Welcome to ManageWP.org

Register to share, discuss and vote for the best WordPress stories every day, find new ideas and inspiration for your business and network with other members of the WordPress community. Join the #1 WordPress news community!

×

Community | xwp.co | Nov. 17, 2017

Tide: A path to better code across the WordPress ecosystem

Interesting attempt to solve the eternal "Does X work with Y"WordPress conundrum.

xwp.co |

Tide: A path to better code across the WordPress ecosystem

Community | xwp.co | Nov. 17, 2017

Involve yourself in enough WordCamps, meetups and community forums, and you start to notice a trend. The same kind of question is asked over and over. It sounds something like… What plugin should I install to do {feature}?
WordPress users have the world’s most popular CMS, with 29% of the web under its wing and 53,000+ plugins, yet there is still a confidence gap when choosing plugins and themes. Right now, WordPress does a great job of providing plugin and theme information related to:
The features
The support you receive
User reviews
These are all part of what makes a good plugin or theme, but there is an important piece missing. This piece of information answers the question…
Will the code I’m about to install break or put my site at risk?
A plugin or theme could deliver the exact range of features you need, with great support, and positive reviews, but if the quality of code it contains is poor, you risk the integrity of your website. A single line of good code can unlock potential for you and your website, but bad code can trigger untold calamity.
Unfortunately, the barrier of entry to writing good code is higher than we would like to admit.
The good news

5 min read Tom Harrigan
Community | xwp.co | Nov. 25, 2014

Why WordPress Agencies Should Support Community Projects

Those with the dough should support those with specialty skillsets in projects (ex. BuddyPress, bbPress, GlotPress) to most efficiently move the project forward, allowing all to benefit from the progress made.

xwp.co |

Why WordPress Agencies Should Support Community Projects

Community | xwp.co | Nov. 25, 2014

Patronage has been a standard method of support for artists and artisans for thousands of years. Shakespeare, Michelangelo, and Da Vinci each made some of their greatest works while under the patronage of someone. The problem with that model is that the patrons could easily disappear, whether through death, calamity, or simple fickleness. Here we are in modern times, and that kind of patronage isn’t as common as it once was. A far better model is to have a large group of smaller impact patrons, so that if some drop off it’s not the end of the project. My friend Rick has done this with 2 music albums already, and it’s great. Indiegogo is a great platform for people to gather many small patrons for a specific project.
Recently John James Jacoby (@JJJ on Twitter) decided he wanted to dedicate himself to full time work on BuddyPress, bbPress, and GlotPress. He’s poured much of himself into these projects in the past, and had an enormous influence on them. It makes wonderful sense for him to work on them full time, but there’s no direct money in that.
He could get a patron by working for an agency or company large enough to be able to pay him for that, but he could run into some of the same