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5 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | whoischris.com | 2 days ago

Building a Payment Gateway for Give WP the Donation Plugin for WordPress - Who Is Chris

A simple and useful tutorial on building your own Give Payment Gateway.

Building a Payment Gateway for Give WP the Donation Plugin for WordPress - Who Is Chris

Tutorials | whoischris.com | 2 days ago

My father runs a non-profit organization and I told him I’d help with some of his online needs. I’m in the midst of a task for him where I need a very simple, but precise method of donations through Stripe. While the Stripe Add-On for Give is excellent, it’s more than I need and missing some small features my project requires. I’m not going to get into that specific project but show you what I’ve learned. Unless I’m missing something obvious on their site and with some quick googling, there’s no documentation for building Give gateways. I had to reverse engineer a couple that are available to see what is necessary to make it work. Here it is in its simplest form.
Bare Bones Gateway
When building an extension for a plugin I like to try and build the absolute barest possible version. What you see at the bottom of this section is just that. We use just two hooks:
add_filter( ‘give_payment_gateways’ )
add_action( ‘give_gateway_{gateway_slug}’ )
The filter registers our gateway. This will then show our gateway as an option in the Give gateway settings.
The action is where we process the submitted form data. It’s pretty

11 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | jjj.blog | 4 days ago

Understanding alloptions in WordPress

Great, in-depth piece on understanding exactly how wp_options works. You'll learn a lot from this.

Understanding alloptions in WordPress

Tutorials | jjj.blog | 4 days ago

WordPress is an extremely flexible piece of software, and it comes with many different settings. Some are made visible to users via Admin > Settings and others are stored invisibly so users aren’t bothered by them, but all of them are saved in a single database table named wp_options. Today, it looks something like this: This database table actually has a few interesting qualities to it. Conceptually, it’s a very simple key/value approach to storing any kind of arbitrary information. It’s a distant cousin to all of the meta database tables WordPress comes with (for posts, comments, terms, and users) and I’m a big fan of the entire meta-data API – it’s now fully implemented across all major object types (except blogmeta and term_relationshipmeta) and, honestly, it’s one of the few “complete” APIs you’ll interact with inside of WordPress today, aside from probably roles & rewrite rules.
The options API, however, is actually quite a bit different from meta, enough to warrant this blog post, and enough for me to have spent the past 4 days studying it, researching it, and generally trying to find ways to improve how it performs

Tutorials | newtlabs.co.uk | 17 hours ago

How To Perform A Website Audit For Incredible Growth - Newt Labs

How best to do a thorough website audit. From design through to coding through to accessibility, architecture, content, SEO etc.. !

10 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 5 days ago

How to Disable WordPress Plugins on Specific Pages and Posts

If you don't want to run the plugin code on every page of your website this is the guide you need to follow.

How to Disable WordPress Plugins on Specific Pages and Posts

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 5 days ago

When it comes to WordPress performance we have a lot to say about plugins. Each plugin adds PHP code that has to be executed, can include scripts and styles, and some may execute additional queries against the database. This means that unnecessary plugins can affect page speed and may have a negative impact on user experience and page ranking. As an example, consider a plugin that builds and displays custom forms in front pages, like Contact Form 7. You typically only need a form on a single page. Do you really want to run the plugin code and include scripts and styles on every page of your website? In this post, I will demonstrate that you can install as many plugins as you need (don’t go crazy of course), and nevertheless make WordPress pages load fast. We’re going to disable WordPress plugins (that are unnecessary from loading on specific posts and pages. This will involve a four four-step process:
Choose the most popular plugins that fit your needs, and compare their features and effects on page speed.
Filter and deactivate unnecessary plugins before page loads.
Optimize CSS and JS files.
Track the site performance.
Let’s dive deep.
Three General Rules to Follow

10 min read Donna Cavalier
Tutorials | gtmetrix.com | 4 days ago

How to Optimize Images: A Practical Guide

Not groundbreaking info, but I did get one tip out of it that I was unaware of previously, so worth sharing, I guess.

How to Optimize Images: A Practical Guide

Tutorials | gtmetrix.com | 4 days ago

Want to know how to Serve Scaled Images and Optimize Your Images? We’ll show you how! As a conclusion to our What Does Optimizing Images Mean? post, we’ll show you how to actually solve your image optimization woes. This walkthrough is general enough to apply to most websites and platforms.
NOTE: This is just one way to scale and compress your images. There are many other methods that would work just as well.
Here’s how to get your images scaled and compressed:
Step 1) Analyze your site with GTmetrix
When the report is complete, look at your PageSpeed tab and click on “Serve scaled images”
The section will expand and show you a list of images that need to be scaled.
In this example, we’re serving an image that’s 2000×1095, but being scaled to 524×287. We can reduce the filesize significantly if we serve a more appropriately sized image.
Take note of the image name, and find where it’s being displayed on your site.
Step 2) Find out the maximum display size of the image
In other words, determine how large that image could potentially get.
Most likely, your site is responsive. You’ll need to figure out what size the image

10 min read Ben Pines
Tutorials | sourcewp.com | 3 days ago

Create a Maintenance Mode Site With Elementor

The talented Brenda Barron wrote this tutorial on how to fully design a maintenance mode page with Elementor

Create a Maintenance Mode Site With Elementor

Tutorials | sourcewp.com | 3 days ago

The folks at Elementor Page Builder are proud to announce a new feature called Maintenance Mode. Many of you are familiar with what maintenance mode does. For those who don’t, it’s a way to tell your site visitors that the website is still under construction and coming soon. Not only that, but you can still manage and make edits to your site from the backend, but no one else can see that. Maintenance Mode comes in handy for a wide range of reasons. First of all, you can build buzz about your website before it even launches. Many maintenance mode pages include countdown timers and information about what’s to come in the future. In addition, maintenance mode allows you to collect information from your customers, like email addresses.
Imagine having a list of email addresses before your site is launched. Not only can you let people know when the site is complete, but you then have contact with those people as long as they don’t unsubscribe.
Finally, maintenance mode pages have all sorts of other features such as social media sharing, text boxes for talking about your services and products and media support. Heck, your maintenance mode page could simply be a video

26 min read Damien O'Neill
Tutorials | apppresser.com | 5 days ago

How to Speed Up WordPress for Mobile: The Ultimate Guide

This article is huge and shows tonnes of tips for speeding up your WordPress site!

How to Speed Up WordPress for Mobile: The Ultimate Guide

Tutorials | apppresser.com | 5 days ago

Speeding up WordPress load times for mobile devices is the single most important thing you can do for mobile optimization. Even if you have the most beautiful responsive design the world has ever seen, it’s not going to matter if your site loads slowly. Many people on mobile devices simply won’t wait for your site to load, they’ll get frustrated and go to your competitor.
Speeding up your site can directly increase your sales and decrease bounce rates, making a huge impact on your bottom line. There are many reasons why your site could be slow, including hosting, caching, site errors, and more. This stuff can get really technical, my goal is to give you practical tips, not bog you down with jargon.
No matter what industry you are in, you will be able to improve your website speed on mobile (and desktop) using the information in this guide.
According to recent research by DoubleClick the average load time for mobile sites is 19 seconds over 3G.
You may be saying, 3G is slow, I’m always on wifi! That may be true for you, but remember that China and India have over 8.5X the population of the United States, and they mainly use older Android devices on slow connections.

5 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | sourcexpress.com | 4 days ago

How to customize WordPress comment notification emails

Simple but effective tutorial on customizing your comment notification emails.

How to customize WordPress comment notification emails

Tutorials | sourcexpress.com | 4 days ago

ordPress comments have been the part of the built since its inception and as WordPress has evolved consistently with need of time and technologies, so has the commenting system. WordPress has come a long way from starting as a blogging platform to be more like an application framework which acquires almost 24% of the whole web till date and comment system has evolved equally being an integral part of WordPress. Keeping with the evolution, with WordPress version 4.4 there would be a change in the comment section structure and henceforth comment textarea would come first, followed by name, email and website, by default. While working in a food guide project, which has like thousands of posts and hundreds of users, ends up getting hundreds of comments everyday, resulting in filling up my clients mailbox with the moderation/notification mails. As the client and the team logs in almost every day and moderates the comments, they wanted to get away with the emails they were getting. This blog is all about how I did it and what else can be done.
Comments moderation and new comment notifications can be enabled and disabled from the Settings >> Discussion. You can check more details about

15 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 6 days ago

Diving Into Zero BS CRM for WordPress

We reviewed and tested Zero BS CRM and it seems this is one of the best CRM plugin you can get right now.

Diving Into Zero BS CRM for WordPress

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 6 days ago

No matter what business you operate in, customers are your lifeline. Without them, you wouldn’t generate any sales, get referrals, or develop new relationships. True customer relationship management helps you better understand your customers and engage with them throughout the entire customer lifecycle. By analyzing data, you can determine what they need or want, and how you can improve your business model. That is why having a CRM should be central to what you do. In this post, we’ll dive into the Zero BS CRM plugin, why you should use a CRM and some of the advantages of going with a self-hosted solution. Why You Need a CRM
CRM. It’s a term which you may be familiar with. It stands for customer relationship management or client relationship management. You don’t need to run an e-commerce store or even sell to people to call them customers. A CRM can be used for anything that involves managing relationships. But why would you want to do so? Knowing the history of your customers lets you tailor your communications to their exact needs and give them what they want when they want it. And beyond that, it is one of the easiest ways to stay organized!
You might be

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 17 days ago

How to Safely Enable WordPress SVG Support

Tutorial on how to safely enable WordPress SVG support by utilizing sanitization upon upload. Take advantage of the smaller and scalable image files to enhance your branding.

How to Safely Enable WordPress SVG Support

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 17 days ago

SVG is an XML-based vector image which is commonly used by websites and brands to display logos and icons on their websites. The main reason they are especially popular among developers and designers is because they are a scalable image format, generally smaller in file size (sometimes by quite a bit), and don’t pixelate on retina screens. WordPress by default though doesn’t allow you to upload the SVG file format, mainly due to security concerns. Today we are going to dive into one way to safely enable WordPress SVG support, discuss browser support, as well as some caveats if you decide you want to switch to the vector image format. Hopefully one day we will SVG as part of WordPress core, but we are not quite there yet.
What is an SVG?
According to Wikipedia, an SVG (scalable vector graphics) is an XML-based vector image format for two-dimensional graphics with support for interactivity and animation. You can even manipulate them with code or your text editor. The SVG specification is an open standard developed by the World Wide Web Consortium since 1999. SVGs are currently only utilized by 3.4% of all websites, but as you can see below, the adoption rate is growing rapidly.

Tutorials | wpshout.com | 11 days ago

Preventing Form Resubmission Warnings in WordPress

How to stop worrying about the "Confirm Form Resubmission" warning in WordPress, using the admin_post hook and the Post/Redirect/Get pattern.

Preventing Form Resubmission Warnings in WordPress

Tutorials | wpshout.com | 11 days ago

Today’s article is on an advanced topic in WordPress development, and is by a distinguished guest and a truly outstanding WordPress developer and educator: Carl Alexander. Carl is a PHP developer from Montréal, Canada, who shares his passion for advanced programming topics on his website, carlalexander.ca, where he publishes articles on a regular basis.
Carl is a regular WordCamp Speaker, has been a WordPress Montréal organizer since 2010, and helps organize other WordPress events during the year. He’s also the author of Learn Object-Oriented Programming Using WordPress. You can find him on Twitter and GitHub.
We’ve all had this happen to us at one point or another. We’re filling a form in a web application. We go to submit, and that’s when we see it, straight from a web usability expert’s nightmare: the infamous “Confirm Form Resubmission” warning box!
Everyone hates seeing this warning. Why is there? Why aren’t you just submitting my form, web browser? Whyyyyyyy?
It’s also common to see the “Confirm Form Resubmission” warning in a lot of plugin admin pages. That’s because most WordPress developers

5 min read David McCan
Tutorials | sitepoint.com | 7 days ago

How to Customize the WordPress ToolBar — SitePoint

This is a tutorial on customizing the WordPress admin toolbar. Interesting that I just looked this up so as to add "Plugins" to the list. I'm not sure why we have "Themes" there and not "Plugins", but I go to the plugins menu much more frequently.

How to Customize the WordPress ToolBar — SitePoint

Tutorials | sitepoint.com | 7 days ago

This article is part of a series created in partnership with SiteGround. Thank you for supporting the partners who make SitePoint possible. I have a love/hate affair with the dark grey toolbar introduced in WordPress 3.3. (It was previously named the Admin Bar in WordPress 3.1 and that name stuck for many — including the API authors!). Looking at the positives, the toolbar provides a consistent set of quick links when you’re viewing the administration panels or the live website. That said, it can cause problems when creating themes or confuse site editors who think everyone can see it.
Fortunately, it’s easy to change the toolbar. We’re going to achieve it using a custom WordPress plugin, but you could also consider adding identical code to your theme’s functions.php file.
The WordPress Admin Bar API
The WP_Admin_Bar class provides the following methods:
add_node() — creates a new menu item (or child menu item) on the toolbar
remove_node() — remove a menu item from the toolbar
add_group() — allows toolbar items to be grouped into distinct sections
get_node() — returns a Toolbar object with the properties of a single toolbar item.

6 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | wordimpress.com | 13 days ago

How to Style Your Google Maps

Styling Google Maps used to be a real pain, but the Google Style Wizard and Maps Builder Pro makes it much easier. Have fun with this one!

How to Style Your Google Maps

Tutorials | wordimpress.com | 13 days ago

Between the Google Styling Wizard and Snazzy Maps you no longer have to settle for default Google map colors. Why not match them to your site colors like you do everything else? This tutorial will walk you through exactly how to do that. Now, Styling Maps is Easy
Google Maps is such a powerful tool and many websites really just use it for showing a simple location. But one seemingly simple feature has always been extremely complex: colors and styling. That is, until recently.
Since we launched Maps Builder back in 2014 we supported the only way to apply map style themes easily with Snazzy Maps. In our free Maps Builder plugin, you can choose from 16 different preset themes. In our Pro version there are over 80 and if you had the know-how to create your own themes, you could upload them directly into your map. But the part about “if you had the know-how” was the really tricky part.
Recently, Google released it’s own tool for styling maps on your own. And guess what? It creates the color themes in the exact same format Snazzy Maps does so you can upload them directly into Maps Builder Pro today.
Navigating Google Styling Wizard
It may seem relatively easy to say “I

14 min read Matteo Duò
Tutorials | codeable.io | 19 days ago

The Step-By-Step Process To Properly Test Your WordPress Website Before Updating It (Workflow, Tools, & Scripts)

Updating sounds like a breeze, but it's not! What if your checkout pages break after the update? What if your opt-in forms no longer work? Learn all the steps, tools and scripts to properly run tests on your website.

The Step-By-Step Process To Properly Test Your WordPress Website Before Updating It (Workflow, Tools, & Scripts)

Tutorials | codeable.io | 19 days ago

It’s easy to just go ahead and update your WordPress website, your theme, and plugin files by yourself. You just hit the “update” button three times and the job is, well… mostly done. You think that.
Everybody thinks that too.
But that’s not where the real challenge lies and where some issues might arise eventually. The “real deal” happens seconds after your updates, when you’ll need to check and test if your website is still working the way you want.
What if you’ve just updated your live site and you broke it? That’s going to be painful! And this is isn’t the worst scenario: what if the website breaks only on certain devices but you don’t realize it because you are viewing it from your desktop? To you everything seemed okay, didn’t it?!
I could go on with other examples, such as:
What if your checkout page is not working on iPhone anymore?
What if your contact form is not working on Safari?
What if your mobile menu is not opening on Android?
What if your product reviews do not show anymore on Firefox?
What if your footer disappears on Edge browser?
The list is almost endless. And you thought it was just

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 27 days ago

How to Diagnose High Admin-Ajax Usage on Your WordPress Site

Check out these recommendations on how to diagnose high admin-ajax.php usage on your WordPress site. This is typically caused by 3rd party plugins and can also cause CPU load on the back-end.

How to Diagnose High Admin-Ajax Usage on Your WordPress Site

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 27 days ago

A very common scenario when dealing with WordPress is diagnosing high admin-ajax.php usage. If you have been working with WordPress for a while, you have most likely encountered this when running speed tests or checking your server access logs. This is generally caused by 3rd party plugins or from frequent un-cachable admin dashboard requests, due to the Heartbeat API, such as autosaving drafts. It is important though that you diagnose high admin-ajax.php spikes when you see them, as they have been known to bring a site to a crawl. Check out the following recommendations below on some ways to tackle the admin-ajax.php issue in WordPress. What is the admin-ajax.php File?
The admin-ajax.php file itself is not a bad thing when used correctly. It is part of core, and was added by the WordPress development team in version 3.6. The purpose of admin-ajax.php is to create a connection between the browser and the server using AJAX. This allows for extended functionality such as improving auto-saving, revision tracking, login timeouts, session management, and notifications about a post being locked when there are multiple editors. Which are all great features, especially for those working with

Tutorials | wp-rocket.me | 18 days ago

5 ways to accelerate your site, in addition to WP Rocket

Have you already optimized all you can to speed up your WordPress? Here are 5 ways you can accelerate your website when you think you've done it all.

5 ways to accelerate your site, in addition to WP Rocket

Tutorials | wp-rocket.me | 18 days ago

Disclaimer: this article is targeted to a public with an intermediate to advanced technical knowledge. This is a guest post and opinions are those of the author, not necessarily WP Rocket. Services mentioned are not necessarily official WP Rocket endorsements. Have you found the perfect WP Rocket configuration for your site but you wish to go even further with your optimization? In this article we’re going to give you 5 suggestions to locate and solve the most common causes of slowness for a website, even if you’re already using WP Rocket. And if your site is already fast, these points will help boost its speed!
5 ways to identify why your site is slow, even if WP Rocket is working
1. Identify a poorly coded plugin with a client-side analysis
The first move to identify the critical causes of slowness for your site, is a front-end scan of your page with one of the available web performance tools.
In order to get a more accurate result, before launching your test you should deactivate your cache plugin.
The Tools
Pingdom
Dareboost
WebPagetest
Yslow (install it on your browser)
For my tests, I’m going to use Pingdom, since it’s fast to use and presents the results

6 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | calderaforms.com | 18 days ago

Accepting Payments for Consulting Services - Caldera Forms

Sometimes working with clients is as easy as a contact form and a payment form. If that's your situation, this article helps you do that easily with CalderaForms.

Accepting Payments for Consulting Services - Caldera Forms

Tutorials | calderaforms.com | 18 days ago

Andrew Lima is a Support Engineer and Junior Developer at Caldera Labs. He also works on a handful of other WordPress projects, and is an active member of the community. Andrew is based out of Johannesburg, South Africa. We’re super excited that that ConsultPress by Proteus Themes officially supports Caldera Forms. ConsultPress is a theme designed for professional consultants that are looking to create an online presence. We have added Proteus Themes to our recommended themes list beacuse their themes look great, work well with Caldera Forms and we have a good relationship with the company.
Caldera Forms works seamlessly with ConsultPress to offer beautiful, sleek and actionable forms for all your consulting needs. In celebration of this partnership, we want to show you how you can combine the powers of ConsultPress and Caldera Forms to create a lead generation form and a form to accept payments for consulting services on your WordPress site.
Capture Leads for Your Consulting Business
Creating The Lead Capture Form
Creating forms with Caldera Forms is easy thanks for the drag and drop form editor. If you’re new to Caldera Forms, I would recommend looking at our getting started

9 min read Aline
Tutorials | mhthemes.com | 13 days ago

How to offload WordPress images to Amazon S3

Tutorial on how to load WordPress media files (images, audio files, etc...) through Amazon S3 instead of your own server.

How to offload WordPress images to Amazon S3

Tutorials | mhthemes.com | 13 days ago

WordPress media items, such as images, videos and audio files, tend to take up a lot of space on your server’s storage drive. This can lead to a decline in your site’s speed over time, especially if you’re someone who publishes a lot of content with high-quality images. Fortunately, you can integrate your WordPress site with Amazon S3, Amazon’s cloud storage service that’s a part of the Amazon Web Services ecosystem. In this tutorial you’ll learn how to integrate your site with Amazon S3 with the help of two plugins from Delicious Brains, the developers of the ever popular WP Migrate DB plugin. We’ll be using their other product, WP Offload S3.
The WordPress images on your site as well as any other types of media you upload to WordPress will be stored in and served from Amazon S3 once all is said and done. Let’s get started.
Amazon Web Services & Amazon S3 Overview
We’ll be using the free WP Offload S3 Lite and Amazon Web Services WordPress plugins for this integration. You’ll also need accounts for Amazon Web Services and Amazon S3. All of this is free to start out with, so there’s no need to worry about paying high

10 min read Iain Poulson
Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Mar. 30, 2017

PHP and cURL: How WordPress makes HTTP requests

In this article Peter goes over the powerful cURL CLI tool and library. You will level up by learning the basics of how PHP and WordPress core use the libcurl bindings and cover the details of a common macOS cURL issue.

PHP and cURL: How WordPress makes HTTP requests

Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Mar. 30, 2017

cURL is the workhorse of the modern internet. As its tagline says, cURL is a utility piece of software used to ‘transfer data with urls‘. According to the cURL website, the library is used by billions of people daily in everything from cars and television sets, to mobile phones. It’s the networking backbone of thousands of applications and services. Unsurprisingly, it’s also a core utility used by WordPress’ own Requests API as well as our own WP Migrate DB Pro. If you’re curious about the power of the cURL library, how it works with WordPress and what to watch out for (especially on macOS), then you’re in the right place.
What is cURL?
Let’s start by going over what cURL is. cURL is really two pieces, libcurl which is the C library that does all the magic, and the cURL CLI program. Programming languages like PHP include the libcurl library as a module, allowing them to provide the cURL functionality natively.
The libcurl library is an open source URL transfer library and supports a wide variety of protocols. Not just HTTP, but HTTPS, SCP, SFTP, HTTP/2 and even Gopher. Pretty much every protocol you can imagine – cURL supports. cURL

7 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 23 days ago

How to Enable GZIP Compression in WordPress

Enabling GZIP compression can help reduce the size of your webpage and improve load times.

How to Enable GZIP Compression in WordPress

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 23 days ago

To achieve fast load times on your WordPress site, decreasing the size of your pages is crucial. This can mean the difference between a site that loads in under 1 second and one that feels like its crawling. Enabling GZIP compression can help reduce the size of your webpage, which can significantly reduce the amount of time to download the resource, reduce data usage for the client, and improve the time to first render of your pages. All modern browsers support it and automatically negotiate GZIP compression for all HTTP requests. Today we are going to share with you how to check and enable GZIP compression on your web server. What is GZIP Compression?
GZIP is a file format and a software application used for file compression and decompression. GZIP compression is enabled server-side, and allows for further reduction in the size of your HTML, stylesheets, and JavaScript files. It will not work on images as these are already compressed in a different way. Some have seen up to 70% reductions due to compression. It is probably one of the easiest optimizations you could make when it comes to WordPress.
Compression is the process of encoding information using fewer bits. — Ilya Grigorik,

6 min read Mohsen
Tutorials | codeposter.com | 24 days ago

How to deprecate a function in your WordPress plugin or theme properly

If you’re developing a WordPress plugin and fortunately your product is popular enough to improve it regularly, one thing that you would need is to replace a function with a newer version or remove it completely because it has become obsolete or deprecated.

How to deprecate a function in your WordPress plugin or theme properly

Tutorials | codeposter.com | 24 days ago

If you’re developing a WordPress plugin and fortunately your product is popular enough to improve it regularly, one thing that you would need is to replace a function with a newer version or remove it completely because it has become obsolete or deprecated. This may be important if the changing function is something the users may use in some ways in their code. For example, a template tag with an outdated prefix like cposter_my_template_tag() is a good candidate. So we’ve decided to update it to something more unique like codeposter_my_template_tag() and we are worried about those users who are using the first version in their products. So what is the solution?
In this case, we should somehow inform the users that the mentioned function is a Deprecated one, and will be removed in next major release and users most avoid using it anymore to be safe for the future updates. It is usually done by showing a warning to anyone using the method or function.
A good example for such situations is WordPress itself. WordPress has a file where it keeps the deprecated functions for backward compatibility. You can find a couple of deprecated ones there:
wp-includes/deprecated.php
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Tutorials | woorkup.com | 26 days ago

How to Add EmojiOne Support to Your WordPress Site

Check out this quick and easy tutorial on how to add EmojiOne support to your WordPress site using SVGs. Each emoji is under 1 KB in size for fast loading.

How to Add EmojiOne Support to Your WordPress Site

Tutorials | woorkup.com | 26 days ago

If you aren’t familiar with the new EmojiOne project, it is already taking the web by storm. It’s basically the first time Emojis are actually cool! Even open source software such as Discourse already has an integration with it. Today I am going to share with you how to add EmojiOne support to your WordPress site.

Tutorials | cloudways.com | Mar. 28, 2017

How to reduce admin-ajax.php related load on WordPress

While testing the speed of your website using online speed testing tools, you might have noticed that admin-ajax.php is responsible for the slow loading experience. Here is a guide, how you can reduce that load.

How to reduce admin-ajax.php related load on WordPress

Tutorials | cloudways.com | Mar. 28, 2017

For better SEO and user experience, experts always recommend speeding up WordPress websites for the end user. In this context, what if your site has more than one user who contributes regularly and the dashboard becomes slow to respond? While testing the speed of your website using online speed testing tools, you might have observed that admin-ajax.php is responsible for the slow loading experience. In this article, I will talk about this file and how you can reduce the server CPU usage by decreasing the number of requests generated by admin-ajax.php.
What is admin-ajax.php in WordPress?
Back in 2013, WordPress introduced WordPress Heartbeat API that provided several important functionalities such as the autosave feature, login-expiration and post lock warning while another user is writing or editing a WordPress post.
Two very prominent features of the Heartbeat API are:
Autosave
Whenever you save a draft of a post and continue working on it, WordPress automatically saves the additions to the post. There is a clear difference between the autosave and manually saving the draft. Check out the following screenshot that shows both types of saves:
Post Lock
Whenever you try to edit a post

4 min read BobWP
Tutorials | bobwp.com | 20 days ago

StudioPress Genesis Child Themes Updates Improve Compatibility with WooCommerce

If you haven't noticed, things have gotten even better between WooCommerce and Genesis.

StudioPress Genesis Child Themes Updates Improve Compatibility with WooCommerce

Tutorials | bobwp.com | 20 days ago

The other day, when I was perusing the child themes on StudioPress, something caught my eye. I noticed that the Smart Passive Pro Child Theme I was using had been recently updated. After some research, I found out something that, well, made me happy. Let me start out by saying the Genesis Child Themes over on StudioPress are now much more well-behaved. It’s the small details, but they can be so important. So I updated the theme here on my site and this is what I discovered.
Genesis Connect for WooCommerce Plugin
Although you still need the Genesis Connect for WooCommerce plugin , you will no longer have to add this code into your functions.php file:
add_theme_support( 'genesis-connect-woocommerce' );
I discovered this by accident as I hadn’t copied over my custom code yet, but I noticed that things were still working just fine.
WooCommerce Now Using Child Themes Styles
If you haven’t noticed in the past, when you use WooCommerce with the child themes, there are some subtle styles that WooCommerce overrides. For example, on your shop page, the standard color of the buy button is what comes with Woo, not the color your other non-Woo Commerce related buttons are elsewhere