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7 min read Iain Poulson

Running WordPress in a Kubernetes Cluster

Container orchestration platforms are a big deal right now. In this article, we're going to start simple and take a look at the Kubernetes platform and how you can set up a WordPress site on a single node cluster on your local machine.

Running WordPress in a Kubernetes Cluster

As a developer I try to keep my eye on the progression of technologies that I might not use every day, but are important to understand as they might indirectly affect my work. For example the recent rise of containerization, popularized by Docker, used for hosting web apps at scale. I’m not technically a devops person but as I build web apps on a daily basis it’s good for me to keep my eye on how these technologies are progressing. A good example of this progression is the rapid development of container orchestration platforms that allow you to easily deploy, scale and manage containerized applications. The main players at the moment seem to be Kubernetes (by Google), Docker Swarm and Apache Mesos. If you want a good intro to each of these technologies and their differences I recommend giving this article a read.
In this article, we’re going to start simple and take a look at the Kubernetes platform and how you can set up a WordPress site on a single node cluster on your local machine.
Installing Kubernetes
The Kubernetes docs have a great interactive tutorial that covers a lot of this stuff but for the purpose of this article I’m just going to cover installation

4 min read Phpbits Studio
Tutorials | widget-options.com | 2 days ago

Ultimate Guide: Optimizing Wordpress Sidebar and Widgets For Better Traffic and Conversions

You might ask how you could possibly neglect optimizing WordPress sidebars and widgets, or in the first place, why you have to optimize them.

Ultimate Guide: Optimizing Wordpress Sidebar and Widgets For Better Traffic and Conversions

Tutorials | widget-options.com | 2 days ago

Over the last few years, we have seen the evolution of websites in terms of structures and design or layout, including the changes in the way we use WordPress sidebars. We have followed trends after trends to ensure that our sites get the look, feel, and functionality that conform to our purpose – for instances such as whether to set an image for ourselves or for the products that we sell. In any case, we create our websites with the visitors in mind. We create to express and not to impress, thus we make a grand plan: to devise contents that will clearly put our messages across through carefully composed texts and well-chosen images, and then link with them highly-relevant contents. The latter part of the plan is crucial to developing a website that not only lets you put your message across but also allows you to reach your supposedly end goals – a. get your visitors engaged with your site; b. draw traffic into your site; and c. increase site revenue or product sales. All these goals are intertwined, but getting your visitors engaged with your site leads to all the other two end goals. The question is, “How do we achieve these goals?” The answer is by a myriad

14 min read Kobe Ben Itamar
Tutorials | sitepoint.com | 6 days ago

A Guide to Migrating from WordPress.Com to Self-Hosted WordPress

This guide is just what it says it is. I just thought the timing was interesting, that's all.

A Guide to Migrating from WordPress.Com to Self-Hosted WordPress

Tutorials | sitepoint.com | 6 days ago

WordPress.com is a limited version of WordPress run by Automattic. Here, you can create a blog or website in moments without worrying about hosting and managing your WordPress. However, to use many more complex plugins and functionality, and to have the full breadth of customization you desire, you may at some point decide to use the full WordPress platform available from WordPress.org and “self-host” it – host it on your own server, or pay a company for hosting services. Moving your blog from the “managed hosting” at WordPress.com to a self-hosted installation of the full WordPress platform requires a little planning, and some time, but can definitely be worth it in the end.
For the most part, getting your content out of WordPress.com is a fairly easy task. What is not easy, though, is matching your design from WordPress.com, and trying to replicate what you had on that platform on the new one.
If you happened to choose one of the themes that are built for WordPress.com by the team at Automattic, then you may be out of luck if it’s not available in the WordPress.org repository. Consider launching a new theme design for your site along with the move.

13 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 7 days ago

A Deep Dive Into WordPress User Roles and Capabilities

A deep dive into the concepts of WordPress user roles and capabilities from both a developer's and user's perspective.

A Deep Dive Into WordPress User Roles and Capabilities

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 7 days ago

Anytime a site viewer signs-up for an account, or you manually add a new user in Admin Users Screen, WordPress registers essential user data in wp_users and wp_usermeta tables. The new user gets the username of his choice, a password, an email address, a role which determines what she can view in the admin panel. But what exactly are WordPress user roles? WordPress User Roles and Capabilities
The WordPress user management system is based on two key concepts: Roles and Capabilities.
A Role identifies a group of users who are allowed to execute the same tasks onto the website.
A Capability is the ability (or permission) to perform each single task assigned to a role.
Out of the box, WordPress comes with six roles:
Super Administrator is a user who has full access to multisite features: she can create and manage sub-sites, create and manage network users, install and remove themes and plugins and enable them on the network.
Administrator is a user who has full access to the administration features of a regular WordPress installation.
Editor is a user who can edit and publish content created by any user.
Author can publish and edit his own content.
Contributor can create and edit but not

5 min read Shawn Hooper
Tutorials | shawnhooper.ca | 5 hours ago

Scheduling WordPress Tasks and WP-CLI Commands to Run from System Cron – Shawn Hooper - WordPress Developer & Speaker

WP-Cron is a really handy, but not perfect way of running scheduled tasks on your WordPress site. This article will show you how to improve that setup by triggering WP-Cron events or WP-CLI commands from your *nix server's cron service.

Scheduling WordPress Tasks and WP-CLI Commands to Run from System Cron – Shawn Hooper - WordPress Developer & Speaker

Tutorials | shawnhooper.ca | 5 hours ago

WordPress comes with a built-in task scheduler called WP-Cron. This is the part of core that regularly checks to see if WordPress itself needs updating, or if any of your plugins and themes have updates available. Named after the Unix Cron service that runs various system tasks at specified intervals, WordPress’ implementation isn’t a true cron service though – there is no guarantee that your task will run exactly when you have it scheduled to. This is because WP-Cron is triggered when a page on your site is viewed. The upside to this is that you don’t have to fiddle with cron jobs to get WordPress’ tasks running, it’s just part of the web application. The downside though: if your site has occasional traffic, tasks will only be run when the next page visit happens.
If you want WordPress tasks to run reliably, you can disable the built-in trigger to run cron jobs, and instead configure your server’s system cron service to trigger the WordPress scheduler.
Prerequisites
To implement the solutions shown below, you will need to be able to modify your system cron file. Your ability to do so will depend on your web host’s setup. For example,

6 min read David McCan
Tutorials | tommcfarlin.com | 8 days ago

Start Using WP-CLI on Your Host

Many web hosts have WP-CLI installed. This post is a short tutorial by Tom McFarlin about how to prepare to use WP-CLI on your web host.

Start Using WP-CLI on Your Host

Tutorials | tommcfarlin.com | 8 days ago

At this point, I think most people who develop solutions WordPress on a regular basis are familiar with using WP-CLI. Installing it locally on your system is one thing, using it on your host is another (but it’s all the same once you’re connected). Case in point: Lately, I’ve been spending a few evenings and times during the weekends working on this site and trying to get it ready for the upcoming redesign. Part of doing that includes using WP-CLI.
If you’re someone on SiteGround (or any host that support WP-CLI, really) and are looking for how to get started using WP-CLI on your host, here’s a quick primer that should provide you everything you need to know to get up and running.
Using WP-CLI on Your Host
Though the steps below are meant to be used whenever you’re looking to use WP-CLI on your host (and any host, at that), I should be clear that I assume the following:
The host has WP-CLI pre-installed. Most modern WordPress hosts do. Even if they don’t, it’s not difficult to install, but that’s beyond the scope of this post.
I assume that you’re familiar with SSH keys. If you’re not, that’s okay as I’m going

12 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 15 days ago

Network Latency - Comparing the Impact on Your WordPress Site

Hosting your WordPress site in the nearest data center to your audience is crucial. Here are a few things to consider.

Network Latency - Comparing the Impact on Your WordPress Site

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 15 days ago

A lot of articles around the web tend to primarily focus on front-end WordPress optimizations and quick ways to speed up your site. Server optimizations such as network latency are sometimes neglected or overlooked. Because of this, we thought it would be interesting to take a deeper look at the importance of network latency and the impact it has on your WordPress site when loading different regions. While a CDN can definitely help decrease network latency, your host server location is still very important, especially if you are serving visitors in a very specific geographical location. Latency matters and we’ll show you a couple reasons why. What is Network Latency?
Network latency refers to the time and or delay that is involved in the transmission of data over a network. In other words, how long it takes for a packet of data to go from one point to another. Nowadays this is typically measured in milliseconds, however, it could be seconds depending upon the network. The closer to zero the better.
“Latency is the wait time introduced by the signal traveling the geographical distance as well as over the various pieces of communications equipment.” – Whatis.com

Tutorials | skyverge.com | 9 days ago

How to Move WooCommerce Orders Between Sites

Great tutorial from Beka on moving WooCommerce orders between sites while keeping the order number the same between them.

4 min read Shawn Hooper
Tutorials | shawnhooper.ca | 15 days ago

How to Run WP-CLI Commands on a Remote Server

A step by step tutorial on running WP-CLI commands against a WordPress site installed on another computer.

How to Run WP-CLI Commands on a Remote Server

Tutorials | shawnhooper.ca | 15 days ago

This weekend at WordCamp Minneapolis I presented an introduction to the power of WP-CLI, a tool that allows you to manage your WordPress website from the command line. I’ve given this talk several times now, but am always looking for cool new features to include. This weekend’s addition to my talk was the ability to run WP-CLI commands from my local machine against a remote site…. which is very cool, and saves even more time.
The Old Way
SSH into Remote Server
Change Directory to where my WordPress Site is installed
Execute WP-CLI command.
The New Way
Execute WP-CLI Command
Step 1: Setting It Up
In order to run commands remotely, you need to install WP-CLI on both the computer you want to run the command from and the server on which your site is located.
I would also recommend setting up passwordless-ssh on your server so that you don’t need to enter your password every time you run a WP-CLI command.
Step 2: Execute the Remote Command
The trick to running commands on a remote server is the –ssh option. Adding this option to any command will tell it to SSH into the remote server and execute the command there. For example, running
wp --ssh=shawn@example.com/var/www/html/

3 min read Codeinwp
Tutorials | codeinwp.com | 14 days ago

44 Things I Wish I Knew Before Starting a Blog

The CodeinWP editorial team chip in with tips on everything from writing to SEO, designing images, marketing, hosting, tools, security, and a lot more.

44 Things I Wish I Knew Before Starting a Blog

Tutorials | codeinwp.com | 14 days ago

Starting a blog for the first time is an amazing, yet intimidating experience. Thinking that people are actually going to read – and even share – something you wrote. It’s unlike any other feeling I can describe.
But it’s not all rainbows and butterflies. Starting a blog is hard work, and there are a lot of pitfalls along the way. Especially if it’s your first time.
So many pitfalls, in fact, that we’ve come up with a full list of 44 things we wish we knew before starting our first blogs. That way, you don’t have to make these mistakes yourself!
But who are “we” exactly, right? Well, this post is a group effort. It features three bloggers chipping in and sharing their best advice on the topic.
So grab a coffee and get cozy, we’re about to review everything we’ve learned in the past 5+ years. Enjoy!
44 things you should know before starting a blog
We’re going to cover everything from writing to SEO, designing images, marketing, hosting, tools, security, and a lot lot more.
But, since it’s probably been the most important piece of many a career, let’s start with SEO.
More specifically, let’s talk

6 min read Igor Benić
Tutorials | ibenic.com | 6 days ago

Display Members in BuddyPress by Roles

A tutorial showing how you can create custom member directories in BuddyPress and display specific users in them.

Display Members in BuddyPress by Roles

Tutorials | ibenic.com | 6 days ago

In a recent project, I had to create a custom BuddyPress member list. I had to display members by their membership. So, I wanted to write a simple tutorial in which I’ll show you how to display members by their roles. In this article, you’ll learn how to create a custom member tab and how to filter only the users we want. This tutorial will also require some customization of the BuddyPress Member list template, but I’ll show you that at the end of this article.
In this tutorial, we will show users that have the Administrator role, but you can easily copy or edit the code to show other users.
You can put this code in your theme or in a plugin. For this projects, which was a specific theme, I have put this in a child theme.
Getting the User IDs
Let’s define the function that will return an array of user IDs that we can then use for filtering.
<?php
/**
* Get only User IDs which have the administrator role
* @return array +
*/
function bp_get_only_administrators_ids() {
$user_ids = get_transient( 'bp_only_administrators_ids' );
if( false === $user_ids ) {
$args = array(
'role__in' => 'administrator',
'fields' => 'ID'
);
$user_ids = get_users( $args );
set_transient(

Tutorials | wppopupmaker.com | 2 days ago

3 Smart Ways to Attract More Customers and Boost Your Online Sales - Popup Maker

Increasing your income is a goal for many site owners. In this post, we'll offer three ways to attract more customers to your store and boost your sales!

10 min read Oli
Tutorials | themefurnace.org | 10 days ago

How to Create a Local Test Server for WordPress using MAMP

How to install WordPress locally in Mac and Windows using MAMP

How to Create a Local Test Server for WordPress using MAMP

Tutorials | themefurnace.org | 10 days ago

A local server, in its simplest definition, is a web server that exists on a local system, such as your desktop computer, and is not accessible by the world wide web. It’s a common practice in web development as a whole, but it plays an especially vital role in WordPress development due to its ability to allow you to test a variety of different components on a WordPress site without having to pay for a live server or affect the live version of a site. WordPress contains a variety of different components that allow it to behave and perform the way it does. A typical WordPress setup includes an operating system for the server application to run on (Windows, OS X or Linux), a web server application (Apache), a database management system (MySQL or MariaDB) and a programming language (PHP). This is why you’ll see many applications se these components as acronyms for their names:
MAMP
My Apache MySQL PHP
LAMP
Linux Apache MySQL PHP (or Python or Perl)
XAMPP
X (Cross Platform) Apache MariaDB PHP Perl
We’re going to learn how to create a local test server for WordPress using MAMP in this post, but first, let’s start with why developers use test servers and why you specifically

58 min read Primož Cigler
Tutorials | proteusthemes.com | 14 days ago

The Ultimate Guide to Page Speed Optimization - Speed Up WordPress

Everything our team has learned on speeding up WordPress sites in the course of the last several years.

The Ultimate Guide to Page Speed Optimization - Speed Up WordPress

Tutorials | proteusthemes.com | 14 days ago

Following this guide, you will learn all techniques to drastically speed up a WordPress site. Here are the most important reasons why having a great page speed loading time in WordPress benefits your business: users will not abandon your website, they will spend more time and money there, and search engines will rank your website better in search results. Ready? Intro
Internet users do not have a lot of patience, when it comes to page loading times. We click on a link or input the URL and we wait a second, two, three and that’s it. Google statistics state, that 50% of users expect a mobile site to load in 2 seconds and 53% users are likely to abandon the page, if it’s loading longer than 3 seconds. That’s a very short period, if you consider that the average loading time of a homepage, on a mobile device, is 19 seconds (on a 3G network). Loading times on computers are faster and an average loading time is 5 seconds, but that’s still too long.
Taking desktop website benchmarks as a reference is not an excuse anymore. For most of the websites today, the majority of the traffic comes from mobile devices. In this article, we’ll take a full look at the most

Tutorials | wedevs.com | 13 days ago

WordPress User Roles, Permissions and Capabilities Explained

This post explains WordPress User Roles in details. This should clear anybody's conception about what role to assign to a user in WordPress depending on capabilities.

WordPress User Roles, Permissions and Capabilities Explained

Tutorials | wedevs.com | 13 days ago

Due to massive popularity and usability, WordPress is now powering almost 27% of world’s websites. It has many handy features that provide the best user experience along with an open world possible of doing anything. Among many default features, WordPress has built in website security and privacy system. This allows managing different WordPress user roles, which becomes very handy to control how users interact with your website. WordPress User Roles – The Internal Website Security
When you install WordPress to power up your website, you get a handy role management system. It effectively defines which actions an individual user can perform inside your website. Sadly, this feature is often overlooked, but you will eventually feel the importance of roles while your website grows.
In today’s blog post, we will explain the user roles that you get with WordPress. We will explain and compare each of them. This will give you a brief understanding of the internal security and privacy system of WordPress.
WordPress enables five default user roles and luckily, it helps to control the behavior of your users. Let’s find out about these WordPress user roles.
Administrator

Tutorials | wedevs.com | 14 days ago

The Ultimate Guide on How to Change WordPress Domain Address

This is a step by step guide to safely change your domain. It could be entirely new domain or www to without www or to a sub domain. But this is fine tuned, very well tested process to change your WordPress site address.

The Ultimate Guide on How to Change WordPress Domain Address

Tutorials | wedevs.com | 14 days ago

Today we are going to share something very basic for WordPress Developers, but quite complex for general WP users. Recently, we have encountered many queries on changing domain names of WordPress powered sites. So, we have prepared this step by step guide to explain how to change WordPress site address (URL). There are several ways of migrating your site to another domain. Here, we will discuss the easiest method. Let’s find out how.
Change the Domain of Your WordPress Site
To make things clear, we have divided the whole process into several steps.
Prerequisite
Before proceeding with the migration, you should have –
Know what you are doing
Access to your cPanel & FTP
A new Domain
Backup everything
The most important thing before jumping into action is to make a full backup. You can backup everything manually and export the database. There are also several powerful plugins which have backup functionalities. Some handy plugins are Updraftplus, BlogVault, VaultPress etc.
Find more must have useful WordPress plugins.
When you are done with a complete backup. Proceed to the next step.
1. Add New Domain to Your Hosting
To use the new domain, you need to add it to your hosting.

Tutorials | wppopupmaker.com | 16 days ago

How to Use Popups to Drive Visitor Engagement on Your Website (3 Easy Ways) - Popup Maker

Your website won't help you meet your sales goals if it can't encourage people to take action. Fortunately, you can use popups to drive visitor engagement!

15 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jul. 19, 2017

How to Stop a DDoS Attack in Its Tracks (Case Study)

DDoS attacks are getting more frequent, but what should you do when your WordPress site is under attack?

How to Stop a DDoS Attack in Its Tracks (Case Study)

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jul. 19, 2017

In our last case study, we showed you how we cleaned up a negative SEO attack on Kinsta. Today we are going to show you some steps and troubleshooting we took to stop a DDoS attack on a small WordPress e-commerce site. DDoS attacks can come out of nowhere and smaller sites are usually even more vulnerable, as they aren’t prepared to deal with it when it happens. Let us ask you this question. If your site was attacked tomorrow, what would you do? If you don’t have any ideas, then perhaps you should bookmark and read this article. What is a DDoS Attack?
DDoS is short for distributed denial of service. The primary purpose of a DDoS attack is to simply overwhelm your web server and either cripple it or take it down. One of the frustrating things with these types of attack is generally the attacker doesn’t gain anything and typically nothing is hacked. The big problem with DDoS attacks is with the overwhelming load associated with it. Most likely you will also see your bandwidth spike to an incredible amount, and this could cost you hundreds or even thousands of dollars. If you are on a cheaper or shared host, this can easily result in a suspension of your account.
On October

3 min read Maor Chasen
Tutorials | GenerateWP.com | 21 day ago

Filtering Post Types by Taxonomies in the Dashboard

y default, the admin Posts screen allows us to filter posts by the built-in “Categories” Taxonomy, using a neat, user-friendly dropdown menu. But in many cases, when we register new Taxonomies we often want to be able to filter posts by these new Taxonomies as well. In this quick tutorial, we will learn how to add new filters (dropdowns) to any Post Type screen in order to filter content by custom Taxonomies.

Filtering Post Types by Taxonomies in the Dashboard

Tutorials | GenerateWP.com | 21 day ago

By default, the admin Posts screen allows us to filter posts by the built-in “Categories” Taxonomy, using a neat, user-friendly dropdown menu. But in many cases, when we register new Taxonomies we often want to be able to filter posts by these new Taxonomies as well. In this quick tutorial, we will learn how to add new filters (dropdowns) to any Post Type screen in order to filter content by custom Taxonomies. Registering a New Post Type and Taxonomies
For many WordPress developers this is a basic step, we do it in almost every project. Therefore, we won’t be getting into how to set it all up in your code — instead, use the following links to navigate to the snippets. You can use the Post Type Generator and the Taxonomy Generator to do that.
Ok, so in our example we will create a car catalog for an imaginary car retailer or agency. We will create a new “Car” post type and add several taxonomies (manufacturer, model, transmission, doors and color).
Adding Filters to the Post Type Admin Screen
Now that we have a working “Car” Post Type with several Taxonomies, we would like to be able to filter our cars in the admin area. For that we need

6 min read Maor Chasen
Tutorials | GenerateWP.com | 29 days ago

Managing Content Easily With Quick Edit

Quadruple your user’s experience with your very own Quick Edit fields in the WordPress dashboard! In this tutorial I’m going to show you how to make your very own Quick Edit fields to improve your client’s content editing experience.

Managing Content Easily With Quick Edit

Tutorials | GenerateWP.com | 29 days ago

In this tutorial I’m going to show you how to make your very own Quick Edit fields to improve your client’s content editing experience. Quick Edit Fields
You probably heard this phrase many times: “Content is king”. By all means, that’s true. No matter how awesome your site is functionality-wise, if it isn’t easy for the content editors to manage, then your site will simply suck. And we don’t want our sites to suck, do we?
One of the most useful features, especially in terms of User Experience, since WordPress 2.7 history is the Quick Edit panel. Quick Edit allows you to edit different pieces of data about a post without having to navigate your browser to the full edit page. The amount of time it helps save when editing main details of a post is a big deal. As a personal favorite feature, and generally as a popular feature of WordPress, I am going to dive into how to set up your very own Quick Edit fields. This way, your clients will have more control over their content when editing their content.
Note: Before you can create a Quick Edit field, you must register a custom admin column. Unfortunately, there is currently no way to add a Quick Edit

Tutorials | zao.is | 16 days ago

Using the WooCommerce API with wp-api.js

Justin writes a WooCommerce API tutorial you need to read.

zao.is |

Using the WooCommerce API with wp-api.js

Tutorials | zao.is | 16 days ago

As of WordPress 4.7, we’ve had a really fantastic, fully featured REST API in WordPress. It is relatively well-known that the infrastructure for the API was introduced in WordPress 4.4, with the content endpoints being introduced in 4.7. What is somewhat less well-known is that 4.7 also shipped with a Backbone.js client you can use to interface with the core API. It’s super simple to enqueue:
wp_enqueue_script( 'wp-api' );
Using it for core objects is pretty straight-forward:
var post - new wp.api.models.Post( { id : 2 } );post.fetch();alert( post.attributes.title.rendered ); // Renders "rendered" title of post.
But what if you want to use it with non-core objects that are in custom namespaces, or maybe not even on your own site? Thinking that you’ll probably have to write some PHP, maybe your own library or framework for interfacing with these, and your own JS models? Ugh, amirite?
Good news! None of that is necessary.
Because of how well-architected the Backbone.js client is (massive shoutout to Adam Silverstein and all the other contributors), you can pretty easily access your custom endpoints and namespaces without writing much code at all. It can be

11 min read Oli
Tutorials | themefurnace.org | 21 day ago

How to Build a WordPress Website with Elementor & Free Themes

A Beginners guide to using the Free Elementor Plugin to Build a website with Custom homepage.

How to Build a WordPress Website with Elementor & Free Themes

Tutorials | themefurnace.org | 21 day ago

Elementor is a free page builder plugin for WordPress that initially launched in June 2016 and quickly took the WordPress community by storm – it’s now currently sitting at over 1.2 million downloads. It’s brought a lot of competition into the page building niche that’s growing in WordPress by offering a live, front-end editor free of charge. Elementor seeks to improve upon other page builders which while giving the user lots of options can offer a poor experience in the end, for example a lot of page builders use a bloated next of shortcodes to build the layouts and if you change themes you are left with a mess on your page – Elementor let’s you switch themes at will.
These drag and drop page builders ensure WordPress stays competitive with platforms like Squarespace and Wix, so we thought we’d offer a tutorial demonstrating how to use it to build a WordPress site from “scratch” even if you don’t know how to write a single line of HTML or CSS.
Let’s get started.
The Anatomy of a WordPress Site
A live WordPress site has four basic parts:
Domain
Web Server
WordPress
Theme
Most WordPress sites will also need a few different

6 min read Eric Karkovack
Tutorials | speckyboy.com | 26 days ago

How to Add HTML5 Video to WordPress Using Custom Fields

A quickie tutorial showing how you can leverage wp_video_shortcode() and custom fields to add a multi-format HTML video.

How to Add HTML5 Video to WordPress Using Custom Fields

Tutorials | speckyboy.com | 26 days ago

Generally speaking, if you ask 10 WordPress developers how to do something, you’ll receive ten different answers. But that speaks to both the versatility of the CMS and that there is more than one solution to any given task. Recently, I faced the challenge of setting up an HTML5 video inside a WordPress page. It’s in a static location and would need to be replaced every so often. While it’s fine to use the Video Shortcode, in this case I wanted to make things extra simple for the folks who would be updating the page. I didn’t want them to have to learn what a Shortcode was or how to use it.
So, the simplest solution (in my mind, anyway) was to create some custom fields where the related video files could be uploaded. From there, the theme’s template would automatically create the necessary code to display the video. Here’s how I did it:
Project Requirements
You’ll of course need a WordPress site and access to edit your theme (please use a child theme if you aren’t already doing so). Some familiarity with PHP and HTML will also be a big help. Beyond that, you should have:
A way to create custom fields. The free version of Advanced Custom

Tutorials | catapultthemes.com | Jul. 18, 2017

WordPress plugin update hook - upgrader_process_complete

How to run an action when your plugin is updated by a user, with bonus free sample plugin

WordPress plugin update hook - upgrader_process_complete

Tutorials | catapultthemes.com | Jul. 18, 2017

I had a situation recently when I wanted to let plugin users know of a change I’d made since the previous version. The best way, I think, is to use admin_notices and create a notice at the top of the admin page. But I wanted the message to appear only to users who had just updated the plugin, not to appear to users who had just installed the plugin. It turns that there is a hook, upgrader_process_complete, that allows you to do exactly this. It fires when WordPress runs an upgrade / update for themes or plugins and provides us with data on which plugins or themes have been updated.
This means that you can add an action that will run when WordPress has processed an update and check which plugins have been updated. If yours is one of them, you can display a notice to your users.
To test this out, I made a short plugin that will display a notice to users when it’s installed then display a different notice when it’s updated.
<?php
/*Plugin Name: Upgrader Process Example
Plugin URI: https://catapultthemes.com/wordpress-plugin-update-hook-upgrader_process_complete/
Description: Just an example of using upgrader_process_complete
Version: 1.0.0
Author: Catapult Themes
Author