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3 min read Phil Wylie
Plugins | philwylie.co.uk | Dec. 20, 2013

Exclude your plugin from update checks in WordPress 3.7

WordPress snippet which prevents your plugin from being included in the list of plugins sent to WordPress.org to check for updates.

Exclude your plugin from update checks in WordPress 3.7

Plugins | philwylie.co.uk | Dec. 20, 2013

In order to keep your plugins up-to-date, WordPress sends information about all it’s plugins (including any inactive ones) to WordPress.org. There are concerns around the information sent as it includes details on each plugin’s developer including name and website address. While not much of a privacy issue for public plugins, there are implications for plugins custom written for specific clients. The information is used to to check if a plugin exist in the WordPress.org repository. If a plugin with the same name and a later version number exists, WordPress will dutifully offer to update/overwrite the installed plugin. A potentially disastrous situation for any custom plugins given a generic sounding name.
Maybe just something to consider for the paranoid. This also introduces the possibility of targeting users of externally hosted plugins such as those only available on GitHub by releasing an identically named WordPress.org plugin. It has been done before . As pointed out by Joost de Valk, each plugin is reviewed before being accepted into the plugin repository and any bad plugins would no doubt be identified and removed.
Mark Jaquith wrote up a solution back in 2009 which included

4 min read Phil Wylie
Community | philwylie.co.uk | Mar. 3, 2014

WP Contributor Day, Manchester

A write-up of the first WP Contributor Day held in Manchester, UK.

WP Contributor Day, Manchester

Community | philwylie.co.uk | Mar. 3, 2014

I spent my Saturday at the first WP Contributor Day . Sold as “An one day event where anyone & everyone contributes to WordPress”. The event, held at TechHub, Manchester was setup and organised by Jenny Wong following a discussion at WordCamp London 2013. Often, knowing where to start is a challenge. And WordPress is no different. It’s a giant project and for me, I saw this day as an opportunity to push me to finally get involved. It was kicked off by an introduction from Jenny, followed by talks from WordPress co-founder Mike Little and web accessibility expert Graham Armfield.
Mike Little introduced Vagrant, and in particular the Varying Vagrant Vagrants (VVV) project. The setup gives developers a kickstart in getting WordPress running locally (without the need to upload files to a hosting account).
Following the talks, we split into groups. Feeling pumped and definitely over-confident, already having used a VVV setup for a while, I sat with a group of developers and looked through Trac for a suitable challenge to tackle. I felt a bit lost to be honest. There were four unclaimed “ Good First Bugs ” (which taking a look after the event, I see that they all remain unclaimed). I had