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8 min read Puneet Sahalot
Editorials | wplift.com | 5 days ago

Page Builder Framework Review: A Theme to Pair With Page Builders

Now that Page Builders are getting popular, we have a new trend of themes built for Page Builders. The Page Builder Framework is one such theme.

Page Builder Framework Review: A Theme to Pair With Page Builders

Editorials | wplift.com | 5 days ago

Do you love using WordPress page builders? If so, you’re probably the type of person who’s interested in a WordPress theme that bills itself as “A Page Builder's best friend” Page Builder Framework is a WordPress theme that’s designed to pair well with popular WordPress page builders so that you can build a detailed WordPress site for yourself or your clients using your favorite page builder.
In my Page Builder Framework review, I’ll tell you a little more about what this theme does. Then, I’ll dig in and go hands-on to show you how everything works.
Page Builder Framework is exactly what its name describes - that is, it’s a lightweight, flexible theme specifically designed to work with page builders like Elementor, Divi, Beaver Builder, and Visual Composer.
Basically, Page Builder Framework provides the foundation for your site. Then, you use a page builder to actually build the design for your main pages.
Here’s what makes Page Builder Framework cool:
It’s easy to create full-width pages and remove page titles …both things that make it great for using with page builders.
The theme settings are all in the WordPress

26 min read Donna Cavalier

Stop the Presses: Gutenberg is What WordPress Needs, but It Doesn't Go Nearly Far Enough

Editorials | wpshout.com | 21 day ago

“Everyone’s a critic,” as the saying goes, and nowhere more so than around Gutenberg, the upcoming content editor overhaul slated for WordPress 5.0. Gutenberg has been the subject of soaring vision statements, angst-filled comments sections, and dozens (hundreds?) of cautiously-optimistic-to-mixed-to-confused-to-skeptical-to-concerned reviews. It’s been a lot, and in entering the conversation I’m conscious of the need to say something new, and not just pile on the noise and (especially) the negativity. I have an approach that I think can help.
What Do WordPress Users Want? (And Is Gutenberg That Thing?)
I think something that could be extremely helpful in such a crowded space is to return the focus to where it needs to be. In my mind, that’s the users: What do WordPress’s users want?
I’m a WordPress user myself: very much so. I’m a developer too, but I’m also someone who kind of wandered into technology by way of an interest in writing and spirituality, and who’s written maybe a million words using the WordPress post editor (including 3,500 today, see below!).
WordPress users have been very clearly signaling what they

11 min read Lizz Ehrenpreis
Editorials | zao.is | 12 days ago

My Thoughts on Gutenberg

Justin Sainton shares his thoughts on Gutenberg. Check it out.

zao.is |

My Thoughts on Gutenberg

Editorials | zao.is | 12 days ago

We’re in an incredibly exciting time in the development of WordPress as a platform: the REST API is in core, we’re imagining a new JavaScript-driven future for WordPress, and we’re in the early stages of development of a new editor for WordPress, Gutenberg. As one might expect, anytime major changes happen in open source software, hot takes abound! While my take isn’t necessarily as hot (I highly recommend each of those posts!), I’d like to share some of my observations on the community reaction to the process of introducing Gutenberg to WordPress.
This post is not a feature-by-feature review of Gutenberg. Any of the posts linked to above do a far better job of that than I could hope to. Rather, I’d like to explore the general sense of animus this project has seemed to introduce into our community – and if possible, I’d like to explore that without pointing any fingers.
Gutenberg is a good thing
Gutenberg is a great step forward. Truly. It’s not “there” yet, wherever “there” is, but it’s better than what we’re used to. It’s so easy (especially as developers!) to approach these grand new ideas

14 min read Aline
Editorials | hermesthemes.com | 13 days ago

The Current State of Hotel Websites (September 2017)

Dumitru Brinzan has analyzed over 705,000 websites and published extensive research data about the current state of hotel websites.

The Current State of Hotel Websites (September 2017)

Editorials | hermesthemes.com | 13 days ago

At the beginning of 2017 I wanted to do a very specific analysis of HermesThemes client websites. I was curious to see how many customers keep their WordPress websites up to date. One thing lead to another and I ended up creating my very own search engine that is able to achieve some interesting things.
During July-September 2017 I have analyzed over 705,000 hotel websites from 150+ countries.
I am publishing the results of my research ~2 months ahead of the Digital Strategies for Travel Europe 2017 conference that will take place in Amsterdam (29-30 November), a conference that I will be attending. Get in touch if you would like to meet and have a quick chat there.
About This Research
Who Is This For?
I believe that this data will be mostly useful to the following categories of people:
IT and Marketing people working in/for the lodging industry;
Web developers and web designers;
Hotel owners and hotel managers;
Social Media Experts;
The Search Engine Optimization Community.
Content Management Systems (CMS)
There are a lot of ways to build websites: static HTML files, free content management systems (CMS), licensed content management systems, proprietary (custom) website engines, etc.

8 min read Eric Karkovack
Editorials | speckyboy.com | 20 days ago

The Debate Over Gutenberg and the Future of WordPress

Specifically tackling the question of whether or not WordPress needs to appeal to non-designers.

The Debate Over Gutenberg and the Future of WordPress

Editorials | speckyboy.com | 20 days ago

A fiery debate is raging on about Gutenberg – the new WordPress editor set to appear in version 5.0. It’s been both defended by founder Matt Mullenweg and derided by some developers. Even I chimed in with my own (very early) take. It’s by far the most controversial topic in the world of WordPress. If you’re wondering why a rebuilt editor is causing such a stir, it’s because this project has evolved to take on a much larger scope. Rather than change just the editor, the process for creating, displaying and customizing content is up in the air. Changes to custom meta boxes are included in the project and that has a lot of people (especially those of us who do lots of customization work) a bit nervous. Designers and developers alike are waiting with baited breath and hoping that changes don’t lead to a bloody trail of broken websites.
The most logical thinking here says that there’s no way the folks working hard on Gutenberg will allow that to happen. So it’s unlikely that everyone’s customized back end is going to cease to work when 5.0 drops.
To me, the bigger debate is some of the reasoning behind Gutenberg and what it says about

5 min read Ross Johnson
Editorials | 3.7designs.co | 27 days ago

The Need for NonCamps

Some thoughts on non-WordCamp conferences and how the community might benefit from having more of them.

The Need for NonCamps

Editorials | 3.7designs.co | 27 days ago

2017 was the year of my foray into non-Camp WordPress conferences. They’ve changed my perspective on the WordPress conference landscape. Years ago when Pressnomics was first announced, I questioned the need for a non-camp focused conference. Couldn’t we discuss business topics at a WordCamp? Is this a way to get around the rules put in place by the foundation? Does WordPress really need independent conferences outside of WordCamps? While many of my WordPress friends attend more WordCamps in a year than I have in my career, I have witnessed an evolution of camps since my first attendance of WordCamp Detroit in 2010. Seven years ago the community was in its infancy, and the platform was much less capable. Since then, the landscape has evolved in a multi-dimensional way. Capabilities, audience, ecosystem, and everything in between has become more sophisticated.
WordCamps, by design, are inclusive of everyone at any level. The idea being you should be able to get something out of a WordCamp regardless if you’ve just discovered WordPress the day prior or you’re a multi-skilled WordPress veteran. This accessibility is a large part of what’s made WordPress so

6 min read David Bisset
Editorials | poststatus.com | Aug. 16, 2017

Free Speech, Privacy, and the Web

Brian talks about how hosting companies, platforms, and businesses need a plan for how they’ll handle issues around free speech and privacy rights for customers.

Free Speech, Privacy, and the Web

Editorials | poststatus.com | Aug. 16, 2017

Web-based hosts, platforms, and businesses need a plan for how they’ll handle issues around free speech and privacy rights for their users and customers. Politics and the web are intersecting more and more. In recent news, at least three WordPress related companies have been getting broad media attention.
In just a few days, we’ve seen GoDaddy shut down a site for violating terms and conditions, as well as Automattic, and DreamHost received significant attention for refusing to release site visitor information to the US Department of Justice.
I think the most relevant angle for this website is to note that it’s important for web based services to be prepared for the unexpected news cycles that revolve around web-based properties.
How well does your PR team know your terms and conditions? What’s your stance on free speech and when can that cross a line into speech or content that your service is ready to limit? The definitions can be narrow; let’s look at Automattic’s decision to shut down a site called Blood And Soil.
It’s a despicable site, and has been for a while. They’re pretty aware of the sites that exist there, and this isn’t

Editorials | kinsta.com | Jul. 31, 2017

Why You Should Be Using a CDN With WordPress

In a lot of scenarios, a CDN can decrease load times by over 50%! Check out all the benefits of using a CDN with your WordPress site.

Why You Should Be Using a CDN With WordPress

Editorials | kinsta.com | Jul. 31, 2017

As a performance hosting company we really like to research and share ways to make your WordPress site faster. One of the no brainers when it comes to speed nowadays is to utilize a content delivery network (CDN). They take the load off of your web server while speeding up the delivery of content to your visitors thus making their experience better! Today we want to explain to you in layman’s terms how a WordPress CDN works, why you should be using one, and some of the extra benefits that accompany them. We’ll also share some speed tests so you can better judge just how much of a performance boost you could expect to see on your own site. What is a WordPress CDN?
A CDN is simply short for content delivery network. These are a network of servers located around the globe which are designed to host your WordPress site’s static (and sometimes dynamic) content such as images, CSS, JavaScript, and video streams. Now when we say host, don’t get this confused though with your WordPress host. These are completely separate services. A CDN isn’t a replacement for your hosting provider, but rather an additional way to increase the speed of your site. While our hosting

Editorials | kevinmuldoon.com | Jul. 17, 2017

Hey WordPress Companies - Don't Forget About Your Customers

An interesting read about how the WordPress ecosystem is changing and companies such as WooCommerce and EDD are raising prices. How does this affect the consumer? Are they being left out of these decisions?

Hey WordPress Companies - Don't Forget About Your Customers

Editorials | kevinmuldoon.com | Jul. 17, 2017

I have been reviewing WordPress themes and plugins actively since 2007 and have always been aware of all the major players in the industry; however my experience at WordCamp Europe last month in Paris opened my eyes to so many WordPress companies I was never been aware of. There are so many new companies fighting for a piece of the WordPress pie.
One way to look at it is that the WordPress market is much more competitive today than it was just a few years ago. Others would argue that the market has become saturated.
With more people fighting for a share of the premium WordPress market, we are seeing many companies change the structure of their business in order to survive. Along the way, I believe many companies are forgetting about the customer.
Watch my video below to hear my thoughts on this issue.
Prefer to read my thoughts? Keep reading on

16 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | wordimpress.com | Jun. 30, 2017

What Does Gutenberg Mean for Plugin Authors?

I decided to take a deep-dive into what Gutenberg might mean for the broader WP ecosystem. Content authors, plugin authors, and page builders all have different ways they may have to pivot once its in Core.

What Does Gutenberg Mean for Plugin Authors?

Editorials | wordimpress.com | Jun. 30, 2017

I chatted with some prominent plugin authors, page builder authors, and Gutenberg contributors to understand how Gutenberg could impact the broader WordPress ecosystem. This article discusses how it can impact content authors, plugin authors, and page builder plugins in the near future. Gutenberg is the proposed new content editor for WordPress Core. It is currently in beta development. It is a radical departure from the simple WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) approach WordPress has traditionally had for content creation. As with any major change in WordPress, this will inevitably have ripple effects throughout the WordPress marketplace. With that in mind, here’s my take on how Gutenberg will affect the broader WordPress ecosystem.
The Awesome for WordPress Content Creators
From everything I’ve seen, the main motivation — primarily from WordPress co-creator Matt Mullenweg — is to dramatically improve end users’ experience with content creation in WordPress. With the advent of website builders like Squarespace and Wix, a cleaner WYSIWYG in Medium, and the plethora of full-featured page building WordPress plugins, the simple post editor has started

4 min read Donna Cavalier
Editorials | donnafontenot.com | Jul. 11, 2017

Gutenberg Will Confuse The Crap Out Of Almost Everyone

I only see doom and gloom resulting from Gutenberg. This won't be good.

Gutenberg Will Confuse The Crap Out Of Almost Everyone

Editorials | donnafontenot.com | Jul. 11, 2017

Have you played around with the beta Gutenberg plugin yet? If you haven’t heard of Gutenberg yet, it’s the new WordPress editor that will replace the current one. I won’t spend a ton of time describing it because there are lots of places you can find that information, like here, here, and pretty much everywhere that might be related to WordPress. But the gist of it is that WordPress is running a little scared (in my opinion) of becoming irrelevant and old-school, so maybe 6 months or so ago, Matt Mullenweg basically said to update the editor to something modern or else. Ok, he didn’t use those exact words, and I don’t remember the exact time frame, but basically, that’s pretty much what went down. Little Blocks (Are we on the playground?)
From what I’ve seen, it looks like someone said, hey, make the WP editor work just like the Medium editor. And there are plenty of “first impression” posts that will give you a look into all the pros and cons of the new “little blocks” editor. “Little blocks”? Really? I won’t comment further on that.
Those little blocks aren’t completely horrible upon first use.

Editorials | kinsta.com | Jun. 15, 2017

Analyzing Third-Party Performance on Your WordPress Site

While onsite and backend optimizations such as image optimization and faster hosting are crucial for success, 3rd-party performance is not something to ignore. Check out some examples in this teardown. One FB like box was a whopping 700 MB alone!

Analyzing Third-Party Performance on Your WordPress Site

Editorials | kinsta.com | Jun. 15, 2017

A lot of optimization articles focus on how you can speed up your WordPress site, such as optimizing your images or moving to a faster host. While those are all important, today we want to discuss with you the impact of third-party performance and how it affects your WordPress site. Basically, anything you call externally from your site has load time consequences. What makes this problem even worse is that some of them are only slow intermittently, making identification of the issue even more difficult. Today we’ll explore ways to identify and analyze third-party services and performance problems. What Are Third-Party External Services?
A third-party external service could be considered anything that communicates with your WordPress site from outside your own server. Here are a few common examples we encounter on a regular basis:
Social media platforms like Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram (widgets or conversion pixels)
3rd-party advertising networks like Google Adsense, Media.net, BuySellAds, Amazon Associates
Website analytics like Google Analytics, Crazy Egg, Hotjar
A/B testing tools such as Optimizely, VWO, Unbounce
WordPress comment systems such as Disqus, Jetpack, Facebook

8 min read Joe Casabona
Editorials | casabona.org | Jul. 12, 2017

Podcast Sponsorship: Get the Most ROI for Your Money

I've been doing my podcast for almost a year and it's been sponsored for pretty much the whole time. I write about my experience and how both the sponsor and the podcaster can help make the most of the sponsorship.

Podcast Sponsorship: Get the Most ROI for Your Money

Editorials | casabona.org | Jul. 12, 2017

It was around this time a year ago that I decided to start my podcast, How I Built It. I started it as a way to generate buzz around building things so I could send people over to my online courses, where you learn how to build things. But a funny thing happened. Thanks to Rebecca Gill (Season 1, Episode 2) I reached out to Justin Ferriman of LearnDash about sponsoring her episode and he said yes! Since then, basically all of my episodes have had at least one sponsor, Season 2 was sold out, and Season 3 is on its way to selling out. In that time I’ve picked up a few things that I feel can help anyone who is thinking about Podcast Sponsorship. Preamble: Find the Right Show
Before we get into the nitty gritty, I should say that if you’re going to do a podcast sponsorship, find the right show. As a relatively new podcaster, I can tell you that knowing who my audience is with hard stats is tough (I’m trying) but I can take pretty good guesses based on who’s sharing it, my subject matter, and the stats Libsyn & Google provide me.
I try not to accept just anyone who wants to sponsor my show. My reputation is at stake, from both sides, so I need to believe in the

7 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | ttmm.io | May. 18, 2017

WordPress.com is not WordPress - Things That Matter Most

Skip to the section "WordPress is not WordPress" -- that's the most important read. A controversial opinion but a conversation worth having.

WordPress.com is not WordPress - Things That Matter Most

Editorials | ttmm.io | May. 18, 2017

A story I enjoy retelling is how a friend of mine tricked me into using WordPress. At the time, I was working with him on a career mentorship project. He’d written a book that I was publishing, and we wanted to add a premium video series to go along with it. We just needed a way to host those videos online.
I was still very new to web development. I had built my own portfolio site in PHP, having learned PHP through a series of emails from a good friend in Arizona. My business partner was excited about the prospect of a dynamic website and turned me loose to find the right tool.
I settled on … not WordPress.
A few days later, he invited me to lunch downtown. Having no real job and, since our project wouldn’t be launched or profitable for a few months, I had no money and was thrilled at the thought of a free lunch. I parked downtown and met at an obscure office building … where the first ever WordCamp Portland was being held.
Spending the day with a bunch of WordPress geeks was fun and excited me about the tool. I switched gears and rebuilt our site on WordPress. I rebuilt my own site on WordPress. I started publishing plugins and a few themes for WordPress.

3 min read Ben Gillbanks
Editorials | wptavern.com | Apr. 8, 2017

Yoast SEO’s PHP Upgrade Nag is Producing a Significant Increase in Sites Upgrading to PHP 7

I find this fascinating. The fact that one plugin can have such power. If only WordPress would do something similar.

Yoast SEO’s PHP Upgrade Nag is Producing a Significant Increase in Sites Upgrading to PHP 7

Editorials | wptavern.com | Apr. 8, 2017

Less than three weeks ago Yoast SEO version 4.5 was released with an ugly, non-dismissible notice for sites on PHP 5.2. The notice encourages the user to upgrade to PHP 7, explaining that it is faster and more secure. It includes links for getting started and example emails that users can send to their hosting companies. In the 18 days since shipping the plugin with the upgrade nag, Yoast SEO creator Joost de Valk has seen a dramatic uptick in sites moving from old, unsupported versions to PHP 7. From December to March, PHP 5.2 usage among Yoast SEO users decreased from 1.9% to 1.7%, a modest drop over three months. After adding the nag on March 21, PHP 5.2 usage dropped from 1.7% to 1.3% for those using Yoast SEO version 4.5. PHP 5.3 usage is also steadily decreasing since de Valk began the campaign to educate his plugin’s users about the benefits of upgrading.
According to de Valk’s stats, 22.2% of Yoast SEO users are on version 4.5 of the plugin. He estimates 1,443,000 sites on 4.5 out of 6.5 million users.
“Assuming 0.5% updated their PHP versions, that’s 7K sites,” de Valk said. “And another 14-20k that updated from 5.3 to something more decent.”

Editorials | linkedin.com | Apr. 5, 2017

The End of 80/20 and the Future of WordPress

Morten describes what a path forward WITHOUT the 80/20 Rule might look like. Really important discussion and great read.

Editorials | briancoords.com | Jun. 30, 2017

Gutenberg: The Obligatory Review

A good high-level review looking at Gutenberg from the perspective of a blog, themer, etc.

Gutenberg: The Obligatory Review

Editorials | briancoords.com | Jun. 30, 2017

The WordPress content editor has been, for a long time, the biggest achilles heel in regards to new WordPress users. I’m a huge fan of ambitiously designed articles, like the infamous NYTimes Greenland piece, which is now two years old. To achieve that effect in WordPress now is no easy feat, but the current focus of development aims to change that. I’ve spent some time eagerly testing the new Gutenberg editor. Let’s note upfront that this is beta software. It isn’t perfect yet, far from it. It’d be easy to get caught up in the numerous bugs, glitches, and inconsistencies, but I don’t think that’s as important. Those issues will get reported and ironed out as needed. As I write this, there are approximately 300 open issues on the official Github repo. Taking a look at the open pull requests, we can see plenty of fixes and enhancements moving forward.
Instead, I’m trying to think about Gutenberg from a few other vantage points.
First, as a blogger. How practical are these tools? How seamlessly do they inject themselves into my writing experience? It’s no secret that Medium is a much nicer writing experience, but then again Calypso

6 min read Donna Cavalier
Editorials | helen.wordpress.com | Jun. 22, 2017

Restaurant vs. meal kit vs. grocery shopping (or, WordPress.com vs. Jetpack vs. WordPress.org)

Nice analogy. Both the short version and the longer explanation helps clarify the situation.

Restaurant vs. meal kit vs. grocery shopping (or, WordPress.com vs. Jetpack vs. WordPress.org)

Editorials | helen.wordpress.com | Jun. 22, 2017

Explain to me in two paragraphs or less the delineation between https://t.co/shm7MBBfUi, Jetpack, and https://t.co/w3VOMjx5s9. — Ryan D. Sullivan (@ryandonsullivan) June 21, 2017
Ryan Sullivan posed a challenge/trick question that got me interested because I like trying to come up with compact plain language explanations. So here’s mine:
Restaurant vs. meal kit vs. grocery shopping. https://t.co/RkKp2ooK07
— Helen 侯-Sandí (@helenhousandi) June 21, 2017
This is, of course, not a complete analogy for all aspects of all of the above. It’s all of seven words, come on. It also assumes cultural knowledge of these methods of having a meal, which seems fairly likely for people looking for this delineation. But I think it’s a solid way to start understanding what these three entities are and what they aim to provide you. It does not explain where your stuff lives or how you pay for it (people use rent vs. buy sometimes for this), and I don’t intend for it to do so. Analogies are helpful in providing understanding where knowledge is still considered specialized. They also center references in ways a given person might understand – this analogy

9 min read Pavel Ciorici
Editorials | wpzoom.com | Jun. 2, 2017

10 Years of WordPress Magazine Themes: Evolution & What's Next

Alex Denning wrote an in-depth article about the evolution of WordPress magazine themes starting with first attempts of selling WordPress premium themes back in 2007-2008.

10 Years of WordPress Magazine Themes: Evolution & What's Next

Editorials | wpzoom.com | Jun. 2, 2017

We recently updated our WordPress magazine theme Domino Magazine, adding in a new layout, new colour schemes and some of the most-requested features from our customers. The updated theme now reflects the latest trends in WordPress magazine themes, which begs the question: how have trends in magazine themes changed since they first appeared roughly a decade ago?
We’ve dug into our archives to find out how the WordPress magazine themes has evolved in the last decade – and looked at some of the most innovative trend-setting magazine sites around to see where things are going next.
Let’s start with the very beginning: the very first WordPress magazine themes.
Magazine themes were the evolution of simple blogging themes
Magazine themes first evolved out of a desire to evolve the blog layout from a simple offering of blog posts listed in reverse-chronological order to something which would display a lot more posts on the homepage, letting the visitor choose what they wanted to read from a selection of stories in different categories.
The “magazine style” monicker was coined to describe the rough similarity to a magazine’s contents page. A lot of themes

5 min read Donna Cavalier
Editorials | scottbolinger.com | Jun. 21, 2017

A Brief History of the WordPress Product Business - Scott Bolinger

I didn't like the end of the story. It felt incomplete. But it held my interest for a bit. :)

A Brief History of the WordPress Product Business - Scott Bolinger

Editorials | scottbolinger.com | Jun. 21, 2017

In January of 1848, James W. Marshall discovered a shiny piece of metal in his Sacramento lumber mill. He showed the metal to his boss John Sutter, and the two discovered that it was gold. Sutter tried to keep the discovery a secret in order to avoid endangering his agriculture business. He failed.
In the coming years about 300,000 forty niners came to California with high hopes of finding gold in the American River. One of the places they came was a small settlement called San Francisco, which at the time had less than 1,000 residents. Within 2 years it would have 25 times that.
Fast forward 150 years or so, and that small settlement now has over 830,000 residents. One of those residents is named Matt Mullenweg.
In 2003, this San Francisco resident, along with Mike Little, forked a piece of software called b2. In doing so, they created their own little nugget of gold that would be called WordPress. Little did they know they were laying the foundations for another gold rush, a digital, open-source kind of gold rush.
When WordPress first started gaining traction, the only people making money from it were in consulting work. Custom websites, and general web related services.
By 2005,

8 min read Ben Gillbanks
Editorials | wptavern.com | Jun. 17, 2017

10 Lessons Learned From Five Years of Selling WordPress Products

The lessons Rebecca Gill learned from running a WordPress themes shop. Rebecca has recently sold her Genesis Theme store to 9seeds. There's some good pointers for anyone thinking about starting a business selling WordPress products. The lessons work equally well for plugins - or even online courses.

10 Lessons Learned From Five Years of Selling WordPress Products

Editorials | wptavern.com | Jun. 17, 2017

This post was contributed by Rebecca Gill. Rebecca is the founder of Web Savvy Marketing, a web development, design, maintenance, and SEO consulting company based in Michigan and host of the SEO Bits podcast. Rebecca recently sold her Genesis Theme store to 9seeds, a store she managed and maintained for five years. In this post, she shares ten lessons learned from selling WordPress products.
When Jon Brown and I started talking about Web Savvy Marketing selling its theme store to 9seeds, it became abundantly clear that I wasn’t just selling him a portfolio of Genesis child themes. Anybody can do that. What I was really selling him was an established process and five long years of making mistakes and creating solutions.
When I launched our theme store and stepped into the world of developing WordPress products, I was beyond naïve. I had no idea what I was getting myself into and I didn’t know how to run a successful e-commerce business.
But after a lot of mistakes and course corrections, I found stability, a lot of great customers, and more revenue than I expected.
Today, I’m sharing my top 10 lessons learned with you, so I can spare you from falling down the same

3 min read Nevena Tomovic
Editorials | managewp.com | Jul. 17, 2017

How to avoid scope creep with prototypes - FREE WP Elevation Webinar

GoDaddy and WP Elevation have teamed up to give you a new tutorial each month, all for free! This month it's all about scope creep. This webinar teaches you that by building and selling website prototypes you will be able to communicate your solutions more effectively and avoid scope creep in the future.

How to avoid scope creep with prototypes - FREE WP Elevation Webinar

Editorials | managewp.com | Jul. 17, 2017

Have you ever had clients ask you to add features half way through a project? If so, how did you cope with it? The next webinar that GoDaddy and WP Elevation have prepared for you tackles exactly this. How to avoid scope creep with your clients. Knowing how to do this will help you keep your project on track and keep it profitable. What is scope creep?
Scope creep (also called requirement creep, function creep, or kitchen sink syndrome) refers to changes that are made after the beginning of the project. To avoid this you need to make sure that the project is properly defined, and documented before you dive into it.
A lot of clients will be familiar with scope creep, and will have clear goals for you to work with, but often clients don’t understand what they want right from the beginning. Only once they see their websites coming to life they want to add new features and make changes. In those occasions what is very useful to do is create a prototype as a ‘proof of concept’, which can be a very valuable part of your discovery process.
What you will learn?
The webinar will show you:
How and when to price a prototype into your proposal.
How to build a prototype in WordPress

2 min read Jim Walker
Editorials | plus.google.com | Jun. 13, 2017

WordPress 4.8 Widget Visual Text Editor Breaks Sites

Many people do coding within text widgets. The auto-on visual editor destroys attempts at making changes to existing text widgets with pre-existing javascript and coding. Deja vu to some years back, before they added in the "Disable the visual editor when writing" User option...