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3 min read Maor Chasen
Tutorials | GenerateWP.com | Aug. 2, 2017

Filtering Post Types by Taxonomies in the Dashboard

y default, the admin Posts screen allows us to filter posts by the built-in “Categories” Taxonomy, using a neat, user-friendly dropdown menu. But in many cases, when we register new Taxonomies we often want to be able to filter posts by these new Taxonomies as well. In this quick tutorial, we will learn how to add new filters (dropdowns) to any Post Type screen in order to filter content by custom Taxonomies.

Filtering Post Types by Taxonomies in the Dashboard

Tutorials | GenerateWP.com | Aug. 2, 2017

By default, the admin Posts screen allows us to filter posts by the built-in “Categories” Taxonomy, using a neat, user-friendly dropdown menu. But in many cases, when we register new Taxonomies we often want to be able to filter posts by these new Taxonomies as well. In this quick tutorial, we will learn how to add new filters (dropdowns) to any Post Type screen in order to filter content by custom Taxonomies. Registering a New Post Type and Taxonomies
For many WordPress developers this is a basic step, we do it in almost every project. Therefore, we won’t be getting into how to set it all up in your code — instead, use the following links to navigate to the snippets. You can use the Post Type Generator and the Taxonomy Generator to do that.
Ok, so in our example we will create a car catalog for an imaginary car retailer or agency. We will create a new “Car” post type and add several taxonomies (manufacturer, model, transmission, doors and color).
Adding Filters to the Post Type Admin Screen
Now that we have a working “Car” Post Type with several Taxonomies, we would like to be able to filter our cars in the admin area. For that we need

58 min read Primož Cigler
Tutorials | proteusthemes.com | Aug. 10, 2017

The Ultimate Guide to Page Speed Optimization - Speed Up WordPress

Everything our team has learned on speeding up WordPress sites in the course of the last several years.

The Ultimate Guide to Page Speed Optimization - Speed Up WordPress

Tutorials | proteusthemes.com | Aug. 10, 2017

Following this guide, you will learn all techniques to drastically speed up a WordPress site. Here are the most important reasons why having a great page speed loading time in WordPress benefits your business: users will not abandon your website, they will spend more time and money there, and search engines will rank your website better in search results. Ready? Intro
Internet users do not have a lot of patience, when it comes to page loading times. We click on a link or input the URL and we wait a second, two, three and that’s it. Google statistics state, that 50% of users expect a mobile site to load in 2 seconds and 53% users are likely to abandon the page, if it’s loading longer than 3 seconds. That’s a very short period, if you consider that the average loading time of a homepage, on a mobile device, is 19 seconds (on a 3G network). Loading times on computers are faster and an average loading time is 5 seconds, but that’s still too long.
Taking desktop website benchmarks as a reference is not an excuse anymore. For most of the websites today, the majority of the traffic comes from mobile devices. In this article, we’ll take a full look at the most

8 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | givewp.com | Jun. 20, 2016

Connect GiveWP to the Internet of Things with Zapier

Zapier is pretty amazing. Combine it with Give and you have some robust automated ways to follow-up with your donors in powerful ways.

Connect GiveWP to the Internet of Things with Zapier

Tutorials | givewp.com | Jun. 20, 2016

The “Internet of Things” is an expression for how the Internet is helping people connect devices, accounts, services, and even household appliances in new and exciting ways. Zapier has been leading that connectedness for several years now. This article is a short list of ways you can connect your Give Forms to other services through our Give Zapier Add-on. Instead of thinking of donations as an end, think of them rather as a means to building a relationship with those who support you and share your vision. Getting a donation is great, but what you do with that donor afterward can be just as important to your organization.
We’ve discussed previously how you can be intentional about thanking your donors after they donate and how you can make your donation receipts dramatic, with more impact. Now, let’s take it to the next step. Let’s make sure you are following up with your donors in fun and purposeful ways through Zapier.
What is Zapier?
Before we jump into all the examples, let’s understand first what Zapier is and the power that it offers you. We have two great resources on understanding Zapier and Give already:
Think of Zapier like the “Universal

5 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | whoischris.com | Apr. 28, 2017

Building a Payment Gateway for Give WP the Donation Plugin for WordPress - Who Is Chris

A simple and useful tutorial on building your own Give Payment Gateway.

Building a Payment Gateway for Give WP the Donation Plugin for WordPress - Who Is Chris

Tutorials | whoischris.com | Apr. 28, 2017

My father runs a non-profit organization and I told him I’d help with some of his online needs. I’m in the midst of a task for him where I need a very simple, but precise method of donations through Stripe. While the Stripe Add-On for Give is excellent, it’s more than I need and missing some small features my project requires. I’m not going to get into that specific project but show you what I’ve learned. Unless I’m missing something obvious on their site and with some quick googling, there’s no documentation for building Give gateways. I had to reverse engineer a couple that are available to see what is necessary to make it work. Here it is in its simplest form.
Bare Bones Gateway
When building an extension for a plugin I like to try and build the absolute barest possible version. What you see at the bottom of this section is just that. We use just two hooks:
add_filter( ‘give_payment_gateways’ )
add_action( ‘give_gateway_{gateway_slug}’ )
The filter registers our gateway. This will then show our gateway as an option in the Give gateway settings.
The action is where we process the submitted form data. It’s pretty

Tutorials | 000webhost.com | Nov. 14, 2017

2 ways to leverage Browser Caching in WordPress (including Google Analytics)

The complete guide showing how to leverage browser caching in WordPress.

2 ways to leverage Browser Caching in WordPress (including Google Analytics)

Tutorials | 000webhost.com | Nov. 14, 2017

One of the things you learn as your website grows is that performance is critical. These days, most people expect your site to load quickly, and they don’t have much patience unless it does. ‘Caching’ – essentially a way of keeping your loading times lean that we’ll talk more about shortly – is a key way to keep your website’s visitors happy. Browser caching enables your website to load faster by cutting down on how much information users need to re-load after their first visit. It’s a simple way to reduce loading times, and anyone can implement it on their website.
In this article, we’re going to talk about what browser caching is and what it means to leverage it in WordPress. Then we’ll talk about when you should disable caching and how to set it up in the first place. Finally, we’ll help you check if caching is working as intended on your website. Let’s get to work!
An Introduction to Browser Caching
If set up correctly, websites will often save some of their files to your computer. That way, you won’t need to load the entire thing over the internet each time you revisit it. This process is known as browser

Tutorials | ithemes.com | Oct. 14, 2016

How to Learn WordPress

There are many places to learn "how to WordPress" but where do you start and what sites are good places to visit.

How to Learn WordPress

Tutorials | ithemes.com | Oct. 14, 2016

Figuring out how to learn WordPress is a daunting task. Where do you begin and what information is actually useful? Relax. You’re in the right place. There are numerous resources on how to learn WordPress and we will discuss some of the most helpful ones. A Quick Word on Learning WordPress
WordPress is an amazing, free tool created to allow people, without coding knowledge, build custom websites.
WordPress began in 2003 and is now the largest self-hosted blogging tool and is used on, literally, millions of sites worldwide.
WordPress isn’t just software used to create websites, it is a community. There is a plethora of people and resource tutorial sites set up, specifically to help you with your WordPress site.
You’re in good company if you use WordPress to publish on the web and you can feel confident in the support you will receive in creating your site.
Tips on How to Learn WordPress Without Losing Your Mind
Give yourself a break. Rome wasn’t built in a day. (Granted you’re building a website, not a city, so shoot for a shorter timeline than Rome.)
Decide now that you will not allow computer software to defeat you.
Devote a certain amount of time per

Tutorials | thewpcrowd.com | Jul. 27, 2016

Build Native IOS & Android Apps w/ WordPress REST API & NativeScript

I'm putting together a three part series on building native mobile apps using NativeScript and driving data with the WP JSON REST API. Here is part 2 with a link to part 1.

Build Native IOS & Android Apps w/ WordPress REST API & NativeScript

Tutorials | thewpcrowd.com | Jul. 27, 2016

Make sure you have read Part 1 – An Introduction before proceeding as we are about to dive right into the action. In this post we will get our simulator/emulator up and running with a simple template project and learn a bit about the layout XML files that make things look purdy on the screen. Setting Up NativeScript
{N} has a great guide on their website so there’s no need for me to rewrite the whole thing over here. Follow the instructions and get the framework setup. If you hit any snags, hit me up on here or @ChrisFlanny on Twitter.
Prepping WordPress
You will need a WordPress install to do this tutorial. You will also need to install the REST API plugin.
To keep things simple we are going to just work with regular posts. It’s just as easy to use custom post types or any data available through the REST API but we are going to learn the basics here so you can branch out in any direction you’d like. So activate the REST API and let’s get started.
New NativeScript Project
Open up your terminal and navigate to a directory where you’d like to host this project. Once there we are going to create a new, blank project template. Type:
tns create WPFeed

7 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | thewpcrowd.com | Jun. 14, 2016

Responsibly Loading Minified Scripts in WordPress Plugins and Themes - The WP Crowd

Minifying scripts in plugins and themes can go terribly wrong. But there's a good/right way to do it -- probably many right ways really. Here's food for thought on that subject.

Responsibly Loading Minified Scripts in WordPress Plugins and Themes - The WP Crowd

Tutorials | thewpcrowd.com | Jun. 14, 2016

Similar to “tabs vs spaces” you’ll find WordPress developers who are passionate about their opinions on whether or not plugin and theme styles and scripts should be minified or not. I personally think that developers should be doing everything possible to make their plugins have the lightest footprint possible on a users website.
Those who argue against it typically argue that minified scripts are difficult and tedious to troubleshoot. That’s absolutely true, but that’s not a reason to not use them in your theme or plugin. At least not if you are doing so responsibly. That’s what this article is about.
Why You Should Load Minifed CSS in Plugins and Themes
There are a few strong reasons to use minified scripts in your plugins and themes.
#1 It’s Considerate to your Users
This to me is the most important reason. When you are shipping code for others to use you want to be as considerate of their website as you can be. This goes along the lines of why you include inline documentation and easy to read function names.
Shipping the smallest files you can to your users tells them that you know their bandwidth and page speed is important to you.
#2 Caching

6 min read Cozmoslabs
Tutorials | cozmoslabs.com | Oct. 24, 2017

How To Restrict bbPress Forums & Topics based on membership subscription

Step by step tutorial on how to restrict bbPress forums and topics with bbPress integration for Paid Member Subscription WordPress plugin.

How To Restrict bbPress Forums & Topics based on membership subscription

Tutorials | cozmoslabs.com | Oct. 24, 2017

In order to build a successful paid membership community with a discussion area, you may want to restrict access to some content areas, based on a subscriptions plan. If you use both Paid Member Subscriptions and Profile Builder Pro, you have to know that bbPress is fully integrated with both of them, and you can extend user profiles with the bbPress add-on.
How to use bbPress Add-on for Paid Member Subscriptions
bbPress is an Advanced add-on, available with Paid Member Subscriptions Hobbyist or Pro license only. In order to make sure the bbPress add-on is working, you’ll need to follow the documentation page and install the following plugins:
Paid Member Subscriptions – version 1.6.0 or higher
Both plugins are shortcode-based and easy to setup and to continue, I won’t enter any specific steps, but in case you need help with the installation part of the plugins, you can read the documentation: bbPress / Paid Member Subscriptions.
How to restrict bbPress Forums based on membership subscription
Firstly, after installing both plugins you will need to create some subscription plans if you don’t have them already up and running on your website.
Furthermore, let’s

Tutorials | wppopupmaker.com | Aug. 7, 2017

How to Use Popups to Drive Visitor Engagement on Your Website (3 Easy Ways) - Popup Maker

Your website won't help you meet your sales goals if it can't encourage people to take action. Fortunately, you can use popups to drive visitor engagement!

3 min read Codeinwp
Tutorials | codeinwp.com | Aug. 9, 2017

44 Things I Wish I Knew Before Starting a Blog

The CodeinWP editorial team chip in with tips on everything from writing to SEO, designing images, marketing, hosting, tools, security, and a lot more.

44 Things I Wish I Knew Before Starting a Blog

Tutorials | codeinwp.com | Aug. 9, 2017

Starting a blog for the first time is an amazing, yet intimidating experience. Thinking that people are actually going to read – and even share – something you wrote. It’s unlike any other feeling I can describe.
But it’s not all rainbows and butterflies. Starting a blog is hard work, and there are a lot of pitfalls along the way. Especially if it’s your first time.
So many pitfalls, in fact, that we’ve come up with a full list of 44 things we wish we knew before starting our first blogs. That way, you don’t have to make these mistakes yourself!
But who are “we” exactly, right? Well, this post is a group effort. It features three bloggers chipping in and sharing their best advice on the topic.
So grab a coffee and get cozy, we’re about to review everything we’ve learned in the past 5+ years. Enjoy!
44 things you should know before starting a blog
We’re going to cover everything from writing to SEO, designing images, marketing, hosting, tools, security, and a lot lot more.
But, since it’s probably been the most important piece of many a career, let’s start with SEO.
More specifically, let’s talk

8 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | givewp.com | Mar. 11, 2016

Using the Give API to Create Charts with ChartJS

Roy Sivan walks you through interacting with the Give API to display donation data using Chart.js. A very technical tutorial that has great results and a great example of the Give API.

Using the Give API to Create Charts with ChartJS

Tutorials | givewp.com | Mar. 11, 2016

What if I told you that the Give API + JavaScript = Awesome Reporting Tools? Mind-blown, right? We already know how awesome Give is, but what if you need more power or visual aid from the data? Charts are an easy way to evaluate how a form is performing, how much donors are donating, or even which gateway people use the most.
For the purpose of this article, I am going to work on an example pie chart that will compare all my forms and, more importantly, demonstrate which one performs best.
Chart.js
D3 and highcharts are powerful tools for JS data, but for the sake of simplicity, we are going to use Chart.js. It’s powerful without being overly complex.
Chart.js has a few awesome charts built into its library with a large contributor community of people who extend and add features. Out of the box you get line charts, bar graphs, radar charts, polar area charts, and pie / doughnut charts. As it is, it’s powerful. A closer look tells us it really just uses the HTML5 canvas element to draw so it is easy to tap into and extend if you want further control.
Give API
Give comes with an amazing developer’s dream feature: an API. While the WordPress REST API is coming into core, it isn’t there

8 min read Brad Morrison
Tutorials | godaddy.com | Sep. 22, 2017

Who hosts this website? Tips and tools for finding IP address, DNS details and more

Aaron Reimann shares tips and tools for determining where a website is hosted.

Who hosts this website? Tips and tools for finding IP address, DNS details and more

Tutorials | godaddy.com | Sep. 22, 2017

These days, most companies of a decent size have their own websites. And while employees might be able to steer you to the address, often they don’t even know who hosts this website you’re tasked with keeping healthy. When I ask these folks who hosts their email — or the website itself — often the response is a blank stare. Or my personal favorite: “Who is hosting my website? Well … Bob’s nephew set it up years ago, but he’s away at college and we can’t get in touch with him.” In a way, it makes sense. People just need web and email hosting. They just want things to work. Who hosts a certain website just isn’t their concern.
But as web professionals, it’s our job to figure out these things, even if our client has no clue.
There are some tools already installed on Mac, PC and Linux systems that can help you find out who hosts a website, so you can get to work.
Find out who hosts this website in three steps
Use ping to find the IP address.
Use WHOIS to find the host information.
Use a dedicated service to look up details.
For this article, we’ll be using screenshots from a Mac, but equivalent tools exist for

Tutorials | zeglist.com | May. 5, 2014

Pay With A Tweet – Add It To Your Site In Just 2 Minutes

You might have noticed some sites have social lockers enabled, such as liking their Facebook page for downloading a file, following or tweeting a website for downloading a freebie...

8 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | calderawp.com | Aug. 8, 2016

Creating A Killer Contact Us Page For Your WordPress Site

Nice walkthrough of creating a "killer" Contact Us page. Honestly, I think I most often neglect to give the Contact Us page its due attention.

Creating A Killer Contact Us Page For Your WordPress Site

Tutorials | calderawp.com | Aug. 8, 2016

Too often, when creating a WordPress site, designers neglect the contact us page. After spending days and days contemplating every element in the homepage, a lot of designers neglect the ‘Contact Us’ page. They simply slap on a generic form, press publish and forget about it. If you actually examined it, you would find that the contact page is one of the most visited pages on your website. More often than none it is actually the most visited page altogether. Hubspot named the contact page one of the 4 most important pages on a website.
Bad “Contact Us” pages can lead to your clients not getting the proper support. It can also lead to your potential clients getting the wrong impression about your service, and may cause a list of other negative effects.
This is why I wanted to show you a step by step guide on how to create an effective contact page on your website. You don’t have to incorporate each and every point I make in your site, but investing time on improving your contact us page will surely improve your website visitor’s experience. It will also help increase your site’s conversion rate.
In this article I will show how to build the contact

Tutorials | kinsta.com | May. 29, 2017

WordPress Maintenance Mode – Troubleshooting and Customizing

The default WordPress maintenance mode is very limited. Check out some nifty ways to extend it, as well as troubleshooting it when you can't get out.

WordPress Maintenance Mode – Troubleshooting and Customizing

Tutorials | kinsta.com | May. 29, 2017

The WordPress maintenance mode page is something that is automatically shown to visitors temporarily when you make updates on your site, such as updating plugins, themes, or core. This is to keep from anything appearing broken or out of sync while files are being patched. However, there are a couple issues with this. The first is that sometimes your WordPress site might get stuck in maintenance mode. This essentially takes down your whole site until you manually fix it. The second is that the default maintenance page/message isn’t styled, looks rather ugly, and is limited in its messaging to your visitors and customers. This might not be the best for your branding or reputation. Today we’ll explore some ways to resolve these issues. WordPress Maintenance Mode
The WordPress maintenance mode is a great little feature that is built into core and was introduced in version 3.0. Whenever you update a plugin, theme, or your WordPress installation, the following message is shown to your visitors until the update operations have completed.
“Briefly unavailable for scheduled maintenance. Check back in a minute.”
During the update and installation process, some backend

Tutorials | managewp.com | Oct. 5, 2016

Webinar: Recurring Revenue With Website Care Plans

Next week we have teamed up with WP Elevation to do a 3 part FREE webinar about recurring revenue with website care plans. It's a great opportunity to level up your business and learn how to implement processes that give you that magical recurring revenue. Don't miss Kristina Romero and Troy Dean, it starts on October 10!

6 min read Brad Touesnard
Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Dec. 8, 2015

HTTP/2, HTTPS, Let's Encrypt and WordPress

HTTP/2 is awesome, but requires HTTPS, which is hard to setup. Let's Encrypt and WordPress can make HTTPS setup simple and help achieve a faster web sooner.

HTTP/2, HTTPS, Let's Encrypt and WordPress

Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Dec. 8, 2015

TL;DR — HTTP/2 is awesome, but requires HTTPS, which is hard to setup. Let’s Encrypt and WordPress can make HTTPS setup simple and help achieve a faster web sooner. My eyes are heavy, my head foggy. Kind of feels like I’m in a dream right now. A couple of hours ago I got home from Philadelphia, where I attended the WordPress Community Summit and the first annual WordCamp US over the past 7 days. And man, what a time.
There will be plenty of recap posts published this week, so instead, I thought I’d dig into one thing I got very excited about at the summit.
HTTP/2
Weeks ago I got really excited about HTTP/2 while researching it for
an episode of Apply Filters. (If you haven’t learned about HTTP/2 yet, I urge you to listen to that episode. I’m very proud of the work Pippin and I did on it.) I learned that adding support for HTTP/2 on your site gives it an instant performance boost. And if you already have HTTPS setup, enabling HTTP/2 is as easy as updating Nginx to version 1.9.6+ and adding http2 to the config file:
listen 443 ssl http2;
If you don’t have HTTPS setup, you have do that in order to get HTTP/2 as it is only supported over HTTPS.
HTTPS
Unfortunately setting up and managing

8 min read Josh Pollock
Tutorials | wordimpress.com | May. 9, 2017

The Best Way To Check Your WordPress Site for PHP Compatibility

You should be PHP7. This helpful guide helps you make sure your WordPress site is ready.

The Best Way To Check Your WordPress Site for PHP Compatibility

Tutorials | wordimpress.com | May. 9, 2017

Are you using the PHP compatibility checker to determine which plugins to use on your site? What are its limitations? Let’s talk about it. PHP 7 is awesome. It’s one of the best things to happen to WordPress in a long time. It’s safer and faster than any previous version of PHP, and when you turn it on, your WordPress site is noticeably faster both frontend and backend.
With that context, I’m a huge fan of PHP 7. I want as many WordPress sites on it as possible. But with such a fundamental change of your server environment, there are necessary precautions you have to take.
Naturally, you’ll need backups and a good way to revert your PHP version if things don’t go well. Some WordPress hosts provide this ability really well. Honestly, if your host doesn’t allow you to safely update to PHP 7 and potentially revert that change if necessary, consider moving hosts.
The other important thing you need to do is make sure that the theme and plugins you use to run your WordPress website are compatible with PHP 7. For that, many users are going to a new plugin by WP Engine called the “PHP Compatibility Checker.”
Caveats and Pitfalls of the PHP

6 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | mattcromwell.com | Nov. 28, 2016

Create a Delayed Admin Notice in your Free Plugins

Admin notices, when done well, can be very effective. Here's a small library I made to trigger a delayed admin notice to your free plugin users to encourage a review or a donation.

Create a Delayed Admin Notice in your Free Plugins

Tutorials | mattcromwell.com | Nov. 28, 2016

Nudging your free users to donate to your free code is a GOOD idea. But you have to do it right. Do it right with this easy "Delayed Admin Notice" library. I built a tool called “Delayed Admin Notice” which allows you to trigger an admin notice a certain number of days after a user activates your plugin. My purpose was to encourage my free plugin users to know that they can review my plugin and/or donate to its development. But admin notices can be obnoxious too, that’s why this one is a bit opinionated.
In the words of the WordPress Plugin Guidelines:
Users prefer and expect plugins to feel like part of WordPress. Constant nags and overwhelming the admin dashboard with unnecessary alerts detract from this experience.
I think when done well, admin notices can benefit a plugin or theme author while still being useful and informative for the user. That’s a win-win in my book. Here’s the keys to making that happen though.
Principles of Respectful Admin Notices
I believe that Admin notices have to always have the end-user in mind. These are some principles I kept in mind when I developed this little library
The admin notice should only appear at the

8 min read Matteo Duò
Tutorials | codeable.io | Oct. 21, 2015

10 quick tips to enhance the security of your new WordPress website

Make your brand new WordPress website secure right from the first day with these quick and easy WordPress security tips.

10 quick tips to enhance the security of your new WordPress website

Tutorials | codeable.io | Oct. 21, 2015

You’ve been working on it for the last couple of months and, even if you’ve missed some nights out with your friends, and have slept a few hours less, you’re done: your new WordPress website is now ready to go live. It's been a lot of time and work, I know, and it’d be a nightmare having to deal with security issues as soon as you make it available on the Web. So you’d better tweak some aspects right from the beginning and go live with an improved WordPress website.
WordPress security is an important aspect you’ll have to take into account for every action that affects your site, starting from the plugins you choose to install, the themes you’ll end up using and other aspects that don’t come to your mind as frequently as they should.
Security is a serious thing and an ongoing process that you should always keep under your radar. Think of the following security tips as layers you’re adding to your website, making it harder to be hacked and violated.
Want to improve the security of your WordPress website? Post your task now or hire one of our security experts.
“Admin” is the most common username for WordPress admin users. Everybody knows this, thus hackers. To make their life a little

34 min read Kobe Ben Itamar
Tutorials | freemius.com | Oct. 26, 2016

The Complete Guide for Building a Lightning Fast & Scalable Knowledge Base

This is an elaborated, step-by-step guide of how the Freemius team built its KB solution and why.

The Complete Guide for Building a Lightning Fast & Scalable Knowledge Base

Tutorials | freemius.com | Oct. 26, 2016

Once your startup’s user-base grows, support becomes a fundamental part of your business. Setting up a solid Knowledge Base solution is an important long term investment, that hopefully, if done right, will pay off by reducing the support burden, widening your site’s SEO reach and generating new leads that otherwise wouldn’t have been landed. This is a comprehensive and technical step-by-step guide for developers. If you aren’t a developer, you should probably send this article to your CTO. He/she will thank you for it.
TL;DR: We finally built and released our semi-static, markdown based Knowledge Base for our monetization platform Freemius, using WordPress. I’m sharing the complete cookbook of our research right here; why we choose WordPress over SaaS solutions and static generators; how we did it (including all code customizations and server level configuration), what we’ve learned, and how you can replicate that process to save valuable time, and set up your own lightning fast, scalable, sustainable, secure, and semi-static KB (Knowledge Base) for your own plugin, theme or any other digital product.
This 15-minute guide will save you 44 hours (we

15 min read Ahmad Awais
Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Jun. 9, 2015

Hosting WordPress Yourself - Server Monitoring and Caching

Server Monitoring and Caching at its best. Not bad at all! The average response time stayed consistent, with a new theoretical limit of 41,107,680 requests per day, which is pretty phenomenal for a $5/mo server.

Hosting WordPress Yourself - Server Monitoring and Caching

Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | Jun. 9, 2015

In the previous installment of this series, I walked you through the process of how to quickly setup sites using WP-CLI. However, no considerations were made on how well the server would handle traffic under heavy load. As a system administrator, it is also imperative that you can quickly determine the current utilisation of system resources. This will better help you to gauge how many sites your server can potentially handle, and when you may need to plan the scaling of hardware or cloud resources. In this post I will guide you through the process of tackling all of those issues, as well as setting up server monitoring and alerts. Server Monitoring with New Relic
Monitoring server performance is a relatively simple process using a tool called New Relic, which allows you to see the server’s current health status from a web-based dashboard. There’s also a smartphone app available, so you can monitor server performance on the go, if you’re into that sort of thing. On top of that, server monitoring is a free service provided by New Relic, so go ahead and sign up now!
Once signed up, you’ll be presented with the following screen.
Click the ‘Servers’ option and then select Ubuntu as the

Tutorials | makeaweblog.com | May. 5, 2014

How to Submit and verify WordPress blog in google webmaster tools

One of the first things you need to do when you launch a WP site is submit it to Google Webmaster Tools

How to Submit and verify WordPress blog in google webmaster tools

Tutorials | makeaweblog.com | May. 5, 2014

Google Webmaster tools is an essential tool kit for website owners to analyze and improve their site’s performance on Google search engine. Basically, it tells you everything how Google sees your site. This means they provide you with insights on your data from their perspective. Once you’ve launched a new website/blog, it is essential that your site]/blog is added to all of the major search engines (Google, Bing and Yahoo search) to increase the visibility of your site. By verifying your site in Google webmaster tools, let Google confirms that you are the owner of the site, and enable you access to free reports, tools and resources for creating a healthy, Google-friendly site.
See also: How to Submit and Verify your WordPress Blog in Bing Webmaster tools
However, submitting your blog to search engines doesn’t necessarily mean you’re going to be on the first page of search results, but at least your blog will be added and will have the chance of being picked up by a search engine crawler.
Why use Google Webmaster Tools?
… and much more.
Steps to Add/Submit and Verify your WordPress blog in Google Webmaster tools
To verify ownership of a blog, you have a number of options. In this tutorial,