Welcome to ManageWP.org

Register to share, discuss and vote for the best WordPress stories every day, find new ideas and inspiration for your business and network with other members of the WordPress community. Join the #1 WordPress news community!

×

5 min read M Asif Rahman
Community | torquemag.io | Apr. 20, 2016

Should User Data From WordPress.org Belong To The Community?

A quite interesting post from our own Josh Pollock about who owns what of WordPress.org

Should User Data From WordPress.org Belong To The Community?

Community | torquemag.io | Apr. 20, 2016

I don’t have a problem with paying for services with data. I use Gmail, knowing full well there is no way Google would provide me with such an amazing service if they didn’t use my data to create targeted ads. Similiarly, I use Facebook, Twitter, and other “free” services knowing that I am the product that these services offer to their customers. This is how I “pay” for these services. If they can’t sell ads, then they can’t make money and that, after all, is their objective.
Two WordPress plugins I use a lot, WordPress SEO by Yoast and Easy Digital Downloads, have an option for anonymous data tracking, and I always allow them to do so. I’m happier to be sending my usage data to them than I am to be sending it to Google — which I do without an option.
WordPress itself is a murkier business. I operate a few WordPress sites, all of which are regularly checking into the WordPress.org API, reporting usage stats, and getting update notifications. The ability to get plugin, theme, and core updates via WordPress.org is really convenient.
If installing and updating themes via the WordPress dashboard wasn’t so easy, WordPress wouldn’t be what it is today. I understand and appreciate this.
Here’s

8 min read David McCan
Community | torquemag.io | Oct. 15, 2016

Why Let's Encrypt Has Completely Changed The SSL Landscape

This article provides a nice overview and history of SSL certs and what Let's Encrypt brings to the table. It is nice to see Let's Encrypt doing so well.

Why Let's Encrypt Has Completely Changed The SSL Landscape

Community | torquemag.io | Oct. 15, 2016

Though WordPress is increasingly bulletproof out of the box, security is a topic that never really goes away for users. It’s not just the platform itself that you have to worry about, there’s also a much wider world out there full of potentially bad actors with a vested interest in breaking down your digital door. SSL certificates solve one part of that puzzle and have been a rock-solid way of keeping the connection between your website and the average user secure since 1996. Cost and implementation concerns, however, have long stood in the way of their widespread deployment.
In this piece, we’ll cover the recent unveiling of the Let’s Encrypt initiative, its promise of free and easily implementable SSL certificates for all, and how it looks set to radically change the online security landscape. Let’s kick things off with a bit of background.
What SSL Is And Why It’s Important
We’ll get some basics out of the way for those who might be coming at this for the first time. HTTP, the protocol we use to sling information around the web, is unencrypted by default. This means that data can potentially be intercepted and tampered with during its journey.

10 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | torquemag.io | Jul. 1, 2015

Is Modular Code the future of WordPress?

Roy Sivan discusses why he got interested in BackPress and why it could be the future of WordPress. I've been lurking in all the BackPress chatter and moderating discussion here and there and I'll say that there's real merit to the idea. Worth reading and following for sure.

Is Modular Code the future of WordPress?

Editorials | torquemag.io | Jul. 1, 2015

This year at WordCamp Miami I had the pleasure of meeting John James Jacoby, or JJJ. Many of you may know him as the man behind BuddyPress, but I got to know him for another, older project, that he used to be involved with, BackPress. The more I learned about BackPress, the more I became intrigued. That’s when JJJ and I started talking about the revival of the BackPress project.
The BackPress Back Story
BackPress started its life as the foundational library of WordPress. It was more or less the wp-includes directory, which granted access to all of the php functions that everyone knows and loves in WordPress code, without the WordPress ecosystem.
No quick, five minute install. No easy-to-use CMS dashboard. Just a library of code. Unfortunately the project died out—and without anyone to maintain it and few pieces of code ever making its way back into WordPress, it was forgotten.
How I Got Interested and Involved
In early 2013, I started to learn AngularJS, and I immediately wanted to connect it to WordPress. I managed to get my first theme up and running using my own crude API.
That year, Ryan McCue introduced the WP-API project… and I was hooked.
About one year later I started to realize

3 min read Josh Pollock
Community | torquemag.io | Jun. 8, 2016

Freemius Checkout Makes It Easier To Sell WordPress Products

Freemius checkout looks like a super awesome way to sell WordPress plugins and themes. Check out Torque's coverage!

Freemius Checkout Makes It Easier To Sell WordPress Products

Community | torquemag.io | Jun. 8, 2016

Freemius today announced Checkout, a new service to help developers sell WordPress products on any site by providing secure checkout, software licensing, and automatic updates. “We created Checkout to help fellow developers be able to do whatever they feel passionate about and make a living from that,” CEO and Founder of Freemius Vova Feldman told Torque.
You can register for Checkout for free clicking “Register for Beta.” You’ll subsequently be asked schedule a 15-minute demo, which according to Feldman will help ensure that each user has all the tools necessary to efficiently use Checkout.
When you have completed the demo, you will be able to go to the Freemius dashboard and start setting up your accounts. Checkout suggests prices but you can add any amount you want for Monthly, Annually, and Lifetime subscriptions. You can also select bulk pricing if you want to bundle your plugins or themes.
Once you’ve selected your pricing preferences, generate your checkout code snippet and add it to your website. You’ll get one code for the actual website and a dummy one that you can test to make sure everything is working the way you want it to.
To

9 min read David McCan
Community | torquemag.io | Feb. 17, 2016

Why WordPress Needs The Fields API And How To Use It

Josh Pollock talks about the Fields API, why WordPress needs it, and gives an example of its use.

Why WordPress Needs The Fields API And How To Use It

Community | torquemag.io | Feb. 17, 2016

Imagine someone creates an open-source, JavaScript admin interface for their WordPress site and names it after a greek demigod. You’re probably thinking wow, that’s so cool, I wonder if I can make it work on my site. But then you start thinking about all of the custom metaboxes and other types of custom forms that plugins add to the post, term, and user edit screens. There is no standard for metaboxes or for declaring what fields a plugin has to use. Making something that “just works” with everything is increasingly more complicated. Custom API-driven interfaces remain the territory of those who can afford to build and maintain bespoke solutions.
Many people, including myself, have talked extensively about an API-driven future of WordPress. In the first article I wrote for Torque on the REST API, I reiterated what WordPress lead developer Andrew Nacin told the audience at WordCamp Milwaukee in 2014: the best projects for contributors to become a part of if they wanted to be a part of the future of WordPress were the REST API and what was then called the metadata project.
Part of the REST API is now in core, and the metadata project, now known as the Fields API project, has made great

12 min read Marie Dodson
Community | torquemag.io | Aug. 13, 2014

Getting Started with Vagrant for Local Development

Vagrant is a system for creating local web servers in portable, highly-configurable virtual machines on Linux, Windows, and Mac. Though there are lots of ways to create a local testing environment for WordPress development, Vagrant is one of the most powerful and configurable options.

Getting Started with Vagrant for Local Development

Community | torquemag.io | Aug. 13, 2014

Vagrant is a system for creating local web servers in portable, highly-configurable virtual machines on Linux, Windows, and Mac. Though there are lots of ways to create a local testing environment for WordPress development, Vagrant is one of the most powerful and configurable options. In this article, I’ll introduce Vagrant, and I will walk you through setting up VVV, a popular WordPress vagrant setup.
The real advantage of Vagrant is that it’s totally customizable. This means you can emulate your production environment in your local development environment. When done right, this means no surprises when you go live.
Developing with the same technologies as you use on the live server can save you from running into bugs on your live site, which never happened locally since the situation that caused them doesn’t exist locally. For example, how can you know that your site has no problems with NGINX if your local web server is powered by apache? Or, how can you be sure your code is compatible with PHP 5.2 or 5.3, which many hosts still use, if you only tested it in the latest version of PHP?
What is Vagrant?
The heart of Vagrant is the vagrant file, which contains a recipe for creating and

2 min read Matt Cromwell
Plugins | torquemag.io | Feb. 24, 2016

Introducing Torque's 2016 Plugin Madness Competition

Not sure the value or the metric for determining the "best plugin of 2016" but this looks like a lot of fun.

Introducing Torque's 2016 Plugin Madness Competition

Plugins | torquemag.io | Feb. 24, 2016

WordPressers, get ready. On March 1, we’re launching Torque’s 2016 Plugin Madness, where the first 64 most popular WordPress plugins from the official plugin directory compete against each other for total plugin domination! Modeled after the NCAA college basketball tournament March Madness, we use a bracket-based voting system to pit plugins against one another each week. Head on over to pluginmadness.com to see which plugins are competing and check in weekly to vote on the current round.
We randomly placed the 64 plugins into four groups — The Pressers, The Wordees, The Extenders, and The Installers (watch our selection video below).
Starting March 1, you can go to pluginmadness.com to vote on which plugins will make it to the next round:
March 1: The Enchanting 64 (Round 1)
March 8: The Thrilling 32 (Round 2)
March 15: The Supreme 16 (Round 3)
March 22: The Exceptional 8 (Round 4)
March 29: The Phenomenal 4 (Semi-finals)
April 5: Championship
April 12: Winner Announced
You will have a full week to vote on your favorite plugins in each round.
Plugin bragging rights isn’t all that’s at stake. When you vote, tell the world and you could win a sweet Torque Magazine swag pack that will

9 min read Ahmad Awais
Tutorials | torquemag.io | Jun. 11, 2015

So You Want To Use WordPress To Make An App?

This is the first, of many upcoming articles I'm writing on what changes in the planning and coding as well as the business/ client relationship when using WordPress to build an app. I'd love to know what questions everyone has that I can address as I go on, or if you have any thoughts on what's important to cover. - via Josh Pollock

So You Want To Use WordPress To Make An App?

Tutorials | torquemag.io | Jun. 11, 2015

At WordCamp Miami, which I attended recently, one of the most popular topics of discussion was leveraging WordPress to power mobile applications. At this point, I think everyone is an agreement that you can, in fact, use WordPress to power both web and mobile applications. Now it’s time to answer the questions “Should I use it?” and, if so, “how do I do it?” These questions don’t have one simple answer. In fact, they are highly contingent on the project, budget, requirements, and competencies of those involved.
Like every other type of project, how well you plan it is going to be one of the biggest determinants for whether or not your project will be successful. In this article, I will address the different questions that you need to answer during your planning; and then, in future articles, I’ll delve a bit deeper into them.
It’s important to note that these are only my opinions. Each project is different, and so you will have to answer these questions for yourself on a per-project basis.
Do You Know Why You’re Using WordPress To Build Your App?
Building web applications is very different than building WordPress sites, themes, or plugins, and, how you use it, may invalidate some of

10 min read Josh Pollock
Editorials | torquemag.io | Mar. 11, 2015

Defining the WordPress 80/20 problem

The difficult 20% of a WordPress project is the customization necessary for getting the any plugin or theme to deliver on its promise. How intuitive that last 20% is, defines how “easy” or "hard" WordPress is perceived to be.

Defining the WordPress 80/20 problem

Editorials | torquemag.io | Mar. 11, 2015

The 80/20 rule, also known as the Pareto Principle, states that “for many events, roughly 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes.” The 80/20 rule is named after Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, and was popularized as a business tool in the book Living the 80/20 Way, by Richard Koch. This is one of the most useful principles for finding the most important things to focus on in business marketing and development. Identifying the 20% of your efforts that have the biggest impacts is a fundamental step in maximizing your efficiency in any pursuit.
Most people with a freelance web development practice have likely come to understand that 20% of their clients generate 80% of their income. This percentage also holds true when it comes to the satisfaction and enjoyment that comes from doing the work—where 20% of clients are responsible for 80% of the overall satisfaction that freelancers get from their work.
Those who apply the 80/20 rule to their lives, eliminate the 80% of work (or clients) that don’t generate a return on investment. This allows them to focus on serving the best clients better—leading to better, more fulfilling (and more profitable) work.
WordPress 80/20
The 80/20

6 min read Leif Quitevis
Business | torquemag.io | Oct. 24, 2014

Interview with Chris Lema on Thinking Strategically

As usual, there's a few nuggets of wisdom from Chris Lema. His 'hope is not a strategy' mantra shows up subtly. A short read well worth a couple of minutes.

Interview with Chris Lema on Thinking Strategically

Business | torquemag.io | Oct. 24, 2014

Starting and growing a successful business requires focus, hard work, and a great deal of industry knowledge. Understanding how to select and appeal to a target market, increase efficiency, and grow revenue are just a few of the important facets that should be considered. To bridge this knowledge gap, hiring a third-party consultant to improve your company’s business strategy is a great option. For some strategic insight into business development we reached out to Chris Lema — CTO & Chief Strategist Crowdfavorite and speaker, coach, and daily blogger.
Q: How did you start?
A: From 1997 until 2006 I worked in five software startups in San Francisco. I loved startups and found myself, towards the end of that period, coaching a lot of other startups. Most of the time we were talking product strategy, team formation, and fundraising. But every one of them needed a website. Initially it would be some simple HTML, but over time I wanted to support them without supporting them. So I wanted a content management solution (CMS) that would let them edit their own site. And while I started with a product called DotNetNuke, I quickly found WordPress one weekend in 2005 and started using it. My first

13 min read Josh Pollock
Tutorials | torquemag.io | Dec. 29, 2015

Creating A JavaScript Single Page App In The WordPress Dashboard

Using AngularJS for your WordPress plugin's admin screen is awesome. This is known. Roy shows you how.

Creating A JavaScript Single Page App In The WordPress Dashboard

Tutorials | torquemag.io | Dec. 29, 2015

For over a year now, I have been talking to the WordPress community about JavaScript, specifically AngularJS. Not only have I expressed the growing significance of JavaScript to people in conversation and blog posts, but I have also emphasized its importance in several of my WordCamp talks in 2015. It appears that Matt Mullenweg shares this sentiment, because earlier this month at WordCamp US, he urged everyone to “learn JavaScript, deeply.” In this article, I’m going to walk through the fundamentals of creating a better admin interface for plugin and theme developers using AngularJS. I’ll also demonstrate how you can take it to the next level.
I won’t, however, discuss why this is so significant for front-end development or how the REST API changes things to make it easier to build JavaScript applications. If you’re interested in learning more about this, Josh Pollock and I have written extensively about it already on Torque.
Before you begin, you must determine what it is you are administering on the site specifically. To keep this simple, let’s say your plugin creates a custom post type (CPT) that is hidden from the sidebar. This use case is simple — you have a CPT to store data,

10 min read Marie Dodson
Community | torquemag.io | Apr. 30, 2015

The real issue with ThemeForest

One of the most controversial companies in the WordPress ecosystem is Envato, the company that owns the theme and template marketplace, ThemeForest.

The real issue with ThemeForest

Community | torquemag.io | Apr. 30, 2015

One of the most controversial companies in the WordPress ecosystem is Envato, the company that owns the theme and template marketplace, ThemeForest. ThemeForest’s best selling product category is WordPress themes, and they are a behemoth in this space. As Envato’s blog states: “In September 2014, ThemeForest was the 88th most trafficked website in the world (according to Alexa.com), at the time ahead of Netflix.”
But in a poll run by Jeff Chandler of WPTavern.com, only twenty-eight percent of respondents said “ThemeForest is a great place to find a variety of good looking themes.” Fifty percent said “it is a marketplace with good looking themes but are poorly coded.” And twenty-two percent said “stay as far away as possible.”
So, did Envato find a hole in the marketplace, and build a business to provide customers what they want? And are all the developers who complain about it just whining? Or is ThemeForest really a marketplace for bad themes?
Like many things, the answer is not a simple yes or no. So let me present both sides of the argument.
The case for ThemeForest
Here are the arguments in support of ThemeForest.
1. ThemeForest gives consumers what they want
It’s become rather

7 min read Marie Dodson
Community | torquemag.io | Jun. 13, 2016

4 New Revenue Routes The WordPress REST API Opens Up

The REST API opens up a range of interesting new revenue routes for WordPress developers. Here's our guide to four of them.

4 New Revenue Routes The WordPress REST API Opens Up

Community | torquemag.io | Jun. 13, 2016

With the WordPress REST API still staggering towards the finishing line, now is a great time to dust off the crystal ball and consider how developers might actually go about making money through its commercial use in the future. The next few years promises to bring a flood of new talent into the WordPress ecosystem, cementing the platform’s place as the dominant publishing platform online. We’re still in the early days of this next stage, but it’s already obvious that a much wider world of opportunity is potentially opening up to skilled developers.
In this piece, we’ll whet your appetite for what’s to come with a look at four exciting new revenue opportunities opened up by the REST API. All of them are still relatively unexplored and have outstanding profit potential for many years to come.
1. Creation of Niche-Specific Software as a Service Solutions
With the right mix of specific themes and plugins, WordPress has more than proven its value as a niche-specific solution over the years, and blogging is far from the only niche being served. From real estate to restaurant sites, hundreds of thousands of small businesses across the globe are already tailoring

Community | torquemag.io | Dec. 17, 2014

Interview with Vladimir Prelovac

Read the story of Founder of this amazing platform, ManageWP. More than 7+ years of experience with WordPress, Vladimir is a big name in the industry due to his contributions in WordPress communtiy.

Interview with Vladimir Prelovac

Community | torquemag.io | Dec. 17, 2014

The growing number of plugins is part of what makes WordPress so appealing. There’s literally a WordPress plugin for everything; from contact forms, to security, to holiday snow. That being said, entering into the world of WordPress plugins may be challenging, particularly if you haven’t already established yourself as a leading plugin author. Today, Vladimir Prelovac, the brains behind ManageWP, announced the release of the Plugin Discovery Tool on ManageWP.org, a tool that will increase the discoverability of new plugins and plugin authors.
Torque reached out to Vladimir Prelovac to learn more about his journey, his new plugin discovery tool, and future initiatives for ManageWP.
Torque: How did you first get involved with WordPress?
Vladimir: It was in 2007, and I was eager to get entrepreneurial. I decided I needed a blog and after trying a couple of options I opted for WordPress. A fateful decision as it turns out.
As a developer, I quickly became a part of the community and started building a name for myself by creating useful WordPress plugins, writing about WordPress and eventually writing a book on WordPress development.
Torque: What was your objective when you first founded

8 min read Josh Pollock
Tutorials | torquemag.io | Jan. 6, 2015

Why and How To Use Class Autoloading and Namespacing To Improve WordPress Development

A case for why to use some of the most important, and easy to use tools that PHP gives us, that WordPress developers avoid due to extreme-backwards compatibility requirements of WordPress core. Namespacing, and autoloaders are two complementary features that make it easier to use small, more manageable, and more easily reusable classes and write better code.

Why and How To Use Class Autoloading and Namespacing To Improve WordPress Development

Tutorials | torquemag.io | Jan. 6, 2015

Chris Aprea recently wrote a great post on why WordPress’ (continued) support of unsupported versions of PHP, especially PHP 5.2, is preventing WordPress developers from taking full advantage of the way the language has evolved over the last 8 years or so. Two of the best features in PHP, which WordPress developers have generally shied away from since they are not supported by PHP 5.2, are SPL autoloaders and namespacing. These two complementary features make it easier to use small, more manageable, and more easily reusable classes.
Understanding how namespacing and autoloaders work will help you get comfortable working with PHP libraries that were not written for WordPress, but do follow the established PHP standards. You can, however, use autoloaders without namespaces or without following the latest standards. For example, Carl Alexander discusses how to build an autoloader that follows the standards for class naming used in WordPress core in one of his excellent tutorials.
In this article, I will discuss how to follow the PSR-4 standard for class and file naming. By doing so, you’ll find that this standard not only makes it very easy to use a class autoloader, but it also makes

8 min read Vova Feldman
Business | torquemag.io | Apr. 8, 2016

 Concentrate On Your Product And Your Users With Freemius

Great write up by Josh Pollock on the decision making of using Freemius and how it enables him to focus on his product and users.

 Concentrate On Your Product And Your Users With Freemius

Business | torquemag.io | Apr. 8, 2016

I think it’s important for WordPress companies to seek advice from those outside of the WordPress economy. While WordPress users have experience in the subject matter, an outsider’s perspective brings fresh insight. It’s one of the many reasons I participate in my local startup culture in Tallahassee. With the exception of hosting, it’s often challenging to explain your WordPress product business. This is in part because people might not see WordPress.org as an avenue to sales since it is not a marketplace. WordPress.org, however, is a great user-acquisition and delivery channel for freemium plugins and themes. Free plugin and add-ons or limited API access have worked really well for WooCommerce, Akismet, WordPress SEO by Yoast, and many other successful product companies.
But, what may seem a little off to people is that freemium plugin and theme developers are forced by the restrictions that come with distributing via WordPress.org to know very little about their users. For example, right now, I not only have very little sense of how my plugin is being used, but I don’t have a way of knowing which plugins it’s most often used with or what version of PHP and WordPress it’s being used

13 min read David Bisset
Development | torquemag.io | Jun. 21, 2016

Basic PHP Design Patterns For WordPress

A refresher or good info for newer developers on design patterns and architectures in PHP plus some WordPress common patterns.

Basic PHP Design Patterns For WordPress

Development | torquemag.io | Jun. 21, 2016

Software development is about repeating yourself intelligently by using functions to encapsulate repetitve code, saving you the hassle of writing it out each time. This doesn’t just mean finding a repeatable pattern and going with it, it’s important to find the right pattern. That is where PHP design patterns come into play. While we often think of this in terms of choosing to write a function or class, or to import a library, this approach also extends to application architecture. The architecture of a framework, CMS, plugin, theme, class, or system is often described as conforming to a pattern.
Being aware of the classic software PHP design patterns and architectures as well as common patterns employed in WordPress can be very instrumental in helping us write better code.
Event Driven Vs. Model View Controller
WordPress uses an event-driven architecture, in which there are hooks in the core software and plugins and themes that act as events. When WordPress encounters a hook, it executes all code “hooked” to that event.
This loosely conforms to the publisher/subscriber pattern where WordPress or a plugin or theme “publishes” an event with apply_filters()

8 min read Michael Beil
Plugins | torquemag.io | Mar. 25, 2014

Taking a Second Look at the Plugin Repository

How can we pare down the available plugins in the repository?

Taking a Second Look at the Plugin Repository

Plugins | torquemag.io | Mar. 25, 2014

Just last week, the WordPress plugin repository passed the 30,000 plugins hosted mark. This is, of course, an incredible achievement and one that reflects both the magnitude of the WordPress project and the spirit of its community. It also got me thinking. 30,000 is a lot of plugins. There are many plugins that are outdated, ineffective, and potentially harmful to WordPress installs. Finding those, however, can be a daunting task, and regulating them can be even more difficult.
I began thinking out loud on Twitter, and was able to come up with a few suggestions. I think that it’s certainly a problem worth investigating, and one with several possible solutions (possibly none of them ideal). This article is simply exploring a few possibilities. I’d like to hear more—lots more—from the community.
We Need Less Plugins
There are a lot of plugins out there. But the good ones tend to bubble to the top, and we don’t have to download or try all of them.
There are a couple reasons why we need to strip the list down. For one, there are some plugins out there that have slipped through the cracks and will absolutely break your site. We need a way of finding and removing these plugins from the repository.

1 min read Marie Dodson
Community | torquemag.io | Dec. 10, 2015

Kinsta's Battle Royale: HHVM Vs. PHP 7

This post features results from Kinsta's test with PHP 5.6, PHP 7, and HHVM. It also talks about other reasons, besides speed, to consider when deciding between PHP7 and HHVM.

3 min read Marie Dodson
Community | torquemag.io | Jan. 3, 2017

WordPress Listed As 'CMS of the Year 2016' for 7th Consecutive Year

W3Techs today released its list of 'Web Technologies of the Year' and once again WordPress earned the spot as the CMS of the year.

WordPress Listed As 'CMS of the Year 2016' for 7th Consecutive Year

Community | torquemag.io | Jan. 3, 2017

W3Techs today released its list of ‘Web Technologies of the Year 2016,’ and once again, for the seventh consecutive year, WordPress earned the spot as the CMS of the year. WordPress is accompanied by other leading web technologies, like Google Analytics, Ubuntu, Amazon, and CloudFlare, on the list of web technologies of the year. The list is determined by the largest increase in usage in the last year, in which W3Techs “compared the number of sites using a technology on January 1st, 2016 with the corresponding number on January 1st, 2017.” WordPress has more than doubled since it first won CMS of the year in 2010, demonstrating its unstoppable growth and dynamic ability to power digital experiences as a full-service application.
At the start of 2016, WordPress was used by 25.6 percent of all websites and by the end was used by 27.3 percent — experiencing a 1.7 percent growth. For perspective, this is more than eight times the increase of the second place CMS, Shopify, which experienced a .2 percent increase over the year.
WordPress’s user-friendliness and extensibility make it the leading choice for small and enterprise sites alike. In fact, a whopping

9 min read Josh Pollock
Plugins | torquemag.io | Jun. 3, 2015

Validation, Shipping, and Scaling WordPress Products

As the WordPress ecosystem matures, more and more developers are making the leap from freelancing or agency work to creating and selling products. That's great, but it means making the switch from thinking like a freelancer, to thinking like a startup entrepreneur.

Validation, Shipping, and Scaling WordPress Products

Plugins | torquemag.io | Jun. 3, 2015

In my last article for Torque, I talked about marketing automation for Easy Digital Downloads. The idea for that article grew out of the work that I’m currently doing to scale my own business—which has been going pretty well so far, but has not yet reached enough people to have the kind of success that we are shooting for long term. Marketing automation is one of many tools to grow a business. As the WordPress ecosystem matures, more and more developers are making the leap from freelancing or agency work to creating and selling products. These products range from WordPress plugins and themes, to services for WordPress users, to services and products that, while being powered by WordPress, are sold to both WordPress and non-WordPress users.
This is a great evolution to see in our rapidly changing ecosystem. As we become even more product-focused, many of us could benefit from thinking about our businesses like startups, according to the lean startup methodology. I’m not an expert on the lean startup method, but I love how its proponents stress validating ideas, pushing them to market, and scaling them intelligently.
To help put this into perspective within the WordPress ecosystem, I

3 min read Vova Feldman
Development | torquemag.io | Jul. 27, 2016

IncludeWP Is A New Home For WordPress Frameworks

W00t W00t! A leaderboard of the top open-source frameworks for WordPress plugin & theme developers.

IncludeWP Is A New Home For WordPress Frameworks

Development | torquemag.io | Jul. 27, 2016

After the plugins review team made a statement disallowing frameworks in the repository last March, Co-founder of Freemius Vova Feldman decided to find them a new home. With help from Luca Fracassi from Addendio, Feldman and his team created IncludeWP, a hub to display all open-source frameworks for WordPress. IncludeWP uses the WordPress.org APIs and SVN to automatically identify which .org frameworks plugins and themes are using, which empowers developers to see who exactly is using their product. Moreover, it also enables them to start a new product with a strong foundation. The work behind the project is all open-source and can be found on GitHub.
Why IncludeWP?
As Feldman said in the release “Code reusability is awesome!” That is the whole idea behind the project. Sharing code is the foundation of WordPress.
Having foundations for a theme or plugin already available will make your workload smaller. It doesn’t make sense to continue to rewrite the same functionality over and over, so check with IncludeWP before you begin to see if there’s a framework that suits your needs.
How To Pick The Right Framework
In the release, Feldman included tips for making sure

Tutorials | torquemag.io | Aug. 27, 2014

Introduction to the JSON REST API

WordPress is slightly addictive. Maybe you started of just needing a simple website. You chose a theme that fit your needs mostly, set up some widgets, maybe installed some plugins and that was all you needed in the beginning.

Introduction to the JSON REST API

Tutorials | torquemag.io | Aug. 27, 2014

In my article on the future of WordPress, I wrote about how the introduction of a JSON RESTful API to WordPress core will radically expand WordPress’s reach and capabilities. What is so exciting about this new REST API — which is currently available as a plugin, and slated to be included in WordPress 4.1 — is its ability to use it to not only display content from other WordPress sites, or even other applications entirely, but to save content from other sites, whether they are WordPress sites or not.
In the past, this sort of integration was really only available through XML-RPC. However, the new REST API uses JSON, which is basically a universal connector for data on the internet. What used to be an incredibly complicated process with XML-RPC, can now be simplified by using the much more common JSON standard.
Most programming languages have an easy way to convert their standard data structures into JSON, and convert JSON into their standard data structures. For example, in PHP we have json_encode() and json_decode() to translate from PHP arrays or objects into JSON or the other way around. What this means on a practical level is that WordPress can be the data management tool for an

16 min read David Bisset
Security | torquemag.io | Mar. 31, 2016

How WordPress Sites Get Hacked (And What to Do About It)

General roundup of general info and tips, usual to share with clients.

How WordPress Sites Get Hacked (And What to Do About It)

Security | torquemag.io | Mar. 31, 2016

Having your WordPress site hacked is one of the biggest nightmares for any website owner. From one moment to the next, your site is shut down. Traffic plummets and all the energy, effort, time, and money you put into your site is on the brink of being lost entirely.
Finding and fixing the problem is hard work, however, not as hard as winning back your audience’s trust or getting your site off spam blacklists.
While getting hacked is never pleasant, it is much more common than you would think.
The ascent of WordPress has painted a large bullseye on the back of the CMS and turned it into a favorite target for hackers.
In 2012 alone, more than 170,000 WordPress websites were hacked — a number that is likely much higher by now.
To spare you this unpleasant experience, in this article we will look at the reasons hackers target WordPress websites, the most common ways they gain access and what measures you can take to protect yourself.
This is compulsory reading for any WordPress website owner, so take notice!
Why Would Anyone Want To Hack Your WordPress Site?
Especially owners of smaller websites often think themselves an unlikely target for hackers.
After all, why would anyone care about