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Pro | erineflynn.com | 6 hours ago

What to say when a potential client thinks you’re too expensive

Ready made templates to use with your client. Remember, your time should be worth much more than a cup of coffee.

What to say when a potential client thinks you’re too expensive

Pro | erineflynn.com | 6 hours ago

If you’ve been in the design business for a while, you’ve likely heard this from potential clients before, “you’re too expensive!” or something to that effect, anyhow. So what do you do?
You’ve got a few options! Here are some handy-dandy email scripts I’ve created that you can copy+paste, and tweak to send to those potential clients!
Note: These scripts are not intended to be used verbatim, but to be edited to fit your own situation and level of professionalism. Use these scripts as a starting point, but tweak them to work for you!
Option One – Educate Her on Why You’re Awesome
Hey ____!
I realize that this is a large investment, but I can assure you that I am delivering top-notch service that you won’t receive with a low-cost alternative. My clients have seen results such as ____ and ____ because I work with you to really make sure that you’re receiving a design that works for you and your brand. I’m not just creating a _____, I’m helping you achieve your goals.
If you don’t have the funds available at this time, I understand. Please keep me in mind for the future. If you are able and willing to invest

5 min read M Asif Rahman
Pro | commercenotebook.com | 27 days ago

Welcome to Commerce Notebook By Brian Krogsgard From Post Status

Brian Krogsgard is announcing CommerceNotebook, which will follow a similar-ish model of PostStatus.

Welcome to Commerce Notebook By Brian Krogsgard From Post Status

Pro | commercenotebook.com | 27 days ago

Commerce Notebook is a new site aimed to inform, educate, and provide resources for eCommerce professionals, store owners, and enthusiasts. Welcome to Commerce Notebook!
The goal for this project is to cater to people that know and love eCommerce, so they can do what they do better and more informed.
Who’s behind Commerce Notebook?
Commerce Notebook is brought to you by the same team that’s behind Post Status — a preeminent website geared specifically for WordPress professionals.
My name is Brian Krogsgard (here’s my personal website and Twitter, where I share most stuff). I’m a writer, developer, eCommerce store owner, and entrepreneur. With this site, I’ll share the stories of others in the trenches of eCommerce, as well as my own journeys.
Prior to running my own content-centric business, I was a developer and web consultant. My first eCommerce website build was in 2011. I have worked on — in some capacity or another — a few dozen eCommerce stores since.
Post Status launched on January 21st, 2013 — four years to the day prior to Commerce Notebook. I cover eCommerce within the WordPress landscape on Post Status, and will continue

6 min read Eric Karkovack
Pro | speckyboy.com | 18 days ago

Am I Developer Enough?

Taking a look at the labels we give ourselves and their importance to the consumer.

Am I Developer Enough?

Pro | speckyboy.com | 18 days ago

In the professional space, a title says a lot about your skill set and qualifications. Of course, some professions have official designations like Doctor, Esquire and so on. When it comes to web design, we don’t really have those official titles. Often, we refer to ourselves as whatever we feel is most appropriate. A lot of us are called ‘web designer’, ‘web developer’ and some even go by ‘full-stack web developer’.
I’d like to think that most of us in the industry are pretty honest about our skills. We know our strengths and weaknesses. We generally wouldn’t call ourselves something we’re not. I think that level of honesty is actually one of the cooler aspects of the web design community at large.
Even so, I do struggle a bit with the terminology I use to describe myself. How do we know what’s appropriate?
What’s in a Name?
My career started out designing and hand-coding static HTML websites back in the day. In the many years since, I’ve evolved into creating custom WordPress themes out of my own PSD mockups, integrating goodies like custom fields and hacking away until everything works the way it needs to.

8 min read Jason Resnick
Pro | rezzz.com | 12 days ago

How To Change the Type of Client I Work With?

This seems to be the biggest problem with most. They start working with crappy clients, they know it, and feel stuck.

How To Change the Type of Client I Work With?

Pro | rezzz.com | 12 days ago

This is a question that I often get because I talk a lot about defining your ideal client in order to build recurring revenue in your business. To change the type of client you work with is hard. Maybe almost as hard as it is to have your dog answer the phone for you. It’s tough because you already have clients that need your concentration and time to work on their projects.
It’s tough because you have clients that don’t fit into your ideal client (anymore).
It’s tough because you are scared that if you shift focus, there will be a bunch of work that could be “missed” out on.
I want to share with you the most effective and best way to be able to start redefining your ideal client and/or projects so that you can build a sustainable freelance business. How do I know? Well because I’ve done it. I went from being a general web developer to an eCommerce specialist in a few short months.
For the sake of this article, I’m going to assume that you’ve done your homework and that there is a market fit for your solution to your new ideal project and/or client.
Bonus: Get The Secret 5th Step to Change The Type Of Clients You Attract
If I can

7 min read David McCan
Pro | ithemes.com | 24 days ago

Different Pricing Strategies: Discover What Works For You

We often wrestle with pricing when introducing a new product or service. This article by Saylor Bullington provides a high-level summary of different pricing strategies along with guidance on why that approach might be chosen.

Different Pricing Strategies: Discover What Works For You

Pro | ithemes.com | 24 days ago

Establishing a pricing strategy reflective of your value that clients agree is fair, is difficult. Here are three different pricing strategies to consider when establishing one for yourself or you company. First Things First: Pricing Strategy Considerations
Before establishing price points for either your goods or services, there are multiple factors that need to be considered:
Who is the target audience your product appeals to?
What are your production and distribution costs?
Who are your competitors and what are their pricing models?
What is the true value of your services? How much time or money can it save your clients or customers?
What is the True Value of Your Product or Service?
It’s helpful to evaluate what your product or services are truly worth. Begin by asking yourself a few questions:
Do you offer a more valuable experience than competitors?
Is there something you offer that others don’t?
What is unique about your business?
How many years have you been in the business?
Examine the value of your business and keep it in mind while exploring different pricing strategies. Check out this great webinar from Chris Lema with 7 tips for value-based pricing.
Most importantly,

8 min read Jason Resnick
Pro | rezzz.com | 13 days ago

The Process of Warm Outreach for Better Leads

Enough about trying to get in new leads, leverage your existing leads, clients, past clients, and colleagues to get those better leads.

The Process of Warm Outreach for Better Leads

Pro | rezzz.com | 13 days ago

There’s no shortage of “How to get clients?” posts and articles out there especially around lead generation. Some of it I’m not sold on because it’s a lot of smoke and mirrors which result in bad leads, if any at all. If there’s effort put in there are many others that do work. I’ve done a lot of these methods and even give away a method I use successfully that hundreds of folks now use as well.
There’s a part of sales that is sorely undervalued and underutilized in the freelancing world. That’s warm outreach!
Warm outreach is the method in which you communicate, whether that’s email, phone, or some other means to people who know you.
Notice how I didn’t use the word “leads” and instead used “people.”
By “people,” I mean those colleagues and folks in your business network.
Your NEW Warm Outreach Process
When I say colleagues and network, I’m referring to past and current clients, friends of yours in business, and yes, people who have the exact same work as you.
When I started out, I was in no way, shape or form going to go knocking on doors to get business. I won’t even

5 min read Eric Karkovack
Pro | speckyboy.com | 29 days ago

Every Website Will Break (Eventually)

While we'd all like to believe that we can create a bulletproof site, the truth is that eventually, something's going to break.

Every Website Will Break (Eventually)

Pro | speckyboy.com | 29 days ago

I know – the headline sounds dire. And, to some degree, it is. But I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately and I feel like we, as designers and developers, should have an open dialogue. Recently, after a spate of websites I maintain faced a variety of problems, I came to a stark realization: Every website I’ve ever worked on is probably going to break at some point.
We’ll get into the reasons why in a second. But, let that last statement just sink in for a moment. Now, do you get that sinking feeling in your stomach, too?
Is it true? How can this happen?
Sadly, I do believe it’s true. And I actually wonder why it took me so long to figure it out. Maybe you were a bit more on-the-ball and realized it long before I did.
As to why a website is going to break – there are a number of reasons for that. Just a few of the possibilities include:
CMS Core/Plugin/Theme Conflicts
Any website that is built on a content management system like WordPress, Drupal or Joomla! are bound to run into a mischievous software update sooner or later. Different parts could then conflict with each other – resulting in anything from a small display issue to an inaccessible

4 min read David McCan
Pro | wptavern.com | Jan. 13, 2017

2nd Edition of Producing Open Source Software Now Available for Free

How to Run a Successful Free Software Project. The Open Source specialist Karl Fogel has released the 2nd edition of his comprehensive book that covers the many facets of Open Source software projects.

2nd Edition of Producing Open Source Software Now Available for Free

Pro | wptavern.com | Jan. 13, 2017

The second edition of Karl Fogel‘s “Producing Open Source Software: How to Run a Successful Free Software Project” is now available for download. Fogel, a partner at Open Tech Strategies and OSS contributor since 1997, was a founding developer in the Subversion project. He has worked for more than a decade as an open source specialist, helping businesses and organizations evaluate, launch, and manage open source projects. Producing Open Source Software version 2 was released for free this week under the Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International license. The first edition was published in 2005 but the landscape of OSS has changed drastically over the past 12 years. In 2013, Fogel successfully raised $15,376 towards his $10,000 Kickstarter goal to fund the revision.
The book includes topics like ‘Free’ Versus ‘Open Source,’ choosing a license, version control, social and political infrastructure, the economics of open source, culture, and communication. It was written for managers and software developers but can also be informative for newcomers to open source projects.
Fogel originally planned on finishing the second edition by the end of 2013

17 min read Ahmad Awais
Pro | hackernoon.com | Oct. 7, 2016

How it feels to learn JavaScript in 2016

I am currently building SaaS product for WP with JS and this article represents 99% of my feelings while choosing a framework — the one which will be there once the project is complete.

How it feels to learn JavaScript in 2016

Pro | hackernoon.com | Oct. 7, 2016

Edit: Thanks for pointing typos and mistakes, I’ll update the article as noted. Discussion in HackerNews and Reddit. The following is inspired by the article “It’s the future” from Circle CI. You can read the original here. This piece is just an opinion, and like any JavaScript framework, it shouldn’t be taken too seriously. No JavaScript frameworks were created during the writing of this article.
Hey, I got this new web project, but to be honest I haven’t coded much web in a few years and I’ve heard the landscape changed a bit. You are the most up-to date web dev around here right?
-The actual term is Front End engineer, but yeah, I’m the right guy. I do web in 2016. Visualisations, music players, flying drones that play football, you name it. I just came back from JsConf and ReactConf, so I know the latest technologies to create web apps.
Cool. I need to create a page that displays the latest activity from the users, so I just need to get the data from the REST endpoint and display it in some sort of filterable table, and update it if anything changes in the server. I was thinking maybe using jQuery to fetch and display the data?
-Oh

9 min read Dave Warfel
Pro | codesmite.com | Sep. 17, 2016

What ever happened to PHP7?

Interesting article on the slow adoption rate of PHP 7 by web hosts, and some of the reasons why most WordPress sites are still running on PHP 5.x.

What ever happened to PHP7?

Pro | codesmite.com | Sep. 17, 2016

TAGS: PHP5, Programming, Webhosting, Wordpress You may be thinking: "Wait, don't you mean what happened to PHP6?"
But no, I am actually referring to PHP7, This may seem quite strange since PHP6 was the version that was skipped, not PHP7.
A QUICK SUMMARY FOR THOSE THAT DO NOT KNOW
PHP6 was proposed sometime back in 2010, but was eventually suspended and never reached production phase. This was mostly due to the core features of PHP6 being deemed too technically difficult to implement; this in combination with multiple other reasons meant the development unfortunately reached a standstill.
Many of the features included in PHP6 were instead back-ported into the PHP5.x branch; explaining why we saw so many new features added with the release of PHP5.3.
The version name PHP6 was omitted by the php.net developers due to the fact that it was a very well established and documented project. There are still vast amounts of information available on the web regarding the PHP6 project; and many conferences were held by the php.net developers in the community regarding the project.
It made very little sense to reuse PHP6 as the name for the next PHP version seeing as the next version was

20 min read Eusebiu Oprinoiu
Pro | carlalexander.ca | Nov. 11, 2016

Mastering the Use of PHP Conditionals

PHP conditionals are so common and easy to use that most of us ignore how easy it is to develop bad habits around them. Luckily, we have Carl Alexander to remind us that "easy to learn" is not always equal to "easy to master".

Mastering the Use of PHP Conditionals

Pro | carlalexander.ca | Nov. 11, 2016

No set of control structures is more pervasive in programming than if, elseif and else. With a few exceptions, you’ll use at least one per function or method that you write. There’s just no way around it. But conditionals (that’s what we call these control structures) fit in the “easy to learn, hard to master” category. In fact, they’re so easy to use that you can develop some bad habits around them. (This is also a problem with loops.) This can lead to code that’s complex and hard to read or even test.
That said, it’s possible to develop good programming habits with conditionals. This is what this article will try to help you with. We’ll go over some programming techniques that can help make conditionals more manageable.
First, let’s take a look at how PHP evaluates conditionals. This is so often misunderstood when using conditionals. But knowing how PHP evaluates them lets you remove and/or combine conditionals. This, in turn, makes your code simpler.
Evaluation order of a conditional
The first thing that you should always keep in mind is the order that conditionals get evaluated. Most programming languages evaluate conditionals

16 min read Joshua Strebel
Pro | pagely.com | Oct. 16, 2016

Extreme Ownership Principles in Practice at Pagely

Sean takes us through a few key takeaways from this useful book on business management / teams.

Extreme Ownership Principles in Practice at Pagely

Pro | pagely.com | Oct. 16, 2016

I recently finished reading a book called Extreme Ownership. It’s a business book by two Navy SEALs who led the most highly-decorated combat units in the Iraq War in which they share key battlefield lessons, distill them into core principles and map them to specific business scenarios to show how they apply in the boardroom. I had a handful of interesting takeaways from reading this book and noticed a fair amount of idea overlap with another military business book that’s a bit of a North Star at Pagely, Turn the Ship Around. I’ll distill the key Extreme Ownership principles of the book below and share how we’ve implemented some of this thinking at Pagely with the hope that it gives you some ideas on how to apply these concepts in your venture. The Concept of Extreme Ownership
The book is divided into three parts. The first section lays the groundwork of the philosophy of Extreme Ownership and presents a compelling argument that quality of leadership is the primary determinant for team effectiveness (trumping even team composition). Put simply, Extreme Ownership is the opposite of “it’s not my job,” it’s taking ownership of all aspects

Pro | indiehackers.com | Oct. 28, 2016

Instapainting – From $4k in debt to $32k/mo in passive revenue with no employees

Thought this was an inspirational comeback story that many could identify with.

Instapainting – From $4k in debt to $32k/mo in passive revenue with no employees

Pro | indiehackers.com | Oct. 28, 2016

Tell us about yourself and what you're working on. Hi, I'm Chris Chen. I created Instapainting.com, a website that lets you turn a photo into a painting hand-made by an artist in real life.
For the first two years I was operating purely from earned income, making about $30-$50k of profit to support both myself and the business (in expensive San Francisco, no less). Now the business is in its third year and doing over $400,000 in annual revenue. I'm still bootstrapped.
How did you get started with Instapainting?
I did YC in Winter 2011 as a solo founder working on a social music site that was a clone of Last.fm. I was fresh out of a 6 month hiatus from college, which I've yet to go back and finish. (I'd only completed 3 semesters of a physics major.) I survived on the money I raised from YC and my various ideas and pivots for about 3 years.
Then I ran out of money.
Luckily, by this point I had already been testing more and more random ideas that deviated from "social music", and I had gotten pretty good at throwing up MVPs. I had a friend who bought paintings from China and sold them in the US, and she wanted me to build a website for her to sell art reproductions. Instead,

11 min read Nemanja Aleksic
Pro | toggl.com | Aug. 27, 2016

Terrible Clients Explained with Pirates (Infographic)

A funny take on all the pitfalls of client communication, wrapped up in a pirate infographic. What's not to like? :)

Terrible Clients Explained with Pirates (Infographic)

Pro | toggl.com | Aug. 27, 2016

You can’t blame your clients for not knowing that negative space is supposed to be empty, or that comic sans is an abomination. But you can't forgive them for assuming that your time is free. Here is our rundown of the worst offenders:
How do you protect yourself against these fiendish customers? Because your time is your most precious resource, you need to track every minute to see where it's going.
Toggl was actually built for doing just that - just follow this link to sign up and give it a try. You'll like it (and your accountant will too).
Once you've got an idea of where your time is really going, you'll be in a much better position to deal with clients who try to steal it.
Below, we've picked out some common client problems agencies run into, and a few solutions we’ve learned along the way.
So who's giving you trouble?
My client won’t stop calling/emailing/talking to me
My client thinks everything is urgent
My client is asking for impossible things
1. My client is really good at haggling!
Every argument they make seems like it's coming from a Harvard economist (and probably is), while your arguments come off as “I like money”.
The reason why people

8 min read Ahmad Awais
Pro | litmus.com | Oct. 2, 2016

Gmail to Support Responsive Email Design

I knew my way around it, but this would be fun. Great news! Responsive email designs are fun :)

Gmail to Support Responsive Email Design

Pro | litmus.com | Oct. 2, 2016

In the early morning hours of September 30th, Gmail started rolling out changes to support what the email world has been clamoring for for so long: embedded styles and responsive design. What are we talking about?
Gmail has not historically supported classes or id’s in the <head> of an email, which forced email designers to use inline CSS to style their emails. Now, Gmail will support embedded CSS with classes and id’s, which removes the need for inline CSS in Gmail. This also means Gmail will finally support media queries—and responsive email.
Just catching up on the news? Follow along our updates in the Live Ticker as we monitor the roll-out, or read a summary of all expected changes and what they mean for email marketers below.
The Gmail Update Live Ticker
September 30, 8:00am EDT
Changes were rolled out to the Gmail App on Android as well. Classes and id’s are being picked up in the head of the email. We also see media query support for some Android Gmail App accounts, but support is not consistent across all accounts we’ve tested. Support might be rolling out gradually across regions.
Updates are now also rolling out to Inbox by Gmail, with support

17 min read Ahmad Awais
Pro | themacro.com | May. 29, 2016

Why the Best Companies and Developers Give Away Almost Everything They Do

A great article indeed. Makes a lot of sense for communities like ours.

Why the Best Companies and Developers Give Away Almost Everything They Do

Pro | themacro.com | May. 29, 2016

I’m going to ask you two questions. Pause for a minute and think deeply about your answers before reading further:
What are the best software companies in the world?
Who are the best software engineers in the world?
Did you come up with a list of names? If so, how many names are on that list? Three? Five? Maybe ten, at most? There are thousands of software companies and software engineers doing incredible things, but when I ask you for the best, I bet only a select few names pop into your head. Why these names and not others?
It’s because these companies and developers not only do great work, but also spend time telling you that they do great work. I’d bet that for every company and programmer on your list, you’ve read their writing (e.g., blogs, papers, books), seen their presentations (e.g., talks, conferences, meetups), and/or used their code (e.g., open source).
For example, if your list of programmers included Linus Torvalds, it’s probably because you’re familiar with Linux or Git, both of which he developed as free, open source projects. If you had Dennis Ritchie on your list, it’s probably because he was one of the people responsible

20 min read Donna Cavalier
Pro | open.buffer.com | Jun. 18, 2016

Tough News: We’ve Made 10 Layoffs. How We Got Here, the Financial Details and How We’re Moving Forward

Ouch! Hate hearing that. Poor judgment affected lives. Happens often of course, but I hate seeing it nevertheless.

Tough News: We’ve Made 10 Layoffs. How We Got Here, the Financial Details and How We’re Moving Forward

Pro | open.buffer.com | Jun. 18, 2016

The last 3 weeks have been challenging and emotional for everyone at Buffer. We made the hard decision to lay off 10 team members, 11% of the team. I’d like to share the full details of how we got here, and the way we have chosen to handle this situation to put Buffer in a healthier position. I believe most startup founders are, by nature, optimistic. We want to solve problems and we believe in going from nothing to something. The attitude of most successful founders is that something previously unproven can be made a reality. Most of us have experienced doubt and skepticism and have pushed through it.
Optimism has seen us through a lot of mistakes at Buffer, like the countless new features and products we spent months building only to realize we need to scrap them. Content suggestions and our Daily iOS app are just a couple.
But after a certain point in a company, the mistakes we make don’t just affect the product features. They affect people’s lives.
And no amount of optimism could prepare Buffer for last Monday, when we had to tell 10 talented teammates that their journey with us was over.
It’s the result of the biggest mistake I’ve made in my career

Pro | medium.com | Mar. 23, 2016

How a developer just broke the Internet

With left-pad removed from NPM, applications and widely used bits of open-source infrastructure were unable to obtain the dependency, and thus fell over. Thousands, worldwide. Left-pad was fetched 2,486,696 downloads in just the last month, according to NPM. It was that popular. To 'fix the Internet', Laurie Voss, CTO and cofounder of NPM, took the unprecedented step of restoring the unpublished left-pad 0.0.3 that apps required.

How a developer just broke the Internet

Pro | medium.com | Mar. 23, 2016

If you write JavaScript tools or libraries, you should bundle your code before publishing. A few hours ago, Azer Koçulu ‘liberated’ his collection of modules from npm following a trademark dispute. One of them — an 11-line utility for putting zeroes in front of strings — was heavily depended on by other modules, including Babel, which is heavily depended on by the entire internet.
And so the internet broke.
People confirmed their biases:
People panicked:
And people got angry:
Everyone involved here has my sympathy. The situation sucks for everyone, not least Azer (who owes none of you ingrates a damn thing!). But reading the GitHub thread should leave you thoroughly exasperated, because this problem is very easily solved.
Bundle your code, even if it’s not for the browser
Just to recap:
left-pad was unpublished
Babel uses fixed versions of its dependencies, one of which (transitively) was left-pad
When you install Babel, you also install all its dependencies (and their dependencies)
Therefore all old versions of Babel were hosed (until left-pad was un-unpublished)
People blame Azer
The key item here is number 3. Suppose that instead of listing all those dependencies in package.json,

Pro | evertpot.com | Jun. 16, 2016

PHP Sucks

Great article. PHP Is similar to WordPress in this respect, lacking good reputation while easy to get things done.

PHP Sucks

Pro | evertpot.com | Jun. 16, 2016

I think PHP sucks, but not for the obvious reasons. Today I got into a mild discussion on twitter, sparked by the following tweet: Every time someone says "PHP sucks" an elephpant laughs and keeps counting their money earned from getting things done
— (((Chris Hartjes))) (@grmpyprogrammer) June 15, 2016
It’s a nice sentiment, and worth analyzing a bit, but first… a little bit of context:
My background
I’m a PHP developer. I originally started with PHP in the early 2000’s. At that point my main exposure to programming was Pascal, and I started learning C.
Then somebody told me to take a look at PHP, and was immediately sold on how easy it was to get a dynamic, mysql-backed website out into the world.
The code I wrote back in the day was as awful as you might expect, but I kept going, and here we are, writing PHP nearly half my life. I’m pretty good at it, and used it as the main technology for perhaps a 100 projects, some of which never leaving my computer and others that have turned into successful businesses, with millions of users and one of which resulted in an exit.
I’m active in the PHP community, as a blogger and, (ex-)member

Pro | medium.com | Aug. 9, 2016

I Peeked Into My Node_Modules Directory And You Won’t Believe What Happened Next

Great satire. What makes it so good is that at first glance it is so believable.

I Peeked Into My Node_Modules Directory And You Won’t Believe What Happened Next

Pro | medium.com | Aug. 9, 2016

The left-pad fiasco shook the JavaScript community to its core when a rouge developer removed a popular module from npm, causing tens of projects to go dark. While code bloat continues to slow down our websites, drain our batteries, and make “npm install” slow for a few seconds, many developers like myself have decided to carefully audit the dependencies we bring into our projects. It’s time we as a community stand up and say enough is enough, this community belongs to all of us, and not just a handful of JavaScript developers with great hair.
Am I being paranoid? Maybe. Am I overestimating the hard work that goes into running an open source project? Most likely. Was I kicked off my ZogSports team because I “make sports less fun for everyone involved”? Yes
I decided to document my experiences in auditing my projects’ dependencies, and I hope you find the following information useful.
Express
Behind the fastest, leanest JavaScript web framework is a heaping pile of dependencies, each with their own heaping pile of dependencies. In fact, a simple “npm install express” leads to 291 installed modules.
$ tree node_modules/ | count
zsh: command

Pro | react-etc.net | Jul. 22, 2016

Your license to use React.js can be revoked if you compete with Facebook

This is sad indeed. Especially if you intend to use it on a Buddypress project.

Your license to use React.js can be revoked if you compete with Facebook

Pro | react-etc.net | Jul. 22, 2016

React is a popular JavaScript technology for creating rich user interfaces. It originates from Facebook (Instagram originally) and is widely used. The library is open sourced under BSD, but it comes with an added patent clause that you should be aware of. If you are using or considering using React in a project you might want to consult a lawyer. Because of the patent clause you are not allowed to do anything that constitutes as competing with Facebook. If you do take legal actions or in other ways challenge Facebook, your license to use React is immediately revoked.
Your license is also revoked if you have any legal disputes if you have legal disputes with any other company using React. This is the reason why both Google and Microsoft employees are not allowed to use React.js in their work - according to Rob Eisenberg, creator of the Aurelia framework and a former member of the Angular 2 development team.
While this may be a theoretical impact for most implementation projects, it's certainly worth remembering and can limit some other projects like WordPress Calypso which have built a deep coupling to the library. Automattic, the company behind WordPress, is no stranger to petty litigation,

Pro | web-savvy-marketing.com | Aug. 4, 2016

Getting Rid of SEO Lies and Other BS You've Heard

Good post about the current state of SEO, why people despise SEO and online marketing in general and how hard it is (but still doable) to do an honest, hard work regarding one's web marketing.

Getting Rid of SEO Lies and Other BS You've Heard

Pro | web-savvy-marketing.com | Aug. 4, 2016

On my way home tonight my Twitter notifications started to chime. Apparently there was some chatter about SEO being similar to “nasty oil salesman, slimy tactics” and I was being brought into the conversation. For the last year I have been a very loud advocate for SEO within the WordPress community and I’ve really tried my best to remove the remove SEO lies and other BS discussions from SEO conversations, blog posts, and webinars.
Today’s Chatter on SEO Lies and BS
Here is how the Twitter conversation started and why I couldn’t help but write a quick post about it.
The original tweets from @jeffr0:
My disgust for SEO is a psychological thing that is hard to get over.
I equate SEO to nasty oil salesman, slimy tactics that aren’t necessary to get results, you can get results without resorting to that though.
Oh bless Jeff. I love him and his big heart.
This was followed by a reply by @corymiller303:
@jeffr0 yep – this is one reason I love @rebeccagill – she’s none of that BUT gets results #truestory
Cory and I are friends and he and I have had many discussions on SEO and what it really takes to win on search.
While I’ve never

28 min read Dave Warfel
Pro | domainnamewire.com | Jul. 19, 2016

A conversation with Matt Mullenweg about domain names

A Podcast: -Why Matt thinks domain names are more important than ever. -Why he thinks they're undervalued. -Why WordPress Foundation goes after certain cybersquatters. -How many .blog domains Matt thinks can be registered in 2017.

A conversation with Matt Mullenweg about domain names

Pro | domainnamewire.com | Jul. 19, 2016

A transcript of my in-depth conversation about domain names with the creator of WordPress. Two weeks ago I had Matt Mullenweg, creator of WordPress and CEO of Automattic, on the Domain Name Wire Podcast to talk about domain names. It was one of the most interesting podcasts I’ve published (and already the most downloaded), in part because Matt brings an outside-the-industry view to domain names.
I encourage you to listen to the podcast. But for those that prefer reading, I’ve published the transcript below.
Highlights include:
Why Matt thinks domain names are more important than ever
Why he thinks domain names are undervalued
How you can get a .blog domain before everyone else
Why WordPress Foundation goes after certain cybersquatters
How many .blog domains Matt thinks can be registered in 2017
Transcript:
Andrew Allemann: My guest today is Matt Mullenweg. He is the creator of WordPress and the CEO of Automattic, the company behind WordPress.com. Matt, welcome to the program.
Matt Mullenweg: Honored to be here. Glad to talk.
Andrew Allemann: Matt, I want to talk about a number of things today, including .blog, which is obviously very relevant to my audience, as well as trademark

Pro | github.com | Jun. 23, 2016

A handy guide to financial support for open source projects

All sorts of information re funding open source projects, neatly in one place

A handy guide to financial support for open source projects

Pro | github.com | Jun. 23, 2016

A handy guide to financial support for open source. "I do open source work, how do I find funding?"
Below I've listed every way I know of that people get paid for open source work, roughly ordered from small to large. Each funding category links to several real examples. (Wherever possible, I've tried to link to a useful article or page instead of just a homepage.)
The categories are not mutually exclusive. For example, a project might have a foundation but also use crowdfunding to raise money. Someone else might do consulting and also have a donation button. Etc. The purpose of this guide is to provide an exhaustive list of all the ways you can get paid, so that you can figure out what works best for you.
Table of Contents
Donation button
Bounties
Crowdfunding (one-time)
Crowdfunding (recurring)
Books and merchandise
Advertising & sponsorships
Get hired by a company to work on project
Start a project while currently employed
Grants
Consulting & services
SaaS
Dual license
Open core
Foundations & consortiums
Venture capital
APPENDIX: Contributing to this guide // License & attribution
*"personal effort" notes when a funding effort was led by an individual,