Welcome to ManageWP.org

Register to share, discuss and vote for the best WordPress stories every day, find new ideas and inspiration for your business and network with other members of the WordPress community. Join the #1 WordPress news community!

×

11 min read Eric Karkovack
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 5 days ago

How to Add Schema Markup to Your WordPress Site

An intro to what Schema Markup is, its benefits and how to implement it into your site.

How to Add Schema Markup to Your WordPress Site

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 5 days ago

A website owner’s top priority should be ensuring that search engines are able to properly index their site’s content. In order to make that happen, the site must be set up to follow Search Engine Optimization (SEO) best practices. If your site was built with WordPress, then you’re already off to a nice start. WordPress is a SEO-friendly platform by default. Right out of the box it provides features like “pretty” permalinks and content hierarchy that make it easier for search engines to digest. You can also extend SEO capabilities through the use of plugins or even themes. In short, WordPress enables you to create a customized SEO strategy to match your specific needs.
Today, we’ll take a look at one area of SEO that is becoming vitally important. The practice of adding Schema markup (sometimes called Structured Data or Microdata) to your website can provide a boost to your search engine rankings and CTR while also making your site more user-friendly.
Let’s explore what Schema markup is, the benefits of using it and how you can implement into your own WordPress website.
Introducing Schema: Where Content Meets Context
When search engines crawl

Tutorials | cssigniter.com | 3 days ago

Creating a simple WordPress blogging layout with CSS Grid and Flexbox

A classic WordPress blogging layout implemented with CSS Grid and Flexbox.

Creating a simple WordPress blogging layout with CSS Grid and Flexbox

Tutorials | cssigniter.com | 3 days ago

CSS has come a long, long way and throughout the very recent years has steadily matured to become more than a simple styling specification which required hacks for many complex (or simple) things. With constant improvements like the introduction of e.g. flexbox, custom properties, and more, the design developer’s life has become dramatically easier. One of the most recent additions into the language’s specification is CSS Grid, which aims to remove any layout limitations the language had before (even by flexbox). CSS Grid is designed to be the most powerful layout system CSS has to offer. Unlike flexbox, which is mostly a one-dimensional positioning system with limited two-dimensional support, CSS Grid handles both dimensions (i.e. rows and columns) with greater versatility.
As CSS Grid is extremely complex (it introduces more than a dozen new properties with near infinite combinations) this post will focus on a general overview of a basic blogging layout, much like the ones we usually see on WordPress, explore some of the required properties to create this layout, and make an attempt to distinguish layout responsibilities between CSS Grid and flexbox.
The desired blogging

5 min read Juriy Polovec
Tutorials | premmerce.com | 3 days ago

Woocommerce Google Analytics Integration and Plugins

In this tutorial, we are going to look through the best practices for integrating Google Analytics into your WooCommerce store to get all the necessary data about your users and their purchases.

Woocommerce Google Analytics Integration and Plugins

Tutorials | premmerce.com | 3 days ago

In this tutorial, we are going to look through the best practices for integrating Google Analytics into your WooCommerce store to get all the necessary data about your users and their purchases. Web analytics is the process of collecting, analyzing and interpreting data about the visitors of your site and their online behavior. Analytical information helps to improve and optimize a web project, contributes to the development of commercial and non-commercial sites. Analytics is particularly valuable for online stores.
Today, many e-commerce niches are highly competitive. Therefore, a careful analysis of the online store and its users’ behavior is a necessary stage of business development.
The analytics is of a great benefit to those projects, that have specific goals set (major and secondary). If you want to work not only to raise sales, but also to develop your brand and build your company community, then the goals can be also divided into commercial (purchases, order processing) and non-commercial (reviews, file downloads, etc.).
Google settings
To use Google services, you must create an account on this platform (mailbox). If you still do not have such an account, you can create

Tutorials | themehybrid.com | 10 days ago

Supporting Gutenberg's "Align wide and full classes" right now

Justin Tadlock takes a look at two new classes in Gutenberg, how to add theme support for them, and how he's already using them in existing themes!

Supporting Gutenberg's "Align wide and full classes" right now

Tutorials | themehybrid.com | 10 days ago

With Gutenberg getting closer and closer to being ready for merge into core WP, I thought it’d be time to look at two of my favorite features being introduced for users and theme developers. That’s the .alignwide and .alignfull classes.
These are two classes that I’ve wished we had for ages. I’ve seen some theme authors implement them in the past, but there was no standard naming scheme for them. Therefore, they couldn’t be shared across themes. Regardless of the direction of the Gutenberg plugin, these two classes are more than welcome.
In this tutorial, I’m going to cover adding support for and styling these new classes. I’m already making liberal use of the classes on this site without actually having Gutenberg installed. This is useful with or without the plugin.
While the primary use case in Gutenberg covers images, I’m using the feature for other things too, such as full-width testimonials on my product pages and elsewhere.
Adding Gutenberg support
Adding support for wide and full images is pretty simple. You need to drop the following code into your theme setup function, which should be hooked to after_setup_theme:
add_theme_support(

5 min read Jim Walker
Tutorials | hackguard.com | 4 days ago

How Do I Migrate WordPress to a Different Domain Name?

Changing the domain name on an existing WordPress installation or staging a WordPress website at a different location may seem daunting at first. But it’s really quite easy to do. And I’ll show you how.

How Do I Migrate WordPress to a Different Domain Name?

Tutorials | hackguard.com | 4 days ago

Changing the domain name on an existing WordPress installation or staging a WordPress website at a different location may seem daunting at first. But it’s really quite easy to do. And I’ll show you how. Use case #1:
You’ve purchased a number of domain names for your website. And you wish to assign another of your domain names as the main domain people see in the web browser location bar when they visit your website.
Use case #2:
Your client has asked you to update their existing theme but would prefer you not edit their live website. Staging the website in a subdirectory within the current hosting account will allow you to work with the existing theme in a safe environment.
Use case #3:
You would like to move your website to another web host, but test your website at the new host before pointing the domain name to the new hosting account.
The process for making a backup of a WordPress website in preparation for a move to another hosting account or for staging purposes is rather straightforward.
Start by making a backup of your existing website files and database.
Backing up files and databases within cPanel is as simple as clicking Backup, then clicking two links:

Tutorials | ibenic.com | 14 days ago

OOP for Better Conversions in WordPress Plugins - Igor Benić

A simple article and a tutorial on how to use OOP for better upgrade conversions.

OOP for Better Conversions in WordPress Plugins - Igor Benić

Tutorials | ibenic.com | 14 days ago

The freemium model is a well-known business model in WordPress. Basically, you have a free plugin with core features and a pro one with advanced features (or add-ons). In this tutorial, you will see how I use OOP to show my users the upgrade option. That could help you get better conversions in WordPress plugins. Loading Order
To use OOP to drive better conversions, you will have to understand how everything works. The first thing is the loading order.
In my own plugin, I am using Freemius to provide my Premium version. That service allows me to have the premium code in the same place as my core features and on deployment, my premium code will be extracted from the free version.
If you’re using another method, that’s fine, as long as you are loading your premium classes before the free ones. You don’t have to load all the premium feature before, just the classes from the features you want to show as premium features. It might be confusing now, but bear with me and I’ll show you what I mean.
Plugin Features
In this example, the plugin premium features will be some of the integrations. Imagine an admin screen of integrations. Each integration is a separate class.

16 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 24 days ago

How to Optimize the Critical Rendering Path in WordPress

Further tips to improve your WP site with step by step instructions.

How to Optimize the Critical Rendering Path in WordPress

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 24 days ago

The Critical Rendering Path is the sequence of tasks the browser performs to first render a page on the screen, i.e. to download, process and convert HTML, CSS, and JavaScript code into actual pixels, and paint them on the screen. The Critical Rendering Path Optimization is the process of minimizing the time spent by the browser to perform each step of the sequence prioritizing the display of content related to the current user action.
Much of this process pertains to the portion of the page that is visible without scrolling down the browser window. That section is also known as Above the Fold. For a better usability, the ATF should be rendered as soon as possible, and this can be done reducing the number of network round trips at a minimum. The resources required to render the ATF are considered critical, and optimizing the Above the Fold means minimizing the impact of critical resources on the time to first render of the page.
In this post, we will walk through the Critical Rendering Path optimization sequence.
First, I will provide a general overview of the tasks the browser performs to render a page’s content.
Following, I will dissect the most relevant actions we can carry

6 min read Joachim Jensen
Tutorials | dev.institute | 18 days ago

How to remove sidebar and get a full-width layout in WordPress

This tutorial will show how easy it is to hide a sidebar from any page or post and get a full-width layout in all modern, well-coded WordPress themes. No coding. No custom templates.

How to remove sidebar and get a full-width layout in WordPress

Tutorials | dev.institute | 18 days ago

In this tutorial we will show how easy it is to remove a sidebar from any page or post and get a full-width layout. This method will work in all modern, well-coded WordPress themes using only the best plugin to hide sidebars! No coding. No custom templates. Does My Theme Support Hidden Sidebars?
If you have a modern WordPress theme, it should automatically support full-width layouts when hiding sidebars. To understand how WordPress themes handle and display widget areas, we need to look at two basic functions you might’ve come across if you have ever looked at the code in your theme:
is_active_sidebar('name') – checks if a specific widget area is active or not
dynamic_sidebar('name') – displays a specific widget area
But what is an active sidebar? In general, a sidebar that contain widgets is active, while an empty sidebar is inactive. The 3 most common cases for how WordPress themes handle inactive sidebars are:
Sidebar is completely removed, and a full-width layout takes up its space (Standard in modern, well-coded themes)
Sidebar is hidden, but a blank space takes its place
Sidebar is hidden, but hardcoded widgets take its place (Used to be the norm in the early

10 min read Martijn
Tutorials | wpcode.io | 12 days ago

Howto: create a front-end profile edit page in WordPress

A tutorial on how to create a custom profile edit page

Howto: create a front-end profile edit page in WordPress

Tutorials | wpcode.io | 12 days ago

Just looking for the how-to? Scroll down to ‘How-to starts below’. One on the benefits of WordPress is it’s collection of over 40.000 plugins in the plugin repository. There is probably a plugin available for every feature you can imagine, just as long the feature is not too site specific.
However, as a professional WordPress developer I try to use as little plugins as possible. Therefor I have multiple reasons:
I want to know exacly what code is in my project.
When a error accurs in a plugin you have to rely on someone else to fix a bug.
A plugin almost always has more features than you need.
You have to rely on someone else to release a bugfix.
Less code = better!
Just recently a project I was working on needed a page where users could edit their profile. The website was a internal website for a hospital where specialists and doctors could log-in and find info on different medical publications. And as said, the doctors had te be able to edit their profile by themself.
This was a perfect use case where a plug-in could add this feature to the website. However in my opinion that was just overkill as the only thing needed was a simple form with some logic basicly :).

11 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 28 days ago

WordPress Sitemap Guide

A deep look at how XML sitemaps specifically work with WordPress.

WordPress Sitemap Guide

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 28 days ago

If you’ve ever sat down and read an article on SEO, you’ve probably come across the terms sitemap and/or XML sitemap. But while sitemaps are a fairly common SEO recommendation, there aren’t a ton of deep looks at how XML sitemaps specifically work with WordPress. To fix that, we’re going to take a deep dive into WordPress sitemaps. Here’s everything that you’ll learn in this post:
What Is An XML Sitemap?
An XML sitemap is basically just a list of URLs that you want to be publicly available. Like robots.txt, it helps search engines like Google and others better crawl your website by giving them a “map” of all your content. That’s it!
Beyond a raw list of URLs, you can also include other helpful “metadata” in your sitemap to further aid search engines in their attempts to index your site. These options are outlined in the Sitemaps protocol and let you specify things like:
When a page was last modified
What priority you’d like search engines to give to the page (though search engines won’t necessarily follow this)
How often the page will change
Beyond those core pieces of metadata, it’s also possible to

Tutorials | wpdeveloper.net | 27 days ago

Elementor Inline Text Editing - How To Get Started

Elementor introduced Inline Text Editing few days ago, this post shows how it works.

Elementor Inline Text Editing - How To Get Started

Tutorials | wpdeveloper.net | 27 days ago

Kudos to the Elementor team. On 7th of November, 2017 Elementor 1.8.0 was released. Now with their latest feature upgrade, you can streamline the process of page-building. You may wonder, how? With the latest version of Elementor, you get in-line editing feature. You get it with both the free and pro version. This feature was much anticipated as it completely upgrades how you write content in the page-builder interface. Combine this with the feature-rich widgets and you have a lethal weapon.
Is it Limited to Just Text-Widgets?
Elementor offers widgets of different types. And without any doubt, you can use the in-line editing feature with every Text-Widget. But do you need this feature for every other widget type? Definitely not! In-line editing suits specific widget types.
For example, the Flip-Box widget is heavily content-based. So you should be able to enjoy the in-line editing with this widget, right? Well, even if you had that chance, you won’t enjoy it. The Flip-Box Widget gives you two canvases inside a certain section area. And as you hover your mouse over the widget it will switch back and forth between these two canvases. Think of these two canvases as two opposite sides

Tutorials | sitebeginner.com | 4 days ago

Speeding Up Wordpress Sites

A few simple (and slightly more advanced) ways to help optimize WP sites for better speed.

Speeding Up Wordpress Sites

Tutorials | sitebeginner.com | 4 days ago

One of the most frequently asked questions we receive from our customers using WordPress for their blogs or websites is how do I speed up my WordPress website? Website speed has become an important factor for SEO purposes, don't believe me, check what Google say. It makes sense, I mean who wants to browse through a slow loading website? Most people will leave the site and look else where for the information they need.
There are lots of different suggestions out there. Some of them will speed up your website considerably. Others may only make a fraction of seconds worth of difference to your page load times. If you’ve got a massive site with hundreds of pages and posts and it is taking a long time to get anywhere then you’ll want to squeeze every bit of optimisation out of it. For a much smaller site, just one or two of the ideas below will be enough to get your WordPress installation running much faster.
Recently I made some of the changes below to one of my client's websites it was taking over 12 seconds to load a page now this is no more than 1.2 seconds per page.
Visit http://tools.pingdom.com and enter your site url and do a speed test to see how long does it take for

13 min read Igor Benić
Tutorials | ibenic.com | 24 days ago

Configuring Webpack in WordPress for the First Time

This is a tutorial on configuring Webpack in WordPress for the first time. It goes from simple JavaScript to Babel and from CSS to SASS.

Configuring Webpack in WordPress for the First Time

Tutorials | ibenic.com | 24 days ago

Adding Webpack in your WordPress plugin or theme might feel scary. I stepped out from my comfort zone while working on a new plugin. Since that plugin might be using React or Vue in a future version, I wanted to have Babel and similar there. In this tutorial, I will show you the steps I used to configure Webpack in WordPress for my first time. Since this is my first Webpack configuration, it may lack some of the useful plugins and scripts. If you think I should include something, you’re welcome to comment that at the end of this tutorial.
Getting Started with Webpack
To get started using Webpack, you must first install the pre-requisites. If you don’t have Node.js installed, go to the website and follow the install instructions. It will take you a few minutes of your time.
That’s it! Now we can move on. Just check npm -v if you have that there. If not, you might want to restart your computer. But in general, you should only quite and re-open the terminal (command line).
Since I have set this for my own plugin, I will talk about my plugin folder. For your own WordPress products, the only things that you will have to change is the path to your JavaScript or CSS (theme

14 min read Iain Poulson
Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Oct. 31, 2017

How to Develop a WordPress Plugin Using Webpack 3, React and the REST API (part 2)

Have you ever wondered how to get React working with the WordPress REST API? In this second part of the series we continue where we left off in part one.

How to Develop a WordPress Plugin Using Webpack 3, React and the REST API (part 2)

Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Oct. 31, 2017

This is article 2 of 2 in the series “How to Develop a WordPress Plugin Using Webpack 3, React and the REST API” How to Develop a WordPress Plugin Using Webpack 3, React and the REST API (part 2)
Have you ever wondered how to get React working with the WordPress REST API? If so you’re in the right place – that’s what we’re going to cover in this follow-up to part one of how to develop a WordPress plugin! In our previous post, we explained what Webpack is and got it integrated into our WordPress sample plugin. We also got BrowserSync set up and reloading our app. In this part we’re going to look at how to get the React side of our plugin working with the WordPress REST API so that the plugin actually does something cool.
So let’s waste no time and get back into it.
In part one we set up a starter plugin called WP React Boilerplate. I’ve now updated this plugin to include the updates made in part two, so feel free to check it out.
Webpack updates
If you recall, in part 1 we went through and learned what Webpack is and how things like loaders and plugins work. If you’re not sure what any of those things are – go ahead and

6 min read Igor Benić
Tutorials | ibenic.com | Nov. 9, 2017

Find Unused Shortcodes in WordPress with Code

A simple guide on how to find unused shortcodes through the code and display the posts where such shortcodes are.

Find Unused Shortcodes in WordPress with Code

Tutorials | ibenic.com | Nov. 9, 2017

When going through various themes and plugins, you might use various shortcodes on your site or on a client site. When making the transition from one theme to another or from one plugin to another something might happen. You could forget a page or post where you have used a shortcode. Such unused shortcode could break your site. Let’s see how to find those pages and posts. How to find Unusued Shortcode
You can go to each post, page or any other custom post type and see which shortcode was not parsed into a styled text, form or something else. We are not doing that!
But we will do that through our code. We will have to parse all the content so that every possible shortcode that is registered gets parsed. With that approach, we will be left only with the shortcodes that once were registered (by a deactivated plugin or theme).
Coding our Search Engine
Our seach engine for unused shortcodes will be done on the admin side. You can add this code as a separate plugin or in your own existing plugin or theme. That is up to you. Let’s begin:
<?php
add_action( 'admin_init', 'ibenic_get_all_posts_shortcodes' );
function ibenic_get_all_posts_shortcodes() {
if( isset( $_REQUEST['get_shortcodes']

12 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Oct. 23, 2017

WordPress Robots.txt Guide - What It Is and How to Use It

An advanced guide on why should you care about your Robots.txt file, how to create and edit it.

WordPress Robots.txt Guide - What It Is and How to Use It

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Oct. 23, 2017

Ever heard the term robots.txt and wondered how it applies to your website? Most websites have a robots.txt file, but that doesn’t mean most webmasters understand it. In this post, we hope to change that by offering a deep dive into the WordPress robots.txt file, as well as how it can control and limit access to your site. By the end, you’ll be able to answer questions like: There’s a lot to cover so let’s get started!
What Is a WordPress Robots.txt?
Before we can talk about the WordPress robots.txt, it’s important to define what a “robot” is in this case. Robots are any type of “bot” that visits websites on the Internet. The most common example is search engine crawlers. These bots “crawl” around the web to help search engines like Google index and rank the billions of pages on the Internet.
So, bots are, in general, a good thing for the Internet…or at least a necessary thing. But that doesn’t necessarily mean that you, or other webmasters, want bots running around unfettered. The desire to control how web robots interact with websites led to the creation of the robots exclusion standard in the mid-1990s.

Tutorials | wp-rocket.me | Oct. 31, 2017

How to Reduce HTTP Requests to Speed Up Your WordPress Site

Want to make your site load faster? Reducing the number of HTTP requests your site makes can speed it up

How to Reduce HTTP Requests to Speed Up Your WordPress Site

Tutorials | wp-rocket.me | Oct. 31, 2017

Every time you visit a website, there’s a whole lot of technical stuff going on behind the scenes. While words and images are loading on your screen, in the background your browser is requesting and receiving files. These HTTP requests impact page load speeds and, ultimately, affect user experience, bounce rate and SEO. The fewer HTTP requests your site sends to the server, the faster your site will load.
So what is an HTTP request and what can you do to reduce them? Let’s take a look at how server requests work, tools to help work out exactly how many HTTP requests your site is sending, and tips on how to reduce your site’s requests and make it faster.
What are HTTP requests?
Every time someone visits a page on your site, their browser pings your web server and requests the files that contain the content of the page. These files might include HTML, CSS and JavaScript files, images, icons and other files.
The request is called an HTTP request. HTTP stands for Hypertext Transfer Protocol and basically the name for a browser sending a request for a file, and the server sending that file to the browser.
When the server receives an HTTP request from a user’s browser,

Tutorials | 000webhost.com | 27 days ago

2 ways to leverage Browser Caching in WordPress (including Google Analytics)

The complete guide showing how to leverage browser caching in WordPress.

2 ways to leverage Browser Caching in WordPress (including Google Analytics)

Tutorials | 000webhost.com | 27 days ago

One of the things you learn as your website grows is that performance is critical. These days, most people expect your site to load quickly, and they don’t have much patience unless it does. ‘Caching’ – essentially a way of keeping your loading times lean that we’ll talk more about shortly – is a key way to keep your website’s visitors happy. Browser caching enables your website to load faster by cutting down on how much information users need to re-load after their first visit. It’s a simple way to reduce loading times, and anyone can implement it on their website.
In this article, we’re going to talk about what browser caching is and what it means to leverage it in WordPress. Then we’ll talk about when you should disable caching and how to set it up in the first place. Finally, we’ll help you check if caching is working as intended on your website. Let’s get to work!
An Introduction to Browser Caching
If set up correctly, websites will often save some of their files to your computer. That way, you won’t need to load the entire thing over the internet each time you revisit it. This process is known as browser

Tutorials | woorkup.com | Oct. 18, 2017

How to Allow Public Post Preview of Unpublished Posts in WordPress

Just a quick little tip on how to allow public post previews and customizing expiration times. Sometimes little plugins go unnoticed and as a writer/blogger, this one saves me so much time!

How to Allow Public Post Preview of Unpublished Posts in WordPress

Tutorials | woorkup.com | Oct. 18, 2017

I’m always collaborating with someone, whether it be on this site or another. A lot of times I need to share drafts I have with others to get their opinions, comments, and correct any misinformation. WordPress by default doesn’t have a way to do this without first publishing the post. Thankfully though there is a quick and easy way. Check out this tutorial below on how to allow public post preview for unpublished posts in WordPress. How to Allow Public Post Preview in WordPress
Many of us bloggers and writers utilize both WordPress and Google Docs a lot. Anyone who does this on a regular basis knows that they don’t work great together. Sure there are tricks you can use, like this one on how to save images from Google Docs. But for the most part, when you’re writing something in WordPress you like to keep it in WordPress.
Thankfully there is a free nifty little plugin called Public Post Preview. It enables you to give a link to anonymous users for public preview of a post before it is published. I’ve used this for years and it has made my life a lot easier.
Public Post Preview is currently maintained by Dominik Schilling, who is actually a WordPress core

Tutorials | wedevs.com | Oct. 20, 2017

Easy Guide to Install Facebook Pixel on WordPress & WooCommerce Store

If your brand usage Facebook Ads, or even remarketing, Facebook Pixel is important for you. This is a complete guide to use the official tool and configure your WordPress site or WooCommerce powered store to use Facebook Pixel properly.

Easy Guide to Install Facebook Pixel on WordPress & WooCommerce Store

Tutorials | wedevs.com | Oct. 20, 2017

Facebook offers amazing advertising capabilities including powerful remarketing and retargeting campaigns. On the other hand, WordPress is the easiest and most efficient way of creating and starting a business online. To utilize Facebook’s advertising capabilities to boost up your business, you will need to install Facebook’s pixel code on your WordPress site, just like Google Analytics tracking code!
In today’s article, we will discuss the process of installing Facebook pixel on WordPress and give you the easiest step by step guide so that you can get started immediately.
So, What and Why Facebook Pixel?
[You can skip this section and if you already know and go to the tutorial section!]
Advertising tools are almost same for every platform. Facebook definitely offers many groundbreaking features, but they are complex and hard to understand. Facebook pixel is one of them.
Although pixel is common in most of the advertising tools. It is simply a piece of code that drops cookies to track visitors on your website so that you can reconnect with them late and show your advertisements. As you may already know, this is retargeting or remarketing.
Using pixels you can track

14 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Sep. 27, 2017

How to Find WordPress Performance Bottlenecks with New Relic - Advanced Guide

Fixing overall slowness with New Relic is easy if you know what to check. This is an advanced tutorial to help you make your WordPress site a lot faster!

How to Find WordPress Performance Bottlenecks with New Relic - Advanced Guide

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Sep. 27, 2017

Here at Kinsta, our Support Engineers make use of New Relic APM every single day. It’s a powerful tool that drills down into the inner workings of a WordPress website to pinpoint plugins, theme template files, database queries, external calls, or coding errors causing performance issues on our clients’ websites. We pride ourselves on being developer-friendly managed WordPress hosting. So we don’t hog this powerful tool all to ourselves. On our platform, our users can add their own New Relic license so they can enjoy the same powerful visibility. If your hosting provider doesn’t offer New Relic integration, you can set it up yourself if your site is hosted in a private environment.
However, getting New Relic running is just the beginning. If you’ve never used New Relic APM (and maybe even if you have), you may struggle to get the most out of this powerful tool. In this tutorial our goal is simple: show you how you can use New Relic APM to fix what ails your WordPress website. Ready to get nerdy? Let’s get to it!
A Quick Overview of New Relic APM
So what is New Relic APM? For our purposes, the following definition fits:
New Relic APM is a web application

Tutorials | cssigniter.com | Oct. 20, 2017

How we use Sass and Gulp in our WordPress theme & plugin development workflow

Learn how we use Gulp to compile Sass in our theme workflow at CSSIgniter and integrate it to your own projects.

How we use Sass and Gulp in our WordPress theme & plugin development workflow

Tutorials | cssigniter.com | Oct. 20, 2017

It’s been quite a while now since we’ve completely abandoned vanilla CSS for a CSS preprocessor (more than four years actually) and more specifically for Sass (with SCSS syntax). There are quite a few reasons why we did that, and the main one is improved DX (developer experience) along with easier plugin integrations. Simply put, Sass used to be (and still is) a much more powerful language than vanilla CSS, especially if you’re concerned with older browser support (i.e… IE ¯\_(ツ)_/¯). I’ve found that the need for variables, conditionals, mixins, rule nesting, along with color functions and all the goodies a preprocessor comes with is much more apparent within the WordPress theming context where you wish to provide multiple color schemes for your theme or tame popular WordPress plugins to match your theme’s design and layout.
That said, I’m not here to sell you on CSS preprocessors right now, this piece is an overview on how we use Sass with Gulp in our theme and plugin development workflow, and how to incorporate the same workflow to your theme, if you so wish.
Our specific requirements
Back when we started exploring how we’d

Tutorials | wpdeveloper.net | Nov. 6, 2017

How To Add Custom Scripts To WordPress Header & Footer Via Customizer

How do you add JavaScript codes you need on your WordPress site? Do you know you could do that with customizer? This nifty little plugin lets you add any JavaScript with customizer, and this post includes a nice tutorial as well.

How To Add Custom Scripts To WordPress Header & Footer Via Customizer

Tutorials | wpdeveloper.net | Nov. 6, 2017

You can add custom scripts to your WordPress websites using a plugin and perhaps it's the best and safest way if you trust the plugin. When you don't need the scripts, you can take off them and disable the plugin. There are few plugins in WordPress repository but none of them using Customizer feature. So you need to add them from WordPress Dashboard, save script and check back the pages to test the functionality. Since I often need to add some scripts to add interactivity or custom features, I felt it should use the Customizer so that it could be tested on the fly. So I built a fresh new plugin for this and released for free on the WordPress repository. You can check Custom Header Footer Scripts for Customizer

8 min read Josh Pollock
Tutorials | mattcromwell.com | Oct. 19, 2017

Outputting Caldera Form Entries on the frontend - Matt Cromwell

Matt shows us how he created a. RSVP form & showed the entires in the front end using the magic of Caldera Forms.

Outputting Caldera Form Entries on the frontend - Matt Cromwell

Tutorials | mattcromwell.com | Oct. 19, 2017

Sometimes you really want to show your form submissions on the front-end. There’s quite a few use-cases if you think about it. What if you wanted to add a type of comment form to a page or section of your site? What if you are taking RSVPs for an event and want to highlight all the great people coming to the event? Putting all those submissions hidden away in wp-admin makes it hard to do those things. Caldera Forms is my go-to form creation tool, and it happens to have some pretty straight-forward ways to query the entries in the backend and do pretty much whatever you like with them.
The Matt Turns 40 Extravaganza
I’m turning the big FOUR-OH this year. Rather than one event, I wanted to allow my friends and family to come to any of several events I’m doing over my birthday weekend. I could have created multiple Evite invitations, but that would have been a real pain for folks to follow multiple links for roughly 8 events over the course of a weekend.
I’ve said many times: “if it can be built on the web, it can be built with WordPress.” So I went to work making this weekend Extravaganza invite happen with Caldera Forms. You can see the results here.