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Community | perezbox.com | 9 hours ago

WordPress: The Vision of Five And What it Means

Tony chips in with his view on the 5% debate, stating that good services and products contribute to the platfrom just by existing

11 min read Jonathan Berkel
Community | poststat.us | 1 day ago

Contribution as culture

Analysis and opinion on Matt Mullenwegs call for WordPress centric companies to contribute 5% of their resources back to the WordPress open source project.

Contribution as culture

Community | poststat.us | 1 day ago

1 This post spends a lot of time analyzing and referencing two other blog posts. Excuse me for that, but also be sure to read both, as they are relevant for this post and also interesting in their own right.
Matt Mullenweg wrote a blog post called Five for the Future yesterday that advocates his belief that WordPress-centric companies should aim to utilize 5% of their company resources toward contributing back to the project.
He noted in the post that Automattic isn’t quite to this point, but that they are working on it, and describes why he believes it’s important. He closes with this:
It’s a big commitment, but I can’t think of a better long-term investment in the health of WordPress overall. I think it will look incredibly modest in hindsight. This ratio is probably the bare minimum for a sustainable ecosystem, avoiding the tragedy of the commons. I think the 5% rule is one that all open source projects and companies should follow, at least if they want to be vibrant a decade from now.
This was followed up by one of the co-founders of one of the very hosting companies Matt partially referenced in his post — WP Engine’s Ben Metcalf — who responded with a blog post of his own: WordPress:

3 min read Mickey Kay
Community | ma.tt | 2 days ago

Matt Mullenweg: Five for the Future

Matt himself gives some provocative opinions on how he thinks bigger companies should be contributing to core.

ma.tt |

Matt Mullenweg: Five for the Future

Community | ma.tt | 2 days ago

On Sunday at WordCamp Europe I got a question about how companies contribute back to WordPress, how they’re doing, and what companies should do more of. First on the state of things: there are more companies genuinely and altruistically contributing to growing WordPress than ever before. In our ecosystem web hosts definitely make the most revenue and profits, and it’s been great to see them stepping up their game, but also the consultancies and agencies around WordPress have been pretty amazing about their people contributions, as demonstrated most recently by the fact the 4.0 and 4.1 release leads both hail from WP agencies (10up and Code for the People, respectively).
I think a good rule of thumb that will scale with the community as it continues to grow is that organizations that want to grow the WordPress pie (and not just their piece of it) should dedicate 5% of their people to working on something to do with core — be it development, documentation, security, support forums, theme reviews, training, testing, translation or whatever it might be that helps move WordPress mission forward.
Five percent doesn’t sound like much, but it adds up quickly. As of today Automattic is 277 people,

10 min read Mark Gavalda
Editorials | kinsta.com | 1 hour ago

Use WordPress to Create Outstanding Long-Form Content

I guess you already know that we at Kinsta love longform content. Here's a guide on how everyone can create great looking longreads, written by Brenda Stokes Barron.

Use WordPress to Create Outstanding Long-Form Content

Editorials | kinsta.com | 1 hour ago

It’s no secret that we’re fans of long-form content. Those meatier, in-depth articles are often more interesting and more useful to readers than your standard 500-worder. Even so, a lot of content marketers and bloggers using WordPress and other platforms are reluctant to jump on the long read bandwagon. Which makes me ask, “Why?” While it’s not going to be right for everybody, I definitely think most people will benefit from giving long-form content a chance. With that in mind, I’ve put together some helpful resources here to start your education in the world of long content. We’ll start with some basic definitions and benefits then move onto how you can most effectively create long-form content in WordPress.
What is Long-Form Content?
At its most basic level, the term “long-form” as it relates to content refers to written articles and blog posts that are longer than your typical run-of-the-mill post. While standard post length seems to hover around 500-700 words these days, a long read is often at minimum 1,200 words and often extends well beyond that up into 2,000+ word territory.
And truly, it’s becoming quite a trend largely in thanks to Medium.com, the blogging platform started

Community | managewp.com | 15 mins ago

Community, diversity and leadership

I felt a need to contribute to the discussion mostly reflecting on WordCamp sponsorships and a few other things

Community, diversity and leadership

Community | managewp.com | 15 mins ago

Just few days ago during WordCamp Europe, Matt Mullenweg got asked by our developer Maja Nedeljkovic how much should companies contribute to the WordPress project. Matt responded and later expanded that a good rule of thumb would be 5%. This seem to have produced a lot of interpretations and a massive stir in the community (prompting some to grab popcorn and watch #wpdrama). If you missed it, please read posts by Krogsgard, Perez, Metcalfe and I also recommend these two broadly related posts by O’Nolan and Buytaert (all currently trending on managewp.org).
Let me get back to the diversity of the community. I think that it is important to acknowledge that many companies and members of the community are at various stages of their life in the community.
For example I got engaged with WordPress in 2007 and started my career as a developer. I proceeded to contribute over 30 free plugins which millions of users proceeded to use on their WordPress sites. I wrote the book on WordPress development in 2009 and still get thanks from people whom the book helped start their careers. This in turn helped me start a business, but I think that it is important to recognize things like these as a contribution

Community | benmetcalfe.com | 1 day ago

WordPress: What exactly do they get for their 5%?

Matt Mullenweg recently stated companies operating in the WordPress space should dedicate 5% of their staff to working on the WordPress open source project. This article begs to differ and calls for reform in the way the WordPress Foundation and Open Source Project is run.

WordPress: What exactly do they get for their 5%?

Community | benmetcalfe.com | 1 day ago

As always on benmetcalfe.com: the views and opinions expressed here are solely my own and may not be opinions shared, supported, or endorsed in any manner by any other entity I may have other interests in. Indeed, these days I work in another realm, transforming the way we use bits to move atoms. Earlier today Matt Mullenweg (WordPress co-founder, Automattic founder & CEO) publicly stated that companies operating in the WordPress ecosystem should have 5% of their staff base working on the WordPress Open Source Project:
“I think a good rule of thumb that will scale with the community as it continues to grow is that organizations that want to grow the WordPress pie (and not just their piece of it) should dedicate 5% of their people to working on something to do with core — be it development, documentation, security, support forums, theme reviews, training, testing, translation or whatever it might be that helps move WordPress mission forward.” – Matt Mullenweg
His sentiment here is laudable; a well run open source ecosystem requires resources, commitment and talent to ensure it remains healthy, viable and doesn’t stagnate. The Open Source Road is lined with the carcasses of many a failed

2 min read Dave Clements
Tutorials | doitwithwp.com | 1 day ago

Declare constants to easily reference your plugin files

This is by far the best way to reference other files in your plugin, allowing you the freedom to reference any file or folder, no matter what file or folder you're referencing from. Overcomes server restrictions with using a URI in the include function

Declare constants to easily reference your plugin files

Tutorials | doitwithwp.com | 1 day ago

While preparing for my WordCamp Tampa talk, and generally improving the codebase in my own plugins and functionality plugins, I came across a helpful improvement, which came up as a result of wanting to include a file in a different directory. Because of server restrictions, I was unable to use relative paths to include the file, so I ended up leaning on the advice of Pippin Williamson, as I so often do, and went about setting up constants in the main plugin file.
By defining these constants at the root of the plugin, you can then use them to reach any point in your plugin directory structure. So, to set up these constants, add the following to your plugin file:
Now when you need to include, require or otherwise reference a file in your plugin, you can drop in your constant to get either the path of URL to your plugin directory, such as:
In this way, you also won’t be tempted to try any back-handed ways of getting the plugin URL or path, which may end up breaking the plugin when someone uses a non-standard location for the wp-content folder for example.
Leave a Reply

Community | john.onolan.org | 1 day ago

Creating Open Source Culture

Another great opinion that I think is adding to today's open source contribution debate

Creating Open Source Culture

Community | john.onolan.org | 1 day ago

Jason Cohen once said that “Every company has a culture. The only question is whether or not you decide what it is.” - I couldn’t agree more. I think this can extend further, though, not just to companies but to any group of people working together. Bands have a culture, stereotypically defined by their genre of music. Sports teams have a culture. Towns and cities obviously have a culture. Even brands have a culture, not just internally, but externally as well (Like Red Bull). The word “culture” really comes down to any set of values which are adhered to and promoted by a group of individuals.
Either you choose a culture, or you end up with one.
Open source projects typically have a very strong (which is to say: clearly evident) culture. Unfortunately most of the time, in my experience, it’s not one which is consciously chosen.
The majority of open source projects start out as a couple of people hacking away to build a tool. Then occasionally they blossom and eventually grow into something far larger. The culture of the project evolves not with the codebase, but rather with the contributors who participate in writing it.
For open source projects, culture has nothing to do with what

1 min read Michael Beil
Community | make.wordpress.org | 19 hours ago

4.1: Call for Tickets

If you have a pet project or a ticket that you'd like to see in 4.1 you should check in on make.

4.1: Call for Tickets

Community | make.wordpress.org | 19 hours ago

If you have a pet project or a ticket that you'd like to see in 4.1 you should check in on make.

Community | winwar.co.uk | 1 day ago

60 Tweetable Tips from WordCamp Europe 2014

A very nice way to recap the biggest WordCamp on this side of Atlantic

Community | cloudways.com | 22 hours ago

Scott Wyden Advises to Build Valuable WordPress Assets

Scott says, "Find something that is needed for WordPress. Not something that already exists that you think you can do better."

Scott Wyden Advises to Build Valuable WordPress Assets

Community | cloudways.com | 22 hours ago

A picture is worth a thousand words. Relevant pictures on your web pages give your website a unique and eye-catching look. But, if you earn your bread through photography or graphic designing, then having an artistic portfolio website is essential. WordPress provides the ease of making such websites as it offers user-friendly plugins for the image galleries, like Photocrati’s famous plugin NextGen gallery for WordPress. [Read Also: Check Out These 5 Amazing WordPress Image Gallery Plugins]
“A great photograph is one that fully expresses what one feels, in the deepest sense, about what is being photographed.” – Ansel Adams
This quote fits extremely well for Scott Wyden Kivowitz, an elegant, enthusiastic and passionate digital photographer, who loves his profession to the core. He is currently working with the community of photographers at Photocrati. He is an avid blogger as well. Interviewing Scott was a great experience. He shared his opinions very candidly on issues related to WordPress themes, plugin development, and the release of WordPress 4.0. I hope you will enjoy this read.
Cloudways: You started your career as a Marketing Manager. Now, you have become an accomplished photographer.

3 min read Kyle Maurer
Editorials | betanews.com | 1 day ago

WordPress and other CMSs are 'inherently insecure'

Brief article discussing the inherent security issues in an open source project with a large user base, especially when inexperienced developers are contributing extensions. Interesting yet somewhat misleading I must say.

WordPress and other CMSs are 'inherently insecure'

Editorials | betanews.com | 1 day ago

A large proportion of websites are not standalone sites in their own right, but creations based on CMSs such as Drupal, WordPress, and Joomla. This is particularly true for personal blogs, but using a CMS as the basis for a site has been increasingly popular among larger companies. CMSs are used because they allow for articles to be posted easily, make it simple for multiple people to contribute to a site, and allow for different users to be assigned different access rights. They can also be extended through the use of plugins, but these self-same extensions are also a security disaster waiting to happen. Security experts High-Tech Bridge frequently discover vulnerabilities in extensions and plugins for popular CMSs. It is standard procedure to notify the developer before going public three weeks after the discovery -- this provides an opportunity for the problems to be fixed without alerting others who might exploit it. High-Tech Bridge CEO, Ilia Kolochenko, says that CMS security issues are nothing new:
"For upwards of a decade the major CMS platforms such as Joomla and WordPress have been deeply researched by both black and white hat hackers. In the early days SQL injections and

Tutorials | elegantthemes.com | 21 hour ago

How To Invoice Your Clients Using WordPress

Thanks to these Plugins now WordPress enthusiast who make living with WP can now invoice their clients and this article shows you how?

How To Invoice Your Clients Using WordPress

Tutorials | elegantthemes.com | 21 hour ago

If you’re like a lot of us WordPress enthusiasts, you make your living using the CMS in some way. For me, it’s writing blog posts (hey, like this one!) that pays my bills. For others, it’s building themes and plugins. Still others earn a living wage by creating custom sites for individual clients. No matter how you interact with WordPress in your day-to-day life, if you bring in money using it, there’s going to be some money management involved. Yes, you might have some favorite accounting software that you use, but wouldn’t it be nice if you could deal with all of your client side interactions within WordPress itself? Well, you can. At least from the invoicing side of things.
Instead of manually having to create an invoice template, which you then have to customize for each client and email to them individually, with the right tools you can perform these tasks within your WordPress dashboard. This means you can see at a glance who has paid you, who hasn’t, and where your business stands as a whole.
Since this is a solution that’s in demand from a lot of WordPress-based business owners, you best believe there are plenty of plugins and tools out there that make integrating the ability

7 min read Mark Gavalda
Plugins | sitepoint.com | 4 hours ago

Turning WordPress into a Self-Hosted Business Powerhouse

Nowadays you can clearly do anything with WordPress, this article is a great example of that!

Turning WordPress into a Self-Hosted Business Powerhouse

Plugins | sitepoint.com | 4 hours ago

As a web developer, chances are you have a mid to high end hosting plan with a large amount of resources you probably don’t come close to using. You might also be using customer relationship management (CRM) software, invoicing suites, project management portals and much more which could be burning a hole in your wallet.
While managed cloud services are convenient, self-hosted solutions can be just as easy to use. By finding the right tools for your company, you can slash costs while still being productive.
Below is a small sampling of the different self-hosted business solutions out there which stand out from the crowd.
Project Management
Rolling out your own project management solution can lead to significant savings since many hosted suites bill based on user count or number of projects. Even for a small freelance shop the costs can add up, especially if you need to purchase extra storage or users. Fortunately the tools below allow you to turn almost any self-hosted WordPress installation into a robust project management suite:
Panorama
Panorama is an easy to use WordPress project management platform which comes with numerous features such as project discussion sections, project

Themes | themeshaper.com | 2 days ago

Prefixing in WordPress Themes

Frank Klein writes about prefixing and why it is a best practice for both wordpress themes and plugins.

Prefixing in WordPress Themes

Themes | themeshaper.com | 2 days ago

An important best practice when coding a WordPress theme or plugin is correct prefixing. In this post, we’ll look at:
Why prefixing is needed in PHP.
Why prefixing is needed in WordPress specifically.
How to prefix properly in your code.
Prefixing in PHP
Programming uses the concept of namespaces. It’s an abstract concept that can be explained as a type of container that contains all your code.
In PHP, all functions, classes, interfaces, constants and variables defined outside of functions and methods live by default in the global namespace.
This means that the names you give to these code constructs have to be unique.
Consider this code:
function output() {
echo 'this';
}

function output() {
echo 'that';
}
If you run this code (with error reporting enabled), you will get the following error:
Fatal error: Cannot redeclare output() (previously declared in /htdocs/prefixing-post.php:5) in /htdocs/prefixing-post.php:5 on line 10.
Although the functions are not identical, their names are, which creates a conflict. You could simply rename them, and you would be fine:
function output_this() {
echo 'this';
}

function output_that() {
echo 'that';
}
While this code runs without

6 min read Jean-Baptiste
Community | code.tutsplus.com | 15 hours ago

Using New Relic to Monitor WordPress Performance

A good review about using New Relic service to Monitor WordPress Performance

Using New Relic to Monitor WordPress Performance

Community | code.tutsplus.com | 15 hours ago

A good review about using New Relic service to Monitor WordPress Performance

7 min read WP Century
Community | wpcentury.com | 1 day ago

14 Completely Free CDN Solutions for WordPress Users

CDNs will help you improve the load time of your website and pages resulting in a great improvement for user experience and with it a better search engine positioning.

14 Completely Free CDN Solutions for WordPress Users

Community | wpcentury.com | 1 day ago

7 5
35
1
36
A CDN, or a Content Delivery Network can be an astonishing improvement for user experience and page speed along with caching and image optimization.
The whole purpose of using a CDN is to serve large files like videos, images or stylesheets like CSS, jQuery files and JavaScript files from a server that is closer to the user and brings faster rendering. Thereby making the whole process faster resulting in a better page load time.
The problem however is that CDN’s are usually pretty difficult to comprehend and they cost money…or do they?
We decided to eliminate the myth that formed around CDN’s and that a good one will require you to pay for it.
In fact, the truth is that there are plenty of free services and cloud solutions to help you serve images and media content on strong, secured servers with SSL and unlimited bandwidth, and that of course on WordPress.
Types of Files That a CDN can Handle
all types of web images
videos, audio and multimedia files
libraries and documents
jQuery and JavaScript
CSS Files
So here they are, the best free CDN solutions for WordPress users.
1. Jetpack – Photon
Is a service offered by the Automattic team. It is part of WordPress.com for self-hosted

5 min read Cliff Seal
Editorials | evermo.re | 4 hours ago

Bears and WordPress Security

We think using scare tactics to sell things is a bad idea, and we don’t want to use them. Ever. However, we do want to be realistic and honest. It’s hard to know what you’re getting yourself into with hosting (or most other things involved in managing a website for that matter). It’s difficult to comprehend the panic and frustration that ensues when something does go wrong, like my friend experienced with her blog.

Bears and WordPress Security

Editorials | evermo.re | 4 hours ago

The other day, a friend learned that I worked in WordPress, the technology that powers Evermore. They said they loved WordPress except for that one time their site got hacked. She and her husband started a WordPress blog together shortly after they were married to share their lives with family and friends. Their site was redirected to porn. She said it was a nightmare. She said her family—very traditional—periodically checked on their blog to check in on the latest, and were suddenly exposed to hardcore pornography.
I asked her if their hosting company helped them resolve this. Her answer was, unfortunately, not surprising to me all.
“Our hosting company did absolutely nothing to help us. We were completely on our own. Every friend and family member that wanted to check in on the latest from our blog saw porn. It was a nightmare.”
What’s at Stake?
This was a family blog. They suffered embarrassment and the hassle of fixing everything, but imagine if this was their family business. On top of embarrassment and aggravation, they would have risked financial loss that could have jeopardized their livelihood.
People don’t realize how easily this can happen, because many low-cost hosts promise

Community | wpvulndb.com | 2 days ago

WPScan Vulnerability Database

Ryan Dewhurst and the team behind the popular WPScan tool setup an online version of WPScan's data files used to detect WordPress core, plugin and theme vulnerabilities.

WPScan Vulnerability Database

Community | wpvulndb.com | 2 days ago

Latest WordPress Vulnerabilities Latest Plugin Vulnerabilities
Latest Theme Vulnerabilities
Most Viewed Vulnerabilities

Community | wptavern.com | 1 day ago

WordPress Beyond Boundaries: A Recap of WordCamp Europe 2014

WordCamp Europe is the largest WordCamp where 2000 folks spent 2 days and had fun with the wonderful presentations. You will be glad to know that Matt Mullenweg and many big names were attended this camp of WordPress.

WordPress Beyond Boundaries: A Recap of WordCamp Europe 2014

Community | wptavern.com | 1 day ago

This weekend, 950 WordPress professionals and enthusiasts from all over the world descended upon Sofia, Bulgaria to participate in Europe’s largest WordCamp to date. WordCampers arrived excited to soak up new information and connect with others in the European community. Sofia’s graffiti-lined streets are peppered with leftovers of communist architecture, contrasting the Neo-Bohemian culture that energizes the city. The event was held in the National Palace of Culture, a magnificent venue situated in the center of Bulgaria’s capital, designed nearly a decade before the fall of the Iron Curtain. Its halls are lined with murals and dark colors, which created an interesting backdrop for a conference devoted to a bright and growing free software community.
The warm hospitality of the organizers of WordCamp Europe lent an intimate atmosphere to what otherwise might have seemed like an impersonally large event. Attendees enjoyed a world class lineup of WordPress speakers and had the opportunity to try delicious local specialties during breaks and lunch.
Organizing WordCamp Europe 2014
WordCamp Europe is an event that requires many months of planning and an army of volunteers to make it happen.

5 min read Mark Gavalda
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 1 day ago

CDN v2.0 For The Cloud Generation - Geo Load Balancing

CDNs are awesome! Unfortunately though they have some weak points that can be addressed today in the very affordable cloud hosting era! Take a look at our solution.

CDN v2.0 For The Cloud Generation - Geo Load Balancing

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 1 day ago

Content delivery networks (CDN for short) are awesome: they take the load off of your web server while speeding up the delivery of static content to your visitors thus making their experience better! We love them. As a performance hosting company we really like to research new ways to make the web faster. If you’re still looking for a performance boost after you’ve added a CDN to your site and made sure you’re on a speedy, well configured server, the next step would be to have complete mirrors of your site in different locations throughout the world. Having 3-5 of your own servers scattered around the globe – that must be pretty expensive! Well, not anymore.
One advantage of the uber popular cloud computing is that you can start your virtual servers for as low as ten bucks, sometimes even less. All the major providers let you pick a location of their data centers when you start a node and for thirty dollars you can start a machine in the US, one in Europe and one in Asia, for example. That pretty much covers the northern hemisphere but of course you can add an infinite number of nodes to your setup until you achieve the granularity you desire.
When you have multiple servers around the

10 min read Oli
Community | wptavern.com | 2 days ago

GoDaddy and Media Temple Engage in Strategic Partnership With WP101

WPTavern Interviews WP101 Founder Shawn Hesketh about his partnership to provide WordPress training videos

GoDaddy and Media Temple Engage in Strategic Partnership With WP101

Community | wptavern.com | 2 days ago

Customers who host sites with GoDaddy or Media Temple will see a new WordPress resource in their control panel. Thanks to a strategic partnership with WP101, GoDaddy and Media Temple customers can watch a 20-part WordPress 101 video tutorial series, directly within the WordPress dashboard. I reached out to founder, Shawn Hesketh, to learn more about the partnership and what his thoughts are on the state of WordPress training. He also shares the valuable lessons he learned during the process. Near the end of the interview, he provides a list of resources for those interested in learning WordPress.
Interview With WP101 Founder, Shawn Hesketh
Jeff – How difficult has been for you to keep up with WordPress development through your training videos?
To be perfectly honest with you, I was a bit nervous when I first heard Matt Mullenweg outline a strategy for increasingly rapid releases, eventually leading to constant background updates to WordPress at some point in the near future. But so far, it’s been fairly manageable, as we’ve only seen an additional one or two revision cycles in a given year.
I’ve given a great deal of thought to how we might continue to keep the WordPress 101 tutorial

8 min read mattmedeiros

How to start an affiliate program

We share our failures and experiences with launching an affiliate program.

How to start an affiliate program

Let’s cut to the chase about starting an affiliate program — it’s not as easy as you think. I’m not even talking about the technicality of choosing a platform, but more so, the logistics of operating one. Other’s might say you need to have a strong moral compass as well. Some years ago we launched an affiliate program and immediately saw an increase in sales. It’s what happened next, that we weren’t prepared for.
In today’s article, we’ll explore if an affiliate program is right for you and which platform to choose for your WordPress product.
Avoid this nightmare
Let’s get back to that failure turned lesson learned.
Back in the day when our theme shop had launched, we were selling and delivering our products via e-junkie. We read about the benefits of an affiliate programs and had envied other companies having visible success with their own program. Naturally, we wanted to launch our own channel to increase sales too.
Sales indeed increased.
10 Sales. 20 Sales. 50 Sales! We were starting to see revenues climb and it was glorious. After about 2 weeks of a sales surge, we received a phone call from a customer in Kansas.
“Hey, what’s this charge on my credit card form Slocum Themes?”,

8 min read Harsh Agrawal
Tutorials | shoutmeloud.com | 2 days ago

How I Earned $1246 By Growth Hacking One WordPress Plugin

Here is how I used one WordPress plugin to increase my earning. This will give a new perspective to bloggers who have an old blog.

How I Earned $1246 By Growth Hacking One WordPress Plugin

Tutorials | shoutmeloud.com | 2 days ago

Hey Shouters, Earlier I have reviewed LinkPatrol WordPress plugin here and apart from fixing link issues on your blog, this plugin can make really huge money for you. For me, I made more than $1200 using LinkPatrol plugin within 2 weeks and in below video I will show you exactly what I did.
Audio transcript:
Hey guys this is harsh from ShoutMeLoud. Today I have something interesting to show you, something that made good amount of money for me. And if you are one of those bloggers who are blogging from last couple of years, this is something going to work out a lot for you.
So I will share exactly what I did to make so much money that without adding something new, I just worked on my old blog posts and that started making more money than I ever imagined. Let me show you how it all started. Few days back, I talked about Linkpatrol plugin and what this plugin do is, it scans all of your links on the blog and it shows which website you are linking to.
I started blogging in 2008 and since then I have added links to websites that I find useful and it doesn’t matter if they make money for me or not. Now the thing is in last couple of years internet has become a big market. I mean All the programs