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Community | stephanis.info | May. 15, 2015

Please Don’t Hack Core

Intriguing to find out that cPanel was doing something like this. Despair or ignorance?

Please Don’t Hack Core

Community | stephanis.info | May. 15, 2015

No Description

6 min read Donna Cavalier
Plugins | stephanis.info | Feb. 1, 2015

Why Jetpack isn't a Collection of Plugins, Part the First

The first, but not the only reason, Jetpack is all bundled together the way it is.

Why Jetpack isn't a Collection of Plugins, Part the First

Plugins | stephanis.info | Feb. 1, 2015

In keeping with a previous post I’d made a couple months ago explaining the oft-discussed rationale of why we do things the way we do with Jetpack, I’ll be doing it again today, on a different — but related — topic. I may as well make a series of it.
This is the first of two posts (in theory, I’ll remember to write the second) explaining why Jetpack is a big plugin with many features, rather than many individual plugins. This post will be looking at the primary technical reason. The abundance of other reasons will be in the subsequent post. (So please don’t read this post and think it’s the only reason — it’s not)
tl;dr: Dependency management sucks.
Jetpack, as you may be aware, is structured as a bunch of modules. Many — but not all — require a connection to WordPress.com to function. This isn’t for vanity purposes, it’s because they actually leverage the WordPress.com server infrastructure to do things harder, better, faster, stronger than a $5/month shared host is capable of. To do that, they need to be able to communicate securely with WordPress.com, and WordPress.com must be able to communicate securely back to your site.
Some of the modules that require a connection are things