let me explain.
What is Gutenberg?
As a customary catch-up for those who don’t know, Gutenberg is the new way to edit content in WordPress. It replaces the tired TinyMCE post content editor and can do a lot more too – think shortcodes, widgets, menus, and even custom fields. It is a client-side interface built with React that uses a block based system to build up content:
It is being developed as a feature plugin over on GitHub and it has been scheduled to land in core in the next version of WordPress, version 5.0 estimated for the first half of 2018. Here’s a great roundup of Gutenberg information.
Gutenberg is an important step forward for publishers, reducing the visual difference between how

9 min read Aline
Editorials | arrayinternet.com | Oct. 26, 2017

A beginner's guide to start podcasting on your WordPress site

Introduction to podcasting for beginners including some helpful suggestions and tools to implement podcasts on WordPress sites.

A beginner's guide to start podcasting on your WordPress site

Editorials | arrayinternet.com | Oct. 26, 2017

No matter what niche or field you’re passionate about, you can probably find a podcast in it. And maybe you’ve even already thought to yourself, Hey, I could do that…. Well, you probably can do that. While podcasting can be a technically complex undertaking, it’s really not all that difficult. There has never been a better time to dive into podcasting than it is right now. You simply need to understand the basics, be willing to work hard (especially at first), and be consistent about it. And judging by the auto-fill suggestions in Google, more people than ever are interested in creating their own podcasts. So we’ll cover the basics & best practices for podcasting in WordPress in this article.
What is podcasting, anyway?
Let’s start by defining the term podcasting – or rather, by letting Google pick a definition for us:
That’s really all there is to it – a streamable, downloadable audio file in episodic format to which listeners can subscribe. However, there’s quite a lot of variation in modern podcasting. Probably the most familiar podcast recently was the insanely popular Serial podcast, which helped to win a convicted

Editorials | wordfence.com | Sep. 13, 2017

The Man Behind Plugin Spam: Mason Soiza

Just your average snitch post showing who the bad guys are.