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11 min read WebDevStudios
Tutorials | webdevstudios.com | 10 days ago

Debugging WordPress with Local by Flywheel, (neo)vim, and xdebug

Senior Backend Engineer, Zach Owens, shows readers a process for debugging WordPress with Local by Flywheel in this tech-savvy blog post.

Debugging WordPress with Local by Flywheel, (neo)vim, and xdebug

Tutorials | webdevstudios.com | 10 days ago

Introduction Local by Flywheel is a popular tool for getting quick and reliable WordPress installations running on your computer. One of its lesser-known features is the inclusion of xdebug support. xdebug is a PHP extension that allows for real-time debugging of PHP code. Today, we’re going to go over how to get both of these working together within vim to provide a powerful interface that allows for some successful debugging of WordPress.
Prerequisites
Firstly, this tutorial is intended for users of vim or neovim. If you aren’t familiar with how to use vi-like editors, but want to learn, I would recommend running vimtutor in your command line and learning how to move and work in vim before continuing with this post.
Next, you’ll need Local by Flywheel. You can download it here. If you haven’t set up a site before with Local, it is pretty straightforward. You can find a guide for getting started on Flywheel’s blog.
Setup
vim
For vim or neovim, henceforth referred to simply as “vim” (with distinctions for neovim if necessary), you will need the Vdebug plugin. Installation instructions are included on the plugin’s page. I use vim-plug to

7 min read Igor Benić
Tutorials | ibenic.com | 9 days ago

Getting better as a WordPress Developer

A recent post, in the Advanced WordPress Facebook group, asking how to get better has got me thinking so I've summarized a few comments into an article.

Getting better as a WordPress Developer

Tutorials | ibenic.com | 9 days ago

When you’re a developer working with any kind of software, you are striving to get better with years. Well, at least, that’s something I think we all as people are always trying to do (get better in any skill with practice). On April, 11th 2019, a developer has asked how he can become a better WordPress developer. He asked that in the Advanced WordPress Facebook group. And the reason behind that question is that he is still writing the same kind of code he wrote 3 years ago.
This is a sign of a developer who is aspiring to get better and wants to learn how to do it. I love that!
I’ll go over some answers that he got in the comments and then add my own view on it.
1. Code Reviews
Jason Bahl has suggested to ask for code reviews from other fellow developers. Here is a part of his comment:
When I started working at an organization that code reviews every pull request to the codebase I started learning a lot, often more so from reviewing others code than them reviewing mine.
Jason Bahl – WP GraphQL
He also mentions to read from open source projects. Since we are here talking about WordPress, he mentioned several big and successful plugins such as WooCommerce, Easy

8 min read robert Abela
Tutorials | wpwhitesecurity.com | 16 days ago

DNS Tools & Quries For WordPress Administrators

An explanation with examples of how easy it is to use tools such as Dig and Nslookup to troubleshoot and test DNS configurations and issues.

DNS Tools & Quries For WordPress Administrators

Tutorials | wpwhitesecurity.com | 16 days ago

When you buy a new domain for your WordPress site you have to configure the name servers and other DNS records. Configuring your the Domain Name System (DNS) for your domain is a simple process, and it becomes even easier when you understand how DNS works, what are Domains, Registrars and DNS records. However, a small mistake in the DNS configuration can lead to big problems – people won’t be able to access your website or send you emails. This article explains how you can use nslookup, dig and other DNS tools to test your DNS setup.
Nslookup and Dig DNS Tools
Both Nslookup and Dig are command line tools found on many operating systems. These tools are used to send queries to DNS servers. Nslookup is more popular with Windows users and Dig is more popular with Mac OS and Linux users. Both’s queries and commands are similar.
In this article we use both Nslookup and Dig to explain how you can use them to check the configured records on a DNS server. We also explain how to check the properties of DNS records, such as TTL. And last but not least, we will also see how to check the propagation of a DNS record and how to do other troubleshooting.
Querying a DNS Server with

9 min read Brian Jackson
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Mar. 4, 2019

How to Find and Fix Broken Links in WordPress (5 Methods)

Broken links are bad for the user experience, crawlers, and SEO. Check out these different (performance-driven) ways to find and fix them.

How to Find and Fix Broken Links in WordPress (5 Methods)

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Mar. 4, 2019

Having broken links on your WordPress site is bad news for both your human visitors and your site’s SEO, so learning how to fix broken links in WordPress is an important part of running a successful WordPress site. In this post, we’ll dive into a deeper explanation for why broken links are something worth seeking out and correcting. Then, we’ll show you five different methods that you can use to find and fix broken links in WordPress without slowing down your site.
Broken Links Are Bad for SEO and User Experience
Broken links are bad for your WordPress site for a few different reasons.
First, there’s the effect on your human visitors. If someone is clicking a link, they’re doing so because they’re interested in the content that they were told the link will take them to. Makes sense, right?
So, by sending them to a broken link instead of the content that you promised them, you’re creating a frustrating experience for your visitors, and that by itself is a good incentive to find and fix broken links on your site.
Broken links aren’t just bad for humans, though, they’re also bad for robots. Specifically, the crawler bots used by search

13 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Mar. 13, 2019

How to Disable WordPress Plugins on Specific Pages and Posts

Do you want to run the plugin code and include scripts and styles on every page of your WordPress website?

How to Disable WordPress Plugins on Specific Pages and Posts

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Mar. 13, 2019

When it comes to WordPress performance, we have a lot to say about plugins. Each plugin adds PHP code that has to be executed, usually includes scripts and styles, and may even execute additional queries against the database. This means that unnecessary plugins can affect page speed and may have a negative impact on the user experience and your page ranking. As an example, consider a plugin that builds and displays custom forms on front pages, like Contact Form 7. Typically, you would only need one form on a single page, but ideally, you may want to embed a form on any page using the plugin’s shortcode. For this reason, Contact Form 7 loads scripts and styles on every page of your website.
But do you really want to run the plugin code and include scripts and styles on every page of your WordPress website?
In this post, I will show you how to prevent unnecessary plugins from loading on specific posts/pages, so that you can install additional plugins (don’t go crazy of course), and still have your WordPress website load fast. To accomplish this task, we’re going to disable WordPress plugins programmatically on specific posts and pages. This is a four-step process:
Choose

27 min read Alex
Tutorials | rankmath.com | Mar. 26, 2019

12 Dead Simple Steps To Complete Your First SEO Audit for Free with Rank Math

Ever wondered how to conduct an SEO audit if you're using WordPress? Well, thanks to the Rank Math SEO for WordPress plugin it's never b een easier to optimize your website in no time...

12 Dead Simple Steps To Complete Your First SEO Audit for Free with Rank Math

Tutorials | rankmath.com | Mar. 26, 2019

If you want to sustain constant website growth, it’s important that you regularly evaluate and ensure that your website is optimized to do so. The easiest way to do this is to conduct an SEO audit.
Usually, SEO audits can take days if not weeks to complete and end up costing you hundreds of dollars on tools or professionals to handle them for you. But, with the right tools (and this guide) you’re about to learn how to perform an SEO audit that takes hours, not weeks, doesn’t require any advanced technical knowledge and is completely free.
Table Of Contents
How to Perform an SEO Audit
What is an SEO Audit?
Search engine optimization is complicated.
It involves keeping your website, content, and the technology powering your compliant with search engine ranking algorithms and their capricious requirements. The worst part is that you can do almost everything right, but overlook one thing which will end up stunting your growth.
An SEO audit is a process in which you perform rigorous checks on certain factors which affect your website’s ability to generate traffic and proceed to make adjustments thereafter. By conducting SEO audits regularly, you can ensure that all

22 min read Weglot
Tutorials | blog.weglot.com | Feb. 7, 2019

How to Create a Multi Language WordPress Site

A in-depth article about how you can create a multi language WordPress website with examples and a case study.

How to Create a Multi Language WordPress Site

Tutorials | blog.weglot.com | Feb. 7, 2019

Expanding internationally is the natural next step for businesses that have achieved local success. But how do you provide content to consumers in other languages? With a WordPress multi language website, you can translate your web pages into multiple languages with ease — and that’s where this guide comes in. Learn everything you need to know about WordPress language translation and start tapping into overseas markets. Creating a WordPress multi language website makes sense. When you look at the numbers, the web caters overwhelmingly — and disproportionately — to English speakers.
English is ranked the third most popular spoken language in the world with 360 million native speakers. But it claims the top spot amongst the most commonly spoken languages online, with 873 million internet users. And then there’s the fact 53.3% of online content is written in English.
The fact is, the number of English speakers pales in comparison to the number of Mandarin speakers (955 million) and Spanish speakers (405 million).
Imagine opening a web page and seeing Chinese characters. If you don’t know Mandarin, you’d quickly leave the site, right? And you sure

Tutorials | cssigniter.com | Mar. 13, 2019

How to add SVG support to WordPress media uploader • CSSIgniter

Uploading SVG graphics is not enabled by default. In this tutorial we'll see how to enable SVG uploads using 2 reliable plugins.

How to add SVG support to WordPress media uploader • CSSIgniter

Tutorials | cssigniter.com | Mar. 13, 2019

WordPress allows the users to upload many file formats via its built in media uploader. Among them one can find the most popular image file formats, .jpg, .jpeg, .png, .gif and .ico. As you might have noticed SVG files are not among the ones allowed. In today’s article we’ll learn more about SVG and then we’ll add support for them in WordPress’ media uploader. What are SVG
According to Wikipedia Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) is an XML-based vector image format for two-dimensional graphics with support for interactivity and animation. The SVG specification is an open standard developed by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) since 1999.
SVG images and their behaviors are defined in XML text files. This means that they can be searched, indexed, scripted, and compressed. As XML files, SVG images can be created and edited with any text editor, as well as with drawing software.
SVG are currently used by 16.1% of all websites
and browser support is pretty great.
SVG are usually much smaller in size and they can be easily scaled without visually distorting the image. This makes them ideal for displaying logos and graphics on a site.
SVG and WordPress
As mentioned earlier

11 min read Adi Spiac
Tutorials | translatepress.com | Jan. 28, 2019

10 Effective Tips to Increase Your Multilingual Site Speed in WordPress

The tutorial covers 10 actionable tips for having a fast multilingual site.

10 Effective Tips to Increase Your Multilingual Site Speed in WordPress

Tutorials | translatepress.com | Jan. 28, 2019

Knowing how to increase your multilingual site speed is an important skill. Page loading speed is an often underestimated factor for the success of a website. However, it influences many key factors, like: traffic, bounce rate, conversions, user satisfaction, as well as SEO. This detailed guide will cover everything you need to know about how to make your multilingual WordPress site faster. We will go over why loading speed is so important, how to test the current state of your site and what measures you can take to increase your multilingual site speed.
Lack of Speed is a Killer
Many people are unaware that in page loading, literally every second counts. Here is why.
Attention is a Rare Good
The reason why speed is so important is because it matters to users:
47% of consumers expect a web page to load in two seconds or less
40% abandon a site that takes longer than three seconds to load
79% of shoppers are less likely to return to a website if they are dissatisfied with its performance (even if it’s in their own language)
One second delay reduces conversions by 7%, page views by 11% and customer satisfaction by 16%
As you can see, saying that every second counts is not an exaggeration.

Tutorials | cssigniter.com | Mar. 19, 2019

Hide the WordPress update notifications from all users except administrators

Here's a quick tutorial on how to hide update notifications for your users.

Hide the WordPress update notifications from all users except administrators

Tutorials | cssigniter.com | Mar. 19, 2019

Between minor and major releases, WordPress is regularly updated with new features, improvements on existing ones, security fixes and more. If you have automatic updates enabled on your site, minor releases are downloaded and installed silently without requiring any action from the site’s administrator. However this is not the case for major releases. Once a major release is out a prompt will appear in the WordPress dashboard letting you know that there is a new major update available for your site urging you to install it. This notification might be annoying in some cases. For example if you are a developer managing many client sites. Depending on the amount of custom work on each site, or the plugins installed, you will often, if not always, need to first do the update on a staging server to see if everything works as it should, before pushing the update to the live site. This process might take some time which means that clients/users might see this update notification and start asking why are you not doing your job keeping their site up to date, and if you manage many sites, answering questions like this one might take up precious time away from the actual update process.

127 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Nov. 19, 2018

How to Speed up Your WordPress Site (Ultimate 2019 Guide)

Today we’re sharing everything we know about how to speed up WordPress, over 15 years worth of experience and hard lessons we’ve learned.

How to Speed up Your WordPress Site (Ultimate 2019 Guide)

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Nov. 19, 2018

We’ve published a lot of tutorials over the years with ways to optimize and speed up WordPress. But sometimes it can be confusing trying to find everything you need in one place. So today we’re going to share with you everything we know about turbocharging WordPress, over 15 years worth of experience and hard lessons learned, all in one ultimate guide. Whether you’re just starting to use WordPress or are a seasoned developer, we promise you’ll find something useful in this post! Over 32% of the web is now powered by WordPress. While this is awesome, it also means there are thousands of different themes, plugins, and technologies all having to coexist. For the everyday WordPress user, this can quickly turn into a nightmare when their site starts to bottleneck and they don’t know why or even where to troubleshooting.
In our previous guide on page speed, we went over a lot of the fundamentals of performance and how it can have a huge impact on the success of your business. But today we’ll be diving into applicable steps you can take right now to see improvements on your own WordPress sites. We’ll also share some resources that have been invaluable

3 min read Dragos Balota
Tutorials | wpdoze.com | 23 days ago

How To Add Menu Notification Badges in WordPress

An interesting tutorial of how you can add a bouncing notification box in a WordPress Menu. Useful for everyone who wants to evidence a menu item.

How To Add Menu Notification Badges in WordPress

Tutorials | wpdoze.com | 23 days ago

While I was browsing the internet I have come across a very interesting video that explains how you can add notification badges to a WordPress Menu. You may want to do that to attract the attention of your visitors to a specific place on the menu. I have added one in my site to the deals items to stand out. With the code you can add a bouncing badge with any text you like to what element you need. The tutorial was first presented on wpcrafter where there is also a nice video with all the steps you need to do + an option to add a pop up menu to the link.
In this article I will present the steps and code you need to do in short and for the complete tutorial you can follow WPCrafter Video.
Steps to Add Menu Notification Badges in WordPress
1.Add the custom CSS code
Navigate to Appearance –> Customize and then in the Customize area in Additional CSS add the below code like in the picture and hit Publish:
Code:
.menu-badge {
font-size: 9px;
margin-left: 4px;
position: relative;
top: -10px;
margin-bottom: 13px;
color: #ffffff;
background-color: #FF0000;
padding: 3px 4px;
border-radius: 3px;
}
.badge-bounce {
animation: bouncing .8s cubic-bezier(0.1,0.05,0.05,1) 0s infinite alternate

14 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Oct. 3, 2018

WordPress Cookies and PHP Sessions - Everything You Need to Know

This is an in-depth guide on how WordPress core uses cookies, what to do with caching, GDPR and much more!

WordPress Cookies and PHP Sessions - Everything You Need to Know

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Oct. 3, 2018

Cookies were first invented in 1994 by a computer programmer named Lou Montulli. Without them, the web would be quite a different place. Whether your logging into the back-end of your WordPress site or closing an annoying popup window, you use and interact with cookies every day (even if you don’t realize it). By now, you’ve probably guessed that when we refer to cookies, we mean the cookies used to store important visitor information on a website, not the yummy chocolate chip kind.

14 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Dec. 10, 2018

How to Display Dynamic Sidebars and Widgets to Reduce Bounce Rate

Dynamic sidebars and widgets can help reduce your site’s bounce rate and improve your chances for a conversion.

How to Display Dynamic Sidebars and Widgets to Reduce Bounce Rate

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Dec. 10, 2018

Today we’ll be diving into the topic of dynamic sidebars and widgets (those that are content-relevant); more importantly how they can help reduce your site’s bounce rate and in turn improve your chances for a conversion. We’ll show you how to create a sidebar, along with widgets that show your visitors exactly what they want to see based on the topic or content of the current page or post. What Is Bounce Rate?
Before I show you how to reduce bounce rate by displaying content-relevant sidebars and widgets, let’s first define bounce rate.
Bounce rate refers to the percentage of site visitors who enter and leave rather than staying to explore other pages on your website. To reduce bounce rate you need to increase engagement, and this tells you much about your site’s usability. When a visitor finds your content useful, they stay and are willing to explore the site for even more useful content. This, in turn, gives you a higher conversion rate. The longer your visitors stay on your site, the greater the likelihood for more sales, sign-ups, and ad revenue.
Of course, you want them to stay longer, so you must have something that will stop them from leaving too

9 min read Adi Spiac
Tutorials | translatepress.com | Dec. 3, 2018

Multilingual SEO on WordPress: 7 Tips To Rank In All Languages

A Multilingual SEO checklist for ranking well in all languages.

Multilingual SEO on WordPress: 7 Tips To Rank In All Languages

Tutorials | translatepress.com | Dec. 3, 2018

SEO is hard enough when you’re only trying to rank in one language. But add a few more languages to the mix? Well, yeah, WordPress multilingual SEO can feel a little overwhelming. It doesn’t have to, though. Multilingual SEO is really just about applying all those same SEO principles and then also following some basic guidelines to make sure that each language has the same chance to benefit from your SEO efforts and rank in Google.
In this post, we’ll cover those best principles so that you can have all your site’s translations ranking.
You’ll still need to build some links and do some keyword research – but this guide will make sure Google can index all your content and serve up the right translation to visitors from around the world.
Let’s dive in…
1. Make Sure Google Can Crawl Each Language
Let’s start at the beginning – you can’t rank your multilingual WordPress site if Google can’t index it.
Services like Google Translate have made it easy to let people dynamically translate your website into any language (kind of like how the Chrome Browser can automatically translate text).
Now, that type of translation

29 min read Codeinwp
Tutorials | themeisle.com | Oct. 17, 2018

8 Steps to How to Make a Website - The Ultimate DIY Guide

Running through the basics of making a website with WordPress. From hosting to adjusting site navigation; it's all here.

8 Steps to How to Make a Website - The Ultimate DIY Guide

Tutorials | themeisle.com | Oct. 17, 2018

Believe it or not, but knowing how to make a website is one of the more essential skills you should master as a small business owner in this day and age. Please bear with me! Here’s why:
If you know how to make a website on your own, you will save a ton of money on web developers and designers.
This will also allow you to follow the market trends and put new things on your website without needing a programmer’s help.
You will effectively stay ahead of your competition because, while they have their projects slowed down by the need to consult developers, you will be able to build most things yourself (within reason, of course).
With that being said, the most important piece of the puzzle here is that you can learn how to make a website and then create something awesome for your business or project all on your own.
How to make a website – in bird’s eye view
Okay, here’s the plan for what we’re going to do in the next steps. The important thing to note is that it’s all DIY-able (if that’s a word) and that we’re minimizing the costs wherever possible.
In short, what you’ll end up with at the end of this guide is a functional, beautiful

10 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jan. 7, 2019

How to Fix a 403 Forbidden Error on Your WordPress Site

Seeing an error on your WordPress site can be frustrating and deflating, which is why we’ve created this detailed guide to help you fix the 403 Forbidden Error.

How to Fix a 403 Forbidden Error on Your WordPress Site

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jan. 7, 2019

Did you just try to access your WordPress site only to be hit by some message telling you something is “Forbidden” or that you don’t have permission to access something on your site? If so, you’ve likely run into the 403 Forbidden error on WordPress. Seeing an error on your WordPress site can be frustrating and deflating, which is why we’ve created this detailed guide to help you fix the 403 Forbidden Error on WordPress and get your site functioning again as quickly as possible.
Let’s get started without any further introduction because we’re sure you just want to fix your site!
What is the 403 Forbidden Error?
Like many other common WordPress errors, the 403 Forbidden error is an HTTP status code that a web server uses to communicate with your web browser.
Quick background on HTTP status codes – whenever you connect to a website with your browser, the web server responds with something called an HTTP header. Usually, this all happens behind the scenes because everything is working normally (that’s a 200 status code, in case you were wondering).
However, if something goes wrong, the server will respond back with a different numbered

17 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Oct. 10, 2018

WordPress Activity Log - 7 Things You Should Be Tracking

We’re going to discuss the seven most crucial activities to track on your site. From content changes to failed login attempts.

WordPress Activity Log - 7 Things You Should Be Tracking

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Oct. 10, 2018

When your WordPress website is small, it’s easy to keep tabs on everything that happens within it. However, as it grows in size and complexity it can become a lot harder to keep up. This is particularly true if you enable users to register on your site, run a membership site, or have multiple contributors on it. Regardless, it’s vital to know what’s happening on your site at all times. You can do this by tracking user activity such as changes to content, profile updates, failed logins, and more. When you have information like this at your fingertips, you can quickly track down the source of any problems and maintain tight security.
In this post, we’re going to briefly talk about why you’d want to track your WordPress site’s activity. Then we’ll help you figure out what types of activity it’s most important to keep an eye on. Let’s jump right in!
Why It’s Crucial to Use a WordPress Activity Log
An activity log can help you keep tabs on important changes to your site.
If your website has only a single user – you – there should be no surprises. Unless your site has been hacked (which we’ll talk more about later),

9 min read Brian Jackson
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jan. 31, 2019

How to Create a Custom WordPress Dashboard (Yourself or Clients)

Creating a custom WordPress dashboard can help streamline the workflow for you, clients, and guest bloggers. Tip: Don't forget about back-end performance.

How to Create a Custom WordPress Dashboard (Yourself or Clients)

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jan. 31, 2019

Want to create a WordPress custom dashboard at your site? You might want to create a more customized experience for your clients or third-party users (like freelance writers or bloggers). Or, you could be working on your own site and just looking for a way to create a more streamlined admin experience that matches your workflows.
No matter why you want to create a WordPress custom dashboard, this post is going to help you out. In it, you’ll learn how to customize all aspects of the WordPress dashboard, including how to:
We’ll start off by showing you how to use an all-in-one plugin that does a little bit of everything. Then, we’ll share some more niche tools to more deeply handle the specific customization areas we mentioned above. Let’s start customizing!
Fair Warning Regarding Performance
Before we dive into the tutorial, it’s important to remember that heavily customing your WordPress dashboard may result in slower back-end performance (or in some cases, it may load faster depending on what you’re doing). This will typically only impact those that are logging into your site, not the front-end. The front-end of your site should be serving primarily

13 min read Brian Jackson
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jan. 17, 2019

WordPress Google Maps Guide: Embed With Or Without A Plugin

Google Maps now requires an API key. Check out these different ways to set up Google Maps on your WordPress site, and not slow it down.

WordPress Google Maps Guide: Embed With Or Without A Plugin

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jan. 17, 2019

Looking for a way to embed WordPress Google Maps content on your site? Like a lot of things in WordPress, there are several different ways that you can embed Google Maps on your site depending on what type of map content you want to include.
In this post, we’ll start by showing you how to add Google Maps in WordPress without a plugin. Then, we’ll recommend some plugins that can help you embed Google Maps, as well as some of the benefits of going that approach. We’ll also dive into how to properly use the Google Maps API, which is now required.
Finally, we’ll end with some performance considerations for using Google Maps on WordPress and share some tips on how to keep your WordPress site loading fast even if you do need to embed Google Maps.
You can click below to jump straight to a specific section or just read through the whole thing.
Google Maps API is Now Required
As of June 11, 2018, an API key is now required for Google Maps. If you’ve already implemented Google Maps on your site and it’s no longer working, this might be the reason. Or rather, you’re missing the API key. The good news is, for 99% of you, it should still be free. Below is

6 min read Josh Pollock
Tutorials | calderaforms.com | Oct. 19, 2018

This Is What Your Forms Are Secretly Doing To Your SEO

Forms are great. The internet is full of wonderful forms, but are you making sure that your forms help your SEO, not hurt? Christie shares tips on how to avoid costly SEO mistakes on your WordPress site.

This Is What Your Forms Are Secretly Doing To Your SEO

Tutorials | calderaforms.com | Oct. 19, 2018

Christie Chirinos is a Partner at Caldera Labs. Christie received her Master of Business Administration degree with a specialization in information systems management from Florida State University, and is currently based out of New York City where she lives with her cat, Snickers. Two things are true about my life: my business partner and I own a popular web form product, and 50% of our product website’s traffic comes from search engines.
This means that I think about forms and SEO a lot. However, most of us don’t think about these two things together often. This is fair: after all, most of your SEO efforts will come from a quality content strategy and lots and lots of networking (don’t know what I mean? Learn about link building here).
However, there are two important considerations when thinking about implementing a form and making sure that your site is doing its best to be a part of a search result. So, after you’ve covered all of your SEO basics, such as identifying your keyword opportunities, looking at your on-page and off-page SEO, and more, make sure you give some thought to what your forms are doing.
(A quick tip: we are big fans of Pathfinder SEO at

6 min read Josh Pollock
Tutorials | mattcromwell.com | Dec. 3, 2018

Contexual Optins with Caldera Forms

Popup optins can be an effective part of a content marketing strategy, if they have the right offer. Matt shows how to create optins with Caldera Forms that are relevant to the current page, which is a great idea.

Contexual Optins with Caldera Forms

Tutorials | mattcromwell.com | Dec. 3, 2018

Newsletter optin forms are more compelling when they speak directly to the readers interest. This tutorial shows you how to achieve that with a simple shortcode and Caldera Forms. Everyone wants to get more subscribers to their email newsletter. There’s so many different tactics from the extremely obnoxious to the completely banal.
At Impress.org we tend to lean heavy on content marketing. We love providing value to our audience through our expertise and insights. We hope that in return for that free content, we might get a few emails here and there.
For the most part that works just fine. Recently though, we launched a new product, which means its newsletter list is relatively tiny. WP Business Reviews is a great product and we’ve been writing some really awesome content all relevant for business owners wanting to learn about online reviews, SEO tactics, reputation management and more. But we want more people to learn more about it as quickly as we can. So how can we ramp up the subscribers without moving into that “obnoxious” territory.
Contextual Signups
Our first step toward more signups is putting the optin form a bit more front-and-center to all our articles.

14 min read Sandra Stone
Tutorials | webzakt.com | Aug. 29, 2018

Comprehensive Guide to How to Speed Up Your WordPress Site

A step-by-step guide on how to speed up your WordPress site focusing on non-developer solutions. If your web content is loading slowly, read our guide on how to speed up your WordPress site and maximize usability for visitors.

Comprehensive Guide to How to Speed Up Your WordPress Site

Tutorials | webzakt.com | Aug. 29, 2018

Your WordPress website speed can gradually slow down for many reasons, which significantly impacts user experience. Many factors, such as the host provider, caching, content delivery networks, usage of JavaScript, poor image optimization, and poorly coded plugins can affect website performance. If your web content is loading slowly, read our guide on how to speed up your WordPress site and maximize usability for visitors. In this step-by-step guide on how to speed up your WordPress site, we’re focusing on non-developer solutions, i.e. improvements anyone can make. Let’s steer clear of custom code implementation since there are so many other ways of improving the speed of your site. Before we get into the methods of speeding up your WP site, it helps to understand some basics, such as why speed is important and some general causes of a slow WordPress site.
How to Speed Up Your WordPress Site
As an administrator, you might not be fully aware of your website’s front-end speed. The first thing to do is to run an eyeball test on your website by checking your site’s page load performance on someone else’s computer. If you find it slow using it yourself as a user

15 min read Brian Jackson
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Dec. 5, 2018

How to Use Icon Fonts in WordPress the Right Way (Better Performance)

Do you really need all those icons? Probably not. So don't load all of them. Check out how we decreased the size of our icon fonts file by a whopping 97.59% by using a font generator.

How to Use Icon Fonts in WordPress the Right Way (Better Performance)

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Dec. 5, 2018

Back in the early days, icons were readily available, but implementing them efficiently in WordPress was a bit more difficult. You could get around some issues with sprites, but they were not always a good way forward, and as retina screens started coming out, the problem was magnified (quite literally). One of the most common solutions to this problem is to use an icon font. Icons are web fonts or vectors, so you can scale them infinitely and a lot of icons can fit inside a single file, bringing down your request count considerably. This allows you to use almost any icon you can possibly dream up. However, with this, also comes some performance considerations.
We’ll show you in this article a couple different ways to use WordPress icon fonts, where to get them, and which method might be the best for your site.
Where to Find Icon Fonts
There are a lot of great places to now find icon fonts for your WordPress site. Just type “icon font” into Google will yield you some great results. One of the most popular and widely used ones is Font Awesome. As of writing this, it has 1,400+ free icons, as well as 4,500+ icons in their pro version. It includes icons for just about