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11 min read Ahmad Awais
Community | riad.blog | Dec. 30, 2017

WordPress Core, the next battles!

This is an important article and this is what WordPress developers should be thinking about as we move into 2018. Kudos to Riad on writing what I have been trying to evangelize for the last couple of years in bits and pieces.

WordPress Core, the next battles!

Community | riad.blog | Dec. 30, 2017

What are the next battles we should take to improve WordPress technology and workflow? What should we do next? I've been part of the WordPress community for more than a year now, which is really short in WordPress time, but I truly love this community and I hope to contribute for several more years. This year has been amazing in terms of Development and Workflow evolutions in the WordPress community, partly pushed by Gutenberg. Let's continue modernizing WordPress!
In this very subjective post, I'm going to list some of the battles worth considering for the future of WordPress. No battle is easy, but remember:
we're on a marathon not a sprint and no matter how far away the goal is, the only way to get there is by putting one foot in front of another every day.
Git and GitHub
Trac served WordPress very well, it centralizes all discussions and patches in one consistent place, but is it the right tool for a large Open Source project in 2018? Is it time to move to something else?
A new generation of developers works exclusively on Git and GitHub. Casual contributors won't invest time to learn a tool not used in any other place (I'm probably exaggerating a bit here) just to submit a small

13 min read Neil Murray
Development | riad.blog | Oct. 27, 2017

One thousand and one way to extend Gutenberg today

Detailed explanation of the extensibility API for Gutenberg. Covers the future of JavaScript-based WordPress plugins and how plugin/theme developers can start working with Gutenberg.

One thousand and one way to extend Gutenberg today

Development | riad.blog | Oct. 27, 2017

If there's one and only one feature that made WordPress gain 30% of the web's market share, this feature would be Extensibility. What is WordPress without Yoast? What is WordPress without ACF? Without JetPack? WooCommerce? Without Akismet? Without Contact Form 7? What is WordPress without Hello Dolly? It's nothing but another niche CMS with way less than its current market share. So yes, Extensibility is key, and we can't build the next generation of the WordPress Editor without making it extensible. What does "making it extensible" mean? Does this mean providing hooks and filters in JavaScript the same way we do in PHP? Does this mean allowing plugins to extend and tweak any UI component used by Gutenberg? Does this mean adding filters to the REST API? Does this mean Giving access to an Editor object to manipulate the editor's content?
There's no clear answer to all these questions. Extensibility is a very difficult problem and unless you build it with real use-cases in mind, you're more likely to get it wrong. (and being stuck with it for a long time).
So let's take a look a closer look at Extensibility in Gutenberg and what we can achieve as a third party plugin right now.

9 min read Neil Murray
Development | riad.blog | Oct. 27, 2017

How Gutenberg is changing WordPress Development?

Important explanation of how Gutenberg is likely to change WordPress Development.

How Gutenberg is changing WordPress Development?

Development | riad.blog | Oct. 27, 2017

If you're already familiar with WordPress, you're probably used to its content editor based on TinyMCE. Creating content in WordPress did not really change for many years now. But with new competitors gaining more and more attraction like Medium, Ghost, Wix, Squarespace, WordPress decided to build a new Editor called Gutenberg (After Johannes Gutenberg, the inventor of the printing press). Gutenberg is a big change, it's a completely new way of creating content. Instead of writing inside a unique rich text input, you add blocks of various types (paragraphs, images, videos, embeds, quotes, lists….) to compose your post's content.
The impact of this change on WordPress Users is not negligible. Content creators will have to learn about blocks, plugins authors will create custom blocks and templates, theme authors will style blocks… There are several posts out there talking about these changes and their impact on the users but very few talk about how Gutenberg is changing radically how we develop WordPress itself (aside from the frameworks battle,
VueJS VS React VS Preact)
1- Developing in Github
Usually WordPress development happens in WordPress Trac, through tickets and