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Community | jjj.blog | 13 days ago

@JJJ Review of WordPress 5.0 Beta 1

John James Jacoby provides an interested stream-of-consciousness review of Gutenberg in WP 5.0-beta1. Lots of small confusions and annoyances.

@JJJ Review of WordPress 5.0 Beta 1

Community | jjj.blog | 13 days ago

I’m writing this post using the new block-based editor that comes packaged with the first WordPress 5.0 beta, known previously and externally as Gutenberg. For just general writing, so far it ain’t so bad, but one thing that bugs me straight away is that the auto-save causes the UI in the upper right corner to spaz out every few seconds. I keep thinking it’s a notification in macOS, so I stop writing to look up at it, because it’s all just outside my periphery.
So far in this post, I haven’t needed to add any blocks or format any text, and I haven’t needed to move any text or paragraphs around. I have a feeling this is how most people will interact with this editor most of the time, and for that, it generally gets the job done no different than the classic editor did.
I suppose it’s about time I try to insert some kind of image, so here’s a shot I took today of some concrete that got poured behind the building my office is in.
I think it’s a little weird that the default new-block buttons are: image, header, and gallery. I also think it’s weird when I hover over the “P” for paragraph button, that it changes to 2

11 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | jjj.blog | Apr. 26, 2017

Understanding alloptions in WordPress

Great, in-depth piece on understanding exactly how wp_options works. You'll learn a lot from this.

Understanding alloptions in WordPress

Tutorials | jjj.blog | Apr. 26, 2017

WordPress is an extremely flexible piece of software, and it comes with many different settings. Some are made visible to users via Admin > Settings and others are stored invisibly so users aren’t bothered by them, but all of them are saved in a single database table named wp_options. Today, it looks something like this: This database table actually has a few interesting qualities to it. Conceptually, it’s a very simple key/value approach to storing any kind of arbitrary information. It’s a distant cousin to all of the meta database tables WordPress comes with (for posts, comments, terms, and users) and I’m a big fan of the entire meta-data API – it’s now fully implemented across all major object types (except blogmeta and term_relationshipmeta) and, honestly, it’s one of the few “complete” APIs you’ll interact with inside of WordPress today, aside from probably roles & rewrite rules.
The options API, however, is actually quite a bit different from meta, enough to warrant this blog post, and enough for me to have spent the past 4 days studying it, researching it, and generally trying to find ways to improve how it performs

Community | jjj.blog | Dec. 5, 2016

One hundred, forever

I like this idea. Sort of the 'this portion of the highway is sponsored by' boards you can see out there.

One hundred, forever

Community | jjj.blog | Dec. 5, 2016

In 2014, Matt Mullenweg challenged the WordPress community to volunteer 5% of their time towards open-source and WordPress.org. A few months later, I ran a successful fundraising compaign that allowed me to donate 6 months worth of time towards BuddyPress & bbPress.
For 2017, and hopefully with your help, I’m going to try something a little different that I’ve nicknamed: ∞.
My goal is be a fully funded independent ambassador for WordPress & the surrounding initiatives, backed by many of the best companies who continue to push WordPress beyond its limits on a daily basis.
Practically speaking, I imagine this to work like a monthly retainer to work on WordPress core and Dotorg. Someone pays, say, $7500, and I get to say January 2017’s progress was brought to you by Pagely, February by GoDaddy, March by CrowdFavorite, April by Jetpack, May by WebDevStudios, June by GiveWP, and so on, forever.
(The structure is a bit TBD. Maybe it’s weekly rather than monthly, or quarterly, or something else entirely. Hopefully you get the idea.)
It’s like a podcast, but instead of airtime ad placement, it’s coretime leadership, contributor relations, and