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Community | make.wordpress.org | Dec. 28, 2016

Matt Mullenweg Announces Supporting the Future of WP-CLI

Great news! The website and code are all coming in under the WordPress.org umbrella and financial support is also involved.

10 min read Donna Cavalier
Development | make.wordpress.org | Sep. 21, 2015

WP REST API: Merge Proposal

It's that time! Proposal to merge into core. A 2-parter though. Whatcha think?

WP REST API: Merge Proposal

Development | make.wordpress.org | Sep. 21, 2015

Hello everyone! This is the post you’ve all been waiting for. We on the REST API team (myself, @rachelbaker, @joehoyle, @danielbachhuber, and newest member and core committer @pento) would like to propose merging the REST API into WordPress core. We’ve been working a while on this, and think it’s now ready to get your feedback.
This is our first iteration of the proposal, and we’re actively looking for feedback. If you have thoughts on the project, or on this proposal, let us know! Only with your feedback can we make progress.
What is the REST API?
The REST API is a nice and easy way to get at your data in WordPress externally, whether that’s from JavaScript in a theme or plugin, mobile and desktop applications, or importing and exporting data. The API offers up all core data types (posts, terms comments, and users), plus support for meta and revisions; we’ve got plans to eventually have access to everything the admin and frontend have access to.
The REST API differs from existing WordPress APIs in that it is explicitly designed from the ground up for modern mobile and browser usage, using the lightweight and widely-supported JSON data serialization format with a modern REST interface.

2 min read Omaar Osmaan
Development | make.wordpress.org | Apr. 23, 2017

WordPress Target Browser Coverage - Ending support for IE 8, 9, and 10

WordPress officially ending support for Internet Explorer versions 8, 9, and 10, starting with WordPress 4.8.

WordPress Target Browser Coverage - Ending support for IE 8, 9, and 10

Development | make.wordpress.org | Apr. 23, 2017

Previously, we discussed the new editor and browser support within WordPress core. Following up on those conversations, we are officially ending support for Internet Explorer versions 8, 9, and 10, starting with WordPress 4.8. Microsoft officially discontinued supporting these browsers in January 2016, and attempting to continue supporting them ourselves has gotten to the point where it’s holding back development. I realize that folks still running these browsers are probably stuck with them because of something out of their control, like being at a library or something. Depending on how you count it, those browsers combined are either around 3% or under 1% of total users, but either way they’ve fallen below the threshold where it’s helpful for WordPress to continue testing and developing against. (The numbers surprised me, as did how low IE market share overall has gone.)
Of course, wp-admin should still work in these older browsers, but with fewer capabilities, and we will no longer be testing new features and enhancements in these browsers. For example, the next versions of TinyMCE – currently targeted at WordPress 4.8 – will not support older IE browsers.

3 min read David Bisset
Development | make.wordpress.org | Apr. 13, 2017

Matt Mullenweg: First Quarter Check On Core

Matt gives some of his thoughts, perceptions and feelings on of how things are going with core foci. Rest API admin will take some time I think.

Matt Mullenweg: First Quarter Check On Core

Development | make.wordpress.org | Apr. 13, 2017

Just wanted to give folks my perception and feelings on of how we’re doing thus far with the core foci: Writing: I’m really happy with the progress. It has had some slower weeks here and there the past few months, but by and large the technical prototypes we implemented have been successful and we’re ready to move into the next phase. We have a Chrome fix we have to get in the next minor release, and the link boundary improvements will be going into TinyMCE core and could be great for an interim +0.1 release.
Customization: Doing well. Remember: The plan is for the larger block-driven customization work to kick off in June. Prior to that, we’re focusing on widgets and other low-hanging fruit. Lack of developers slowed us down last few months, now doing better but could still use more help there. Media widgets + WYSIWYG on text widget seem simple but will have a big user impact.
REST API: There has been little to no perceivable progress on having any parts of wp-admin powered by the REST API.
Considering 4.8: The TinyMCE inline element / link boundaries, new media widgets, WYSIWYG in text widget, and perhaps something else small like the WordCamp / meetup dashboard

4 min read David Bisset
Development | make.wordpress.org | Sep. 9, 2016

Say Hello to Twenty Seventeen

Every year there's a brand new default theme, and Helen Hou-Sandi post gives us a preview. Designed by Mel Choyce.

Say Hello to Twenty Seventeen

Development | make.wordpress.org | Sep. 9, 2016

It’s that time again: time to build a new default theme for WordPress! WordPress 4.7 will launch with a brand new theme – Twenty Seventeen. Designed by Mel Choyce (@melchoyce), Twenty Seventeen sports a modern look and will make a good base for any business website or product showcase.
Check out the gallery below to preview our next default theme at full-size: Higher resolution mockups
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In addition to having a wide appeal, Twenty Seventeen will focus on providing a seamless initial theme setup so anyone can set up a website for themselves or their business with minimal hassle.
Twenty Seventeen aims to show off some new core features and enhancements, such as:
A better flow for using a static page as your front page.
Visible edit icons in the Customizer, replacing the current hidden shift+click method.
Expanding custom header images to include video (think: atmospheric video headers!).
Dummy content for live previews.
Mel will keep an eye on all things design during the creation of Twenty Seventeen. Laurel Fulford (@laurelfulford) and David Kennedy (@davidakennedy) will assist her, leading the theme’s development. Lots of opportunities exist this year for getting

3 min read Primož Cigler
Development | make.wordpress.org | Nov. 3, 2016

Post Type Templates in 4.7

WordPress has supported custom page templates for over 12 years. With WP 4.7 the same functionality is coming to all post types, using "Template Post Type" in the file header.

Post Type Templates in 4.7

Development | make.wordpress.org | Nov. 3, 2016

WordPress has supported custom page templates for over 12 years, allowing developers to create various layouts for specific pages. While this feature is very helpful, it has always been limited to the ‘page’ post type and not was not available to other post types. With WordPress 4.7, it will be. By opening up the page template functionality to all post types, the template hierarchy’s flexibility continues to improve.
In addition to the Template Name file header, the post types supported by a template can be specified using Template Post Type: post, foo, bar. Here’s an example:
1234567
<?php/*Template Name: Full-width layoutTemplate Post Type: post, page, product*/// … your code here
That way, you’ll be able to select this full-width template for posts, pages, and products.
When at least one template exists for a post type, the ‘Post Attributes’ meta box will be displayed in the back end, without the need to add post type support for 'page-attributes' or anything else. The ‘Post Attributes’ label can be customized per post type using the 'attributes' label when registering a post type.
Selecting the post template
Selecting

1 min read David Bisset
Development | make.wordpress.org | Jan. 18, 2017

Theme Developer Handbook Released!

The WordPress Theme Developer Handbook has finally been released. Congrats to the almost 100 involved. Feedback welcomed.

Theme Developer Handbook Released!

Development | make.wordpress.org | Jan. 18, 2017

Weekly Meetings As well as discussing docs issues here on the blog, we use Slack for group communication.
Individual teams have their own regular meetings – you can find details of those in the sidebar.

2 min read David Bisset
Development | make.wordpress.org | Apr. 18, 2017

WordPress 4.7.4 Release Candidate Now Available!

This fixes 46 bugs and scheduled for final release on (drumroll please).... Thursday, April 20, 2017. Developers, start 'a test'n.

WordPress 4.7.4 Release Candidate Now Available!

Development | make.wordpress.org | Apr. 18, 2017

After about six weeks of development, a Release Candidate for WordPress 4.7.4 is now available. This maintenance release fixes 46 issues reported against 4.7 and is scheduled for final release on Thursday, April 20, 2017. Thus far WordPress 4.7 has been downloaded nearly 60 million times since its release on December 6, 2016. Please help us by testing this release candidate to ensure 4.7.4 fixes the reported issues and doesn’t introduce any new ones.
Notable Bug Fixes
There are a few more notable issues being addressed in this release. The first one is about broken video/audio thumbnails when uploading media (#40075). Additionally, an incompatibility between the upcoming Chrome version and the visual editor (#40305) has been solved by updating TinyMCE. Furthermore, the REST API saw some enhancements in relation to date handling (#39854, #40136).
All Changes
Here’s a list of all closed tickets, sorted by component:
Administration
#39983 – Consider to don’t use the CSS class button-link for controls that don’t look like links
#40056 – Shift-click to select a range of checkboxes isn’t working anymore since 4.7.3 update
Bootstrap/Load
Build/Test

7 min read Ahmad Awais
Development | make.wordpress.org | Jun. 1, 2017

WPCLI Version 1.2.0 released!

Fun time to be alive ;) Cool stuff is happening with WPCLI. Look at that badass logo. New workflows, features, commands, and everything!

WPCLI Version 1.2.0 released!

Development | make.wordpress.org | Jun. 1, 2017

Happy release day! After 325 merged pull requests, we’re excited to bring you WP-CLI v1.2.0, chock full of enhancements, bug fixes… and a bootstrap refactor.
But first…
We have a new logo!
Coming soon to a laptop near you:
Thanks to Chris Wallace and the crew at Lift UX for their work, as well as everyone who responded to my pings about feedback.
Commands abstracted to distinct packages
We’ve split up the project!
The main wp-cli/wp-cli repository now only contains the framework itself. All of the bundled commands can be found in separate repositories. For instance, the wp cache * series of commands are now located at github.com/wp-cli/cache-command.
This abstraction provides a few benefits:
While developing, the tests are only run for the specific component you’re working on, making the feedback loop much shorter.
Individual command packages can be controlled and set up independently, opening up the opportunity for better collaboration.
Hotfixes and intermediary releases can be published for individual commands, that can then be updated through the built-in package manager.
Tests run really fast now.
When you submit a pull request, you don’t have

9 min read David Bisset
Development | make.wordpress.org | May. 26, 2017

NEW Media Widgets for Images, Video, and Audio

NICE! WordPress 4.8 includes media widgets for not only images but also video and audio, on top of an extensible base for introducing additional media widgets in the future, such as for galleries and playlists.

NEW Media Widgets for Images, Video, and Audio

Development | make.wordpress.org | May. 26, 2017

As first introduced in the Image Widget Merge Proposal, WordPress 4.8 includes media widgets (#32417) for not only images (#39993) but also video (#39994) and audio (#39995), on top of an extensible base for introducing additional media widgets in the future, such as for galleries and playlists. To quote [40640]: The last time a new widget was introduced, Vuvuzelas were a thing, Angry Birds started taking over phones, and WordPress stopped shipping with Kubrick. Seven years and 17 releases without new widgets have been enough, time to spice up your sidebar!
Since widgets are a very old part of WordPress (since 2.2), widgets in core have been very much entirely built using PHP with some Ajax sprinkled on top. In the time since WP_Widget was introduced in 2.8, WordPress has made dramatic shifts toward developing interfaces in JavaScript, including with the Customizer in 3.4 and the Media Library in 3.5, and more recently with the focus on the REST API and the editor (Gutenberg).
Given that the media widgets are naturally interfacing with the media library JS, it is necessary that the media widgets make use of JavaScript to construct their UI instead of relying on PHP. The media widgets

Development | make.wordpress.org | Dec. 6, 2016

WordPress 4.7 Field Guide for Developers

A collection of useful links to all the things shipping with WordPress 4.7. A must-read for all WordPress developers.

WordPress 4.7 Field Guide for Developers

Development | make.wordpress.org | Dec. 6, 2016

WordPress 4.7 is shaping up to be the best WordPress yet! Users will receive new and refined features that make it easier to “Make your site, YOUR site”, and developers will be able to take advantage of 173 enhancements and feature requests added. Let’s look at the many improvements coming in 4.7… RESTing, RESTing: 1, 2, 3
The foundation for RESTful APIs has been in core since 4.4, and 4.7 sees the addition of Content Endpoints after a healthy discussion. We’ve defined four success metrics as part of the merge discussion and you can help by building themes and plugins on top of the API, using the API in custom development projects, and utilizing the API for a feature project, core features, or patches. So, dive in, start playing around, and let us know what you build!
Hi everyone, it’s your friendly REST API team here with our second merge proposal for WordPress core. (WordPress 4.4 included the REST API Infrastructure, if you’d like to check out our previous merge proposal.) Even if you’re familiar with the REST API right now, we’ve made some changes to how the project is organised, so … Continue reading
It don’t mean

4 min read David Bisset
Development | make.wordpress.org | Jan. 30, 2017

WordPress Directory Plugin Guideline Change

If you're a WordPress plugin developer with plugins in the repo, note these changes to two specific guidelines.

WordPress Directory Plugin Guideline Change

Development | make.wordpress.org | Jan. 30, 2017

With the advent of the new directory being on the horizon, which allows us to easily hard-limit the number of plugin tags displayed, we have taken the time to change the guidelines. While minor updates to the guidelines (with regard to spelling, grammar, etc) are common, major changes are rare and we are striving to be more transparent about them. Hence this post
Guideline 12 (readme links) clarified to cover spam and tags.
The guideline now reads as follows:
12. Public facing pages on WordPress.org (readmes) may not spam.
Public facing pages, including readmes and translation files, may not be used to spam. Spammy behavior includes (but is not limited to) unnecessary affiliate links, tags to competitors plugins, use of over 12 tags total, blackhat SEO, and keyword stuffing.
Links to directly required products, such as themes or other plugins required for the plugin’s use, are permitted within moderation. Similarly, related products may be used in tags but not competitors. If a plugin is a WooCommerce extension, it may use the tag ‘woocommerce.’ However if the plugin is an alternative to Akismet, it may not use that term as a tag. Repetitive use of a tag or specific

2 min read David Bisset
Development | make.wordpress.org | Jun. 27, 2017

Gutenberg: Official Call For Testing

Announced today, there are now official forms on the make.wordpress.org site. Currently 2 types of testing being looked for, each has a central feedback form.

Gutenberg: Official Call For Testing

Development | make.wordpress.org | Jun. 27, 2017

Gutenberg is now in beta, with that comes a new opportunity for testing. There is now a testing page dedicated to Gutenberg, you can find it right here. There are currently 2 types of testing being looked for, each has a central feedback form.
Looking for other ways to give feedback? You can also write a blog post (let the editor team know about that in Slack #core-editor) or add an issue to the GitHub repository.
Your feedback and testing is really important at this stage of Gutenberg, it really does matter and help make this as good as it can be.

5 min read Ahmad Awais
Community | make.wordpress.org | Jul. 1, 2016

Theme Review Team action plan

"A long overdue change is in the air " — Emil Uzelac

Theme Review Team action plan

Community | make.wordpress.org | Jul. 1, 2016

Sometimes, things need to change; that’s true for everything. The Theme Review Team is aware that we currently have problems. This post proposes some suggestions for how we should change. The objective of these changes are to reduce queues and make reviewing easier, both for those being reviewed and those doing the review. A big thanks goes out to everyone that has helped with writing this post. Specific props to @emiluzelac, @grappleulrich, @greenshady, @samuelsidler, @cais and @jcastaneda. The admin team have signed off on this in agreement.
Our role as a team should be to check that the theme has no licensing, security, or “breaking” issues. Any issues beyond those three categories should be dealt with after the fact, not during review. We all want to do more, but without ensuring we provide the minimum review to themes in a timely manner, we aren’t succeeding.
Let’s have a look at the following sections and see how we can improve.
Structure
In order for us to function, we should change the structure of our team.
Reduce down to 2 tiers for reviewers: key reviewers and reviewers. No more admins. If you have not been actively contributing to theme review

5 min read Ahmad Awais
Development | make.wordpress.org | Nov. 12, 2015

WordPress 4.4: Field Guide

A must read! If you are a WordPress developer, you must read this post to find out about what's new in WordPress 4.4 releasing this December.

WordPress 4.4: Field Guide

Development | make.wordpress.org | Nov. 12, 2015

WordPress 4.4 is the next major release of WordPress and is shaping up to be an amazing release. While you have likely discovered many of the changes from testing your plugins, themes, and sites (you have been testing, right?), this post highlights some of the exciting

2 min read Matt Cromwell
Community | make.wordpress.org | Jan. 26, 2017

What Are Little Blocks Made Of?

This could be a MAJOR improvement for Core. Imagine the whole Editor as "tiny blocks". Yes Please!

What Are Little Blocks Made Of?

Community | make.wordpress.org | Jan. 26, 2017

At the core of the 2017 editor focus is the is idea of introducing blocks (or sections) which help “make it easy what today might take shortcodes, custom HTML, or ‘mystery meat’ embed discovery”. How do we do that? Let’s start with paragraphs as blocks/sections. If we count a paragraph as a block or section you can manipulate, here’s how that could look:
You can still type type type but you create blocks along the way. When you mean to insert content that isn’t text, click the plus (or perhaps as a power-user feature, type / on a newline, Slack-style?), to invoke the insert menu:
Click an item to insert it, or pick it using arrow keys.
One of the interactions we need to figure out here, is what happens when you press Enter, as you’re writing. Over chat in the past week it was suggested we might want to tweak the default behavior so that Enter inserts just a single linebreak, and a new paragraph is created with two linebreaks. (The pertinent bits of the chat starts here, or you can read this summary).
Let’s discuss these mockups, data structure, linebreaks and lots more in Wednesdays editor chat, January 25, 2017 6:00:00 PM GMT! And

Plugins | make.wordpress.org | Feb. 26, 2016

Plugin Directory V3 Is Coming

Konstantin Obenland, Samuel “Otto” and Meta team is working on bringing V3 for WordPress.org plugin directory. They are looking for MVP by March 1 and working for the final release date of June 26. Stay tuned, and check all the improvement coming. Its big change, as instead of using bbPress, now all will be based in WordPress.

Plugin Directory V3 Is Coming

Plugins | make.wordpress.org | Feb. 26, 2016

A year after relaunching the Theme Directory on WordPress, the Plugin Directory will finally get the same make over. With the entire process being open source from the start, please feel free to follow along and contribute on Meta Trac and in the #meta Slack channel. For more in-depth information, please consult the project overview page.

Plugins | make.wordpress.org | Aug. 27, 2015

WordPress Forks and Copies

MIka explains policies regarding forks and copies in the WordPress repo.

WordPress Forks and Copies

Plugins | make.wordpress.org | Aug. 27, 2015

This has come up recently. What happens when someone submits a plugin that’s a copy of another? The tl;dr here is this: Please email us at plugins@wordpress.org if you find someone has slipped an uncredited fork or identical copy of another plugin into the repository.
In general, we spot these before they ever get published. We rejected 10s of plugins a month for being identical copies. That said, we also approve double that for being legitimate forks.
While the GPL and it’s compatible licenses allow for forking, we have an ‘above and beyond’ rule for hosting here, that means your plugin must be a substantial change of the original. We do not allow direct copies of other plugins to be re-listed under somebody else’s name, we allow changed forks.
What does that mean? It’s very simple. You have to add new features, remove features, modernize, fix, clean up, or otherwise make a change to the plugin that differentiates it from the original. In rare cases, a simple clean-up will be accepted, but normally we try to get a hold of the original authors and have the fixes folded in to the original plugin. If you have a fork, we require you to retain all credit and/or copyright information.
That’s

5 min read David Bisset
Development | make.wordpress.org | Mar. 30, 2016

WordPress 4.5 Field Guide

Great overview of many of the features coming to WordPress 4.5 from Aaron Jorbin

WordPress 4.5 Field Guide

Development | make.wordpress.org | Mar. 30, 2016

WordPress 4.5 is the next major version of WordPress and with it come some bang bang changes. This guide will describe many of the developer-focused changes to help you test your themes, plugins, and sites. So grab a ☕️ ,

Community | make.wordpress.org | Oct. 4, 2016

Feature Project Proposal: Notifications API

This is 2016 and email is no longer the only way to send notifications. We have many more options, like push notifications to mobile platforms, desktop notifications to browsers, messages to chat apps, endless services via webhooks, SMS messages, or even notifications in the WordPress admin area. Maybe it's time we get a really flexible API.

Feature Project Proposal: Notifications API

Community | make.wordpress.org | Oct. 4, 2016

Most of the situations where WordPress sends an outgoing email can be classified as a notification. X just happened on your website and you should be aware of it. Back when WordPress was a youngster, the only way to reliably notify a user was via email. In 2016 we have many more options, including push notifications to mobile platforms, desktop notifications to browsers, messages to chat apps, endless services via webhooks, SMS messages, or even notifications in the WordPress admin area. The list goes on. For many users, email is no longer the optimal delivery mechanism for ephemeral notifications.
To that end, let’s think about replacing wp_mail() with a modern API that allows developers to route notifications to services other than email, allow them to better modify notifications and the way in which they’re formatted, and allow them to do so without stepping on each others’ toes.
The current lack of a notifications API (or even an email sending API) can be easily summed up:
Problem: Plugin A wants to provide HTML emails, and Plugin B wants to send emails via an email delivery service such as Mandrill. Plugin C wants to disregard emails and send Slack notifications.

Community | make.wordpress.org | May. 5, 2015

Reporting Plugin Issues

Mika does a descriptive guide on how to properly report plugin issues.

Reporting Plugin Issues

Community | make.wordpress.org | May. 5, 2015

Note: I’ll be using Hello Dolly as my example ‘bad’ plugin for this post. It’s fine and not (to my knowledge) vulnerable. There are a few reasons people report plugins but the main two are as follows:
Guideline violations
Security vulnerabilities
If you report a plugin, you can make everyone’s life easier if you do the following:
Verify that it’s still applicable
Before you do anything, check if the exploit is on the latest version of the code or not. If it’s not, we may not do anything about it, depending on how popular the plugin is.
Use a good subject line
“Plugin Vulnerability” is actually not good at all. “Plugin Vulnerability in Hello Dolly – 0 Day” is great.
Send it in plain text
SupportPress is a simple creature. It doesn’t like your fancy fonts and inline images. Attachments are fine, but we cannot read your ‘Replies in-line in red’ so just keep it simple.
Link to the plugin
https://wordpress.org/plugins/hello-dolly/
Yes, it’s that easy. Put the URL on it’s own line, no punctuation around it, for maximum compatibility. With over 35k plugins, and a lot with similar names, don’t assume, link.
If the plugin is not hosted on WordPress.org, I’m sorry, but there’s nothing we can

2 min read Donna Cavalier
Community | make.wordpress.org | Jul. 31, 2015

WordPress 4.2.4 Release Candidate 1 Fixes Shortcode Mess

If you got all mad about the shortcode breaking thing in the last update, here is your chance to smile again. They are unbreaking the shortcode thing now. :)

WordPress 4.2.4 Release Candidate 1 Fixes Shortcode Mess

Community | make.wordpress.org | Jul. 31, 2015

tl;dr WordPress 4.2.4 RC1 is available (download) for testing and fixes an issue with inline scripts. A change in WordPress 4.2.3 had the unintentional side effect of breaking some inline scripts when the CDATA block is used (see #33106). For example, consider the intended content here:
//

In 4.2.2, this content is left as is and _my_function() fires as expected. In 4.2.3, the content is manipulated as such:
//
This results in the script being commented out by the // and it will not fire. A workaround for this is to use /* for commenting.
/* */
However, this workaround should not be necessary. As a result, we intend on releasing WordPress 4.2.4 to fix this issue.
Additionally, WordPress 4.2.3 caused issues when using shortcodes within angle brackets (see #33116). For example, this shortcode usage worked in 4.2.2 but did not work in 4.2.3:

While we do not recommend this use of shortcodes and strongly encourage plugin developers to move away from this use of shortcodes, the breakage was unintentional

3 min read Matt Cromwell
Community | make.wordpress.org | Oct. 5, 2016

Twenty Seventeen is Heading into Page Builder Territory

It almost looks like TwentySeventeen is getting into Page Builder Territory with its "Sections" feature built into the Customizer.

Twenty Seventeen is Heading into Page Builder Territory

Community | make.wordpress.org | Oct. 5, 2016

Here’s the summary for this week. The meeting was busy, so feel free to add anything missed in the comments. Housekeeping
Slack archive of meeting.
Meetings are every Friday at 18:00 UTC in #core-themes in Slack.
The major design implementation pull request was merged today.
Summary
The group:
discussed #37974 (Add multi-panel feature to pages through add_theme_support) for the majority of the meeting. The goal was to find a minimum viable product that could be developed in the time left.
decided to shoot for this feature to be 1. limited to the front page only. 2. exist in the Customizer 3. provide basic markup, created by Core.
decided this story board stood out as the strongest to be iterated on and mocked up as a design.
decided live preview in the Customizer wasn’t critical at the current time.
@helen and I will work on marshaling people to help with the project.
@karmatosed will work on the initial mock-up of the feature.
briefly discussed #38172 (Enable video headers in custom headers) It also needs to have a minimum viable product defined and those interested were encouraged to comment on the ticket with that in mind.
brought up #19627, and that could be worked on

4 min read David Bisset
Development | make.wordpress.org | Aug. 1, 2016

Release Leads: Call for Volunteers

The call is out for those interested in leading 4.8 and beyond releases. Release leads do not need to be developers!

Release Leads: Call for Volunteers

Development | make.wordpress.org | Aug. 1, 2016

WordPress 4.6 will be released in a couple of weeks, and Helen Hou-Sandí is preparing to lead 4.7, the final major release of 2016. With five months left in 2016, it’s time to start considering release leads for 2017. Giving release leads time to prepare is beneficial to the success of the release. It might seem advantageous to announce a year’s worth of release leads, but it puts the first and even second release lead at a disadvantage. Going forward, identifying and pre-announcing the next two release leads will help give them time to prepare. For example, at the start of the 4.8 cycle, both the 4.9 and 5.0 release leads should be confirmed.
Leading a release is a substantial time commitment. It blends aspects of being a product manager, project manager, engineering manager, and release manager. The release lead works across teams to ensure the success of the release. They are supported by the lead developers, permanent committers, and deputies of their choosing. Release leads do not need to be developers, but having experience contributing to WordPress is recommended.
Here’s how some previous release leads have described the role:
Leading a release of WordPress