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Pro | wedevs.com | Mar. 17, 2017

WordPress Company Growing Big: 4 Years of weDevs: Discount & Giveaway

18th March marks 4th birthday of weDevs. To celebrate this they are running their biggest ever sales discount, and giveaway. Any user could select what product they want to get in the giveaway for free. Check their diverse range of product.

WordPress Company Growing Big: 4 Years of weDevs: Discount & Giveaway

Pro | wedevs.com | Mar. 17, 2017

It has been 4 years since we launched as a company and we are humbled to see where weDevs has come. On 18th March 2017, we are celebrating our anniversary with a bigger plan to give back as a display of respect for our well wishers. We have designed a giveaway for our clients and a discount for anyone who wants to get any solution from us. But on that soon, I am getting a little emotional here and so I will talk shortly about the journey.
How we came to be
At the very very beginning, in 2008, before we even became a company, we only were a blogging site. We developed small themes, plugins and covered reviews, tutorials. Which is why we still blog very passionately on tech. It is during this time where we picked up our love for WordPress and Open Source development from the community. After some experience and learning, we started as a startup company in 2012 and offered premium plugins. Our company took off like a rocket!
We never thought we could come all this way. Now, after 4 years, we have become one of the biggest WordPress companies of the region holding a 30+ member and several departments with 4 major plugins. We have launched WP ERP, the first ever complete and free ERP system

12 min read Jason Resnick
Pro | rezzz.com | Aug. 10, 2016

Why Freelancing Isn't For You

Not everyone is meant to be a freelancer. It all sounds great, but there are a few things to consider before making the leap that one should be real about themselves with.

Why Freelancing Isn't For You

Pro | rezzz.com | Aug. 10, 2016

Working from the beach; not having a boss; being able to set my own hours. These are just some reasons folks choose freelancing. These are also the end results of deliberate exercise and hard work that a freelancer puts into their business to achieve. Not everyone is meant to be a freelancer. It’s not for the faint of heart. There was a time in my career that I questioned if it was something I was meant to do. There are many reasons why you should not choose freelancing as a career. I’d like to share some of these with you in this article. These are not just from my own experience, but from other freelancers I’ve spoken with over the years as well.
not organized or easily distracted
Deliver what you say you are going to, when you say you are going to!
If possible, deliver more than what you say you are going to deliver, earlier than when you say you are going to!
Bottom line here is, if you think you are organized, you aren’t! Being a freelancer means being organized to the 100th degree. To the point of being maniacal.
If your family isn’t looking at you like you have completely lost your mind when you say things like “let me check my calendar”

13 min read Codeinwp
Pro | codeinwp.com | Oct. 13, 2015

From 0 to 4,000 … How We Grew Our Email List - PART 2

Everything From Open Rates to CTRs, how our emails looks like, what works and what doesn't

From 0 to 4,000 … How We Grew Our Email List - PART 2

Pro | codeinwp.com | Oct. 13, 2015

This is PART 2 of our email marketing case study. In PART 1, we discussed our general list building and email marketing strategy, our growth rate, the subscription forms we use, the tools we use to run those forms, what’s our email service provider and why, and how we go about convincing people to subscribe. Make sure to check it out prior to getting through this part. Since we have already discussed everything related to email marketing that’s happening on the blog itself, today let’s focus on what’s going on inside the inboxes of our subscribers.
In other words, here’s everything about the emails we send, the results we get, the campaigns we run, etc. And most importantly, what works and what doesn’t.
An overview of the kinds of emails we send
Basically, there are two kinds of emails that we usually send:
“New post notifications” – where we tell people about something new being published on the blog.
“Exclusive content” – guides, tutorials, other info that doesn’t get published elsewhere – things that are created exclusively for the newsletter.
I should also add that none of our emails are 100% automated. This means that new post notifications aren’t generated straight from the RSS

Pro | frontendmasters.gitbooks.io | Oct. 29, 2015

Front-end Developer Handbook

Attempting to kickstart the new Pro category at ManageWP.org with this amazing guide for front-end devs.

Front-end Developer Handbook

Pro | frontendmasters.gitbooks.io | Oct. 29, 2015

This is a guide that anyone could use to learn about the practice of front-end development. It broadly outlines and discusses the practice of front-end engineering: how to learn it and what tools are used when practicing it. It is specifically written with the intention of being a professional resource for potential and currently practicing front-end developers to equip themselves with learning materials and development tools. Secondarily, it can be used by managers, CTO's, instructors, and head hunters to gain insights into the practice of front-end development.
The content of the handbook favors web technologies (HTML, CSS, DOM, and JavaScript) and those solutions that are directly built on top of these open technologies. The materials referenced and discussed in the book are either best in class or the current offering to a problem.
The book should not be considered a comprehensive outline of all resources available to a front-end developer. The value of the book is tied up in a terse, focused, and timely curation of just enough categorical information so as not to overwhelm anyone on any one particular subject matter.
The intention is to release an update to the content yearly.

Pro | medium.com | Jan. 12, 2016

The Sad State of Web Development — Medium

"I swear every other website I visit uses React, for the stupidest stuff". A funny and interesting read.

The Sad State of Web Development — Medium

Pro | medium.com | Jan. 12, 2016

Random thoughts on web development Going to shit
2015 is when web development went to shit. Web development used to be nice. You could fire up a text editor and start creating JS and CSS files. You can absolutely still do this. That has not changed. So yes, everything I’m about to say can be invalidated by saying that.
The web (specifically the Javascript/Node community) has created some of the most complicated, convoluted, over engineered tools ever conceived.
Node.js/NPM
At times, I think where web development is at this point is some cruel joke played on us by Ryan Dahl. You see, to get into why web development is so terrible, you have to start at Node.
By definition I was a magpie developer, so undoubtedly I used Node, just as everyone should. At universities they should make every developer write an app with Node.js, deploy it to production, then try to update the dependencies 3 months later. The only downside is we would have zero new developers coming out of computer science programs.
You see the Node.js philosophy is to take the worst fucking language ever designed and put it on the server. Combine that with all the magpies that were using Ruby at the time, and you have the

10 min read Codeinwp
Pro | codeinwp.com | Apr. 7, 2016

Does WordPress Site Speed Really Matter for SEO?

We did the test on 3 popular websites and saw how a huge TTFB reduction had no SEO impact.

Does WordPress Site Speed Really Matter for SEO?

Pro | codeinwp.com | Apr. 7, 2016

Staying current with some SEO vs. WordPress site speed concerns can be a burden. After all, keeping on top of the various moving parts of a successful site is tricky enough, without worrying about which one of over 200 ranking signals is currently making a difference in the SERPs. One SEO signal that’s gotten a lot of attention over the last few years is site speed. We all know we should be making our sites faster, but how much difference does it really make in terms of SEO?
In this piece, we’ll round up a number of external studies and look at our own suite of sites to get to the bottom of how much WordPress site speed really moves the needle out in the wild. By the time we’re done, you’ll have a much clearer idea of how much of your efforts you should be devoting to it.
Bonus info: Just wanted to let you know that we have a whole crash course on speeding up your WordPress site. With some simple fixes, you can reduce your loading time by even 50-80%. It’s free, check it out by clicking here.
Let’s kick things off with a quick look at the official line on the subject:
The official line on site speed and SEO
Google’s 2010 announcement of site speed as a ranking factor put it on site

Pro | medium.com | Mar. 23, 2016

How a developer just broke the Internet

With left-pad removed from NPM, applications and widely used bits of open-source infrastructure were unable to obtain the dependency, and thus fell over. Thousands, worldwide. Left-pad was fetched 2,486,696 downloads in just the last month, according to NPM. It was that popular. To 'fix the Internet', Laurie Voss, CTO and cofounder of NPM, took the unprecedented step of restoring the unpublished left-pad 0.0.3 that apps required.

How a developer just broke the Internet

Pro | medium.com | Mar. 23, 2016

If you write JavaScript tools or libraries, you should bundle your code before publishing. A few hours ago, Azer Koçulu ‘liberated’ his collection of modules from npm following a trademark dispute. One of them — an 11-line utility for putting zeroes in front of strings — was heavily depended on by other modules, including Babel, which is heavily depended on by the entire internet.
And so the internet broke.
People confirmed their biases:
People panicked:
And people got angry:
Everyone involved here has my sympathy. The situation sucks for everyone, not least Azer (who owes none of you ingrates a damn thing!). But reading the GitHub thread should leave you thoroughly exasperated, because this problem is very easily solved.
Bundle your code, even if it’s not for the browser
Just to recap:
left-pad was unpublished
Babel uses fixed versions of its dependencies, one of which (transitively) was left-pad
When you install Babel, you also install all its dependencies (and their dependencies)
Therefore all old versions of Babel were hosed (until left-pad was un-unpublished)
People blame Azer
The key item here is number 3. Suppose that instead of listing all those dependencies in package.json,

Pro | haseebq.com | May. 19, 2016

How to Break Into the Tech Industry—a Guide to Job Hunting and Tech Interviews

An amazing post about hiring in tech. Using wit and patience Haseeb managed to double his initial offer from $105k to $250k. More on that here: http://haseebq.com/farewell-app-academy-hello-airbnb-part-i/ http://haseebq.com/farewell-app-academy-hello-airbnb-part-ii/ I also admire the earning to give concept described here: http://haseebq.com/why-ive-decided-to-devote-my-career-to-earning-to-give/

How to Break Into the Tech Industry—a Guide to Job Hunting and Tech Interviews

Pro | haseebq.com | May. 19, 2016

I recently completed a job search for my first role as a software engineer. Despite having first learned how to code almost a year before, having a background as an English major and former professional poker player, I was able to land a total of 8 offers including Google, Uber, Yelp, and Airbnb (where I ultimately joined). In this three-part blog post I’m going to describe my advice to a job-seeker trying to break into the tech industry.
If you haven’t read the story of my job search, you can read about it here. It provides some of the backdrop for this post.
First, several caveats.
I have a weird background, but make no mistake—I both worked my ass off and got very lucky. When I got my job offers, I was working as an instructor and Director of Product of App Academy, and had been studying (and teaching) this stuff for a little under a year.
In light of that, some people have interpreted this as a “get rich quick” sort of thing. It’s not. It’s more of a a “go into a cave for six months and hopefully get a job when you emerge” sort of thing. Subtle difference, but an important one.
Note that my advice here draws not just from my

Pro | medium.com | Apr. 26, 2016

Being A Developer After 40

I soon qualify :) A fun read to end the day at work.

Being A Developer After 40

Pro | medium.com | Apr. 26, 2016

(This is the talk I have given at App Builders Switzerland on April 25th, 2016. The slides are available on SpeakerDeck and at the bottom of this article.) Hi everyone, I am a forty-two years old self-taught developer, and this is my story.
A couple of weeks ago I came by the tweet below, and it made me think about my career, and those thoughts brought me back to where it all began for me:
I started my career as a software developer at precisely 10am, on Monday October 6th, 1997, somewhere in the city of Olivos, just north of Buenos Aires, Argentina. The moment was Unix Epoch 876142800. I had recently celebrated my 24th birthday.
The World In 1997
The world was a slightly different place back then.
Websites did not have cookie warnings. The future of the web were portals like Excite.com. AltaVista was my preferred search engine. My e-mail was kosmacze@sc2a.unige.ch, which meant that my first personal website was located in http://sc2a.unige.ch/~kosmacze. We were still mourning Princess Lady Diana. Steve Jobs had taken the role of CEO and convinced Microsoft to inject 150 million dollars into Apple Computer. Digital Equipment Corporation was suing Dell. The remains of Che Guevara had

6 min read Dave Warfel
Pro | css-tricks.com | Sep. 30, 2017

How Different CMS's Handle Content Blocks (like WordPress' Gutenblocks)

Interesting comparison of how other CMSs implement content blocks. With Gutenberg on its way, I found this very interesting.

How Different CMS's Handle Content Blocks (like WordPress' Gutenblocks)

Pro | css-tricks.com | Sep. 30, 2017

Imagine a very simple blog. Blog posts are just a title and a paragraph or three. In that case, having a CMS where you enter the title and those paragraphs and hit publish is perfect. Perhaps some metadata like the date and author come along for the ride. I'm gonna stick my neck out here and say that title-and-content fields only is a CMS anti-pattern. It's powerful in its flexibility but causes long-term pain in lack of control through abstraction. Let's not have a conversation about CMS's as a whole though, let's scope this down to just that content area issue.
Now imagine we have a site with a bit more variety. We're trying to use our CMS to build all sorts of pages. Perhaps some of it is bloggish. Some of it more like landing pages. These pages are constructed from chunks of text but also different components. Maps! Sliders! Advertising! Pull quotes!
Here are four different examples, so you can see exactly what I mean:
I bet that kind of thing looks familiar.
You can absolutely pull this off by putting all those blocks into a single content field. Hey, it's just HTML! Put the HTML you need for all these blocks right into that content field and it'll do what you want.
There's a couple

Pro | commercenotebook.com | Jan. 25, 2017

Welcome to Commerce Notebook By Brian Krogsgard From Post Status

Brian Krogsgard is announcing CommerceNotebook, which will follow a similar-ish model of PostStatus.

Welcome to Commerce Notebook By Brian Krogsgard From Post Status

Pro | commercenotebook.com | Jan. 25, 2017

Commerce Notebook is a new site aimed to inform, educate, and provide resources for eCommerce professionals, store owners, and enthusiasts. Welcome to Commerce Notebook!
The goal for this project is to cater to people that know and love eCommerce, so they can do what they do better and more informed.
Who’s behind Commerce Notebook?
Commerce Notebook is brought to you by the same team that’s behind Post Status — a preeminent website geared specifically for WordPress professionals.
My name is Brian Krogsgard (here’s my personal website and Twitter, where I share most stuff). I’m a writer, developer, eCommerce store owner, and entrepreneur. With this site, I’ll share the stories of others in the trenches of eCommerce, as well as my own journeys.
Prior to running my own content-centric business, I was a developer and web consultant. My first eCommerce website build was in 2011. I have worked on — in some capacity or another — a few dozen eCommerce stores since.
Post Status launched on January 21st, 2013 — four years to the day prior to Commerce Notebook. I cover eCommerce within the WordPress landscape on Post Status, and will continue

17 min read Ahmad Awais
Pro | themacro.com | May. 29, 2016

Why the Best Companies and Developers Give Away Almost Everything They Do

A great article indeed. Makes a lot of sense for communities like ours.

Why the Best Companies and Developers Give Away Almost Everything They Do

Pro | themacro.com | May. 29, 2016

I’m going to ask you two questions. Pause for a minute and think deeply about your answers before reading further:
What are the best software companies in the world?
Who are the best software engineers in the world?
Did you come up with a list of names? If so, how many names are on that list? Three? Five? Maybe ten, at most? There are thousands of software companies and software engineers doing incredible things, but when I ask you for the best, I bet only a select few names pop into your head. Why these names and not others?
It’s because these companies and developers not only do great work, but also spend time telling you that they do great work. I’d bet that for every company and programmer on your list, you’ve read their writing (e.g., blogs, papers, books), seen their presentations (e.g., talks, conferences, meetups), and/or used their code (e.g., open source).
For example, if your list of programmers included Linus Torvalds, it’s probably because you’re familiar with Linux or Git, both of which he developed as free, open source projects. If you had Dennis Ritchie on your list, it’s probably because he was one of the people responsible

4 min read Borek Bernard
Pro | blog.versionpress.net | Jun. 6, 2017

Announcing VersionPress.com

A sister project to VersionPress is coming in July. It is a fully hosted platform with great staging, speed and developer UX.

Announcing VersionPress.com

Pro | blog.versionpress.net | Jun. 6, 2017

I’m happy to announce that VersionPress is getting a sister project: VersionPress.com. It is a hosted WordPress platform (a managed WordPress host if you will) that takes the best ideas from VersionPress and packages them in an easy to use interface and adds things like backups, security and world-class infrastructure. It has full compatibility with WordPress plugins and doesn’t require Git so it’s a perfect place to host almost any WordPress site. The platform will fully launch in July 2017 with pre-orders available today. Go check it out at https://preview.versionpress.com/.
VersionPress
We started working on VersionPress in 2014 to bring full version-control to WordPress. The benefits if this is achieved are immense: undo button for everything, the possibility to merge databases between environments (staging <-> live, developers between themselves, etc.), keeping track of who did what and many others. It feels almost magical.
We also learned that there will be two major challenges:
WordPress plugins. They can do almost anything to the database and boy they do. Even those well-written must be explicitly supported and while we’re building an infrastructure

11 min read Nemanja Aleksic
Pro | toggl.com | Aug. 27, 2016

Terrible Clients Explained with Pirates (Infographic)

A funny take on all the pitfalls of client communication, wrapped up in a pirate infographic. What's not to like? :)

Terrible Clients Explained with Pirates (Infographic)

Pro | toggl.com | Aug. 27, 2016

You can’t blame your clients for not knowing that negative space is supposed to be empty, or that comic sans is an abomination. But you can't forgive them for assuming that your time is free. Here is our rundown of the worst offenders:
How do you protect yourself against these fiendish customers? Because your time is your most precious resource, you need to track every minute to see where it's going.
Toggl was actually built for doing just that - just follow this link to sign up and give it a try. You'll like it (and your accountant will too).
Once you've got an idea of where your time is really going, you'll be in a much better position to deal with clients who try to steal it.
Below, we've picked out some common client problems agencies run into, and a few solutions we’ve learned along the way.
So who's giving you trouble?
My client won’t stop calling/emailing/talking to me
My client thinks everything is urgent
My client is asking for impossible things
1. My client is really good at haggling!
Every argument they make seems like it's coming from a Harvard economist (and probably is), while your arguments come off as “I like money”.
The reason why people

6 min read Codeinwp
Pro | codeinwp.com | Feb. 25, 2016

Is Mandrill Done? 5 Alternatives for Your Transactional Email

We are using Mandrill for Themeisle transactional emails, however not MailChimp for email marketing, know that probably some of you are doing the same and thought this might be interesting .

Is Mandrill Done? 5 Alternatives for Your Transactional Email

Pro | codeinwp.com | Feb. 25, 2016

TL;DR: Mandrill wanted to raise their prices 4x. They found a way to do that by merging with MailChimp. Here are some Mandrill alternatives. I know I know … I sound like a click-baity BuzzFeed headline, sorry.
But that’s, more or less, the case.
The backstory:
Mandrill is was probably the perfect solution for sending transactional email. For instance, if you have a website that needs this sort of functionality (e.g an eCommerce store) or an app, you can use Mandrill for one-to-one communication with your customers.
Think, reminding people of their passwords, sending info regarding their purchases, etc.
But.
All of a sudden, Mandrill has decided to merge back with MailChimp (originally, Mandrill was a startup within MailChimp, but operating independently, with their own model, databases, prices, etc.), and while doing so, they’ve basically forced their users to start spending up to 4x as much for the service.
Here’s how it plays out:
The standard plan with Mandrill used to be $9.95 / month, which allowed you to send up to 25,000 transactional emails.
After the merge, Mandrill will only be available as a paid add-on for paid MailChimp accounts. The cheapest MailChimp account is $20 (which

Pro | premium.wpmudev.org | Mar. 10, 2016

Monitor the Vital Stats of All Your WordPress Sites with The Hub

A new player in already crowded WordPress Management solution. Though I find it's somehow different than others. It mainly focus on MU Dev User. As they have hundreds of plugin of their own, the literally have plugin for almost each and every purpose, so they feel people could live entirely in their WP Universe.

Monitor the Vital Stats of All Your WordPress Sites with The Hub

Pro | premium.wpmudev.org | Mar. 10, 2016

In recent weeks, we’ve rolled out the biggest changes to our member dashboard ever. Introducing The Hub, your mission control for monitoring the vital stats of all your WordPress websites, including uptime, performance, and security. Add as many sites as you want – including Multisite networks – and receive instant security alerts whenever a vulnerability is spotted on any of your sites, warnings when your sites go offline, run performance scans and get detailed information on how you can improve your Google PageSpeed Insights scores, and get notifications when any of your plugins or themes need to be updated.
We’ve also updated our WPMU DEV Dashboard plugin in tandem with the Hub so both have the same beautiful user experience and design.
Login to the Hub now and take the tour. If you’ve done it already, do it again! Go to Hub > Support and click Quick Tour.
The Hub vs ManageWP / InfiniteWP / Jetpack Manage etc
So… Why did we build The Hub?
The Hub isn’t simply about being able to manage multiple websites from one location. It’s about being able to keep your websites – and those of your clients – up-to-date, fully supported, optimized, secure and online.
Yes, we know there’s a lot

Pro | erineflynn.com | Feb. 21, 2017

What to say when a potential client thinks you’re too expensive

Ready made templates to use with your client. Remember, your time should be worth much more than a cup of coffee.

What to say when a potential client thinks you’re too expensive

Pro | erineflynn.com | Feb. 21, 2017

If you’ve been in the design business for a while, you’ve likely heard this from potential clients before, “you’re too expensive!” or something to that effect, anyhow. So what do you do?
You’ve got a few options! Here are some handy-dandy email scripts I’ve created that you can copy+paste, and tweak to send to those potential clients!
Note: These scripts are not intended to be used verbatim, but to be edited to fit your own situation and level of professionalism. Use these scripts as a starting point, but tweak them to work for you!
Option One – Educate Her on Why You’re Awesome
Hey ____!
I realize that this is a large investment, but I can assure you that I am delivering top-notch service that you won’t receive with a low-cost alternative. My clients have seen results such as ____ and ____ because I work with you to really make sure that you’re receiving a design that works for you and your brand. I’m not just creating a _____, I’m helping you achieve your goals.
If you don’t have the funds available at this time, I understand. Please keep me in mind for the future. If you are able and willing to invest

Pro | managewp.com | Feb. 24, 2017

How to Become a Consultant For Your Clients

Insightful post by Kenny Lange with many great points. "Teach people how to treat you like a partner in their business by becoming a consultant for your clients"

How to Become a Consultant For Your Clients

Pro | managewp.com | Feb. 24, 2017

The problem is you can quickly find yourself pigeon-holed as “” who updates the client’s site. This means that client’s see you as nothing more than someone who knows how to do tasks they either don’t know how to do or don’t have the time to do themselves.

17 min read Ahmad Awais
Pro | hackernoon.com | Oct. 7, 2016

How it feels to learn JavaScript in 2016

I am currently building SaaS product for WP with JS and this article represents 99% of my feelings while choosing a framework — the one which will be there once the project is complete.

How it feels to learn JavaScript in 2016

Pro | hackernoon.com | Oct. 7, 2016

Edit: Thanks for pointing typos and mistakes, I’ll update the article as noted. Discussion in HackerNews and Reddit. The following is inspired by the article “It’s the future” from Circle CI. You can read the original here. This piece is just an opinion, and like any JavaScript framework, it shouldn’t be taken too seriously. No JavaScript frameworks were created during the writing of this article.
Hey, I got this new web project, but to be honest I haven’t coded much web in a few years and I’ve heard the landscape changed a bit. You are the most up-to date web dev around here right?
-The actual term is Front End engineer, but yeah, I’m the right guy. I do web in 2016. Visualisations, music players, flying drones that play football, you name it. I just came back from JsConf and ReactConf, so I know the latest technologies to create web apps.
Cool. I need to create a page that displays the latest activity from the users, so I just need to get the data from the REST endpoint and display it in some sort of filterable table, and update it if anything changes in the server. I was thinking maybe using jQuery to fetch and display the data?
-Oh

20 min read Donna Cavalier
Pro | open.buffer.com | Jun. 18, 2016

Tough News: We’ve Made 10 Layoffs. How We Got Here, the Financial Details and How We’re Moving Forward

Ouch! Hate hearing that. Poor judgment affected lives. Happens often of course, but I hate seeing it nevertheless.

Tough News: We’ve Made 10 Layoffs. How We Got Here, the Financial Details and How We’re Moving Forward

Pro | open.buffer.com | Jun. 18, 2016

The last 3 weeks have been challenging and emotional for everyone at Buffer. We made the hard decision to lay off 10 team members, 11% of the team. I’d like to share the full details of how we got here, and the way we have chosen to handle this situation to put Buffer in a healthier position. I believe most startup founders are, by nature, optimistic. We want to solve problems and we believe in going from nothing to something. The attitude of most successful founders is that something previously unproven can be made a reality. Most of us have experienced doubt and skepticism and have pushed through it.
Optimism has seen us through a lot of mistakes at Buffer, like the countless new features and products we spent months building only to realize we need to scrap them. Content suggestions and our Daily iOS app are just a couple.
But after a certain point in a company, the mistakes we make don’t just affect the product features. They affect people’s lives.
And no amount of optimism could prepare Buffer for last Monday, when we had to tell 10 talented teammates that their journey with us was over.
It’s the result of the biggest mistake I’ve made in my career

9 min read Dave Warfel
Pro | codesmite.com | Sep. 17, 2016

What ever happened to PHP7?

Interesting article on the slow adoption rate of PHP 7 by web hosts, and some of the reasons why most WordPress sites are still running on PHP 5.x.

What ever happened to PHP7?

Pro | codesmite.com | Sep. 17, 2016

TAGS: PHP5, Programming, Webhosting, Wordpress You may be thinking: "Wait, don't you mean what happened to PHP6?"
But no, I am actually referring to PHP7, This may seem quite strange since PHP6 was the version that was skipped, not PHP7.
A QUICK SUMMARY FOR THOSE THAT DO NOT KNOW
PHP6 was proposed sometime back in 2010, but was eventually suspended and never reached production phase. This was mostly due to the core features of PHP6 being deemed too technically difficult to implement; this in combination with multiple other reasons meant the development unfortunately reached a standstill.
Many of the features included in PHP6 were instead back-ported into the PHP5.x branch; explaining why we saw so many new features added with the release of PHP5.3.
The version name PHP6 was omitted by the php.net developers due to the fact that it was a very well established and documented project. There are still vast amounts of information available on the web regarding the PHP6 project; and many conferences were held by the php.net developers in the community regarding the project.
It made very little sense to reuse PHP6 as the name for the next PHP version seeing as the next version was

Pro | techcrunch.com | Apr. 27, 2016

The Money In Open Source Software

An interesting opinion piece on TC showing you can definitely make money with open source. Nice quote "Keep in mind that even open-source software is always owned by someone."

The Money In Open Source Software

Pro | techcrunch.com | Apr. 27, 2016

It’s no secret that open-source technology — once the province of radicals, hippies and granola eaters — has gone mainstream. According to industry estimates, more than 180 young companies that give away their software raised roughly $3.2 billion in financing from 2011 to 2014. Even major enterprise-IT vendors are relying on open-source for critical business functions today. It’s a big turnaround from the days when former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer famously called the open-source Linux operating system “a cancer” (and obviously a threat to Windows).
Despite the growing popularity of open-source software, though, many open-source companies are not financially healthy. Just like eyeballs didn’t translate into actual online purchases during the first dot-com era in the late 1990s, millions of free-software downloads do not always lead to sustainable revenue streams.
Make no mistake, open-source software is a brilliant delivery model to drive user adoption, and it’s poised to drive increasing market value in the coming years. But it’s not a business model on its own.
Just how challenging is it to build a big, profitable open-source business? Consider this: Besides the ongoing success of

3 min read Dave Warfel
Pro | godaddy.com | Aug. 9, 2017

PHP 7 now available on some GoDaddy hosting plans

I know many developers who still hate GoDaddy, but one of the complaints has been a lack of PHP 7 support. They just added it for cPanel hosting plans. Does that mean we'll see it soon for Managed WordPress hosting?

PHP 7 now available on some GoDaddy hosting plans

Pro | godaddy.com | Aug. 9, 2017

Looking for a way to speed up your website? Here at GoDaddy we are always looking for ways to improve our customer’s experience. For our web hosting customers on cPanel Shared or Business Hosting we just made available the ability to upgrade to PHP 7. Let me explain the what, why and how. What is PHP 7?
PHP is a server-side scripting language designed primarily for web development. Popular website apps that use PHP are WordPress, Drupal and Joomla. PHP 7 is the latest version of PHP.
Why should I upgrade?
Are you looking to improve your site speed? Look no further than PHP 7! Benchmarks for PHP 7 consistently show speeds twice as fast as PHP 5.6.
How do I upgrade?
Currently, PHP 7 is available for cPanel customers on either Shared or Business Hosting. We made the upgrade to PHP 7 very easy; however before upgrading, I recommend that you check compatibility on your site to ensure that your website and plug-ins will run as you expect.
Things to Check for Popular Apps
WordPress – PHP Compatibility Checker (Link)
Drupal – Drupal 7 and above is PHP 7 compatible
Joomla – Joomla 3.5 and above is PHP 7 compatible
So, once you checked your compatibility and have decided

11 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Pro | kinsta.com | May. 2, 2016

How HTTP/2 Will Speed Up the Web - The Ultimate Guide

This in-depth 10 chapter guide explains HTTP/2 for end-users and developers.

How HTTP/2 Will Speed Up the Web - The Ultimate Guide

Pro | kinsta.com | May. 2, 2016

1 The HTTP/2 vs HTTP1 debate must proceed with a short primer on the term Protocol frequently used in this resource. A protocol is a set of rules that govern the data communication mechanisms between clients (for example web browsers used by internet users to request information) and servers (the machines containing the requested information).
Protocols usually consist of three main parts: Header, Payload and Footer. The Header placed before the Payload contains information such as source and destination addresses as well as other details (such as size and type) regarding the Payload. Payload is the actual information transmitted using the protocol. The Footer follows the Payload and works as a control field to route client-server requests to the intended recipients along with the Header to ensure the Payload data is transmitted free of errors.
HTTP2 mail example
The system is similar to the post mail service. The letter (Payload) is inserted into an envelope (Header) with destination address written on it and sealed with glue and postage stamp (Footer) before it is dispatched. Except that transmitting digital information in the form of 0s and 1s isn’t as simple, and necessitates a