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22 min read Weglot
Tutorials | blog.weglot.com | 9 days ago

How to Create a Multi Language WordPress Site

A in-depth article about how you can create a multi language WordPress website with examples and a case study.

How to Create a Multi Language WordPress Site

Tutorials | blog.weglot.com | 9 days ago

Expanding internationally is the natural next step for businesses that have achieved local success. But how do you provide content to consumers in other languages? With a WordPress multi language website, you can translate your web pages into multiple languages with ease — and that’s where this guide comes in. Learn everything you need to know about WordPress language translation and start tapping into overseas markets. Creating a WordPress multi language website makes sense. When you look at the numbers, the web caters overwhelmingly — and disproportionately — to English speakers.
English is ranked the third most popular spoken language in the world with 360 million native speakers. But it claims the top spot amongst the most commonly spoken languages online, with 873 million internet users. And then there’s the fact 53.3% of online content is written in English.
The fact is, the number of English speakers pales in comparison to the number of Mandarin speakers (955 million) and Spanish speakers (405 million).
Imagine opening a web page and seeing Chinese characters. If you don’t know Mandarin, you’d quickly leave the site, right? And you sure

11 min read Adi Spiac
Tutorials | translatepress.com | 20 days ago

10 Effective Tips to Increase Your Multilingual Site Speed in WordPress

The tutorial covers 10 actionable tips for having a fast multilingual site.

10 Effective Tips to Increase Your Multilingual Site Speed in WordPress

Tutorials | translatepress.com | 20 days ago

Knowing how to increase your multilingual site speed is an important skill. Page loading speed is an often underestimated factor for the success of a website. However, it influences many key factors, like: traffic, bounce rate, conversions, user satisfaction, as well as SEO. This detailed guide will cover everything you need to know about how to make your multilingual WordPress site faster. We will go over why loading speed is so important, how to test the current state of your site and what measures you can take to increase your multilingual site speed.
Lack of Speed is a Killer
Many people are unaware that in page loading, literally every second counts. Here is why.
Attention is a Rare Good
The reason why speed is so important is because it matters to users:
47% of consumers expect a web page to load in two seconds or less
40% abandon a site that takes longer than three seconds to load
79% of shoppers are less likely to return to a website if they are dissatisfied with its performance (even if it’s in their own language)
One second delay reduces conversions by 7%, page views by 11% and customer satisfaction by 16%
As you can see, saying that every second counts is not an exaggeration.

14 min read Tevya
Tutorials | wordx.press | 4 days ago

Creating Custom Post Types Layouts in Divi & Interlinking Them with CPT-onomies

Want to cross-link two sets of Custom Post Types? What about build their layouts in Divi? If you're looking for these things, heres a guide on how we accomplished all of that.

Creating Custom Post Types Layouts in Divi & Interlinking Them with CPT-onomies

Tutorials | wordx.press | 4 days ago

We recently had the law firm of Hepworth Holzer become a WordXpress member. Their site looked and worked great for visitors and SEO. Unfortunately it was a bit of a pain to update content, especially if we wanted to add a new block of content to a page or something. It required first creating a new block for that content in Advanced Custom Fields (ACF) plugin. Then going in and modifying the custom-built-theme’s code to display that new block of content. We recognize that a lot of developers set things up like this, and it’s a great system. We manage a number of WordPress sites that are setup this way. However, it can be difficult for someone else who’s taking over the site, to find and figure out where to add the new code, etc. Adding a new block of content and getting it to look nice can take hours if the theme isn’t well setup or isn’t commented well. In contrast, with a theme or plugin that uses a visual or block-based editor like Divi or Elementor, that same content addition might only take 5 or 10 minutes.
Part 1 – The Why, What, and How of CPT’s
First, let’s look at why, what, and how of Custom Post Types. This will establish the

11 min read Igor Benić
Tutorials | ibenic.com | 4 days ago

Extending WP_Query with Custom Queries and Tables

A tutorial on how you can use the get_posts function to retrieve custom post type data but filtered with additional tables and/or queries.

Extending WP_Query with Custom Queries and Tables

Tutorials | ibenic.com | 4 days ago

Retrieveing data using get_posts or WP_Query can be challenging when we need to include custom tables in the query. In this tutorial, we will learn how to include our custom tables to create custom queries. The idea for this tutorial came while working on my plugin Simple Sponsorships. I had to retrieve sponsors by packages and also by the content they sponsor.
This plugin has a custom wrapper function ss_get_sponsors( $args = array() ) which basically passes the arguments to the get_posts function.
I could have built new functions but I wanted for me and other developers to have an easier API so I decided to stick only with one function.
Here are two challenges:
How to get sponsors by a package when the packages are saved in a custom table,
How to get sponsors by the content they sponsor which is also saved in the wp_posts table.
The first challenge should be quite easy to handle since there is a third table sponsorships which has two columns sponsor and package and contains IDs of both. So I had to join this table with the wp_posts table to get the data.
The second challenge was a bit tricky. The content that is sponsored by the Sponsor, has its meta table updated with the meta_key

6 min read Rhys Wynne
Tutorials | winwar.co.uk | 11 days ago

How To: Include Custom Fields in WordPress Permalinks

A guide on how to include custom fields in WordPress Permalinks, useful for post types that have structurally similar content.

How To: Include Custom Fields in WordPress Permalinks

Tutorials | winwar.co.uk | 11 days ago

Take a look at the WordPress Talks section of my site. On that section I generally list all the public talks I’ve done. Some have videos, some just have a slide and a brief introduction. I use this to remember what I’ve said and where. It isn’t wholly complete – a few talks have been missed off, but overall it’s a good record of my talks. However, you may notice I do tend to repeat talks. That’s fine – contrary to WordPress guidelines, I’ve no problem giving the same talk in a few locations. Even so, I do try and update the presentation occasionally with new information, or when a new question comes to light.
This can lead to a problem, as sometimes the URL structure is not exactly the best – often the title doesn’t change and having [talk-name]-2/3/4/5 as a talk isn’t too great. I’m not expecting a huge SEO boost, but my theory is that with the meetup location in the title as well as the date, I may attract a few people searching for the talk and long tail searches for the date/location. That’s the plan anyway.
Adding it to the URL is a quick and easy process. However, I’d like to make it even quicker

9 min read Brian Jackson
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 17 days ago

How to Create a Custom WordPress Dashboard (Yourself or Clients)

Creating a custom WordPress dashboard can help streamline the workflow for you, clients, and guest bloggers. Tip: Don't forget about back-end performance.

How to Create a Custom WordPress Dashboard (Yourself or Clients)

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 17 days ago

Want to create a WordPress custom dashboard at your site? You might want to create a more customized experience for your clients or third-party users (like freelance writers or bloggers). Or, you could be working on your own site and just looking for a way to create a more streamlined admin experience that matches your workflows.
No matter why you want to create a WordPress custom dashboard, this post is going to help you out. In it, you’ll learn how to customize all aspects of the WordPress dashboard, including how to:
We’ll start off by showing you how to use an all-in-one plugin that does a little bit of everything. Then, we’ll share some more niche tools to more deeply handle the specific customization areas we mentioned above. Let’s start customizing!
Fair Warning Regarding Performance
Before we dive into the tutorial, it’s important to remember that heavily customing your WordPress dashboard may result in slower back-end performance (or in some cases, it may load faster depending on what you’re doing). This will typically only impact those that are logging into your site, not the front-end. The front-end of your site should be serving primarily

13 min read Brian Jackson
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jan. 17, 2019

WordPress Google Maps Guide: Embed With Or Without A Plugin

Google Maps now requires an API key. Check out these different ways to set up Google Maps on your WordPress site, and not slow it down.

WordPress Google Maps Guide: Embed With Or Without A Plugin

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jan. 17, 2019

Looking for a way to embed WordPress Google Maps content on your site? Like a lot of things in WordPress, there are several different ways that you can embed Google Maps on your site depending on what type of map content you want to include.
In this post, we’ll start by showing you how to add Google Maps in WordPress without a plugin. Then, we’ll recommend some plugins that can help you embed Google Maps, as well as some of the benefits of going that approach. We’ll also dive into how to properly use the Google Maps API, which is now required.
Finally, we’ll end with some performance considerations for using Google Maps on WordPress and share some tips on how to keep your WordPress site loading fast even if you do need to embed Google Maps.
You can click below to jump straight to a specific section or just read through the whole thing.
Google Maps API is Now Required
As of June 11, 2018, an API key is now required for Google Maps. If you’ve already implemented Google Maps on your site and it’s no longer working, this might be the reason. Or rather, you’re missing the API key. The good news is, for 99% of you, it should still be free. Below is

127 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Nov. 19, 2018

How to Speed up Your WordPress Site (Ultimate 2019 Guide)

Today we’re sharing everything we know about how to speed up WordPress, over 15 years worth of experience and hard lessons we’ve learned.

How to Speed up Your WordPress Site (Ultimate 2019 Guide)

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Nov. 19, 2018

We’ve published a lot of tutorials over the years with ways to optimize and speed up WordPress. But sometimes it can be confusing trying to find everything you need in one place. So today we’re going to share with you everything we know about turbocharging WordPress, over 15 years worth of experience and hard lessons learned, all in one ultimate guide. Whether you’re just starting to use WordPress or are a seasoned developer, we promise you’ll find something useful in this post! Over 32% of the web is now powered by WordPress. While this is awesome, it also means there are thousands of different themes, plugins, and technologies all having to coexist. For the everyday WordPress user, this can quickly turn into a nightmare when their site starts to bottleneck and they don’t know why or even where to troubleshooting.
In our previous guide on page speed, we went over a lot of the fundamentals of performance and how it can have a huge impact on the success of your business. But today we’ll be diving into applicable steps you can take right now to see improvements on your own WordPress sites. We’ll also share some resources that have been invaluable

10 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jan. 7, 2019

How to Fix a 403 Forbidden Error on Your WordPress Site

Seeing an error on your WordPress site can be frustrating and deflating, which is why we’ve created this detailed guide to help you fix the 403 Forbidden Error.

How to Fix a 403 Forbidden Error on Your WordPress Site

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jan. 7, 2019

Did you just try to access your WordPress site only to be hit by some message telling you something is “Forbidden” or that you don’t have permission to access something on your site? If so, you’ve likely run into the 403 Forbidden error on WordPress. Seeing an error on your WordPress site can be frustrating and deflating, which is why we’ve created this detailed guide to help you fix the 403 Forbidden Error on WordPress and get your site functioning again as quickly as possible.
Let’s get started without any further introduction because we’re sure you just want to fix your site!
What is the 403 Forbidden Error?
Like many other common WordPress errors, the 403 Forbidden error is an HTTP status code that a web server uses to communicate with your web browser.
Quick background on HTTP status codes – whenever you connect to a website with your browser, the web server responds with something called an HTTP header. Usually, this all happens behind the scenes because everything is working normally (that’s a 200 status code, in case you were wondering).
However, if something goes wrong, the server will respond back with a different numbered

14 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Dec. 10, 2018

How to Display Dynamic Sidebars and Widgets to Reduce Bounce Rate

Dynamic sidebars and widgets can help reduce your site’s bounce rate and improve your chances for a conversion.

How to Display Dynamic Sidebars and Widgets to Reduce Bounce Rate

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Dec. 10, 2018

Today we’ll be diving into the topic of dynamic sidebars and widgets (those that are content-relevant); more importantly how they can help reduce your site’s bounce rate and in turn improve your chances for a conversion. We’ll show you how to create a sidebar, along with widgets that show your visitors exactly what they want to see based on the topic or content of the current page or post. What Is Bounce Rate?
Before I show you how to reduce bounce rate by displaying content-relevant sidebars and widgets, let’s first define bounce rate.
Bounce rate refers to the percentage of site visitors who enter and leave rather than staying to explore other pages on your website. To reduce bounce rate you need to increase engagement, and this tells you much about your site’s usability. When a visitor finds your content useful, they stay and are willing to explore the site for even more useful content. This, in turn, gives you a higher conversion rate. The longer your visitors stay on your site, the greater the likelihood for more sales, sign-ups, and ad revenue.
Of course, you want them to stay longer, so you must have something that will stop them from leaving too

9 min read Adi Spiac
Tutorials | translatepress.com | Dec. 3, 2018

Multilingual SEO on WordPress: 7 Tips To Rank In All Languages

A Multilingual SEO checklist for ranking well in all languages.

Multilingual SEO on WordPress: 7 Tips To Rank In All Languages

Tutorials | translatepress.com | Dec. 3, 2018

SEO is hard enough when you’re only trying to rank in one language. But add a few more languages to the mix? Well, yeah, WordPress multilingual SEO can feel a little overwhelming. It doesn’t have to, though. Multilingual SEO is really just about applying all those same SEO principles and then also following some basic guidelines to make sure that each language has the same chance to benefit from your SEO efforts and rank in Google.
In this post, we’ll cover those best principles so that you can have all your site’s translations ranking.
You’ll still need to build some links and do some keyword research – but this guide will make sure Google can index all your content and serve up the right translation to visitors from around the world.
Let’s dive in…
1. Make Sure Google Can Crawl Each Language
Let’s start at the beginning – you can’t rank your multilingual WordPress site if Google can’t index it.
Services like Google Translate have made it easy to let people dynamically translate your website into any language (kind of like how the Chrome Browser can automatically translate text).
Now, that type of translation

8 min read Eric Karkovack
Tutorials | speckyboy.com | 19 days ago

How to Test Your WordPress Website for PHP 7.x Compatibility

Some simple ways to ensure your site is compatible with newer versions of PHP.

How to Test Your WordPress Website for PHP 7.x Compatibility

Tutorials | speckyboy.com | 19 days ago

There are a number of benefits to running your WordPress website on a recent version of PHP. Among the most noticeable perks is the massive increase in speed. PHP 7.3 runs about three times as many requests per second when compared with PHP 5.6. While performance is important, there is something even more concerning. Both PHP 5.6 and 7.0 reached their end-of-life at the end of 2018. That means neither version is receiving crucial security fixes. Therefore, the longer you remain on one of these non-supported versions, the more potential there is for something bad to happen.
The WordPress Toolbox
Unlimited Downloads: 500,000+ WordPress Themes, Plugins, Templates & Design Assets
Also of note is that WordPress is currently recommending that your web server run PHP 7.3 and is making plans to drop support for anything lower than PHP 5.6. But in this case, running at the bare minimum isn’t good enough.
So, if you’re utilizing an outdated version of PHP, it’s time to get up-to-speed. But before you upgrade, it’s important to test your site to ensure that it will continue running smoothly afterwards.
Let’s have a look at some considerations and testing methods

14 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Oct. 3, 2018

WordPress Cookies and PHP Sessions - Everything You Need to Know

This is an in-depth guide on how WordPress core uses cookies, what to do with caching, GDPR and much more!

WordPress Cookies and PHP Sessions - Everything You Need to Know

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Oct. 3, 2018

Cookies were first invented in 1994 by a computer programmer named Lou Montulli. Without them, the web would be quite a different place. Whether your logging into the back-end of your WordPress site or closing an annoying popup window, you use and interact with cookies every day (even if you don’t realize it). By now, you’ve probably guessed that when we refer to cookies, we mean the cookies used to store important visitor information on a website, not the yummy chocolate chip kind.

29 min read Codeinwp
Tutorials | themeisle.com | Oct. 17, 2018

8 Steps to How to Make a Website - The Ultimate DIY Guide

Running through the basics of making a website with WordPress. From hosting to adjusting site navigation; it's all here.

8 Steps to How to Make a Website - The Ultimate DIY Guide

Tutorials | themeisle.com | Oct. 17, 2018

Believe it or not, but knowing how to make a website is one of the more essential skills you should master as a small business owner in this day and age. Please bear with me! Here’s why:
If you know how to make a website on your own, you will save a ton of money on web developers and designers.
This will also allow you to follow the market trends and put new things on your website without needing a programmer’s help.
You will effectively stay ahead of your competition because, while they have their projects slowed down by the need to consult developers, you will be able to build most things yourself (within reason, of course).
With that being said, the most important piece of the puzzle here is that you can learn how to make a website and then create something awesome for your business or project all on your own.
How to make a website – in bird’s eye view
Okay, here’s the plan for what we’re going to do in the next steps. The important thing to note is that it’s all DIY-able (if that’s a word) and that we’re minimizing the costs wherever possible.
In short, what you’ll end up with at the end of this guide is a functional, beautiful

6 min read Josh Pollock
Tutorials | mattcromwell.com | Dec. 3, 2018

Contexual Optins with Caldera Forms

Popup optins can be an effective part of a content marketing strategy, if they have the right offer. Matt shows how to create optins with Caldera Forms that are relevant to the current page, which is a great idea.

Contexual Optins with Caldera Forms

Tutorials | mattcromwell.com | Dec. 3, 2018

Newsletter optin forms are more compelling when they speak directly to the readers interest. This tutorial shows you how to achieve that with a simple shortcode and Caldera Forms. Everyone wants to get more subscribers to their email newsletter. There’s so many different tactics from the extremely obnoxious to the completely banal.
At Impress.org we tend to lean heavy on content marketing. We love providing value to our audience through our expertise and insights. We hope that in return for that free content, we might get a few emails here and there.
For the most part that works just fine. Recently though, we launched a new product, which means its newsletter list is relatively tiny. WP Business Reviews is a great product and we’ve been writing some really awesome content all relevant for business owners wanting to learn about online reviews, SEO tactics, reputation management and more. But we want more people to learn more about it as quickly as we can. So how can we ramp up the subscribers without moving into that “obnoxious” territory.
Contextual Signups
Our first step toward more signups is putting the optin form a bit more front-and-center to all our articles.

17 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Oct. 10, 2018

WordPress Activity Log - 7 Things You Should Be Tracking

We’re going to discuss the seven most crucial activities to track on your site. From content changes to failed login attempts.

WordPress Activity Log - 7 Things You Should Be Tracking

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Oct. 10, 2018

When your WordPress website is small, it’s easy to keep tabs on everything that happens within it. However, as it grows in size and complexity it can become a lot harder to keep up. This is particularly true if you enable users to register on your site, run a membership site, or have multiple contributors on it. Regardless, it’s vital to know what’s happening on your site at all times. You can do this by tracking user activity such as changes to content, profile updates, failed logins, and more. When you have information like this at your fingertips, you can quickly track down the source of any problems and maintain tight security.
In this post, we’re going to briefly talk about why you’d want to track your WordPress site’s activity. Then we’ll help you figure out what types of activity it’s most important to keep an eye on. Let’s jump right in!
Why It’s Crucial to Use a WordPress Activity Log
An activity log can help you keep tabs on important changes to your site.
If your website has only a single user – you – there should be no surprises. Unless your site has been hacked (which we’ll talk more about later),

15 min read Brian Jackson
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Dec. 5, 2018

How to Use Icon Fonts in WordPress the Right Way (Better Performance)

Do you really need all those icons? Probably not. So don't load all of them. Check out how we decreased the size of our icon fonts file by a whopping 97.59% by using a font generator.

How to Use Icon Fonts in WordPress the Right Way (Better Performance)

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Dec. 5, 2018

Back in the early days, icons were readily available, but implementing them efficiently in WordPress was a bit more difficult. You could get around some issues with sprites, but they were not always a good way forward, and as retina screens started coming out, the problem was magnified (quite literally). One of the most common solutions to this problem is to use an icon font. Icons are web fonts or vectors, so you can scale them infinitely and a lot of icons can fit inside a single file, bringing down your request count considerably. This allows you to use almost any icon you can possibly dream up. However, with this, also comes some performance considerations.
We’ll show you in this article a couple different ways to use WordPress icon fonts, where to get them, and which method might be the best for your site.
Where to Find Icon Fonts
There are a lot of great places to now find icon fonts for your WordPress site. Just type “icon font” into Google will yield you some great results. One of the most popular and widely used ones is Font Awesome. As of writing this, it has 1,400+ free icons, as well as 4,500+ icons in their pro version. It includes icons for just about

Tutorials | easywpguide.com | Jan. 8, 2019

Easy WP Guide for WordPress 5.0 is now available

Anthony Hortin does a fantastic job with the Easy WP Guide, and has just added 60 new pages to cover everything Gutenberg!

Easy WP Guide for WordPress 5.0 is now available

Tutorials | easywpguide.com | Jan. 8, 2019

WordPress 5.0, named “Bebo” after Cuban jazz musician Bebo Valdés, was released in early December. It’s available for download from WordPress.org or you can update in your WordPress dashboard. WordPress 5.0 is a HUGE release, with some major changes to how you write your content. The major change being the introduction of a brand new editor, called the Block Editor, although you may also know it by its development codename, Gutenberg. The editing interface has been rebuilt to make it easier to create media rich Pages and Posts and to provide you with more flexibility. As the name suggests, the Block Editor treats all your content as individual blocks. Each block can be inserted, rearranged and styled individually, making this new editor more flexible than the old (TinyMCE) Classic Editor.
Starting from WordPress 5.0, the Block Editor will be the default editor whenever you're creating a new Page or Post. However, if you wish to continue to use the old (TinyMCE) Classic Editor, you can do so by installing the Classic Editor plugin. The Classic Editor plugin will allow you to disable the new Block Editor and instead, will provide you with the same editing interface

6 min read Josh Pollock
Tutorials | calderaforms.com | Oct. 19, 2018

This Is What Your Forms Are Secretly Doing To Your SEO

Forms are great. The internet is full of wonderful forms, but are you making sure that your forms help your SEO, not hurt? Christie shares tips on how to avoid costly SEO mistakes on your WordPress site.

This Is What Your Forms Are Secretly Doing To Your SEO

Tutorials | calderaforms.com | Oct. 19, 2018

Christie Chirinos is a Partner at Caldera Labs. Christie received her Master of Business Administration degree with a specialization in information systems management from Florida State University, and is currently based out of New York City where she lives with her cat, Snickers. Two things are true about my life: my business partner and I own a popular web form product, and 50% of our product website’s traffic comes from search engines.
This means that I think about forms and SEO a lot. However, most of us don’t think about these two things together often. This is fair: after all, most of your SEO efforts will come from a quality content strategy and lots and lots of networking (don’t know what I mean? Learn about link building here).
However, there are two important considerations when thinking about implementing a form and making sure that your site is doing its best to be a part of a search result. So, after you’ve covered all of your SEO basics, such as identifying your keyword opportunities, looking at your on-page and off-page SEO, and more, make sure you give some thought to what your forms are doing.
(A quick tip: we are big fans of Pathfinder SEO at

4 min read Brian Jackson
Tutorials | woorkup.com | Jan. 2, 2019

How to Easily Create a Blank Favicon with Code (Fix 404 Errors)

A short tutorial on how to easily create a blank favicon. For all of your WordPress dev/perf testers out there.

How to Easily Create a Blank Favicon with Code (Fix 404 Errors)

Tutorials | woorkup.com | Jan. 2, 2019

I do a lot of speed testing in my line of work. Usually, I’m testing the performance of the default WordPress theme on a fresh install to use as a baseline. Or perhaps running a comparison for a client. Being that Kinsta makes it incredibly easy to create new installs and snapshots, I’m constantly destroying and spinning up new WordPress sites from scratch. One issue that I run into every single time is that speed testing tools like Pingdom and WebPageTest complain about a missing favicon (404 error). Talk about first world problems.

2 min read Benjamin Intal
Tutorials | benjaminintal.com | Dec. 17, 2018

How to Make Twenty Nineteen's Content Full-Width - Benjamin Intal

Just some additional CSS to make Twenty Nineteen's content Full-Width.

How to Make Twenty Nineteen's Content Full-Width - Benjamin Intal

Tutorials | benjaminintal.com | Dec. 17, 2018

If you’ve updated to WordPress 5.0, then you probably noticed the new Twenty Nineteen theme. It very simple, with a huge emphasis on the content and clean typography. It’s great. However, the content area is really made for articles and blogging.
For wide screens, the content is nudged to the a little bit to the side. This works well for articles, but for creating pages especially with the influx of Gutenberg blocks, the content area should evenly fill the width of the screen.
Twenty Nineteen doesn’t currently have an option to do that. But you can easily do that by adding this line in your Customizer:
body.page .entry .entry-content > *,
.entry .entry-summary > * {
max-width: none;
}
That will only widen pages and should leave your blog posts alone.
Here’s what the pages look like before:
Here’s what it looks like after adding the CSS:
Now if you also wanted to do this for posts, you can use this CSS:
body.single-post .entry .entry-content > * {
max-width: none;
}

14 min read Sandra Stone
Tutorials | webzakt.com | Aug. 29, 2018

Comprehensive Guide to How to Speed Up Your WordPress Site

A step-by-step guide on how to speed up your WordPress site focusing on non-developer solutions. If your web content is loading slowly, read our guide on how to speed up your WordPress site and maximize usability for visitors.

Comprehensive Guide to How to Speed Up Your WordPress Site

Tutorials | webzakt.com | Aug. 29, 2018

Your WordPress website speed can gradually slow down for many reasons, which significantly impacts user experience. Many factors, such as the host provider, caching, content delivery networks, usage of JavaScript, poor image optimization, and poorly coded plugins can affect website performance. If your web content is loading slowly, read our guide on how to speed up your WordPress site and maximize usability for visitors. In this step-by-step guide on how to speed up your WordPress site, we’re focusing on non-developer solutions, i.e. improvements anyone can make. Let’s steer clear of custom code implementation since there are so many other ways of improving the speed of your site. Before we get into the methods of speeding up your WP site, it helps to understand some basics, such as why speed is important and some general causes of a slow WordPress site.
How to Speed Up Your WordPress Site
As an administrator, you might not be fully aware of your website’s front-end speed. The first thing to do is to run an eyeball test on your website by checking your site’s page load performance on someone else’s computer. If you find it slow using it yourself as a user

4 min read pol taj
Tutorials | wpgeodirectory.com | Oct. 1, 2018

The Font Awesome v5 WordPress Problem

A post about potential problems that could arise with the new version of Font Awesome when used within WordPress themes and plugins

The Font Awesome v5 WordPress Problem

Tutorials | wpgeodirectory.com | Oct. 1, 2018

This blog post is mainly to draw attention to the brewing problem with using Font Awesome v5 in your WordPress Plugin or Theme. What is Font Awesome?
It’s a little CSS (or JS in v5) file that you can add to your site to be able to use lots and lots of fancy icons on your site.
What’s the problem?
There are really two problems;
1. The first (less serious) problem is a common problem with JS/CSS libraries and WordPress and can affect FA v4 not just FA v5, that is the fact that two developers might add the script and use different names so the same file gets added to the website twice. The fix to this is relatively simple and is resolved by the two devs using the same name to add the file, we use and we suggest “font-awesome”.
2. The main brewing problem with using Font Awesome in WP these days is that FA v5 introduced a new way to use it, in FA v4 it was always just a CSS file but now it can be used either as a CSS file or as a JS file. This is fine for “Joe Blogs” with his html website but once you are using a CMS (content management system) like WordPress which has plugins built by many many devs you have the situation that both the CSS and the JS

12 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | blog.visualcomposer.io | Oct. 11, 2018

9 Tips For Hosting Dynamic WordPress Sites

Dynamic sites are a bit more complicated than just "simple" sites and they require more attention when it comes to hosting.

9 Tips For Hosting Dynamic WordPress Sites

Tutorials | blog.visualcomposer.io | Oct. 11, 2018

One of the big reasons that so many people love WordPress is that you can use it to create pretty much any type of website. From blogs to eCommerce stores to membership sites, WordPress can do it all. But…the same can’t be said for the average WordPress host… While pretty much any host can handle a simple WordPress blog or brochure site, WordPress sites that rely more heavily on dynamic content, like eCommerce stores or membership sites, require a more detailed approach to hosting and optimization if you want them to perform well.
For example, you’ll hear horror stories of the WooCommerce dashboard that takes minutes to load or run reports. Or the online course content that takes forever to load and frustrates course-takers.
To help you avoid that being your site, we’re going to dig into 9 tips for hosting dynamic WordPress sites like:
eCommerce stores built with WooCommerce or Easy Digital Downloads;
Membership sites built with any one of the many quality membership plugins out there;
Online courses built with LMS plugins;
Social networking sites based on BuddyPress, PeepSo, or others;
Forums built with bbPress or BuddyPress.
Three Big Reasons Why Dynamic