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2 min read Donna Cavalier
Editorials | siteground.com | 3 hours ago

14 Years of WordPress Playlist

Siteground made a playlist featuring a track by every musician that's ever had a WordPress release named in their honor. Really cool!

14 Years of WordPress Playlist

Editorials | siteground.com | 3 hours ago

It's that time of the year when we're getting ready to celebrate another WordPress anniversary. Tomorrow, May 27th, WordPress turns 14! To mark the occasion the SiteGround way, we made a playlist featuring a track by every musician that's ever had a WordPress release named in their honor. The mix did wonders for our productivity in the office, so we decided to share it. We hope it makes your day better, whether you had to spend it working on your website or celebrating. Enjoy and a Happy 14th Birthday to the whole WordPress community! Enthusiastic about all Open Source applications you can think of, but mostly about WordPress. Add a pinch of love for web design, new technologies, search engine optimisation and you are pretty much there!

7 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | ttmm.io | 8 days ago

WordPress.com is not WordPress - Things That Matter Most

Skip to the section "WordPress is not WordPress" -- that's the most important read. A controversial opinion but a conversation worth having.

WordPress.com is not WordPress - Things That Matter Most

Editorials | ttmm.io | 8 days ago

A story I enjoy retelling is how a friend of mine tricked me into using WordPress. At the time, I was working with him on a career mentorship project. He’d written a book that I was publishing, and we wanted to add a premium video series to go along with it. We just needed a way to host those videos online.
I was still very new to web development. I had built my own portfolio site in PHP, having learned PHP through a series of emails from a good friend in Arizona. My business partner was excited about the prospect of a dynamic website and turned me loose to find the right tool.
I settled on … not WordPress.
A few days later, he invited me to lunch downtown. Having no real job and, since our project wouldn’t be launched or profitable for a few months, I had no money and was thrilled at the thought of a free lunch. I parked downtown and met at an obscure office building … where the first ever WordCamp Portland was being held.
Spending the day with a bunch of WordPress geeks was fun and excited me about the tool. I switched gears and rebuilt our site on WordPress. I rebuilt my own site on WordPress. I started publishing plugins and a few themes for WordPress.

6 min read Eric Karkovack
Editorials | speckyboy.com | 9 days ago

The Quest for a Seamless WordPress Experience

The plugin decisions you make when developing a site may have repercussions that you might not have realized - especially when you need to export data.

The Quest for a Seamless WordPress Experience

Editorials | speckyboy.com | 9 days ago

I work with WordPress on a daily basis. Whether it’s design, theme development, customization or performing maintenance – the open source CMS makes up the vast majority of my workload. Over the years, I’ve really come to love the flexibility and the sheer number of options available that allow me to create just about any type of website. But, sometimes, all of that choice and flexibility means a piecemeal approach to site development – particularly if you’re (like me) not a master developer. What are the potential pitfalls? What in the world am I talking about? Don’t worry, I’ll explain!
A Collage of Functionality
When developing a WordPress website, we often have our own set of trusted plugins we turn to in order to add specific functionality.
Each plugin does its own thing and comes from a diverse group of developers. Each one of these developers has created their plugin in their own unique way.
Besides their primary function, the plugins might do things such as add a custom post type, install new JavaScript or CSS. Depending on the purpose of the plugin, they might also write their own database entries. In essence, the sky is the limit.
Much

Editorials | linkedin.com | Apr. 5, 2017

The End of 80/20 and the Future of WordPress

Morten describes what a path forward WITHOUT the 80/20 Rule might look like. Really important discussion and great read.

3 min read Ben Gillbanks
Editorials | wptavern.com | Apr. 8, 2017

Yoast SEO’s PHP Upgrade Nag is Producing a Significant Increase in Sites Upgrading to PHP 7

I find this fascinating. The fact that one plugin can have such power. If only WordPress would do something similar.

Yoast SEO’s PHP Upgrade Nag is Producing a Significant Increase in Sites Upgrading to PHP 7

Editorials | wptavern.com | Apr. 8, 2017

Less than three weeks ago Yoast SEO version 4.5 was released with an ugly, non-dismissible notice for sites on PHP 5.2. The notice encourages the user to upgrade to PHP 7, explaining that it is faster and more secure. It includes links for getting started and example emails that users can send to their hosting companies. In the 18 days since shipping the plugin with the upgrade nag, Yoast SEO creator Joost de Valk has seen a dramatic uptick in sites moving from old, unsupported versions to PHP 7. From December to March, PHP 5.2 usage among Yoast SEO users decreased from 1.9% to 1.7%, a modest drop over three months. After adding the nag on March 21, PHP 5.2 usage dropped from 1.7% to 1.3% for those using Yoast SEO version 4.5. PHP 5.3 usage is also steadily decreasing since de Valk began the campaign to educate his plugin’s users about the benefits of upgrading.
According to de Valk’s stats, 22.2% of Yoast SEO users are on version 4.5 of the plugin. He estimates 1,443,000 sites on 4.5 out of 6.5 million users.
“Assuming 0.5% updated their PHP versions, that’s 7K sites,” de Valk said. “And another 14-20k that updated from 5.3 to something more decent.”

9 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | thewpcrowd.com | Apr. 17, 2017

Why I still choose & Love Angular

Roy Sivan goes through tons of Pro's and Con's of the Javascript Wars to support why he still loves and chooses Angular for his WordPress projects. Really good read with a great video presentation as well.

Why I still choose & Love Angular

Editorials | thewpcrowd.com | Apr. 17, 2017

The JavaScript Framework Wars are still heated, with new projects coming up every day, but the 2 main competitors for a while now have been Angular and React. The WordPress community has taken a big liking to React, and it is not really hard to see why. React, its not horrible
React is a great framework for building a heavy UI-focused app. It has a lot more built out of the box that lends itself fundamentally to the “action/hook” mentality that WordPress has. When Automattic released Calypso, built in React, and even used React in the newest JetPack plugin. As is the case, most of the community will also follow in line as soon as the leads have picked something, so many people adopted React.
React isn’t horrible, its a great, and very powerful framework. It has a lot to offer to build complex UI’s and many people even like the syntax. The reactive state makes it easy to easily modify the view as data changes, and with the build tools out now, it isn’t even as hard to get up and running as it used to be. I am not a React hater, I have projects I work on that are React, I even have (although needs an update) a boilerplate I built with it.
Angular has had

Editorials | woorkup.com | Apr. 24, 2017

Moving to a System Font Stack in 2017

System fonts aren't anything new, in fact, the WP admin uses them. But they look great and don't add any overhead. Check out this example of adding to a WordPress site.

Moving to a System Font Stack in 2017

Editorials | woorkup.com | Apr. 24, 2017

As many of you know, I am a big fan of web performance. But I also don’t think that it should or have to compromise design. There is always a good balance in the middle. The other day I was on GitHub’s blog and was really digging their font! It was super easy to read. So I dug into the properties with Chrome Devtools and saw that they were using a system font stack. So today I want to show you how to use a system font stack on your WordPress site. What is a System Font Stack?
There are different types of fonts to choose from when it comes to a website. You pretty much have four different options:
Web safe fonts: Free and no download time required by the browser, but typically look dated and therefore aren’t used a lot. See a list of web safe fonts.
Web fonts: Look beautiful, but require download by the browser. Have both free and premium options available. Adds to overall page weight of your website. However, they can be served from cached CDN. Providers include Google, TypeKit, etc.
Host web fonts locally: Both free and premium options available. Still requires download time, can take advantage of single HTTP/2 connection on cached CDN.
System fonts: Free, look pretty

Editorials | wpexplorer.com | Apr. 7, 2017

WordPress Performance Testing: Why, How & Which Tools to Use

Interesting article comparing some of the variations with different performance testing tools.

WordPress Performance Testing: Why, How & Which Tools to Use

Editorials | wpexplorer.com | Apr. 7, 2017

Tons of articles written as the one guide to performance on WordPress, tons of content dedicated to the subject at hand but, what about the tools we use for measurement? The online and software tools we use are a big part of the equation. A wrong tool or improper results can lead you astray. Today we are going to do the exact opposite, today we are going to benchmark the benchmarks and see if we can come up with a better idea of what’s good, what’s acceptable and what should be definitely avoided when trying to analyze our sites in our need for speed.
The stars of the night are going to be: GTMetrix, KeyCDN Speed Test, Pingdom Tools, Google Pagespeed Insights, Webpagetest and Monitis Speed Tools. we will talk about the strong and week points on each and then offer you the results.
For Techno Geeks
For this article we are going to use a website and a service we are sure it’s suited for optimum performance. The site will be a digital gaming magazine, highly optimized, with tons of articles. The site is using minified CSS, static HTML cache, minified JS, a CDN and is running under HTTP/2. On the server side it is running on a Xeon processor, 24 threads, 24GB of RAM, a

Editorials | wpexplorer.com | Apr. 20, 2017

How to Source and Share Relevant Content on Your WordPress Website

Some interesting solutions on how to introduce curated content to your site. Of course, a hybrid approach is probably best SEO wise.

How to Source and Share Relevant Content on Your WordPress Website

Editorials | wpexplorer.com | Apr. 20, 2017

When you consider adding new content to your website or blog, you’re likely to think about creating original articles or posts. This is only natural, and most sites will want to prioritize unique content. However, it can also be a smart move to source and share relevant third-party content with your readers whenever you have the opportunity. One of the best things about the internet is how much information it provides access to – there’s an article or website out there about almost anything. Linking out to this content, or curating it into helpful resources, is both a service to your readers and an excellent way to take some of the pressure off of yourself.
In this article, we’ll talk about why you might want to share third-party content, and discuss the most common ways to do so. Then we’ll introduce three handy WordPress plugins to help you get the job done. Let’s get started!
Why You Should Consider Sharing Content on Your Website
WP Clipboard
It’s important to have plenty of quality, original content on your website. Sharing your own unique ideas positions you as an expert, and including too much duplicate content on your site is harmful

Smashing Magazine is ditching WordPress

After many years on WP it looks like the "Next Smashing Magazine" will be run by a different platform, actually a mix of different platforms!

18 min read David Bisset
Editorials | wpshout.com | Apr. 17, 2017

What WordPress Teaches Us About Software Ecosystems

David Haynes takes some time out to examine what facets of WordPress’s ecosystem led to its marketshare and overall success.

What WordPress Teaches Us About Software Ecosystems

Editorials | wpshout.com | Apr. 17, 2017

Quick Note: I’m speaking about this topic at Lone Star PHP 2017, April 20-22. If you’re looking to learn about PHP development, and can get to the Dallas-Fort Worth area, it’s a great conference and you should come! WordPress is, without a doubt, one of the most successful pieces of software of all time. Sure, Microsoft’s Office and Windows are both more influential. Apple’s iOS is huge, as is Google’s Android. Linux is no chump either. But WordPress is relevant to all those platforms and more. And it has about the same name recognition to boot. If people can name a single piece of web infrastructure technology today, there’s a good chance of WordPress being the one they know. (Not counting Facebook as infrastructure.)
WordPress people like to boast that it’s running on at least 25% of the web. And right or wrong, that number gives a pretty clear sense of the impact of it as a technology. Many web developers have opinions on Rails, Jekyll, Django, Laravel, or CakePHP. Every developer has an opinion about WordPress. Why is this?
That’s what we’re going to be exploring today: what facets of WordPress’s current and historical

11 min read Ben Gillbanks
Editorials | content.nanobox.io | Apr. 1, 2017

Why Developers Hate WordPress

An interesting opinion piece about why developers hate WordPress. I find it interesting that the WordPress code is not directly managed. No mention of OOP (or other code practices) that normally rear their head when talking about what could be improved in WordPress.

Why Developers Hate WordPress

Editorials | content.nanobox.io | Apr. 1, 2017

This article is the opinion of the author and does not represent the official stance of Nanobox. I have a feeling that if you're here, you either strongly agree or disagree with the title of this article. That's fine. This is an opinion piece, so feel free to feel however you'd like. But I have data to back me up! According to the 2017 Stack Overflow Developer Survey, 64.5% of respondents said they dread WordPress. It's the 3rd most dreaded platforms of those they included in their survey.
I want to talk about why developers – the people who are knee-deep in the code; who could and would rather build a custom solution; those who are expected to make it work and work well – hate WordPress. This list is by no means exhaustive, but represents common pain-points I've found from my own personal experience and experiences others have shared with me.
First, the Redeeming Qualities
Before getting into the pain-points, I feel I have to mention the things WordPress does well.
To start, it's dead simple to install and setup. With a basic Apache/MySQL/PHP stack in place, you can be up and running in a matter of minutes.
WordPress is really easy to customize. The catalog of themes and

6 min read Puneet Sahalot
Editorials | wpbeaveraddons.com | Apr. 14, 2017

Top 10 Things to do After Installing WordPress

A quick guide for the routine tasks that should be followed after installing WordPress.

Top 10 Things to do After Installing WordPress

Editorials | wpbeaveraddons.com | Apr. 14, 2017

It’s great to have WordPress installed. But the common question asked by the beginners is What do you do after installing WordPress? In this post I’ll guide you to 10 most essential things to be done after installing WordPress. Here are 10 Things to do after installing WordPress:
1. Configure General Settings
General Settings include Site Title, Tagline, User Registration option, Timezone and Favicon which have to be configured. Go to Settings> General option on the Dashboard.
Change the Site Title, Tagline and TimeZone:
Site Title and Tagline should be such that it resembles your site, as it will appear in the Google search results. Default site tagline is “just another WordPress site”.
Scroll down to set up the TimeZone to your local time. Doing so will enable you to schedule your Posts according to your Timezone.
Now add a Favicon to your Website.
What exactly this Favicon is and how important it is for your website?
Favicon is a small icon that appear next to your website title in the browser. This icon will later help you to gain recognition for your website. People will start identifying you where ever they see this icon. Favicon also help you build

Editorials | kevinmuldoon.com | Feb. 9, 2017

Pay Attention to Your WordPress Database (19.5GB down to 159MB)

Great little post by Kevin on a reminder to pay attention to your WordPress database. Without knowing it, his DB grew to 19.5GB due to one plugin.

Pay Attention to Your WordPress Database (19.5GB down to 159MB)

Editorials | kevinmuldoon.com | Feb. 9, 2017

In general, I am quite good at maintaining my WordPress websites. I use the fantastic update service WP Remote to ensure all plugins and themes are kept up to date and I regularly remove plugins that I am not using. However, I am only human.
From time to time some things do slip through the net and I don’t realise I have missed anything until much later.
When I started getting automatic disk warning emails from my server telling me that this blog was using most of its allocated block, I knew something was wrong.
The Investigation Begins
I began looking into where the storage was being used up and saw that phpMyAdmin was reporting that this blog’s database is 19.5GB in size. When I sorted the database by row size I started to get a better picture of what was happening.
The top four rows all had profiler in the name. The profiler_functions table was taking up 9.3GB, profiler_queries was taking up 8.8GB, profiler_requests was taking up 607.6MB, and profiler_plugins was taking up 583.8MB.
To put into perspective how large these tables are, you need to look at the next tables. The next largest table is the prli_clicks table created by the link tracker Pretty Links Lite. After

7 min read Aline
Editorials | mhthemes.com | 26 days ago

Why you should consider WordPress for shops and ecommerce websites

Short overview of why it makes sense to consider using WordPress when you want to launch an online shop or ecommerce website.

Why you should consider WordPress for shops and ecommerce websites

Editorials | mhthemes.com | 26 days ago

WordPress came a long way from its humble beginnings as a simple blogging platform. Nowadays, it powers more than 27% of all websites, including some of the most popular brands and websites like PlayStation, TechCrunch, BBC, NY Times, Bloomberg, Forbes and many more. In the early days of WordPress, it was hard to imagine WordPress being used for anything else other than a simple blog. But as WordPress matured and evolved, people started using it for more complex websites, including online stores. Nowadays, WordPress is used for many popular ecommerce sites. Here are some excellent reasons why you should consider WordPress for your online store:
WordPress is open-source software, which means you can use and modify the source code in any way you want. Unlike many ecommerce applications which require you to pay for a license fee and come with significant limitations, WordPress gives you complete control over your online store.
Another benefit of WordPress is its community which is always ready to help in case you run into any issues. Best of all, WordPress is free to download and use, which means the only really necessary costs associated with your online store will be your domain name

Editorials | kinsta.com | Mar. 2, 2017

Behind the Scenes - Launching a Premium WordPress Coupon Plugin

Check out this behind the scenes look at some of the decisions and lessons learned from the first attempt at launching a premium WordPress plugin.

Behind the Scenes - Launching a Premium WordPress Coupon Plugin

Editorials | kinsta.com | Mar. 2, 2017

The affiliate marketing space is booming, and has grown into a very important and effective channel for driving sales. Thanks in a big part to WordPress, many internet marketers are now working from home and making a living from their websites. It is typical for a consumer nowadays to lookup reviews online when they are contemplating a new purchasing. And while this might be seen as a good or bad, internet marketers are right there, waiting to capitalize on this traffic. Besides working full-time here at Kinsta, I also develop and support a premium WordPress coupon plugin, specifically targeted towards affiliate marketers. Today I am going to take you on a little behind the scenes look at how it came about and some of the challenges faced when launching a plugin for the first time. Affiliate Marketing Growth
According to a 2016 Rakuten Affiliate Network study, the US affiliate marketing spend will increase at a compound annual growth rate of 10.1% percent between 2015 and 2020, to an estimated $6.8 billion industry. And to put this into perspective, in 2016 the New York Time’s print advertising fell 16%. As the world wide web continues to grow, a lot of advertising is now shifting

Editorials | zao.is | Apr. 12, 2017

The Importance of Generosity and Gratitude in Business - Zao.is WordPress Plugin and eCommerce Development

Are generosity and gratitude a part of your business? Liz shares her experience with generosity and gratitude in her working life and why she thinks they're so crucial to success.

zao.is |

The Importance of Generosity and Gratitude in Business - Zao.is WordPress Plugin and eCommerce Development

Editorials | zao.is | Apr. 12, 2017

There are billions of books, articles, journals, and thoughts about how to run a successful business and be the most profitable. Search “run a good business” in Google and you get 441,000,000 hits. Clearly, a lot of people have a lot to say about this, yet there isn’t enough time in a lifespan to cover it all. While I’m by no means an expert in the business realm, I’m a small business employee and I have a tangible experience and perspective in the job market. So, naturally, I do have my own two cents on the subject. Generosity and gratitude can have one of the most profound effects on your business, beyond what is easily measurable.
I’m not the first person to value generosity and gratitude in business. I’m not going to convince you through research, metrics, and data on why generosity and gratitude are so important. You can look to In the Company of Givers and Takers and The Business Value of Gratitude for that. Instead, I want to share two stories on how they have directly impacted me. I’m sure my experience is not unique, and my hope is that you’ll be connected to your own experiences with generosity and gratitude.
Generosity

11 min read David Bisset

Why WordPress in Education

When it comes to Education, many in the WP community don't hear about how WordPress makes an impact or what it TAKES to make an impact.

Why WordPress in Education

I’ve noticed the topic of WordPress in Education recently in my Twitter feed. @Jeffr0 over on WP Tavern was recently polling his followers for info on the type of CMS (Content Management Systems) used by schools, along with the cost to run such platforms. Here at Hamilton Wentworth District School Board, we are big WordPress users. Our main website is a WordPress site (http://www.hwdsb.on.ca). We run over 100 individual school websites on a WordPress Multisite Network, and back in May of 2011, we launched the HWDSB Commons: a second Multisite Network which now hosts over 8000 blogs for over 30 000 users. There is a saying in the WordPress community, that WordPress is Free as in Freedom, not Free as in Beer. Beer may not the best example given the audience that may stumble upon this post in the feed (oh Puritan Canadian, you worry too much); free as is Costco samples would work as well, although it won’t look as good on a T Shirt). I don’t think I understood that concept when we first began this journey, because when you are first starting out, beyond the hosting fee, we found everything we needed in the free Plugin Repository hosted on WordPress.org. (In this instance

6 min read Ben Gillbanks
Editorials | wptavern.com | Jan. 6, 2017

Matt Mullenweg Announces Tech and Design Leads for New Focus-Based Development Cycle

An editorial look at Matts structure for the next generation of WordPress.

Matt Mullenweg Announces Tech and Design Leads for New Focus-Based Development Cycle

Editorials | wptavern.com | Jan. 6, 2017

photo credit: Angelina Litvin WordPress core development is kicking off in 2017 with the new focus-based development process that Matt Mullenweg announced during the 2016 State of the Word. The new approach to releases shifts WordPress from the familiar time-based release cycle to one that is more project-based. The idea is that design and user testing will lead the way and upcoming releases will ship when significant user-facing improvements are ready.
Mullenweg, who will serve as the overall product lead for 2017, announced tech and design leads for each of the three focus areas: the REST API, the editor, and the customizer.
“For the REST API we’re going to work on getting first party wp-admin usage of the new endpoints, and hopefully replace all of the core places where we still use admin-ajax,” Mullenweg said. The REST API team nominated Ryan McCue and K.Adam White to take the lead on the objectives Mullenweg outlined, as well as infrastructure and endpoint performance, security, and improvements to authentication options and documentation.
“The editor will endeavor to create a new page and post building experience that makes writing rich posts effortless,

Editorials | themeisle.com | Jan. 19, 2017

PageSpeed Insights Score: Faster WordPress Hosting is More Important

Google PageSpeed Insights scores should be taken with a grain of salt. They are helpful as guidelines for optimization, but sometimes simply choosing faster WordPress hosting can be more important.

PageSpeed Insights Score: Faster WordPress Hosting is More Important

Editorials | themeisle.com | Jan. 19, 2017

You want your WordPress site to load lightning-fast. And if you’re like most of us, when you think of improving your site’s page load times to get that “lightning-fast” designation, you think of your Google PageSpeed Insights score. For many website owners, it’s their white whale. Getting a perfect score on PageSpeed Insights is the impossible quest that will magically solve all of their page speed woes.
But is a high PageSpeed Insights score the be-all and end-all of fast page load times? Sorry, but no. If your focus is on improving your site’s page load times, finding a better host will often take you further.
In this post, I’m going to run a real test to show you that high-performance hosting will do more for your page load times than endlessly striving to improve your PageSpeed Insights score.
What is Google PageSpeed Insights? Should you care?
If you’re not already familiar, PageSpeed Insights is a Google-offered tool that helps you both analyze and optimize your website’s performance for desktop and mobile visitors. Before I get into what exactly that entails, let’s talk about what PageSpeed Insights is not:
It’s

4 min read Ahmad Awais
Editorials | ahmadawais.com | Jan. 11, 2017

2016 Year in Review: WordPress, Business, & the Big NEWS!

2016 has been a phenomenal year! I wrote about the business, stability, My Open Source Contributions, the products I built, interviews, fitness, the big news, and my future plans. Read here → https://AhmdA.ws/ME_2016

2016 Year in Review: WordPress, Business, & the Big NEWS!

Editorials | ahmadawais.com | Jan. 11, 2017

Tonight’s the new year’s night, and I plan to write about everything that happened in 2016 (boy it was a hell of a year — BTW I ended up completing this article on 10th Jan! ). If you are new here, you must know that I wrote about last year in My Commitment to WordPress and Epic Moments of 2015. I have so much to talk about. And I have an incredible news to share with all of you at the end of this post. Anywho, let’s get to it.
Showoff! Yes, that’s precisely the word with which I wanted to start this article. And yes, I know what you are thinking. But hey, I have a story to tell. You see, I come from a diverse background. Tech is not as much common here as it is in the US. Even in global aspect of things, people do not generally understand software developers and especially what we do at work (— except for sitting in front of a screen all day and night long).
This was exactly the reason why I started looking for different online communities more than a decade ago. Ten years ago I found WordPress, I became a developer and started giving back to the community. This led me to be part of a great online family — the WordPress community.
I love what

Editorials | kinsta.com | Feb. 8, 2017

An Introduction to a WordPress Multisite Setup

Got lots of sites? No problem. Learn more about WordPress Multisite and how you can utilize it to turn your single WordPress website into a network of independent sites.

An Introduction to a WordPress Multisite Setup

Editorials | kinsta.com | Feb. 8, 2017

WordPress Multisite is a collection of independent websites sharing the same WordPress installation. The sites in the network are virtual sites, meaning that they do not have their own directory on the server, although they do have separate directories for media uploads and separate tables in the database. In this post I will introduce you to WordPress Multisite. It will be a basic user guide aiming to point out the pros and cons of Multisite vs single site installations, and to show you how to turn a single WordPress site into a Multisite network.
First, I will try to give you an idea of the many reasons you may have to install a network, and conversely of the many factors that could prevent you from installing a Multisite. Following, I will provide an overview of the available types of networks, I will describe the main characteristics of each type, and the system requirements that could force you to choose a type instead of another. Finally, we will dive deep into the installation process, and I will show you how straightforward it is migrating from a single WordPress installation to a Network of sites.
Notice: chances are that, after reading this post, you will switch from your

Editorials | wpin.me | Jan. 14, 2017

No More WordPress Theme Or Plugin List Posts & Other News

Props to this person for not just stopping writing Theme/Plugin list posts but deleting all the old ones.

No More WordPress Theme Or Plugin List Posts & Other News

Editorials | wpin.me | Jan. 14, 2017

New Years Resolution #1 – No more theme / plugin list posts I’ve neglected the blog of late. I’ve been busy with other avenues and simply haven’t had the time to update WPin.me. It’s not until I revisited the blog did I realize just how many list posts of themes and plugins I actually had!
I referred back to a post entitled “Why List Posts Are Hurting Your Pocket.” Guess what? I took my own advice. I don’t want to be one of those sites, I guess it’s easy to write list posts for themes packed full of affiliate links rather than offering good quality content.
I don’t want to be like, Athemes, Colorlib, WPlift, WPExplorer and alike. Nothing against them you understand, I just don’t want to be anything like them in terms of list posts.
It goes against everything I want from WPin, it’s a ball ache to do and the only person it benefits is me, not you.
I deleted my WordPress theme & plugin list posts.
That’s why I deleted the lot of them, I don’t want them to hang around the website like unwelcome guest at a New Years Eve party, hence they are no more.
So no more theme / plugin list posts!
New Years Resolution

3 min read David Bisset
Editorials | daily.jorb.in | Jan. 5, 2017

User Trust Matters In WordPress

If you're a developer and/or contributor, take a few minutes out to read this. Nice quote: "User trust isn’t something you earn and then just get to keep forever. It’s a maintenance relationship."

User Trust Matters In WordPress

Editorials | daily.jorb.in | Jan. 5, 2017

Helen Hou-Sandi, in response to someone suggesting a large rewrite in slack wrote this: Your plan as I understand it disregards a couple of core WordPress philosophies/practices: striving for maintenance of backwards-compatibility, and that an X.0 release is no more significant than X.1 or Y.9 (this is closely related to maintaining back-compat, in that something like semantic versioning is less meaningful for WordPress core).
Generally, the most successful refactorings in core have been done in support of features being built, whether that’s a user- or dev-focused feature. It’s not that core code can’t be improved (clearly it can), it’s that better decisions regarding back-compat and, more importantly, forward-compat for an API or other bit of code can be made when one eye is on practical application.
As a user centric project, WordPress chooses philosophies that put the user first. There is also an unwritten philosophy point that many committers talk about which is that User Trust Matters. What that means to me is that users trust WordPress for running businesses, sharing content, and engaging with their own users. User trust must be maintained in order to