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9 min read David Bisset
Editorials | digwp.com | Aug. 2, 2016

Stop Ruining the WP Admin Area

WordPress developers respect the software you are working with. On another note, love a good rant.

Stop Ruining the WP Admin Area

Editorials | digwp.com | Aug. 2, 2016

I guess what I was trying to get at with my previous poll about too many plugins was the idea that a lot of WordPress sites that I see these days are just absolutely trashed in the Admin Area due to inconsiderate, poorly planned plugins and themes. For users, a few wrong turns when choosing plugins can leave the streamlined, easy-to-use Admin Area an absolute mess of annoying ads and discordant design. So this DigWP post is encouragement for plugin and theme developers to please STOP ruining the WordPress experience with aggressive marketing tactics, endless nagging, and other obtrusive nonsense. tl;dr:
“The overall quality of a plugin or theme is revealed by how well it harmonizes with WordPress.”
And the winners are..
Just kidding. When it comes to polluting the WP Admin Area with hideous design and strident advertising, there are no winners. The user experience suffers, your brand looks pathetic, and the WordPress experience is ruined.
For those of us that run "pristine" WP installs, it's easy to imagine that all WordPress users enjoy the same clean, well-organized Admin experience. You know, a world where the unencumbered luxury of the Admin Area is freely

11 min read David Bisset
Editorials | pippinsplugins.com | Aug. 26, 2016

Rebuilding a Dying Product (Pippin Williamson)

Details on Pippin's journey of bringing back Restrict Content Pro to what it is today.

Rebuilding a Dying Product (Pippin Williamson)

Editorials | pippinsplugins.com | Aug. 26, 2016

I continued to let Restrict Content Pro dwindle for nearly two years before making a decision. I had several options. I could let it die a slow, drawn out death, I could sell it, or I could work to bring it back to life and let it kick ass again.

Editorials | linkedin.com | Apr. 5, 2017

The End of 80/20 and the Future of WordPress

Morten describes what a path forward WITHOUT the 80/20 Rule might look like. Really important discussion and great read.

3 min read Ben Gillbanks
Editorials | wptavern.com | Apr. 8, 2017

Yoast SEO’s PHP Upgrade Nag is Producing a Significant Increase in Sites Upgrading to PHP 7

I find this fascinating. The fact that one plugin can have such power. If only WordPress would do something similar.

Yoast SEO’s PHP Upgrade Nag is Producing a Significant Increase in Sites Upgrading to PHP 7

Editorials | wptavern.com | Apr. 8, 2017

Less than three weeks ago Yoast SEO version 4.5 was released with an ugly, non-dismissible notice for sites on PHP 5.2. The notice encourages the user to upgrade to PHP 7, explaining that it is faster and more secure. It includes links for getting started and example emails that users can send to their hosting companies. In the 18 days since shipping the plugin with the upgrade nag, Yoast SEO creator Joost de Valk has seen a dramatic uptick in sites moving from old, unsupported versions to PHP 7. From December to March, PHP 5.2 usage among Yoast SEO users decreased from 1.9% to 1.7%, a modest drop over three months. After adding the nag on March 21, PHP 5.2 usage dropped from 1.7% to 1.3% for those using Yoast SEO version 4.5. PHP 5.3 usage is also steadily decreasing since de Valk began the campaign to educate his plugin’s users about the benefits of upgrading.
According to de Valk’s stats, 22.2% of Yoast SEO users are on version 4.5 of the plugin. He estimates 1,443,000 sites on 4.5 out of 6.5 million users.
“Assuming 0.5% updated their PHP versions, that’s 7K sites,” de Valk said. “And another 14-20k that updated from 5.3 to something more decent.”

11 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | geekgirllife.com | Feb. 24, 2016

Are WordCamps still camps?

WordCamps are slowly becoming massive events and the ones really "paying" for them are the volunteers that run and speak at them continually. Natalie makes some really important points worth heeding for any WordCamp attendee or volunteer.

Are WordCamps still camps?

Editorials | geekgirllife.com | Feb. 24, 2016

Matt Mullenweg organized the first WordCamp ten years ago, in 2006. At that time, camps of all sorts were sweeping through the web dev community as a way to connect with others, share knowledge, and build community. Camps vs. Conferences
What sets a camp apart from a more traditional conference? Camps are un-conferences: informal, attendee-run affairs. Speakers aren’t selected ahead of time, talks aren’t polished, everyone who attends can expect to participate in some way, whether that’s presenting a short talk or demo, volunteering, or voting for the speakers. Camps are kept simple – they’re organized quickly and easily and speakers are selected the morning of.
Because they’re short on amenities and simple to plan, camps are often free or affordably priced and speakers and organizers aren’t paid. But the ad hoc nature of the events and the resulting camaraderie among the participants means that almost everyone walks away with a wealth of new knowledge, new friends, and new ideas. Lots of newbie speakers get their first chance at presenting at a camp. Impromptu after parties are held at nearby bars and restaurants as the attendees unwind from the day’s activities.
The modern-day WordCamp

29 min read Rob Neu
Editorials | matthewwoodward.co.uk | May. 20, 2014

Your Webhost Cannot Be Trusted - How WP Engine Hijacked My Business

A pretty candid review of WP Engine by one of the most well-known affiliate bloggers. I kind of wish he hadn't turned it into an affiliate play, but that's really his style so it's nothing out of the ordinary.

Your Webhost Cannot Be Trusted - How WP Engine Hijacked My Business

Editorials | matthewwoodward.co.uk | May. 20, 2014

When I first moved my hosting over to WP Engine I was highly impressed. They were very helpful, support took ownership of problems and site speed was incredible. As someone that has been in the game as long as I have it is rare to find a hosting company that provided the level of support they did.
But over the past 8 months things have really started to go downhill with WPEngine in a serious way. I have gone from singing their praises to everyone I meet to telling everyone to avoid them.
Here is an example of just some of the things they have done-
Deleting live customer data without taking a backup
Injecting a link to their homepage in my footer without permission
Lots of site down time/slow loading
Losing connecting to the server in the post editor
Disabled fulltext mysql indexing without notification – this broke my RSS feed costing 60% of subscribers
Repeat broken promises from their co-founder
Support is a rolling joke
If I could write a list of things that a web host should never do – WP Engine has done them all. They are no longer the hassle-free wordpress hosting experts they claim to be.
In this post I will share my WPEngine experience across the last 18 months and above all,

Editorials | chrislema.com | Jun. 23, 2015

This is why you don't put wordpress in a domain name

Dont use wordpress in the domain name was one of the very first things that caught my eye when I got into WP. Later I always took folks who had wordpress in the domain name less seriously.

This is why you don't put wordpress in a domain name

Editorials | chrislema.com | Jun. 23, 2015

Before you tell me that I didn’t capitalize the P in my post title, let me explain that most domain name registrars don’t recognize capital letters. But I do know how to correctly type out WordPress. Apple was getting ready to announce the first iPhone…
I remember the months before the early January 2007 announcement. They were filled with speculation that it would not be named an iPhone because Cisco already had the trademark for iPhone (via a Linksys acquisition).
The rumors, which turned out to be true, were that Steve Jobs had tried to talk with Cisco execs for months, letting them know he wanted the iPhone name. But Cisco didn’t budge.
So Jobs got on stage and announced the name – knowing that a) he didn’t think people would confuse his product with that Linksys product and b) that he could negotiate some form of an agreement later.
The reality is that by February of that year, they had settled out of court. And on top of that, Apple ended up licensing the term “iOS” from Cisco as well.
You know what those two companies had in common?
Large bank accounts.
While Steve Jobs was on stage, making his announcement, he showed off the ability to check stocks from the iPhone. He looked

4 min read David Bisset
Editorials | rarst.net | Jul. 18, 2016

WordPress Crusade Against Technical Responsibility

There are two (or more) sides to the PHP version arguement and Rarst presents his case.

WordPress Crusade Against Technical Responsibility

Editorials | rarst.net | Jul. 18, 2016

Some time ago I had read Milestones: The Story of WordPress book by Siobhan McKeown. It is a charming and detailed tale of WordPress history. But more than historical detail I had enjoyed a theme of cultural fit and its importance. It is often hard to distinguish what WordPress cultural values are precisely. We are different, we argue, we disagree, but there is some foundation of principles that did shape it as a project.
Democratize publishing.
What does that vague call stands for?
They don’t have to know
It is often stressed in WordPress circles that plugins and themes should be compatible to obsolete 5.2 version of PHP programming language.
Why?
Because otherwise you will break people’s sites.
Why?
Because people still run their sites on PHP 5.2.
Why?
Because they don’t know they should update.
Why?
Because we won’t tell them.
Why?
Because they don’t have to know.
Wait, what?
It took me a long time to grasp that “they don’t have to know” is one of the most important and least obvious WordPress principles.
I don’t agree with that.
Internet of quantity
WordPress goes to great lengths to make it easy for people to create sites. I

5 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | wordimpress.com | Aug. 24, 2016

Google Plans to Punish Popups, Balkhi and Van Kooten are Not Concerned

Following Google's announcement that interstitial popups will be punished in search results, I tweeted Syed Blakhi and Danny Van Kooten. Basically OptinMonster and Boxzilla users have options to avoid this new rule from Google.

Google Plans to Punish Popups, Balkhi and Van Kooten are Not Concerned

Editorials | wordimpress.com | Aug. 24, 2016

Google is flexing it’s muscles again, leveraging it’s dominance in the search engine market to push it’s own idea of what website best practice looks like. They announced that popup “interstitials” will make your site have less relevance if they appear on mobile devices. In April of 2015, Google tweaked their search algorithm to make sites that were not mobile responsive have less relevant results on their search engine. Back then, I wrote this piece:
I’ll keep this pretty brief. Today Google’s search engine algorythym is being updated to give better rankings to sites that are “mobile-friendly”. What this means in finite detail is up for heavy debate, but your best bet is to stick your site domain into this tool (provided by Google themselves) and say HOORAY! if you’re good … Continue reading
I was heavily in favor of the move at that time. It seemed pretty obvious that sites that weren’t mobile responsive simply weren’t paying attention. This move I’m also in favor of, but it definitely feels a lot more in the realm of Google pushing their agenda rather than being some benevolent protector of the web.

Smashing Magazine is ditching WordPress

After many years on WP it looks like the "Next Smashing Magazine" will be run by a different platform, actually a mix of different platforms!

16 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | wordimpress.com | Jun. 30, 2017

What Does Gutenberg Mean for Plugin Authors?

I decided to take a deep-dive into what Gutenberg might mean for the broader WP ecosystem. Content authors, plugin authors, and page builders all have different ways they may have to pivot once its in Core.

What Does Gutenberg Mean for Plugin Authors?

Editorials | wordimpress.com | Jun. 30, 2017

I chatted with some prominent plugin authors, page builder authors, and Gutenberg contributors to understand how Gutenberg could impact the broader WordPress ecosystem. This article discusses how it can impact content authors, plugin authors, and page builder plugins in the near future. Gutenberg is the proposed new content editor for WordPress Core. It is currently in beta development. It is a radical departure from the simple WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) approach WordPress has traditionally had for content creation. As with any major change in WordPress, this will inevitably have ripple effects throughout the WordPress marketplace. With that in mind, here’s my take on how Gutenberg will affect the broader WordPress ecosystem.
The Awesome for WordPress Content Creators
From everything I’ve seen, the main motivation — primarily from WordPress co-creator Matt Mullenweg — is to dramatically improve end users’ experience with content creation in WordPress. With the advent of website builders like Squarespace and Wix, a cleaner WYSIWYG in Medium, and the plethora of full-featured page building WordPress plugins, the simple post editor has started

Editorials | managewp.com | Sep. 8, 2014

An Open Letter to WordPress Community: Let's Solve Security Once and For All

It is the time that we do something about this lurking monster. Wanna join?

An Open Letter to WordPress Community: Let's Solve Security Once and For All

Editorials | managewp.com | Sep. 8, 2014

Dear WordPress Community, It hasn’t been a full month since we discussed the MailPoet security breach, when just a few days ago another disaster struck.
It was discovered that Slider Revolution, the most popular slider plugin used by staggering amount of themes (more than 1,000 themes include it) has a serious security issue allowing hackers to gain control of the affected site.
The Problem
The major problem is the current mindset and approach to security in the global WordPress community. After the Slider Revolution incident, its developers released a statement that among other things said:
The problem was fixed 29 updates back in 4.2 in February. We were told not to make the exploit public by several security companies so that the instructions of how to hack the slider will not appear on the web.
“We were told to keep our mouths shut” makes me scream. It also seems to be on the border of being legally pursuable. And cases like this – a major one almost each month – have really hit a point of no return, at least for me.
Quite frankly, I am getting sick of this. I am getting sick of people calling WordPress unauthenticated remote shell that, as a useful side feature, also contains a

6 min read Ben Gillbanks
Editorials | wptavern.com | Jan. 6, 2017

Matt Mullenweg Announces Tech and Design Leads for New Focus-Based Development Cycle

An editorial look at Matts structure for the next generation of WordPress.

Matt Mullenweg Announces Tech and Design Leads for New Focus-Based Development Cycle

Editorials | wptavern.com | Jan. 6, 2017

photo credit: Angelina Litvin WordPress core development is kicking off in 2017 with the new focus-based development process that Matt Mullenweg announced during the 2016 State of the Word. The new approach to releases shifts WordPress from the familiar time-based release cycle to one that is more project-based. The idea is that design and user testing will lead the way and upcoming releases will ship when significant user-facing improvements are ready.
Mullenweg, who will serve as the overall product lead for 2017, announced tech and design leads for each of the three focus areas: the REST API, the editor, and the customizer.
“For the REST API we’re going to work on getting first party wp-admin usage of the new endpoints, and hopefully replace all of the core places where we still use admin-ajax,” Mullenweg said. The REST API team nominated Ryan McCue and K.Adam White to take the lead on the objectives Mullenweg outlined, as well as infrastructure and endpoint performance, security, and improvements to authentication options and documentation.
“The editor will endeavor to create a new page and post building experience that makes writing rich posts effortless,

12 min read Tom Harrigan
Editorials | poststat.us | Sep. 17, 2014

The future of Post Status

Features and memberships and partnerships! Oh my! Thoughts on the future of Post Status and how Brian Krogsgard plans to get there.

The future of Post Status

Editorials | poststat.us | Sep. 17, 2014

3 I’m tired. Really, really tired. I’ve been tired for weeks. Those of you who follow this blog closely know that it’s been slow around here. I’ve only published ten blog posts since the beginning of August. For me, that’s three to four times less than normal.
I’m not burned out, but I’ve definitely been on a break from Post Status. I’ve gone days without visiting my own site or even looking at the stats (!!!).
This post is quite introspective; but I figured it was better to tell you what I’ve learned and what I’m thinking, versus act like everything is normal here.
Since 2010 I’ve regularly blogged about WordPress. I’ve had breaks before and this is probably my longest. Since launching Post Status a year and eight months ago, I’ve thought about it every single day of my life. I’ve probably not missed a single week until this last month, even when I took vacation.
This summer I’ve been gearing up for a lot of changes for Post Status, and honestly this break is at the worst time. I’m about 70% done with a complete redesign of the website, and I’ve spent months agonizing on how to direct the future of the blog and planning for a whole new revenue model. I want Post Status to be around

Editorials | wordfence.com | Sep. 13, 2017

The Man Behind Plugin Spam: Mason Soiza

Just your average snitch post showing who the bad guys are.

20 min read Mark Gavalda
Editorials | poststat.us | Jul. 16, 2014

How much should a custom WordPress website cost?

Brian looks at all the different costs involved with having a custom WP based site.

How much should a custom WordPress website cost?

Editorials | poststat.us | Jul. 16, 2014

2 Eventually, you have to talk about cost.
If you’re a consultant, as I am, you’ve been asked how much your services cost. And you have to make some decisions:
What services am I providing?
How many hours do I think this will take me?
How much is this worth to the client, from a business perspective?
Does the client have money? How about a business plan?
Should I charge hourly or by project?
Is this a one off thing or is there potential for a long term relationship?
How busy am I? Do I need this job? Do I want it?
These questions are important. The answers are important. Gauging the client is important. Every interaction I have with the client helps me learn more about them and the project at hand, and affects what the cost will be.
Cost often also depends on market and location. I’m assuming I’m talking to an American audience in US dollars. What follows may translate well or poorly depending on your location and culture.
How much should a custom WordPress website cost?
I’ve built websites or been a part of website projects — all on WordPress — that have ranged in cost from under $1,000 to over $100,000, for complete websites.
So in short: it always depends.
This is why we can’t ballpark

6 min read David Bisset
Editorials | deliciousbrains.com | Jun. 14, 2016

Developers: Your Clients Should Own Their Plugin Licenses

Doesn't apply to all plugins, but you should be making alot of plugin licenses owned by the client. Brad has some good points.

Developers: Your Clients Should Own Their Plugin Licenses

Editorials | deliciousbrains.com | Jun. 14, 2016

Before we get into this I want to say that WP Migrate DB Pro doesn’t really apply here. It’s a developer tool so the developer should own the license, not the client. A carpenter should own their own hammer. Our other plugin, WP Offload S3 definitely does apply here though. Ok, now back to the show… Just the other day I had a tennis match with a local business owner. He was telling me about the ordeal he was going through to get control of his domain name. Once upon a time, he had hired a developer to build his site. The developer had used his own details (including email address) when registering the domain name. And now he couldn’t reach the developer. He tried contacting the registrar but they wouldn’t give him control of the domain name (and rightly so).
I’ve heard similar stories involving WordPress plugins. Client hires developer. Developer adds a paid plugin to the site during development and uses their “Developer” (unlimited sites) license. Developer doesn’t renew their license and the client isn’t able to update the plugin. Worst case scenario: the client never updates the plugin and eventually it breaks the site

26 min read Donna Cavalier
Editorials | wpshout.com | Sep. 6, 2017

Stop the Presses: Gutenberg is What WordPress Needs, but It Doesn't Go Nearly Far Enough

Hits the nail on the head. Worth the time to read it.

Stop the Presses: Gutenberg is What WordPress Needs, but It Doesn't Go Nearly Far Enough

Editorials | wpshout.com | Sep. 6, 2017

“Everyone’s a critic,” as the saying goes, and nowhere more so than around Gutenberg, the upcoming content editor overhaul slated for WordPress 5.0. Gutenberg has been the subject of soaring vision statements, angst-filled comments sections, and dozens (hundreds?) of cautiously-optimistic-to-mixed-to-confused-to-skeptical-to-concerned reviews. It’s been a lot, and in entering the conversation I’m conscious of the need to say something new, and not just pile on the noise and (especially) the negativity. I have an approach that I think can help.
What Do WordPress Users Want? (And Is Gutenberg That Thing?)
I think something that could be extremely helpful in such a crowded space is to return the focus to where it needs to be. In my mind, that’s the users: What do WordPress’s users want?
I’m a WordPress user myself: very much so. I’m a developer too, but I’m also someone who kind of wandered into technology by way of an interest in writing and spirituality, and who’s written maybe a million words using the WordPress post editor (including 3,500 today, see below!).
WordPress users have been very clearly signaling what they

20 min read Mark Gavalda
Editorials | pearsonified.com | Jul. 17, 2015

The Truth About Thesis.com

Chris's side of the story, told by himself. Matt said publicly that there a "lot of untruths" in this article and that he'll tell his side when the legal battle is over.

The Truth About Thesis.com

Editorials | pearsonified.com | Jul. 17, 2015

On July 8, 2015, I lost a legal battle against Automattic over thesis.com, despite owning the trademarks for Thesis and Thesis Theme in the website software space. Many of you have probably read the initial account of what happened on WP Tavern along with all of the comments. Unfortunately, as is customary with legal disputes involving WordPress that receive widespread criticism, Jeffr0 closed the comments on that post, effectively shutting down the conversation.
However, there is a lot to talk about on this issue. I’d like to walk you through how Automattic and I ended up in a legal battle for a domain, why this was connected—in a very personal way—to a public disagreement that happened years ago, and finally, what this could mean for business owners who operate in the WordPress ecosystem.
I think the most important place to start is by asking: Why would Automattic—a website software company with over $300 million in funding—buy thesis.com when I owned the trademark for Thesis in the website software space?
Negotiating a Price for Thesis.com
By late 2012, my premium WordPress Theme, Thesis, had grown to tens of thousands of users, and I realized it might make sense to invest in the

10 min read Ben Gillbanks
Editorials | alexdenning.com | Oct. 27, 2016

Lessons from failing to sell WordPress themes (during the gold rush)

Alex shares the things he learnt when he tried to release a premium theme 6 years ago.

Lessons from failing to sell WordPress themes (during the gold rush)

Editorials | alexdenning.com | Oct. 27, 2016

I’d like to take you back in time six years, to a time when the world of blogging was very different. The “premium WordPress theme” was in its relative infancy, the default WordPress theme was Kubric (HuffPo claims “Kubrick has helped change the face of cyberspace”) and WordPress 2.9 had just launched, boasting the addition of being able to “trash” posts.
The default WordPress theme at the time, which “helped change the face of cyperspace”.
At this time I was 15 and running writing a lot of WordPress tutorials, alongside studying for my GCSEs. I could see the gold rush to sell WordPress themes happening and reasonably assumed I could be part of it.
I spent six months building an okay theme with a partner and didn’t go great. The product failed. After talking about survivorship bias (and accusing the classic product case study of misleadingly highlight success) I figured I should share my story and (in an attempt to avoid survivorship bias) clearly say what I’d do differently now.
Let me walk you through what I did wrong and what lessons can be learned from my unsuccessful foray into the WordPress theme market.
Building

9 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | wordimpress.com | Apr. 15, 2016

Making Your WordPress Plugin Memorable - Not Just Good Enough

Why are your favorite plugins your favorites? Probably not for the reasons you think! Good plugins from good company's make an emotional connection with you. You like their brand, their presence in the community, their support. It's a complex and complicated beast that few really do really well.

Making Your WordPress Plugin Memorable - Not Just Good Enough

Editorials | wordimpress.com | Apr. 15, 2016

WordPress plugins should be great — not just good enough. They should be memorable and offer a great user experience; to both developers and site-admins. Backing up here. There’s a Chinese restaurant, now closed, located in the middle of our route of errands. Every so often, my husband and I would say to each other,
“Let’s go to Shanghai Charlie’s.”
And the other will say,
“Was it good?”
“Didn’t we go there once?”
“I think so but I don’t remember.”
Even though we considered dining there, our past experience was not memorable. Result? Pass.
I always say if you don’t remember how the food was at a restaurant, it wasn’t that good.
Important to note here is that it wasn’t that bad, either. It just wasn’t memorable. We remember the bad and the good. The dangerous ground is in the ho-hum zone.
I apologize that my analogies revolve around food, but it’s something we all understand. Think about your favorite restaurants. In many ways, what makes them rise in rank are the same reasons why any product excels.
Do you recognize these plugin logos?
Of course you do.
They offer easy-to-use products, a good experience, and support that stands above.
Just because you can cook, doesn’t mean you should

Editorials | poststat.us | Aug. 23, 2014

Post formats are slowly dying, and that's okay - Post Status

Brian writes about the initial introduction of post formats into wordpress and the gradual move away from.

Post formats are slowly dying, and that's okay - Post Status

Editorials | poststat.us | Aug. 23, 2014

10 Post formats were introduced in WordPress 3.1. They were, and still are, little more than an organizational feature that allows themes to support ten custom content formats such as asides, links, quotes, video, and audio. They are just a taxonomy — similar to categories and tags — and are restricted to whatever the active theme supports.
The concept for post formats made sense at the time, though even then it was a topic of intense debate. Post formats in 3.1 were supposed to be an introduction of the feature, to be iterated on once themes began to show how they would use them. In WordPress 3.6 there was an effort to establish a consistent UI, which failed to land in core. I believe they’ve been dying a slow death ever since.
Were we just chasing a competitor?
When post formats were discussed and launched, they felt like an attempt to mimic what Tumblr was doing so well — to make it easy for end users and bloggers to create nicely formatted content for specific content structures.
The problem with post formats is that they have no standard user interface and there is no intuitive standard for how themes should implement storage for post format data, beyond a general recommendation

3 min read Matteo Duò
Editorials | codeable.io | Dec. 16, 2015

$1 million payout to WordPress experts in 90 days (and other numbers about our startup)

The last 3 months have been crazy at Codeable because we've reached not one, but two significant milestones for a less than 3-year-old company. Yep, confetti time it is!

$1 million payout to WordPress experts in 90 days (and other numbers about our startup)

Editorials | codeable.io | Dec. 16, 2015

The last 3 months have been crazy here at Codeable because we've reached not one, but two significant milestones for a less than 3-year-old company. Yep, confetti time it is!
You read that correctly: $1 million has been paid to our top experts in such short time. It's no secret we only work with high-quality developers and designers around the world who can provide high standard results (97% of all applicants who apply to become a coveted Codeable expert are turned down). But if they prove to be as great as they say, they're rewarded for their amazing work and helped to get new and qualified clients on a regular basis. They're one of our dearest assets. Therefore we're trying to make sure they grow with us. We treasure them.
With WordPress market share skyrocketing, the number of people who are in need of WordPress help is growing faster than ever. And with such high demand, business owners, entrepreneurs, and web agencies alike are having hard times finding reputable WordPress experts who can address their business needs in a timely, efficient, and stress-free manner. But when you know you have outstanding WordPress professionals on one hand, and average support response times of 11

Editorials | kevinmuldoon.com | Feb. 9, 2017

Pay Attention to Your WordPress Database (19.5GB down to 159MB)

Great little post by Kevin on a reminder to pay attention to your WordPress database. Without knowing it, his DB grew to 19.5GB due to one plugin.

Pay Attention to Your WordPress Database (19.5GB down to 159MB)

Editorials | kevinmuldoon.com | Feb. 9, 2017

In general, I am quite good at maintaining my WordPress websites. I use the fantastic update service WP Remote to ensure all plugins and themes are kept up to date and I regularly remove plugins that I am not using. However, I am only human.
From time to time some things do slip through the net and I don’t realise I have missed anything until much later.
When I started getting automatic disk warning emails from my server telling me that this blog was using most of its allocated block, I knew something was wrong.
The Investigation Begins
I began looking into where the storage was being used up and saw that phpMyAdmin was reporting that this blog’s database is 19.5GB in size. When I sorted the database by row size I started to get a better picture of what was happening.
The top four rows all had profiler in the name. The profiler_functions table was taking up 9.3GB, profiler_queries was taking up 8.8GB, profiler_requests was taking up 607.6MB, and profiler_plugins was taking up 583.8MB.
To put into perspective how large these tables are, you need to look at the next tables. The next largest table is the prli_clicks table created by the link tracker Pretty Links Lite. After