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8 min read Tom Ewer
Plugins | managewp.com | 17 hours ago

How to Integrate MailChimp and WordPress

We love MailChimp at ManageWP, so it seemed to make sense that we write a WordPress integration guide!

How to Integrate MailChimp and WordPress

Plugins | managewp.com | 17 hours ago

The combination of WordPress and MailChimp is a dream come true for many website owners. Even though there are many email delivery platforms to choose from, over five million users rely on MailChimp. If you use WordPress to power your websites, there’s a pretty good chance that you use MailChimp to communicate with your email list. (We do!)
However, if your WordPress and MailChimp integration begins and ends with a basic subscription form, you’re leaving a lot on the table. In this article, I’ll show you how to best integrate MailChimp and WordPress, whether you’re looking to master your subscription forms or unlock hidden elements of this match made in heaven.
Diving Into MailChimp
If you’ve made it this far, I’m guessing you have an integral understanding of MailChimp.
However, you may also be thinking about switching your list over to MailChimp from another provider. We won’t be covering how to do a direct import, but the overwhelming list of features we’ll cover below may help you make the decision.
The main types of integration are split up into two categories:
1. Email Subscription Forms
This integration process will have you using widgets, plugins, or just plain copy and pasting

Editorials | redblue.us | 17 hours ago

Writing my core functionality plugin

Interesting take on having that universal plugin that you install on every site. By Jon Shroeder

Writing my core functionality plugin

Editorials | redblue.us | 17 hours ago

I’ve seen a number of people I respect talking about writing a “core functionality” plugin which, essentially, accomplishes two related goals: Streamlines development by allowing for repetitive functionality to “go” somewhere without creating 15-20 different plugins to do those typical tasks or packaging them into the theme.
Takes functionality and keeps it out of the theme. When your client switches themes, the content would still appear in roughly the right places, and nothing would just disappear from the backend of the site.
Here’s what a few of these people have to say on the topic: Otto, Bill Erickson, Andrea Whitmer, WP Candy, Ryan Cowles, Justin Tadlock (I’m sure other people have written about this as well, and if you drop me a link, I’ll be happy to link you as well).
These are good reasons to develop a core functionality plugin, and I’m setting out to do just that. But I thought I might start making a list here of the things I’d like my boilerplate core functionality plugin to do on just about every site. Basically, these are things that could be tweaked later, but are a typical setup for a client.
So, here are a few of those things (this is actually a to-do list of sorts).

6 min read Chris Burgess
Themes | sitepoint.com | 9 hours ago

Creating Custom “Snow Fall” Designs in WordPress with ACF

In this article we show you how to use ACF flexible content fields to create custom “Snow Fall” design layouts.

Creating Custom “Snow Fall” Designs in WordPress with ACF

Themes | sitepoint.com | 9 hours ago

In December 2012, the New York Times broke out of their standard online post layout and wowed us with John Branch’s beautiful “Snow Fall” article. Instead of simply containing headings, text, and the occasional inline photo, this article made liberal use of full screen images, videos, custom text layouts, and animations to draw readers in and captivate them with a well-designed and well-told story. It wasn’t long before other publishing sites followed suit and began departing from their “normal” design for occasional art-directed articles, like The Chicago Tribune’s “His Saving Grace” and The Verge’s “longform” articles.
Normally, articles on news sites follow a pretty standard pattern: featured image, headline, content (text, headings, and inline images), with a menu above, a sidebar next-door, and comments and a footer below. The large majority of WordPress sites follow that pattern as well. But with a little help from a couple helpful plugins and a custom template page, you can easily build attention-grabbing art-directed articles in WordPress.
For the sake of this tutorial, let’s pick several unique design elements we’d like to add to our “Snow Fall” layout. We’ll want (1) normal

10 min read Tim Nash
Plugins | timnash.co.uk | 2 days ago

Top 'Must Use Plugins' for me, Tim Nash

I feel dirty publishing a top plugins list, let alone promoting it, but here it is my top "Must Use" plugins

Top 'Must Use Plugins' for me, Tim Nash

Plugins | timnash.co.uk | 2 days ago

So you know how almost every site that talks about WordPress will eventually do a top 10 WordPress plugin post? For some, that’s all they do. These posts basically consist of the following: Either WP Total Cache and WP Super Cache so that you can screw your site by using a badly configured caching plugin
Some sort of spam catching device, probably Akismet (you know the thing bundled with WordPress)
A form plugin, normally Gravity Forms, Contact Form 7 or Ninja Forms
An E-Commerce plugin, normally WooCommerce, or some Membership software – it will be rubbish
An SEO plugin, either Yoast SEO or All in one SEO
A security plugin – WordFence, iThemes Security etc because security begins by installing a plugin
Jetpack because you know every site has to have Jetpack
Which is great and all, I mean some of those plugins are really useful and good. But it’s strange because with perhaps the exception of a couple I don’t think I have ever had the need for these essential top 10 plugins on most sites.
I thought it would be interesting to look at my Must Use plugins, by which I mean the plugins I have in an MU Folder. Wait never heard of MU plugins? Once upon a time there were two WordPress Cores,

3 min read carrie dils
Business | carriedils.com | 12 hours ago

The Business of WordPress #21 - Carrie Dils

Talking about the business of WordPress with Genesis child theme creator Shay Bocks and boutique agency owner Diane Kinney. Entertaining and informative!

The Business of WordPress #21 - Carrie Dils

Business | carriedils.com | 12 hours ago

In this episode, we’re talking about the business of WordPress with Shay Bocks, author of the famed Foodie theme, and Diane Kinney, agency owner that knows how to float-like-a-butterfly and sting-like-a-bee when it comes to taking care of business and handling large-scale projects. The #gohchat hasthtag on Twitter is alive and well, so thanks to everyone who comments and asks questions using the hashtag – your participation is awesome!
Site auditing is like proof reading. We all need it and all learn from it. @cdils#gohchat
— AngelaWilson (@AngelaWilson) July 31, 2014
Key Discussion Points
Solopreneur
Are you running a business? You want to be credible and sound professional. Whether you self-identify as a solopreneur, freelancer, service provider, or whatever… consider what that word means to your potential customer base. Just some interesting food for thought. It made me curious, how do most of the GOH listeners (that’s you!), identify yourselves.
Take a moment for a quick, anonymous survey?
Introducing the GOH Book Club!
Confession: I love books and I love book clubs. I posed the question to GOH listeners a few weeks about the interest level in firing up a book club and have decided

Community | codeinwp.com | 2 days ago

How to Simplify the WP-Admin to Get It Client

As a WordPress developer, you usually have to tackle many challenges along your way through a given project. But quite unfortunately, more often than not, those challenges don’t go away once you deliver the site to your client, that's why is important to have an education system in place.

How to Simplify the WP-Admin to Get It Client

Community | codeinwp.com | 2 days ago

As a WordPress designer, you usually have to tackle many challenges along your way through a given project. But quite unfortunately, more often than not, those challenges don’t go away once you deliver the site to your client. The thing is that clients are not always WordPress savvy, especially if it’s the first time they’ve become a website owner.
As a result, they will struggle with a lot of tasks, starting from simple post publishing, to uploading media, to “what’s the difference between posts and pages?”, to “why all those people submit comments about Viagra?”, and so on and so forth.
We need to help them out, clearly!
However, I don’t believe that we should be forcing them to learn every single aspect of WordPress. They really don’t have to be masters of online publishing just to be able to handle their sites.
My point of view is that it is us who should do whatever it takes to make the experience seamless and as straightforward as possible.
How to make WordPress client-friendly
Now, there are many things we can do to help our clients. Some of them revolve around WordPress itself. Others focus more on individual consultation, tutorials and other forms of education. But in this

9 min read Oli
Tutorials | wplift.com | 2 days ago

Practical Tips for Learning and Experimenting with WordPress

Get to know the technologies and languages used within WordPress.

Practical Tips for Learning and Experimenting with WordPress

Tutorials | wplift.com | 2 days ago

WordPress is like a G I Joe to the kid inside me. It’s like Legos for a toddler and like a “truck that needs fixing” to a 40 something year old Texan. With a straw in his mouth. You see, there are endless possibilities when it comes to WordPress. It is so diverse and yet so simple that anyone who can use “WordPad” is qualified enough to use WordPress. It’s not a steep learning curve.
All you have to do is login to you WordPress dashboard, click on Add New Post and Publish it when you’re done. You get a ton of editing tools such as bold, italics, strike-through, subscripts, etc. via the Visual Editor in WordPress. Add a couple of tags and categories and you have a blog, good as any.
When it comes to images, WordPress 3.9 introduces a ton of never before seen features such as cropping, resizing and real-time image replacement.
If that’s not awesome, somebody call Master Shifu. (Reference: Kung Fu Panda)
We’ve been taking about the front-end activity of WordPress. Writing posts, adding images are actions that end-users perform.
Like you know, how does a car actually spin its wheels when you step on the gas? It just does, doesn’t it?
An automobile engineer can give you detailed steps the

WP Plugin "Easy Social Share Buttons" supports ManageWP sharing!

Plugins | 2 days ago

Hey,

Just a quick heads up for blog owners: we really like the plugin Easy Social Share Buttons for WordPress, after spending a lot of time searching for the best one for this particular function we now use it exclusively on Kinsta (and other sites of ours).

A couple of months ago I got in touch with its creator and asked him to implement ManageWP as a sharing option, which he did! And today for the first time the sharing button displays the share count too, so we can say that ManageWP.org is fully supported now :) You can check out how it looks "live" on our blog. And more info about the plugin is here:
codecanyon.net/item/easy-social-share-buttons-for-wordpress/6394476

Cheers,
Mark

Cool, great news. Thanks for sharing!

via Vladimir Prelovac
8 min read Marie Dodson
Community | torquemag.io | 2 days ago

A Glimpse into the Future of WordPress

This year’s WordCamp Milwaukee featured an array of impressive speakers who discussed trending topics on WordPress business and development. The speakers even included a presentation on Joomla and how to use other PHP frameworks to overcome the limitations of WordPress.

A Glimpse into the Future of WordPress

Community | torquemag.io | 2 days ago

This year’s WordCamp Milwaukee featured an array of impressive speakers who discussed trending topics on WordPress business and development. The speakers even included a presentation on Joomla and how to use other PHP frameworks to overcome the limitations of WordPress. A few weeks ago, I wrote about what you can expect in WordPress 4.0, but at WordCamp Milwaukee last weekend I actually got a glimpse into what the future of WordPress has to offer. Presentations by Andrew Nacin, one of the lead developers of WordPress, as well as the lead developers of the WP-API project, Ryan McCue of Human Made and Rachel Baker of 10up, detailed some very exciting new capabilities of WordPress that the next few WordPress releases will unlock. Not all of the work is done, but the structure is in place.
Nacin’s presentation was planned to provide an update on WordPress development. Instead he told the crowd that his only update was that “WordPress 4.0 is gonna be awesome,” and so he moved on to a talk he called “registering metadata at the dawn of external API.” Similarly, a presentation by McCue and Baker showed how these new changes—which will take place over the next several iterations of WordPress—will

Community | elegantthemes.com | 7 hours ago

22 Of The Best WordPress Blogs You Don’t Want To Miss

22 Best WordPress Blogs In The Community You Would Like To Visit For Latest And Updated News

22 Of The Best WordPress Blogs You Don’t Want To Miss

Community | elegantthemes.com | 7 hours ago

Aug01 WordPress is one of the easiest content management platforms to learn. Within an hour, most people will feel comfortable navigating the WordPress admin area, adding articles, and uploading images. It does, however, take a little longer to get the most out of WordPress. That is why I recommend reading WordPress blogs regularly.
WordPress blogs give tips on how to improve WordPress and make it more efficient. They share useful plugins, beautiful WordPress themes, practical code snippets, and much more. I have been reading WordPress blogs and writing about WordPress for eight years and continue to read WordPress blogs regularly to this day. It is the best way to stay up to date with the latest WordPress plugins, themes, and techniques.
This article details the best WordPress blogs that are active today. I have listed blogs that cover a range of topics as I covered WordPress tutorial websites and WordPress news blogs recently. Therefore, blogs such as the official WordPress blog, TutsPlus, WP Sites, Cats Who Code and WP Beginner, have not been listed.
Obviously, I am very biased with this opinion, but I believe that Elegant Themes blog is currently one of the best wordPress blogs

3 min read Nelio
Community | techcrunch.com | 22 hours ago

TechCrunch Open Sources Its WordPress Async Task Library

Improve the performance of your WordPress site by offloading time-consuming tasks into background tasks with the help of this library

TechCrunch Open Sources Its WordPress Async Task Library

Community | techcrunch.com | 22 hours ago

Back in early 2012, when the TechCrunch developer team (Nicolas Vincent, Alex Khadiwala, Eric Mann, and John Bloch) started working on the TechCrunch redesign, one of the main goals was to improve site performance. During the development process, we implemented several tools to help achieve that goal. One of the approaches we took was to offload time-consuming tasks into background tasks. We built a library called WP Async Task to structure those background tasks.
In June, we gave a presentation called “Non-Blocking WordPress” in which we talked about some of our approaches to performance. There was a lot of interest in our asynchronous tasks from the audience, and people wanted to know if they could get the code anywhere and use it.
We’re happy to announce that, as of today, the WP Async Task library is open source and available on GitHub. We’re big believers in the power of open source software and want to give back to the community that’s provided us with our publishing platform. Check out the code and look at the documentation on how to use the library in your own code.
Why Make Tasks Asynchronous?
We try to reduce the number of processes that could lead to blocking and increased

9 min read Tim Nash
Editorials | blog.sucuri.net | 3 days ago

Responsible Disclosure – Sucuri Open Letter to MailPoet and Future Disclosures

Rather upsetting the reaction by MailPoet to Sucuri, sadly it won't harm their business perhaps as much as it should, makes you think Full Disclosure might be the way forward for WordPress plugins.

Responsible Disclosure – Sucuri Open Letter to MailPoet and Future Disclosures

Editorials | blog.sucuri.net | 3 days ago

Many don’t know who I am. My name is Tony Perez, I’m the CEO of Sucuri. I have the pleasure of calling this company my family and everyday I work for every person at this company. My partner is Daniel Cid. He is one of the foremost thought leaders in the website security domain, his influence extending far beyond the communities that make up some of the most popular CMS applications today. Together we are building one of the fastest growing Website Security companies in the domain, we have one simple mission, to create a safer web. We are a technology company built by technologists with a special, quirky, idea that we can make a difference.
Many don’t realize that the bedrock of our business is Research, all facets of research. It’s how we stay ahead of the bad guys, or attackers. It’s a responsibility we have, not just to the general public, but one that we owe to our clients – in basic terms, it’s what they pay us for. It’s how we ensure our tools and technologies stay ahead of the rest and what makes us the ideal solution for every website owner, our commitment to the Website Security domain.
This has come to head recently from the huge debacle over the past few weeks in which we

6 min read Peter Nilsson
Plugins | wptavern.com | 21 hour ago

LaunchKey Plugin Adds Biometric Authentication to WordPress

The future is here! With the WordPress plugin LaunchKey can you use biometric facial and fingerprint scanning to log into your WordPress website.

LaunchKey Plugin Adds Biometric Authentication to WordPress

Plugins | wptavern.com | 21 hour ago

We’ve entered the future, folks. With the help of the LaunchKey plugin, you can now log into your WordPress site using your phone’s biometric facial and fingerprint scanning capabilities. The LaunchKey mobile authentication platform has been pioneering multi-factor authentication for WordPress sites via its official plugin since 2013. The plugin has received glowing five-star reviews from users who enjoy logging in without a password. It is the first plugin to protect your site with biometric face and fingerprint scanning.
LaunchKey CEO and Co-Founder Geoff Sanders said the platform currently supports all devices that support biometric facial scanning and a limited number of devices for the fingerprint scan.
Our support for fingerprint scan is currently limited to the devices that gives us access to their fingerprint scanner, which at this time is only the Samsung Galaxy S5. As more devices with fingerprint scan become available, we’ll add support, including iOS devices with the release of iOS 8.
If you’ve ever enabled the fingerprint scan for unlocking your device, the WordPress authentication works in a similar way, except you will be scanning your finger to authorize an authentication

Community | cloudways.com | 3 days ago

Women in WordPress: Behind the Scenes with Kim Doyal aka The WP Chick

In this interview, Kim shared a few important stories of her WordPress journey. You all would love to read it.

Women in WordPress: Behind the Scenes with Kim Doyal aka The WP Chick

Community | cloudways.com | 3 days ago

WordPress (WP) industry is full of smart folks and Kim Doyal is one of them. She is also known as “WP Chick”. Kim is well known in WP industry due to her generous attitude. She has been ever so kind from the day we first talked on Twitter. From the very first tweet till now, we developed a nice working relationship. I am really happy that she gave our platform a go and sent back great feedback which would help us in making our services better. (By the way, Kim is now part of our Board of Contributors and you’ll see her short profile on Contributor’s page very soon.)
I hope everyone would love this candid interview as much as I do.
Cloudways: Kim, tell me about yourself. Was your entrance in the WP industry accidental or was it all planned?
Kim Doyal: Haha… I wish I could tell you that it was a well laid out plan, but it wasn’t. I started my business in March of 2008, simply with the intention to build an online business so I could stay home with my kids. I was widowed in 2003, and I was tired of commuting and being isolated from them so much. I had a little bit of a financial cushion in 2008 and I just went for it.
My plan was to create and sell products, although I wasn’t exactly sure

Community | carriedils.com | 20 hours ago

Shh… I’m dating several WordPress hosts

Battle of the WordPress hosts from Carrie's perspective. Really interesting comments.

Shh… I’m dating several WordPress hosts

Community | carriedils.com | 20 hours ago

I get around. That’s right, I’m always dating several WordPress hosts at once, because I want to keep my options open and I want to know what’s out there. Below is a summary of my experience with three web hosts, each of them great enough that I’m willing to recommend them to you.
Let’s start the introductions…
(IMHO) Recommend WordPress Hosting
Before we dive, I’d like to be clear: this is not a “definitive top 10″ or “best hosts for WordPress” post. This is just me sharing my experiences and thoughts related to WordPress hosting.
I have no doubt there are other amazing web hosts out there, but they’ll have to bide their time for an honorable mention here until I’ve had a chance to vet them for myself.
Note: As of this writing, I have active sites hosted with each company below. I’m paying for the accounts and don’t have any relationship with these companies beyond simply being a customer (and in some cases, an affiliate).
WPEngine
WPEngine is what’s commonly called a “managed WordPress host,” meaning that they only host and optimize their servers for WordPress. There’s no one-click install, WordPress just IS when you set up your account. I’ve always had great interactions with their

8 min read Mickey Kay
Community | tommcfarlin.com | 12 hours ago

Steps to Becoming a World Class Programmer (In a Lifetime)

Tom McFarlin shares his views (and some tips) on becoming a great programmer.

Steps to Becoming a World Class Programmer (In a Lifetime)

Community | tommcfarlin.com | 12 hours ago

One tensions that I’m not sure every goes away for programmers is that of “Am I learning enough?” If it does, I’d like to know when so I can prepare myself :). Here’s the thing: Technology, and programming specifically, move really fast and there’s a lot not only to keep up with, but to be aware of on a week-to-week basis. Notice that I did not say that there’s a lot of to learn on a week-to-week basis.
Very, very early in my career I used to feel as if I needed to keep up with every single new programming language and/or related technology in the software world as it releases.
Talk about a fools errand.
Even as I began working with what is now known as Pressware, I was focusing both on Ruby on Rails and WordPress at the same time. Then something changed: I dropped Ruby on Rails (not because I dislike it – critiques aside, I actually am a big fan of Ruby and what the Rails framework offers), but because I began to think:
“If I dedicated my time to one area rather than splitting it into two areas, could I be a better asset to those whom I’m tying to serve?”
But this question can be generalized even further because our culture releases tons of new stuff every single day, and there’s an

6 min read Peter Nilsson
Community | wptavern.com | 2 days ago

7 Aspects Of WordPress I Take For Granted

Jeff Chandler from WP Tavern talk about seven WordPress things he take for granted. Including features such as the Visual Editor, One click and automatic updates etc.

7 Aspects Of WordPress I Take For Granted

Community | wptavern.com | 2 days ago

After using WordPress for seven years in a row, it’s hard to consider switching to another publishing platform. I have my gripes about WordPress and there are plenty of things that can improve the publishing process. However, after testing a few other open source alternatives, I was reminded of how many things I take for granted in WordPress. Here are seven WordPress things I take for granted. The Visual Editor
For the longest time, the visual editor in WordPress has been the bane of existence for so many users. It has a reputation for screwing up code snippets and ruining the formatting of text. In the past two years, there have been several improvements to the editor that make it my favorite way to write a post. These are just a few of my favorites, some of which are slated for WordPress 4.0. oEmbed support, oEmbed previews, sticky toolbar, automatic resizing based on the amount and type of content, and the ability to easily edit inserted media.
After using a few different themes, I’ve determined support for visual editor styles to be a killer feature. If executed properly, content within the visual editor looks the same as it does on the frontend of the site. After using a theme

9 min read WPSquared.com
Plugins | wpsquared.com | 2 days ago

4 Conversion and Experiment Plugins to Increase Conversions

Are you looking for a way to A/B test in WordPress or looking for better conversions? One of these plugins could help!

4 Conversion and Experiment Plugins to Increase Conversions

Plugins | wpsquared.com | 2 days ago

If the purpose of your website to get more leads for your business, sell products, or elicit some other outcome from your visitors, then experimenting with different versions of your content to find out which ones result in the highest conversion rates can be a valuable use of your time. While you can do research and read up on what works best at converting visitors into customers, including details such as colours, copy, or layouts, running tests and experiments tailored to your own audience and goals can often yield more useful insights that are more relevant to your business.
If optimizing your content in order to get better goal conversion rates sounds appealing to you, then the plugins covered here will give you the tools you need to start experimenting with your content in order to find what performs best with your audience and goals.
If you want to find out what’s working on your site, instead of guessing, these conversion and experimentation plugins are for you.
WP Experiments
This is a new plugin which aims to make it as easy as possible to run multiple tests or experiments on individual pieces of content in your WordPress posts and pages. The purpose of this is to find out

Tutorials | wpexplorer.com | 13 hours ago

Best .htaccess Snippets to Improve WordPress Security

This tutorial will show you .htaccess Code snippets that would improve Your WordPress Site Security and Fortify it

Best .htaccess Snippets to Improve WordPress Security

Tutorials | wpexplorer.com | 13 hours ago

WordPress security is one of the most undermined factors amongst novice bloggers. In an unsupervised WordPress installation, there are quite a few potential vulnerabilities that are left unattended. Most of the WordPress installation tutorials explain a quick and easy way to deploy WordPress in minutes. But they miss out a few important security factors. For example, directory browsing and using the ‘admin’ username are considered serious security loopholes. Today we’re going to take a look at 10 .htaccess code snippets which will help improve your WordPress blog’s security. Before we get started, let’s take a quick look into what is the htaccess file. What is the .htaccess file?
An htaccess file is an optional configuration file for the Apache web server to interpret, for each directory. You can store various settings in that file such as: password protect a directory, block IPs, block a file or folder from public access, etc. Traditionally, the .htaccess file is present in the base WordPress installation directory. It stores the permalink structure by default.
TIP: Before you start with the tutorial, make sure to backup the current .htaccess file (if present) in a cloud storage service

4 min read Oli
Community | wplift.com | 5 days ago

3 Simple WordPress SEO Hacks That Most People Don’t Think About

Ariel at Wplift covers a few simple tips to help improve your on-site SEO.

3 Simple WordPress SEO Hacks That Most People Don’t Think About

Community | wplift.com | 5 days ago

Hacking is such a dirty word. I think of hacking and two things come to mind. Someone or something getting chopped to bits, or some random dude trying to break in my digital backdoor to steal my info. Both visuals are unsettling. But let’s take a step back… Are hacks or hacking the system all that bad? Well, obviously if its illegal, you don’t want any part of it but that’s not what I mean.
I’m talking about ways to make like easier. To make your blog efforts easier.
These sort of Hacks are a godsend and we have a few WordPress SEO Hacks that you’re gonna love. (Virtual high five! Yeah!)
Add an XML Sitemap To Your Blog
An XML Sitemap is the first SEO Hack on our list. Essentially, a sitemap is a list that consolidates all your site’s pages and posts onto one page that is accessible to the search engines.
This is vital as this helps those pesky little bots and spiders scanning your site better understand and categorize what your website is all about.
There are a few ways to create a sitemap, but many popular plugins already have the capabilities. My favorite is the WordPress SEO plugin by Yoast. The plugin has an easy way to create a sitemap for your site. After creating the sitemap,

14 Easy Ways To Make Your WordPress Website More Secure

A comprehensive list of 14 easy ways to make your WordPress website more secure without any plugins.

8 min read Devesh Sharma
Tutorials | wpkube.com | 3 days ago

How to Install WordPress using Softaculous

This guide takes us to the basics of installing WordPress in a web host. There are literally 10+ methods by which you can install a deployable (i.e. ready for the Internet) WordPress site. Factors such as your operating system, intended usage (local or live) and hosting environment lead to several ways of installing WordPress.

How to Install WordPress using Softaculous

Tutorials | wpkube.com | 3 days ago

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This tutorial takes us to the basics of installing WordPress in a web host. There are literally 10+ methods by which you can install a deployable (i.e. ready for the Internet) WordPress site. Factors such as your operating system, intended usage (local or live) and hosting environment lead to several ways of installing WordPress.
We at WPKube have decided to start a WordPress installation series where we’ll discuss the most effective ways of installing WordPress in any web host. In this kickoff tutorial, we will discuss one of the most popular ways to install WordPress – i.e. by using automatic software/script installers like Softaculous.
How to install WordPress using automatic script installers?
With the advent of automatic script installers, better known as “one-click installers”, installing any script or web-software is reduced to a matter of a few mouse clicks – sometimes accompanied by a a couple of keystrokes.
I’m sure you’ve heard of the famous Softaculous script installer, which is a luxury most web hosts provide.
And we all love Softaculous, don’t we? What’s there not to like?
You can literally install any web software – scripts for polls and surveys,

Community | elegantthemes.com | 3 days ago

WordPress Jobs Boards For Hiring Freelancers And Finding Clients

Great topic, although the article went a bit general. Still nice to have them all in one place.

WordPress Jobs Boards For Hiring Freelancers And Finding Clients

Community | elegantthemes.com | 3 days ago

Jul29 If you freelance, chances are you have to work to get to work. Some people choose to contract freelancers by a per project approach while others are hired hourly for an estimated amount of time. No matter the case, finding work is crucial to surviving as a freelancer. This post is a list of the best places to find WordPress jobs for freelancers anywhere.
Jobs available can range anywhere to full-time to part-time to simply a few hours worth. The goal is to meet your contractor half way by providing both parties a fair agreement.
Smashing Jobs
With over 4 million monthly users, you can bet jobs will be a great resource at Smashing Magazine. Their job listings can be filtered by full-time and freelance with a handful of categories dealing with design, development, and more.
Potential job winners get direct contact with the job poster as well as enough information about the job provided the job poster.
Craigslist
Apart from nearly any other type of listing, Craigslist offers a great resource for those looking for freelance work. While it’s true there are some scammers and some odd looking entries a lot of success can be won by working to find the right jobs. There are plenty of filters

2 min read Nelio
Community | github.com | 3 days ago

Automattic/wpgo

Command-line tool to interact with WordPress blogs. You can read, publish and administer to some degree. Written in Go

Automattic/wpgo

Community | github.com | 3 days ago

readme.md Command-line tool to interact with WordPress blogs. You can read, publish and administer to some degree.
Works with WordPress.com and self-hosted blogs running Jetpack. If running Jetpack it requires the JSON API to be enabled, which should be activated by default.
You need to configure with an authorization token and blog id for each of your blogs. To do so, you can authorize using this site, which looks totally sketchy but it is run by a good guy, trust me: rest-access.test.apokalyptik.com/
Once you obtain the token and blog id, create ~/.wpgo.conf with the following two parameters:
token = ABCDEFGH123456
blog_id = 123456
You can setup multiple blogs, by specifying multiple entries, labeling each with [name] before parameters. The name used in brackets, is what you'll type on the command-line.
[mkaz]
token = ABCDEF123456
blog_id = 123456

[tinker]
token = ZYXWVU987654
blog_id = 987654
Single Site
$ wpgo read

$ wpgo read [post-id]

$ wpgo post filename.md

$ wpgo stats

$ wpgo upload image.jpg
Multiple sites using blog name
$ wpgo mkaz read

$ wpgo mkaz read [post-id]

$ wpgo mkaz post filename.md

$ wpgo mkaz stats

$ wpgo mkaz upload image.jpg
See sample-post.md