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6 min read Brad Touesnard
Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Dec. 8, 2015

HTTP/2, HTTPS, Let's Encrypt and WordPress

HTTP/2 is awesome, but requires HTTPS, which is hard to setup. Let's Encrypt and WordPress can make HTTPS setup simple and help achieve a faster web sooner.

HTTP/2, HTTPS, Let's Encrypt and WordPress

Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Dec. 8, 2015

TL;DR — HTTP/2 is awesome, but requires HTTPS, which is hard to setup. Let’s Encrypt and WordPress can make HTTPS setup simple and help achieve a faster web sooner. My eyes are heavy, my head foggy. Kind of feels like I’m in a dream right now. A couple of hours ago I got home from Philadelphia, where I attended the WordPress Community Summit and the first annual WordCamp US over the past 7 days. And man, what a time.
There will be plenty of recap posts published this week, so instead, I thought I’d dig into one thing I got very excited about at the summit.
HTTP/2
Weeks ago I got really excited about HTTP/2 while researching it for
an episode of Apply Filters. (If you haven’t learned about HTTP/2 yet, I urge you to listen to that episode. I’m very proud of the work Pippin and I did on it.) I learned that adding support for HTTP/2 on your site gives it an instant performance boost. And if you already have HTTPS setup, enabling HTTP/2 is as easy as updating Nginx to version 1.9.6+ and adding http2 to the config file:
listen 443 ssl http2;
If you don’t have HTTPS setup, you have do that in order to get HTTP/2 as it is only supported over HTTPS.
HTTPS
Unfortunately setting up and managing

6 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Sep. 10, 2015

WordPress REST API Basics

In this article we take a look at the basics of the REST API and how you can use it to make your website better.

WordPress REST API Basics

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Sep. 10, 2015

WordPress has been gradually moving away from being just a blogging for years now. The final nail in the coffin of that outdated perception is the REST API. As WordPress enters the arena of full web application capable frameworks, the REST API is what makes interaction through third parties part of the core system. Available right now in the form of the REST API Plugin, the goal of the project is to enable predictable, resource-oriented URLs, standardized return structures and to use HTTP response codes to indicate API errors.
In this article I’ll take a look at the basics of the REST API and how you can use it right now to make your website or web application that much better.
The Basics
Once you’ve downloaded and activated the plugin your site is ready to go and your API base path will be /wp-json/. This means that to get all your posts from an external application you can make a request to http://yoursite.com/wp-json/something.
In most cases the “something” in the URL will start with /wp/v2 which indicates that you are using version 2 of the API
The easiest way to try out the new API is to make sure you’re logged in to the website you’ve installed and activated the plugin on and

22 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Dec. 12, 2016

How to Score 100/100 in Google PageSpeed Insights with WordPress

It needs some work and effort but achieving 100/100 score is possible. Follow the steps listed in the tutorial.

How to Score 100/100 in Google PageSpeed Insights with WordPress

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Dec. 12, 2016

Here at Kinsta we work with a lot of agencies and freelancers that deal with clients on a daily basis. It is not uncommon for clients or even a CEO of a company to ask their agency or WordPress developer to increase their Google PageSpeed Insights score. Google does a good job at marketing this tool to consumers, and many times, they don’t always understand that a perfect score isn’t the end of the world. This can definitely be frustrating at times. However, today we want to share with you some tips and strategies that can help you score a 100/100 in Google PageSpeed Insights with your WordPress site. How Important is Google PageSpeed Insights?
Google PageSpeed Insights is a web performance tool created by Google to help you easily identify ways to make your site faster and more mobile friendly, by following recommendations on best web practices. A very important thing to remember though is that you shouldn’t always obsess over scoring 100/100. This might not even be possible in all scenarios, depending upon how your WordPress site is setup.
We recommend looking at the speed of your site, more than the scores. Scores with tools like Pingdom, GTMetrix, and Google PageSpeed

16 min read Iain Poulson
Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Mar. 19, 2015

A Developer's Guide to Contributing to WordPress Core

A great guide to getting started with contributing to WordPress core as a developer

A Developer's Guide to Contributing to WordPress Core

Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Mar. 19, 2015

Every month the team here at Delicious Brains have a “WP Core Contrib Day”, a day to give back to Core. This is an important day for us as we make our living from premium WordPress plugins. Using our skills to help keep WordPress core awesome just feels right. Also, all of us contributing a work day per month to WordPress Core is very close to the 5% contribution that Matt Mullenweg talks about in his 5 for the Future post. In this article I’ll discuss the basics for finding things to work on, how to handle the WordPress source code, how to submit your work and what you might expect to happen from there. This article is very much targeted towards PHP developers that already know how to set up a normal WordPress installation, but are looking to dive in and contribute back to WordPress Core.
As we’re all developers at Delicious Brains, on our WP Core Contrib Days we endeavour to find tickets for WordPress Core that we can contribute to by committing code. I’ll be focusing on that type of contribution, but there are many other ways to contribute and anything you can do is appreciated.
Where To Find Tickets
When we first started our contrib days last November the first big hurdle we encountered

Tutorials | keycdn.com | Jan. 26, 2016

Google PageSpeed Insights: Scoring 100/100 with WordPress

We all know WordPress can be a tricky beast when it comes to conforming to best web practices. Here is a quick tutorial on how to achieve a 100/100 score on Google PageSpeed Insights with WordPress.

Google PageSpeed Insights: Scoring 100/100 with WordPress

Tutorials | keycdn.com | Jan. 26, 2016

Running speed tests with tools like Google PageSpeed Insights, WebPageTest, or KeyCDN’s site speed test are always a good way to help gauge your website’s performance. While these metrics can be very helpful it is also important to keep this data in perspective. While they can provide valuable information to help optimize your website, don’t forget about perceived performance, specifically the user’s experience. With that being said, see how we easily achieved a 100/100 score with WordPress and Google PageSpeed Insights. A lot of people try and strive for that 100/100 score on Google PageSpeed Insights. Some do it because they are trying to speed up their site and others because a client is demanding they meet this metric (yes, this happens more than you think). It is important to take some time though and think about why we are trying to achieve that 100/100 score. Don’t think of it solely from a metrics point of view. The whole reason Google developed PageSpeed Insights was as a guideline on best web performance practices to provide recommendations to optimize your site. And by following the guidelines hopefully you will achieve a faster website.
It is also important to remember that

1 min read Donna Cavalier
Tutorials | sterlinghamilton.com | Feb. 15, 2016

The WordPress Noob: Common Mistakes - Sterling Hamilton

Definitely a nice list for those new to WP. There are things there that I wish I'd known about when I first started.

The WordPress Noob: Common Mistakes - Sterling Hamilton

Tutorials | sterlinghamilton.com | Feb. 15, 2016

Sterling Hamilton I'm an avid student of Stuff & Things. I work with cool people & do some neat things now and again.

Tutorials | scalewp.io | Feb. 4, 2016

WordPress at Scale

Interesting resource for running a high trafficed WordPress site to scale.

WordPress at Scale

Tutorials | scalewp.io | Feb. 4, 2016

No Description

10 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Apr. 25, 2017

How to Disable WordPress Plugins on Specific Pages and Posts

If you don't want to run the plugin code on every page of your website this is the guide you need to follow.

How to Disable WordPress Plugins on Specific Pages and Posts

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Apr. 25, 2017

When it comes to WordPress performance we have a lot to say about plugins. Each plugin adds PHP code that has to be executed, can include scripts and styles, and some may execute additional queries against the database. This means that unnecessary plugins can affect page speed and may have a negative impact on user experience and page ranking. As an example, consider a plugin that builds and displays custom forms in front pages, like Contact Form 7. You typically only need a form on a single page. Do you really want to run the plugin code and include scripts and styles on every page of your website? In this post, I will demonstrate that you can install as many plugins as you need (don’t go crazy of course), and nevertheless make WordPress pages load fast. We’re going to disable WordPress plugins (that are unnecessary from loading on specific posts and pages. This will involve a four four-step process:
Choose the most popular plugins that fit your needs, and compare their features and effects on page speed.
Filter and deactivate unnecessary plugins before page loads.
Optimize CSS and JS files.
Track the site performance.
Let’s dive deep.
Three General Rules to Follow

Tutorials | keycdn.com | Mar. 3, 2016

Harness the Power of WP-CLI to Manage WordPress Sites

WordPress is known for being very user friendly. But what about for developers? WP-CLI might just be your new best friend.

Harness the Power of WP-CLI to Manage WordPress Sites

Tutorials | keycdn.com | Mar. 3, 2016

WordPress is well known for being very user-friendly, and that is one of the reasons it has become one of the most popular content management systems on the web. But when it comes to managing multiple WordPress sites and repeating the same operations over and over again it can become quite a tedious task for developers. And that brings us to WP-CLI, a set of command line tools to help speed up the development process and accomplish tasks more efficiently and quickly. Compared to tools like ManageWP, which are limited by features provided within the UI, WP-CLI is much more powerful! WP-CLI’s mission is to be, quantitatively, the fastest interface for developers to manage WordPress. – wp-cli.org
What Is WP-CLI?
WP-CLI is an open source set of command line tools to help make web developers lives easier when it comes to managing WordPress installations. You can install WordPress (including Multisite), update plugins, take backups, perform database operations, publish content, manage WP-Cron events, and perform hundreds of other tasks without ever touching your web browser. If you prefer working from the command-line then WP-CLI is your friend!
WP-CLI was originally created by Andreas Creten

11 min read Donna Cavalier
Tutorials | ubergizmo.com | Jun. 12, 2015

Web Hosting Support Accusing You Of Slow MySQL Queries? Read This

I like that there are normal ranges presented and solid examples so users have some kind of reference point to work from.

Web Hosting Support Accusing You Of Slow MySQL Queries? Read This

Tutorials | ubergizmo.com | Jun. 12, 2015

It happens to thousands of people each day: for some mysterious reason, their website –maybe a WordPress or Drupal site- has become very slow. The administrative area of the back-office takes many seconds to load (more than 2 seconds starts to be bad), and the whole thing becomes a pain to use. In extreme cases, the whole page could even time-out and return an “unable to serve page” message, which is every webmaster’s nightmare. After contacting your hosting company’s tech support, a technician takes a look at several log files, and returns with the dreaded answer: “I see some slow queries in your MySQL slow query log file, please optimize your application”.
Read: “it’s your fault, fix it”. But is your site really causing this? Maybe not.
Basic pre-requisites
As it is the case with any hosting issue, it’s always best to do whatever is within your power to trace the source of the problem. Keep in mind that most hosting support staff are not there to support your web app, but just make sure that the server runs normally (check your terms). Any hosting company that will officially support your app is definitely worth looking at, because many of the day-to-day problems come from the app

3 min read Josh Pollock
Tutorials | joshpress.net | Nov. 11, 2015

I'm Making A WordPress REST API Course

I'm stupid excited to announce I've been working on a four part video course on the WordPress REST API. You can pre-order and save today:)

I'm Making A WordPress REST API Course

Tutorials | joshpress.net | Nov. 11, 2015

I’ve had so much fun teaching myself the WordPress REST API for the last year or so. Part of what has made the experience so great is sharing what I’ve learned a long the way — tutorials, WordCamp talks, Podcast appearances, a free ebook. I can’t decide what I love more — using the REST API to build custom APIs the WordPress way or sharing what I’ve learned. So, I’ll just keep doing both.
That’s why I’m happy to announce I’m working on a four part video course, teaching you how to use the WordPress REST API.
Actually, it is already in use by those doing the coolest stuff with WordPress.
WordPress just hit 25% market share among content management systems. That’s awesome, the more growth in our industry the more potential customers or clients there are for people like you and me who offer WordPress services and products. We know that there are a lot of negative opinions about WordPress out there. Some of them are fair, some of them are not.
The more times we can exceed the pre-conceived opinions about WordPress, deliver more “You can do that with WordPress?” moments, the more our industry will grow. I want you to be the one to deliver that “wow” moment to your clients. I want you to

8 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | calderawp.com | Aug. 8, 2016

Creating A Killer Contact Us Page For Your WordPress Site

Nice walkthrough of creating a "killer" Contact Us page. Honestly, I think I most often neglect to give the Contact Us page its due attention.

Creating A Killer Contact Us Page For Your WordPress Site

Tutorials | calderawp.com | Aug. 8, 2016

Too often, when creating a WordPress site, designers neglect the contact us page. After spending days and days contemplating every element in the homepage, a lot of designers neglect the ‘Contact Us’ page. They simply slap on a generic form, press publish and forget about it. If you actually examined it, you would find that the contact page is one of the most visited pages on your website. More often than none it is actually the most visited page altogether. Hubspot named the contact page one of the 4 most important pages on a website.
Bad “Contact Us” pages can lead to your clients not getting the proper support. It can also lead to your potential clients getting the wrong impression about your service, and may cause a list of other negative effects.
This is why I wanted to show you a step by step guide on how to create an effective contact page on your website. You don’t have to incorporate each and every point I make in your site, but investing time on improving your contact us page will surely improve your website visitor’s experience. It will also help increase your site’s conversion rate.
In this article I will show how to build the contact

22 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | smashingmagazine.com | Jun. 7, 2017

Creating Better, Faster And More Optimized WordPress Websites – Smashing Magazine

The most common site issues and how to fix them - from the perspective of the WordPress host.

Creating Better, Faster And More Optimized WordPress Websites – Smashing Magazine

Tutorials | smashingmagazine.com | Jun. 7, 2017

Consumers typically have their own experiences when it comes to web hosting and their own opinions. If you search Google for reviews for any web hosting provider you’ll find dozens of results. Usually, there are a lot more negative reviews than there are positive ones. I thought I would flip that around and share some WordPress hosting challenges from the perspective of the WordPress host and how I frequently solve them. I have compiled a list of bad web practices and recommendations on what not to do on your site, based on thousands of hours of customer interactions, support tickets, and troubleshooting I experience on a daily basis. Some of these range from beginner mistakes to more complex issues. A lot of these can be the difference between having a successful WordPress site and a failure. Picking the right web host is very important. But your decision also goes hand-in-hand with educating yourself on how to best optimize your WordPress site.
1
I often observe that even seasoned developers focus on what they are good at, which is building solutions and sometimes neglect or don’t have time to learn the latest optimization practices. Whether you are a WordPress user just

2 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | tomjn.com | Jan. 23, 2017

Writing a WP REST API endpoint in 2 minutes

It's rare to get such a quick and easy tutorial on something that seems complicated but really isn't. Good read!

Writing a WP REST API endpoint in 2 minutes

Tutorials | tomjn.com | Jan. 23, 2017

I need to write a REST API endpoint, but lets assume we know nothing about REST APIs. The Task
My homepage has a box that contains a magical word, and I’m going to use the REST API to grab this word and display it on my site:
<div id="tomsword">... word goes here ...</div>
I’m going to need:
A word to use, I’ve chosen “moomins”
A REST API endpoint on my site to send the word from
Some Javascript to ask the API for the magic word
The Endpoint
This parts easy. REST API endpoints live at /wp-json, and they have a namespace so your endpoints don’t clash with those of other plugins. My endpoint is going to live at tomjn.com/wp-json/tomjn/v1/test.
When my endpoint is called, I want to return the word “moomins”, so I’ve prepared a function to do just that:
function tomjn_rest_test() {
return "moomins";
}
and I’ll register my endpoint, and tell WordPress what to do when it’s called like this:
add_action( 'rest_api_init', function () {
register_rest_route( 'tomjn/v1', '/test/', array(
'methods' => 'GET',
'callback' => 'tomjn_rest_test'

Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Mar. 16, 2016

AMP Up Your WordPress Site with Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages

In the latest Delicious Brains article Jeff outlines AMP and how to use it in your WordPress site.

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jan. 12, 2017

4 Simple Ways to Setup Stripe For WordPress

Check out these 4 simple ways to setup Stripe for your WordPress site. Whether you have a basic site, a form, EDD, or WooCommerce, you can be accepting payments in a matter of minutes.

4 Simple Ways to Setup Stripe For WordPress

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jan. 12, 2017

When it comes to choosing a payment gateway to use on your WordPress site, there are two popular ones that usually come to mind, PayPal and Stripe. Years ago PayPal used to be one of the only easy solutions for ecommerce sites, but that is no longer the case. Stripe provides lower transaction fees and is very popular in the developer community for its flexible API. Today we are going to dive into 4 simple ways to setup Stripe for WordPress, no coding needed. For startups, businesses, and those running WooCommerce and EDD shops, Stripe can be a great affordable solution. What is Stripe?
Stripe is a fast-growing payment gateway that’s able to handle recurring payments and can process refunds automatically. It is trusted and used by big names brands all over the world, some of which include Best Buy, Target, Lyft, Docker, HubSpot, Facebook, Shopify, and IndieGoGo. We actually use them here at Kinsta to accept payments for all of our web hosting customers.
Stripe was founded back in 2010 by two brothers, John and Patrick Collison. It launched publicly in 2011 and has received multiple rounds of funding. It even ranked #4 on Forbes Cloud 100 list in 2016. There are a lot of payment

11 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | jjj.blog | Apr. 26, 2017

Understanding alloptions in WordPress

Great, in-depth piece on understanding exactly how wp_options works. You'll learn a lot from this.

Understanding alloptions in WordPress

Tutorials | jjj.blog | Apr. 26, 2017

WordPress is an extremely flexible piece of software, and it comes with many different settings. Some are made visible to users via Admin > Settings and others are stored invisibly so users aren’t bothered by them, but all of them are saved in a single database table named wp_options. Today, it looks something like this: This database table actually has a few interesting qualities to it. Conceptually, it’s a very simple key/value approach to storing any kind of arbitrary information. It’s a distant cousin to all of the meta database tables WordPress comes with (for posts, comments, terms, and users) and I’m a big fan of the entire meta-data API – it’s now fully implemented across all major object types (except blogmeta and term_relationshipmeta) and, honestly, it’s one of the few “complete” APIs you’ll interact with inside of WordPress today, aside from probably roles & rewrite rules.
The options API, however, is actually quite a bit different from meta, enough to warrant this blog post, and enough for me to have spent the past 4 days studying it, researching it, and generally trying to find ways to improve how it performs

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Apr. 13, 2017

How to Safely Enable WordPress SVG Support

Tutorial on how to safely enable WordPress SVG support by utilizing sanitization upon upload. Take advantage of the smaller and scalable image files to enhance your branding.

How to Safely Enable WordPress SVG Support

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Apr. 13, 2017

SVG is an XML-based vector image which is commonly used by websites and brands to display logos and icons on their websites. The main reason they are especially popular among developers and designers is because they are a scalable image format, generally smaller in file size (sometimes by quite a bit), and don’t pixelate on retina screens. WordPress by default though doesn’t allow you to upload the SVG file format, mainly due to security concerns. Today we are going to dive into one way to safely enable WordPress SVG support, discuss browser support, as well as some caveats if you decide you want to switch to the vector image format. Hopefully one day we will SVG as part of WordPress core, but we are not quite there yet.
What is an SVG?
According to Wikipedia, an SVG (scalable vector graphics) is an XML-based vector image format for two-dimensional graphics with support for interactivity and animation. You can even manipulate them with code or your text editor. The SVG specification is an open standard developed by the World Wide Web Consortium since 1999. SVGs are currently only utilized by 3.4% of all websites, but as you can see below, the adoption rate is growing rapidly.

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Apr. 3, 2017

How to Diagnose High Admin-Ajax Usage on Your WordPress Site

Check out these recommendations on how to diagnose high admin-ajax.php usage on your WordPress site. This is typically caused by 3rd party plugins and can also cause CPU load on the back-end.

How to Diagnose High Admin-Ajax Usage on Your WordPress Site

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Apr. 3, 2017

A very common scenario when dealing with WordPress is diagnosing high admin-ajax.php usage. If you have been working with WordPress for a while, you have most likely encountered this when running speed tests or checking your server access logs. This is generally caused by 3rd party plugins or from frequent un-cachable admin dashboard requests, due to the Heartbeat API, such as autosaving drafts. It is important though that you diagnose high admin-ajax.php spikes when you see them, as they have been known to bring a site to a crawl. Check out the following recommendations below on some ways to tackle the admin-ajax.php issue in WordPress. What is the admin-ajax.php File?
The admin-ajax.php file itself is not a bad thing when used correctly. It is part of core, and was added by the WordPress development team in version 3.6. The purpose of admin-ajax.php is to create a connection between the browser and the server using AJAX. This allows for extended functionality such as improving auto-saving, revision tracking, login timeouts, session management, and notifications about a post being locked when there are multiple editors. Which are all great features, especially for those working with

4 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jan. 14, 2016

Bandwidth Theft - How to Prevent Image Hotlinking in WordPress

In this article we’ll explain why hotlinking is bad and how you can prevent hotlinking on your WordPress site.

Bandwidth Theft - How to Prevent Image Hotlinking in WordPress

Tutorials | kinsta.com | Jan. 14, 2016

Hotlinking can be a huge drain of resources for the target website, not to mention it is technically theft. That said, many times the hotlinker isn’t aware that this is an issue. In this article I’ll explain why hotlinking is bad and how you can prevent hotlinking on your WordPress website.
What Is Image Hotlinking?
The concept of hotlinking is very simple. You find an image on the Internet somewhere and use the URL of the image directly on your site. This image will be displayed on your website but it will be served from the original location.
This is very convenient for the hotlinker but it’s actually theft as it is using the hotlinked site’s resources. It’s like me getting in my car and driving with gas I siphoned off my neighbour’s car.
This might not seem like a big deal, but it could generate a lot of extra costs for you. The Oatmeal is a great example. The Huffington Post hotlinked a cartoon of his which consisted of multiple images. Since we’re talking about a major publication this could incur a lot of extra costs for The Oatmeal.
In a classic Oatmeal move Matthew Inman – creator of The Oatmeal – replaced all of the hotlinked files with the following:
He also took care to replace

34 min read Kobe Ben Itamar
Tutorials | freemius.com | Oct. 26, 2016

The Complete Guide for Building a Lightning Fast & Scalable Knowledge Base

This is an elaborated, step-by-step guide of how the Freemius team built its KB solution and why.

The Complete Guide for Building a Lightning Fast & Scalable Knowledge Base

Tutorials | freemius.com | Oct. 26, 2016

Once your startup’s user-base grows, support becomes a fundamental part of your business. Setting up a solid Knowledge Base solution is an important long term investment, that hopefully, if done right, will pay off by reducing the support burden, widening your site’s SEO reach and generating new leads that otherwise wouldn’t have been landed. This is a comprehensive and technical step-by-step guide for developers. If you aren’t a developer, you should probably send this article to your CTO. He/she will thank you for it.
TL;DR: We finally built and released our semi-static, markdown based Knowledge Base for our monetization platform Freemius, using WordPress. I’m sharing the complete cookbook of our research right here; why we choose WordPress over SaaS solutions and static generators; how we did it (including all code customizations and server level configuration), what we’ve learned, and how you can replicate that process to save valuable time, and set up your own lightning fast, scalable, sustainable, secure, and semi-static KB (Knowledge Base) for your own plugin, theme or any other digital product.
This 15-minute guide will save you 44 hours (we

7 min read Iain Poulson
Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Aug. 22, 2017

Running WordPress in a Kubernetes Cluster

Container orchestration platforms are a big deal right now. In this article, we're going to start simple and take a look at the Kubernetes platform and how you can set up a WordPress site on a single node cluster on your local machine.

Running WordPress in a Kubernetes Cluster

Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Aug. 22, 2017

As a developer I try to keep my eye on the progression of technologies that I might not use every day, but are important to understand as they might indirectly affect my work. For example the recent rise of containerization, popularized by Docker, used for hosting web apps at scale. I’m not technically a devops person but as I build web apps on a daily basis it’s good for me to keep my eye on how these technologies are progressing. A good example of this progression is the rapid development of container orchestration platforms that allow you to easily deploy, scale and manage containerized applications. The main players at the moment seem to be Kubernetes (by Google), Docker Swarm and Apache Mesos. If you want a good intro to each of these technologies and their differences I recommend giving this article a read.
In this article, we’re going to start simple and take a look at the Kubernetes platform and how you can set up a WordPress site on a single node cluster on your local machine.
Installing Kubernetes
The Kubernetes docs have a great interactive tutorial that covers a lot of this stuff but for the purpose of this article I’m just going to cover installation

7 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | joshpress.net | Sep. 14, 2016

Getting Started With Modern WordPress Development: What You Need - Josh Pollock

Josh delivers a succint overview of what you need to do modern WordPress development. Tuts like this should be required reading.

Getting Started With Modern WordPress Development: What You Need - Josh Pollock

Tutorials | joshpress.net | Sep. 14, 2016

I’m teaching a few workshops this month aimed at those looking to level up their WordPress development chops. It’s got me thinking a lot about what you need to do quality WordPress development. It’s a very subjective question, what software to use, what principles to value, what resources to learn from… So I wanted to share my thoughts on what is necessary for getting started. The list is less about software, and more about concepts because in the end, it’s about the wizard, not the wand.
Tools
You can write code in notepad and FTP it up to a shared host and hope for the best, but to do it right you need some basics tools. Here is my opinionated list. I’ve broken it down into “basics” and “important”. The first category is things you should have right away. The second list is important, but can probably wait.
Basics
A code editor is a specialized text editor designed for writing code. I like Atom as my simple code editor. It’s the application I use when I just need to open up a file, read it and maybe make a few changes.
An Integrated Development Environment (IDE) is more than a code editor. A good IDE provides everything

21 min read Steven Gliebe
Tutorials | pippinsplugins.com | Jul. 31, 2015

How to Properly Format and Enhance Your Plugin's Readme.txt File for the WordPress.org Repository

David Decker shares tips on preparing a WordPress plugin's readme.txt file. This is great for first-time plugin authors and perhaps those of us not taking full advantage of the readme file.

How to Properly Format and Enhance Your Plugin's Readme.txt File for the WordPress.org Repository

Tutorials | pippinsplugins.com | Jul. 31, 2015

When beginning writing plugins for WordPress, most developers will publish the fruits of their work in the official WordPress.org Plugin repository. It’s a great way to get into plugin development for your favorite CMS. I started this myself in June 2011 and so far it has gotten me lots of experience on how to code better and manage the whole process. My Experience
If you’ve already published on WordPress.org or plan to do so, your plugin or theme is required to provide a so-called “readme.txt” text file. This is required because the repository parses it with Markdown language and draws all appropiate information from it, which is then displayed on the public repository. The header of that file also controls all aspects of the title, tagging, author, donate link etc. for your plugin or theme.
So, in this tutorial I’ll give you a lot of tips on how to do it the right way, based on my experiences over the last six months. I’ve seen so many great plugins in the repository but only a few have great descriptions and documentation. A lot of plugins have very minimal descriptions and documentation and leave the user alone. We want to change this.
All readme files are split into sections and