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9 min read John Locke
Development | dev.to | Jan. 7, 2019

The True Cost Of LEGO WordPress Development

Mario Peshev of DevriX explains in detail why "affordable WordPress development" ends up costing a lot later on down the road.

dev.to |

The True Cost Of LEGO WordPress Development

Development | dev.to | Jan. 7, 2019

When I switched to WordPress over a decade ago, I was aiming at maximizing RAD (Rapid Application Development). But not for the reason everyone assumes first.
Coding Can Last Forever
My background in engineering is enterprise-grade development. I spent a few years with Java (JavaServer Faces, Google Web Toolkit) and some dabbling into .NET.
Gathering a team of 20+ working on a project for 5 years is significantly different than bootstrapping a powerful application in two or three months.
Throughout my transition period, I switched between web and mobile Java development, Python (Django) for a UNICEF project, programming for set-top boxes before smart TVs were a thing, and PHP development with CodeIgniter, CakePHP, and custom frameworks.
I even tried to sell my own custom Java CMS, but this was pointless. I couldn't match the "time to market" with PHP's abilities, nor the server costs back in the day.
WordPress Can Be A RAD Framework
This is one of the reasons why WordPress currently powers nearly 33% of the Web.
A PHP-driven CMS promising backward compatibility, offering unlimited design opportunities, a streamlined editorial experience, and a powerful modular infrastructure

19 min read Igor Benić
Tutorials | dev.to | Feb. 15, 2017

Headless WordPress with React

A tutorial on how to use React to retrieve WordPress data in an external app using the WP REST API

dev.to |

Headless WordPress with React

Tutorials | dev.to | Feb. 15, 2017

An intro to building decoupled WordPress-powered websites using the WordPress REST API and Create React App In recent months, I’ve taken a big interest in the WordPress REST API (hereto referred to as the WP-API) and React. I’ve been writing an introductory series to the WP-API, but decided to break for a more full-length, detailed post.
This post will outline how to get started building decoupled (or “headless”) WordPress web applications with Create React App and the WP-API. While this post is going to focus on React for the frontend, some of the general concepts still apply if you want to build your frontend with something else such as Angular, Rx, Ember, or Vue.
And you don’t have to stop with web applications. You can use the WP-API to power not only web applications, but also mobile apps, gaming console apps, and more, simultaneously.
Before getting started, feel free to clone the repository for this demo.
Why?
Why WordPress?
Your first question may be “why should I care that WordPress has an API?” I’ve already written about this a bit in another post, but if you aren’t up for opening another tab, here are a few highlights: