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4 min read David Bisset
Plugins | mickeykay.me | Jun. 27, 2016

Archiver: WordPress Plugin That Auto-archives Content using The Wayback Machine

Looks like a slick plugin from Mickey Kay: detect changes to content types and then auto generates a snapshot on the Wayback Machine.

Archiver: WordPress Plugin That Auto-archives Content using The Wayback Machine

Plugins | mickeykay.me | Jun. 27, 2016

TL;DR I just published a new WordPress plugin called Archiver that automatically creates snapshots of your content using The Wayback Machine. At our NerdWallet hackathon a few months back, my colleague John Lee presented an idea that goes something like this: what if we could create a tool that would automatically generate a visual archive of our site content so that we could easily scroll backwards in time and associate SEO/performance shifts with causal changes we made to our content?
Brilliant idea? Yes. Has it been done? Turns out, not really. . .
When it comes to WordPress, there are a multitude of great plugins and services that can be used to automatically create backups: BlogVault (which I’ve written about before), VaultPress, BackupBuddy, etc. That said, none of these solutions allow you to easily/quickly view your site’s content over time. Most require fully restoring a specific backup before you can view your content as it looked when the backup was created – a time consuming process, especially if you’re not sure which backup is the one you’re looking for.
Additionally, WordPress’ native revisions system – while pretty awesome in

Community | mickeykay.me | Mar. 21, 2016

A model for the new WordPress plugin directory

Mickey makes a good case how simple changes can do a lot to improve a relation between WordPress and (plugin) developers.

A model for the new WordPress plugin directory

Community | mickeykay.me | Mar. 21, 2016

TL;DR a new WordPress plugin directory is in the works, and the plugin could serve as a good model for a new developer interface. There’s been a lot of great talk lately around efforts to fully revamp the WordPress plugin directory. As a plugin developer myself, I like what I hear, and get excited thinking about how we can improve upon the current setup.
For developers, the existing system has served us well in a lot of ways, allowing us to easily publish and maintain plugins, track usage (albeit not so accurately1), and provide basic support to end-users. That said, there are also a multitude of pain points with the existing plugin directory: dependency on SVN instead of Git, inconsistent search results, inclusion of obsolete information, obfuscation of more important statistics, etc. Bottom line: lots of room for improvement, and it sounds like improvement is underway.
In that same spirit, I’d like to add my two cents, using the WP Dev Dashboard plugin I authored a while back as a model for some features I’d love to see enter the scene. But first, a little back story. . .
When I published my very first plugin nearly 3 years ago, I was just stoked to make a contribution to the open