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21 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | wordimpress.com | Aug. 4, 2015

Are WordPress Legal Battles Bad for WordPress Users?

My motivation for writing this is simply to call attention to the fact that the WordPress community is the most important factor in how WordPress is perceived, and Automattic should be making decisions on how best to serve the community, because WE are the ones that will help WP grow and evolve best. That's the spirit of Open Source, and the Spirit of WordPress.

Are WordPress Legal Battles Bad for WordPress Users?

Editorials | wordimpress.com | Aug. 4, 2015

If you make a living using WordPress in any way you most likely have noticed WordPress in the news in ways that might make you a little uncomfortable lately. Anyone who builds a site with WordPress or builds their profession from WordPress learns that often, they have to be all things to all people. You end up learning all kinds of things about SEO, Advertising, or Accounting that you certainly never willingly signed-up for when you started on this Open Source endeavor.
With the weight of all that pressure, why should WordPress users also have legal expertise? In some ways, it’s part and parcel to running a business, even for a sole proprietorship. But lately, with news of a domain name challenge against Automattic, and a suit against The WordPress Helpers, anyone paying attention to WordPress news suddenly feels responsible to wade through legalese and jargon. I can tell you that I personally felt like a fish out of water, but was also desperate to understand not just the legal implications but also the potential consequences of these suits. Specifically how these kinds of “ugly cases” might affect the broader WordPress community — a community I personally adore.
That’s why I reached

16 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | wordimpress.com | Jun. 30, 2017

What Does Gutenberg Mean for Plugin Authors?

I decided to take a deep-dive into what Gutenberg might mean for the broader WP ecosystem. Content authors, plugin authors, and page builders all have different ways they may have to pivot once its in Core.

What Does Gutenberg Mean for Plugin Authors?

Editorials | wordimpress.com | Jun. 30, 2017

I chatted with some prominent plugin authors, page builder authors, and Gutenberg contributors to understand how Gutenberg could impact the broader WordPress ecosystem. This article discusses how it can impact content authors, plugin authors, and page builder plugins in the near future. Gutenberg is the proposed new content editor for WordPress Core. It is currently in beta development. It is a radical departure from the simple WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) approach WordPress has traditionally had for content creation. As with any major change in WordPress, this will inevitably have ripple effects throughout the WordPress marketplace. With that in mind, here’s my take on how Gutenberg will affect the broader WordPress ecosystem.
The Awesome for WordPress Content Creators
From everything I’ve seen, the main motivation — primarily from WordPress co-creator Matt Mullenweg — is to dramatically improve end users’ experience with content creation in WordPress. With the advent of website builders like Squarespace and Wix, a cleaner WYSIWYG in Medium, and the plethora of full-featured page building WordPress plugins, the simple post editor has started

7 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | givewp.com | May. 5, 2016

Why PHP Versions Matter

Detailed piece on the how's and why's of your web hosts PHP version. It's an important subject that should be discussed more often in the WordPress space since it's the backbone of everything WP.

Why PHP Versions Matter

Editorials | givewp.com | May. 5, 2016

What is PHP, and why does your server’s version of PHP matter? PHP is the primary language WordPress is built upon and the more efficiently it allows your server to interact with your readers’ browser, the better their experience.: Advancements in technology bring down costs. Streamlined PHP 7 means more money for you, because you build more quickly with fewer costs.
For starters: How Do I Know Which Version of PHP I’m using?
If you use the Give plugin, we’ve made it staggeringly easy to determine which version of PHP you are using. Navigate to Donations → Settings → System Info (tab) and scroll down to the “Webserver configuration” section. There you’ll see which version of PHP you are using.
A Bit of Philosophy
Imagine I handed you a hammer and 17 nails and told you to build a shed out of a pile of wood. It’s possible, right? You’ll just need to be creative.
Now, imagine I gave you the same assignment with the same pile of wood, but I gave you 57 nails, a nail gun, 15 galvanized lag bolts with nuts, washers, and 13 pieces of steel angle-iron with pre-drilled holes. Sitting on top of the pile of wood is now a hydraulic air wrench and a drill. The job just got a lot easier, right?
Advances

11 min read David Bisset
Editorials | pippinsplugins.com | Aug. 26, 2016

Rebuilding a Dying Product (Pippin Williamson)

Details on Pippin's journey of bringing back Restrict Content Pro to what it is today.

Rebuilding a Dying Product (Pippin Williamson)

Editorials | pippinsplugins.com | Aug. 26, 2016

I continued to let Restrict Content Pro dwindle for nearly two years before making a decision. I had several options. I could let it die a slow, drawn out death, I could sell it, or I could work to bring it back to life and let it kick ass again.

5 min read Roy Sivan
Editorials | markoheijnen.com | Jun. 24, 2015

Why I care what happens with BackPress

Marko's thoughts on why BackPress is a good thing and should be worked on and accepted.

Why I care what happens with BackPress

Editorials | markoheijnen.com | Jun. 24, 2015

As many know, I’m the lead developer of GlotPress. Simply because I was the only one at that time who cared about Polyglots and also had the technical skill to make GlotPress better. But by getting GlotPress a live, I was building on something called BackPress. At the time I didn’t know exactly what the status was but soon I found out it was even more dead then GlotPress. Updates did happen but no real development. In the beginning it was pretty easy going with developing GlotPress. It was hard to get in to due to a more OOP application but everything worked out for the best. From a dying project we grow to a project which had more then 20 contributors last year. And more people give me feedback on what they like to change. I even have to say “no” a lot of times since I simply can’t build in a short time span.
BackPress
So what about BackPress then. Personally for me there are three options for GlotPress to continue and one is to continue making BackPress better. This by forking it or a complete build. For me, I can live with both options. The last option would be to find another framework like Symfony or Laravel. Which I would love to do that, it would also mean that it becomes even

8 min read Jean-Baptiste
Editorials | blog.wp-rocket.me | Jun. 17, 2015

Why you Shouldn’t Care About Google PageSpeed Insights

Is Google PageSpeed worth bothering with? You might be surprised at how misleading it can be.

Why you Shouldn’t Care About Google PageSpeed Insights

Editorials | blog.wp-rocket.me | Jun. 17, 2015

As a website owner, you know your site needs to be fast. You’ve read all the articles about how to make WordPress faster and which plugins to install to accomplish this. You’ve probably added a caching plugin, hopefully WP Rocket, and now you want to know how much benefit you’re getting. So you head over to Google PageSpeed Insights, because that’s what all the articles tell you to do, and enter your URL. You’ll be presented with a grade and a list of recommendations from Google and at that point, you might be dismayed:
“What are all these red and orange warnings??”
“Why isn’t my grade higher??”
“What do all these recommendations mean???”
After adding caching to your site, you might be expecting that your PageSpeed grade will be near-perfect. Or you’ll look at the recommendations and wonder why your caching plugin hasn’t fixed them all, automatically.
A lot of customers ask us why their PageSpeed grade isn’t higher, or they assume that because it didn’t increase a lot, it must mean WP Rocket isn’t making their site faster.
The simple truth is this:
Your Google PageSpeed score does not matter.
That’s right, I said it doesn’t matter.
Here’s why.
The Need for Speed
The purpose of WP Rocket

Editorials | managewp.com | Sep. 8, 2014

An Open Letter to WordPress Community: Let's Solve Security Once and For All

It is the time that we do something about this lurking monster. Wanna join?

An Open Letter to WordPress Community: Let's Solve Security Once and For All

Editorials | managewp.com | Sep. 8, 2014

Dear WordPress Community, It hasn’t been a full month since we discussed the MailPoet security breach, when just a few days ago another disaster struck.
It was discovered that Slider Revolution, the most popular slider plugin used by staggering amount of themes (more than 1,000 themes include it) has a serious security issue allowing hackers to gain control of the affected site.
The Problem
The major problem is the current mindset and approach to security in the global WordPress community. After the Slider Revolution incident, its developers released a statement that among other things said:
The problem was fixed 29 updates back in 4.2 in February. We were told not to make the exploit public by several security companies so that the instructions of how to hack the slider will not appear on the web.
“We were told to keep our mouths shut” makes me scream. It also seems to be on the border of being legally pursuable. And cases like this – a major one almost each month – have really hit a point of no return, at least for me.
Quite frankly, I am getting sick of this. I am getting sick of people calling WordPress unauthenticated remote shell that, as a useful side feature, also contains a

7 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | roysivan.com | Feb. 10, 2016

Starter Themes, are they really the best place to start?

Roy Sivan explores the pro's and con's of using Starter Themes to jumpstart your theme development.

Starter Themes, are they really the best place to start?

Editorials | roysivan.com | Feb. 10, 2016

There are a few types of WordPress developers out there, one group use starter themes since their job, or work, requires them to constantly build custom one-off theme for clientele, work, etc. While not every developer who creates custom themes uses a starter theme, many do, and for good reason. What is a starter theme?
A starter theme is a theme that instead of creating a child theme of, you just change the name of, and make your own theme. It is not meant to be a parent, it is meant to be the first few files of your new custom theme. If you don’t use a starter theme, you have to create the same base code every time: style.css, header.php, index.php, and footer.php – these are the core files for any theme, even the functions.php file is optional.
So think of a starter theme as your base starting point.
Why use a starter theme?
I am not going to try to argue that using starter themes are bad, I firmly believe that no matter how fast you can make yourself code, having those 3 files ready to go for a WordPress theme is going to save you HOURS over a couple sites. There are also many great starter themes out there, from the dev-favorite roots.io (sage) or Automattic’s starter theme which

9 min read David Bisset
Editorials | digwp.com | Aug. 2, 2016

Stop Ruining the WP Admin Area

WordPress developers respect the software you are working with. On another note, love a good rant.

Stop Ruining the WP Admin Area

Editorials | digwp.com | Aug. 2, 2016

I guess what I was trying to get at with my previous poll about too many plugins was the idea that a lot of WordPress sites that I see these days are just absolutely trashed in the Admin Area due to inconsiderate, poorly planned plugins and themes. For users, a few wrong turns when choosing plugins can leave the streamlined, easy-to-use Admin Area an absolute mess of annoying ads and discordant design. So this DigWP post is encouragement for plugin and theme developers to please STOP ruining the WordPress experience with aggressive marketing tactics, endless nagging, and other obtrusive nonsense. tl;dr:
“The overall quality of a plugin or theme is revealed by how well it harmonizes with WordPress.”
And the winners are..
Just kidding. When it comes to polluting the WP Admin Area with hideous design and strident advertising, there are no winners. The user experience suffers, your brand looks pathetic, and the WordPress experience is ruined.
For those of us that run "pristine" WP installs, it's easy to imagine that all WordPress users enjoy the same clean, well-organized Admin experience. You know, a world where the unencumbered luxury of the Admin Area is freely

Editorials | linkedin.com | Apr. 5, 2017

The End of 80/20 and the Future of WordPress

Morten describes what a path forward WITHOUT the 80/20 Rule might look like. Really important discussion and great read.

9 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | thewpcrowd.com | Apr. 17, 2017

Why I still choose & Love Angular

Roy Sivan goes through tons of Pro's and Con's of the Javascript Wars to support why he still loves and chooses Angular for his WordPress projects. Really good read with a great video presentation as well.

Why I still choose & Love Angular

Editorials | thewpcrowd.com | Apr. 17, 2017

The JavaScript Framework Wars are still heated, with new projects coming up every day, but the 2 main competitors for a while now have been Angular and React. The WordPress community has taken a big liking to React, and it is not really hard to see why. React, its not horrible
React is a great framework for building a heavy UI-focused app. It has a lot more built out of the box that lends itself fundamentally to the “action/hook” mentality that WordPress has. When Automattic released Calypso, built in React, and even used React in the newest JetPack plugin. As is the case, most of the community will also follow in line as soon as the leads have picked something, so many people adopted React.
React isn’t horrible, its a great, and very powerful framework. It has a lot to offer to build complex UI’s and many people even like the syntax. The reactive state makes it easy to easily modify the view as data changes, and with the build tools out now, it isn’t even as hard to get up and running as it used to be. I am not a React hater, I have projects I work on that are React, I even have (although needs an update) a boilerplate I built with it.
Angular has had

29 min read Rob Neu
Editorials | matthewwoodward.co.uk | May. 20, 2014

Your Webhost Cannot Be Trusted - How WP Engine Hijacked My Business

A pretty candid review of WP Engine by one of the most well-known affiliate bloggers. I kind of wish he hadn't turned it into an affiliate play, but that's really his style so it's nothing out of the ordinary.

Your Webhost Cannot Be Trusted - How WP Engine Hijacked My Business

Editorials | matthewwoodward.co.uk | May. 20, 2014

When I first moved my hosting over to WP Engine I was highly impressed. They were very helpful, support took ownership of problems and site speed was incredible. As someone that has been in the game as long as I have it is rare to find a hosting company that provided the level of support they did.
But over the past 8 months things have really started to go downhill with WPEngine in a serious way. I have gone from singing their praises to everyone I meet to telling everyone to avoid them.
Here is an example of just some of the things they have done-
Deleting live customer data without taking a backup
Injecting a link to their homepage in my footer without permission
Lots of site down time/slow loading
Losing connecting to the server in the post editor
Disabled fulltext mysql indexing without notification – this broke my RSS feed costing 60% of subscribers
Repeat broken promises from their co-founder
Support is a rolling joke
If I could write a list of things that a web host should never do – WP Engine has done them all. They are no longer the hassle-free wordpress hosting experts they claim to be.
In this post I will share my WPEngine experience across the last 18 months and above all,

3 min read Matteo Duò
Editorials | codeable.io | Dec. 16, 2015

$1 million payout to WordPress experts in 90 days (and other numbers about our startup)

The last 3 months have been crazy at Codeable because we've reached not one, but two significant milestones for a less than 3-year-old company. Yep, confetti time it is!

$1 million payout to WordPress experts in 90 days (and other numbers about our startup)

Editorials | codeable.io | Dec. 16, 2015

The last 3 months have been crazy here at Codeable because we've reached not one, but two significant milestones for a less than 3-year-old company. Yep, confetti time it is!
You read that correctly: $1 million has been paid to our top experts in such short time. It's no secret we only work with high-quality developers and designers around the world who can provide high standard results (97% of all applicants who apply to become a coveted Codeable expert are turned down). But if they prove to be as great as they say, they're rewarded for their amazing work and helped to get new and qualified clients on a regular basis. They're one of our dearest assets. Therefore we're trying to make sure they grow with us. We treasure them.
With WordPress market share skyrocketing, the number of people who are in need of WordPress help is growing faster than ever. And with such high demand, business owners, entrepreneurs, and web agencies alike are having hard times finding reputable WordPress experts who can address their business needs in a timely, efficient, and stress-free manner. But when you know you have outstanding WordPress professionals on one hand, and average support response times of 11

22 min read Mark Gavalda
Editorials | vikingcodeschool.com | May. 20, 2015

Why Learning to Code is So Damn Hard

Although not strictly WordPress related, I think this is a great resource to get at a least a general understanding of a developer's "life", how tough it is to get really good and why you should (need to?) pay well for a job well done.

Why Learning to Code is So Damn Hard

Editorials | vikingcodeschool.com | May. 20, 2015

Quincy Larson was just a "guy in a suit in an office" and decided he wanted to learn how to code. So he asked around. He started by picking up a bit of Ruby then found himself skimming through other languages like Scala, Clojure and Go. He learned Emacs then Vim and even the Dvorak keyboard layout. He picked up Linux, dabbled in Lisp and coded in Python while living on the command line for more than half a year. Like a leaf in a tornado, the advice Quincy received jerked him first one way and then another and then another until he'd finally taken "every online course program imaginable". By the end of it all, despite having ultimately landed a software development job, Quincy:
... was convinced that the seemingly normal programmers I ran into were actually sociopaths who had experienced, then repressed, the trauma of learning to code.
Ouch. Does that sound familiar?
Phase I: The Hand-Holding Honeymoon
It's really hard to blame anyone for coming into the programming industry with outrageous expectations.
On the one hand, you've heard rumors of how difficult programming is since you were young, like old wives tales meant to scare children into studying social sciences instead.
On the

Editorials | tommcfarlin.com | Jan. 13, 2016

Where Do You Find Quality WordPress Support?

Really awesome writeup on finding great WordPress Support, and some big props to my team at WP Site Care. #shameless

9 min read Harish Chouhan
Editorials | flattrendz.com | May. 22, 2014

Making any WordPress site load faster in 3 easy steps

Contains some insights on how I managed to make this website load faster without moving to managed WordPress Hosting.

Making any WordPress site load faster in 3 easy steps

Editorials | flattrendz.com | May. 22, 2014

FlatTrendz.com was started around 10 months ago. I created this site with my colleague Navin Nagpal using WordPress and a custom theme. While most of our readers are designers like me, I still wanted to share the technical aspects of maintaining this WordPress site and how I managed to optimize it to handle more traffic and also make it load faster without spending on expensive managed WordPress hosting. In last few years managed WordPress hosting companies are becoming popular as they offer a hassle free approach to setting up and running with a WordPress site. They take care of site speed, optimization, security and backup. But this comes at a premium, ranging anywhere from $ 25 and going upwards as far as $ 100 if your website gets even 10,000 page views a month. (Yes they do charge based on pageviews)
After trying an unmanaged VPS, than a Managed VPS followed by managed WordPress hosting, I have come back to my shared hosting account for the simple reason that using just 1 plugin (WP-Rocket.me) and CDN service (MaxCDN.com) I was able to get the 1 second page load time and maintain control of my site at one tenth the cost of managed WordPress hosting.
Before I discuss what I did

Editorials | chrislema.com | Jun. 23, 2015

This is why you don't put wordpress in a domain name

Dont use wordpress in the domain name was one of the very first things that caught my eye when I got into WP. Later I always took folks who had wordpress in the domain name less seriously.

This is why you don't put wordpress in a domain name

Editorials | chrislema.com | Jun. 23, 2015

Before you tell me that I didn’t capitalize the P in my post title, let me explain that most domain name registrars don’t recognize capital letters. But I do know how to correctly type out WordPress. Apple was getting ready to announce the first iPhone…
I remember the months before the early January 2007 announcement. They were filled with speculation that it would not be named an iPhone because Cisco already had the trademark for iPhone (via a Linksys acquisition).
The rumors, which turned out to be true, were that Steve Jobs had tried to talk with Cisco execs for months, letting them know he wanted the iPhone name. But Cisco didn’t budge.
So Jobs got on stage and announced the name – knowing that a) he didn’t think people would confuse his product with that Linksys product and b) that he could negotiate some form of an agreement later.
The reality is that by February of that year, they had settled out of court. And on top of that, Apple ended up licensing the term “iOS” from Cisco as well.
You know what those two companies had in common?
Large bank accounts.
While Steve Jobs was on stage, making his announcement, he showed off the ability to check stocks from the iPhone. He looked

Editorials | poststat.us | Jun. 10, 2014

Fear mongering journalist pointlessly blasts WordPress - Post Status

A journalist in Australia pointlessly attacked WordPress and open source. I refuted his article bit by bit.

6 min read David Bisset
Editorials | deliciousbrains.com | Jun. 14, 2016

Developers: Your Clients Should Own Their Plugin Licenses

Doesn't apply to all plugins, but you should be making alot of plugin licenses owned by the client. Brad has some good points.

Developers: Your Clients Should Own Their Plugin Licenses

Editorials | deliciousbrains.com | Jun. 14, 2016

Before we get into this I want to say that WP Migrate DB Pro doesn’t really apply here. It’s a developer tool so the developer should own the license, not the client. A carpenter should own their own hammer. Our other plugin, WP Offload S3 definitely does apply here though. Ok, now back to the show… Just the other day I had a tennis match with a local business owner. He was telling me about the ordeal he was going through to get control of his domain name. Once upon a time, he had hired a developer to build his site. The developer had used his own details (including email address) when registering the domain name. And now he couldn’t reach the developer. He tried contacting the registrar but they wouldn’t give him control of the domain name (and rightly so).
I’ve heard similar stories involving WordPress plugins. Client hires developer. Developer adds a paid plugin to the site during development and uses their “Developer” (unlimited sites) license. Developer doesn’t renew their license and the client isn’t able to update the plugin. Worst case scenario: the client never updates the plugin and eventually it breaks the site

Editorials | wordfence.com | Sep. 13, 2017

The Man Behind Plugin Spam: Mason Soiza

Just your average snitch post showing who the bad guys are.

6 min read Michael Beil
Editorials | tommcfarlin.com | Jun. 6, 2014

The Best Developer Tools

Tom talks about finding tools that best suit the developer's needs to produce high quality work.

The Best Developer Tools

Editorials | tommcfarlin.com | Jun. 6, 2014

One of the things that developers love to discuss is the tools that we use. And why not, right? It’s fun to talk about what IDEs, minifiers, compressors, build tools, deployment utilities, and so on that we incorporate into our daily workflow. It’s also fun to see what other people use to see if there isn’t something to be learned and gained from the way that other people do work.
But sometimes I think that we do cross a line: I think that many of us have a disposition such that we think “if they aren’t using what I’m using then they aren’t being as productive (read: they are as proficient) as I am.”
And this mentality is lame primarily because there are a number of factors that contribute to the tools that a developer opts to use when he or she is getting his or her work done.
The Best Developer Tools
More than ever, we have more tools at our disposal to help us get work done than we’ve ever had before. I mean, we even have code generators for certain things.
Yikes, right?
And don’t get me wrong: I absolutely love the fact that we have choice in the tools that we use.
After all, the fact that we’re able to choose the set of tools that we use on a daily basis directly contributes to

20 min read Mark Gavalda
Editorials | poststat.us | Jul. 16, 2014

How much should a custom WordPress website cost?

Brian looks at all the different costs involved with having a custom WP based site.

How much should a custom WordPress website cost?

Editorials | poststat.us | Jul. 16, 2014

2 Eventually, you have to talk about cost.
If you’re a consultant, as I am, you’ve been asked how much your services cost. And you have to make some decisions:
What services am I providing?
How many hours do I think this will take me?
How much is this worth to the client, from a business perspective?
Does the client have money? How about a business plan?
Should I charge hourly or by project?
Is this a one off thing or is there potential for a long term relationship?
How busy am I? Do I need this job? Do I want it?
These questions are important. The answers are important. Gauging the client is important. Every interaction I have with the client helps me learn more about them and the project at hand, and affects what the cost will be.
Cost often also depends on market and location. I’m assuming I’m talking to an American audience in US dollars. What follows may translate well or poorly depending on your location and culture.
How much should a custom WordPress website cost?
I’ve built websites or been a part of website projects — all on WordPress — that have ranged in cost from under $1,000 to over $100,000, for complete websites.
So in short: it always depends.
This is why we can’t ballpark

6 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | mediatemple.net | 18 days ago

The WordPress Philosophy: What Is It and Why Should ... - Media Temple

This is the first of a series on the WordPress Philosophy. What is it and why does it matter. A new article will be published each month of this year.

The WordPress Philosophy: What Is It and Why Should ... - Media Temple

Editorials | mediatemple.net | 18 days ago

Have you ever installed a plugin into your WordPress website and thought, “Ummm… that’s different”? Something about it just stood out as not quite right. The settings felt strange, or there were way too many settings, or maybe it changed parts of your site in ways you didn’t expect. Most often this experience involves a plugin or a theme that doesn’t do things “The WordPress Way.” If you’ve ever heard that phrase, it probably sounded a bit mysterious. That’s because while “The WordPress Way” does have a definition, it’s still a bit fuzzy; it’s not so simple to boil it down to a sentence or two. It’s not merely about the settings interface, or where to put the menus — it’s a whole philosophy of understanding user experience, development, and even freedom itself.
This series is about the WordPress Philosophy. Yes, WordPress has an actual philosophy! This simple document will hold a lot of sway over everything that you interact with in your WordPress admin.
By the end of this series, you’ll have a stronger grasp of the WordPress Philosophy. You’ll be empowered to make more

3 min read Ben Gillbanks
Editorials | wptavern.com | Apr. 8, 2017

Yoast SEO’s PHP Upgrade Nag is Producing a Significant Increase in Sites Upgrading to PHP 7

I find this fascinating. The fact that one plugin can have such power. If only WordPress would do something similar.

Yoast SEO’s PHP Upgrade Nag is Producing a Significant Increase in Sites Upgrading to PHP 7

Editorials | wptavern.com | Apr. 8, 2017

Less than three weeks ago Yoast SEO version 4.5 was released with an ugly, non-dismissible notice for sites on PHP 5.2. The notice encourages the user to upgrade to PHP 7, explaining that it is faster and more secure. It includes links for getting started and example emails that users can send to their hosting companies. In the 18 days since shipping the plugin with the upgrade nag, Yoast SEO creator Joost de Valk has seen a dramatic uptick in sites moving from old, unsupported versions to PHP 7. From December to March, PHP 5.2 usage among Yoast SEO users decreased from 1.9% to 1.7%, a modest drop over three months. After adding the nag on March 21, PHP 5.2 usage dropped from 1.7% to 1.3% for those using Yoast SEO version 4.5. PHP 5.3 usage is also steadily decreasing since de Valk began the campaign to educate his plugin’s users about the benefits of upgrading.
According to de Valk’s stats, 22.2% of Yoast SEO users are on version 4.5 of the plugin. He estimates 1,443,000 sites on 4.5 out of 6.5 million users.
“Assuming 0.5% updated their PHP versions, that’s 7K sites,” de Valk said. “And another 14-20k that updated from 5.3 to something more decent.”