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Editorials | poststat.us | 16 hours ago

Post formats are slowly dying, and that's okay - Post Status

Brian writes about the initial introduction of post formats into wordpress and the gradual move away from.

Post formats are slowly dying, and that's okay - Post Status

Editorials | poststat.us | 16 hours ago

10 Post formats were introduced in WordPress 3.1. They were, and still are, little more than an organizational feature that allows themes to support ten custom content formats such as asides, links, quotes, video, and audio. They are just a taxonomy — similar to categories and tags — and are restricted to whatever the active theme supports.
The concept for post formats made sense at the time, though even then it was a topic of intense debate. Post formats in 3.1 were supposed to be an introduction of the feature, to be iterated on once themes began to show how they would use them. In WordPress 3.6 there was an effort to establish a consistent UI, which failed to land in core. I believe they’ve been dying a slow death ever since.
Were we just chasing a competitor?
When post formats were discussed and launched, they felt like an attempt to mimic what Tumblr was doing so well — to make it easy for end users and bloggers to create nicely formatted content for specific content structures.
The problem with post formats is that they have no standard user interface and there is no intuitive standard for how themes should implement storage for post format data, beyond a general recommendation

14 min read Tracey Rickard
Tutorials | traceyrickard.co.uk | 9 hours ago

Manage Your Metatags & More SEO for WordPress

Getting down to the nitty gritty of using SEO for WordPress in posts and pages, plus a few more tips and tricks for marketing a business.

Manage Your Metatags & More SEO for WordPress

Tutorials | traceyrickard.co.uk | 9 hours ago

SEO or Search Engine Optimisation is the art optimising your website to ensure it is found and ranked by Google and other major search engines. Getting the Foundation Right
There are some important steps that a website developer should take first to set your on your way. This needs to be in place before you start worrying about updating WordPress SEO.
The way your site is coded is very important for SEO. There are web standards with which your site should comply to give it the best possible start. It should be built with HTML5 code including the modern markup and sections that search engines recognise. Your site navigation should be well structured and easy for visitors (including search engines) to follow.
Your URL (Permalink) structure should be search engine friendly. For example traceyrickard.co.uk/seo-for-wordpress is written in English and readable by search engines. Whereas traceyrickard.co.uk/ has strange characters and numbers after the forward slash, which mean nothing.
Page load speed is important to Google and we need to be sure again that your pages load quickly, no matter where or how your visitor accesses your page. We can do lots for you here but

Installing a WordPress MU-plugin automatically

Not many people tackle the MU plugins so I thought this could be a nice start.

Installing a WordPress MU-plugin automatically

A mu-plugin is a special kind of WordPress plugin, originally created to facilitate the administration of multi-user (that’s why the ‘mu’) sites but later renamed as Must-Use and made available for all kinds of sites in order to help everybody to benefit from their special features. The most interesting feature of mu-plugins is that they are always executed before loading the “normal” plugins which makes them very useful to control how (and when) those other plugins are loaded. In our case, the mu-plugin we deploy as part of our A/B Testing for WordPress service, increases the page speed of split testing experiments by stopping other plugins to interfere with our AJAX calls (part of our page loading process) and delay them. Thanks to the mu-plugin, we can stop them during some “routine AJAX calls” that our plugin needs to perform, until we are done.
However, when we first included this plugin as part of the Nelio release we realized that practically nobody was using it. The reason is simple, mu-plugins cannot be installed from your WP Dashboard, they need to be directly uploaded to a special folder (wp-content/mu-plugins by default). Same for uninstalling them. And that’s just too complicated

3 min read Michael Beil
Plugins | make.wordpress.org | 2 days ago

Introducing plugin icons in the plugin installer

Some great movement forward on the plugin installer UI. What do you think of it?

Introducing plugin icons in the plugin installer

Plugins | make.wordpress.org | 2 days ago

WordPress 4.0 comes with a redesigned plugin installer. Just now we’ve added one of the finishing touches to this project — plugin icons. Plugin authors, If your plugin is compatible with WordPress 4.0, it only takes a few moments to change a readme “Tested up to:” value to 4.0. Compatibility information is prominently shown in the new plugin installer, so you’ll definitely want to update this value. For your plugin to stand out, you’ll also want to give your plugin an icon. Read on…
Beautiful, auto-generated icons
Default icons are generated using the GeoPattern library by Jason Long of GitHub. If you have a banner image, it is automatically sampled to determine the primary color for the pattern, using Tonesque from @matveb. (Cool, huh?)
Making your own icon
Plugin icons are 128 pixels square. HiDPI (retina) icons are supported at 256 pixels square. Like banners, these go into your /assets directory and can be either a PNG or JPG. So just create assets/icon-128x128.(png|jpg) and/or assets/icon-256x256.(png|jpg) and you have an icon.
You also have another option: SVG. Vectors are perfect for icons like this, as they can be scaled to any size and the file itself is small. For an SVG

Plugins | wpexplorer.com | 14 hours ago

Free Plugins to Speed Up Your WordPress Website

Check out WordPress Free Plugins That Will Help Speed Up Your WordPress Site And Help Boost Your SEO

Free Plugins to Speed Up Your WordPress Website

Plugins | wpexplorer.com | 14 hours ago

Internet users today are an impatient bunch. Seemingly small time delays are hugely significant, and have a big impact on user-experience. This is particularly true for eCommerce sites, with an estimated 40% abandonment rate accompanying just a three-second delay. Put another way: a sluggish website will kill your bottom line. People just don’t want to wait, and will click away after just a few seconds. With hundreds of other websites just a mouse click away, you really need to grab a user’s attention — having to wait for your website to load, achieves exactly the opposite. With this in mind, having a fast, efficient website really is a pre-requisite for being successful in today’s competitive online environment.
If website speed is something you’ve struggled with, there are a number of free WordPress plugins you can use to speed things up – Pingdom is a great tool for testing your current load time to get a baseline. Now, plugins are just a small piece of the puzzle when it comes to your website’s load speed. There are plenty of other factors that can improve your performance: a better host, a content delivery network, and a less bloated theme for starters. However, WordPress plugins

Plugins | webdevstudios.com | 1 day ago

Unit Testing Your Plugins

Basic introduction to unit testing with PHPunit for WordPress by Brad Williams.

Unit Testing Your Plugins

Plugins | webdevstudios.com | 1 day ago

So you have an amazing plugin, and it’s starting to get bigger and the bug reports are piling up (or better you are are starting a new plugin and you wanna do it right). Unfortunately getting PHPUnit to properly function with WordPress is a task that requires some serious configuration. Fortunately WP-CLI includes an automated method for getting started with tests in your plugin! Using WP-CLI’s scaffold command we can automatically generate the files necessary to start testing our plugin. The most difficult portion of this process is getting everything installed properly. If you are using Varying Vagrant Vagrants which I highly recommend with Alison Barret’s Site Wizard you already have everything you need installed and you can just ‘vagrant ssh’ in and skip down to the “Setup the Plugin” section.
Installation
Install PHPUnit here phpunit.de/getting-started.html
Setup the Plugin
Once you have everything installed and working properly it’s just a matter of running a few cli commands.
wp scaffold plugin-tests plugin-name
# replacing plugin-name with the folder name of your plugin

# then move to the plugin directory if you aren't there already
cd wp-content/plugins/plugin-name

8 min read Marie Dodson
Community | torquemag.io | 2 days ago

Demystifying Object-Oriented PHP for WordPress Developers

If you’re just starting out as a developer, and you’re learning PHP through WordPress, you might be intimidated by the idea of object-oriented programming (OOP), but the reality is you’ve probably already seen it in use.

Demystifying Object-Oriented PHP for WordPress Developers

Community | torquemag.io | 2 days ago

If you’re just starting out as a developer, and you’re learning PHP through WordPress, you might be intimidated by the idea of object-oriented programming (OOP), but the reality is you’ve probably already seen it in use. For example, have you ever retrieved the ID of a current post like this:
global $post;r $id = $post->ID;
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global $post;r
$id = $post->ID;
That’s object-oriented programing. You might not know the terminology, but what you’ve done in the first line is get the current post as an object of the standard class. In the second line you get the value of that class’s property ID.
Another example of where you’ve probably seen object-oriented PHP is when using WP_Query.
Here is a common use of WP_Query:
$args = array( 'post_type' => 'clothing', 'tag' => 'hat' ); $query = new WP_Query( $args ); if ( $query->have_posts() ) { while ( $query->have_posts() ) { $query->the_post(); echo '' . get_the_title() . ''; } echo ' '; }
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$args = array(
'post_type' => 'clothing',
'tag' => 'hat'
);
$query = new WP_Query( $args );
if ( $query->have_posts() ) {
while ( $query->have_posts() ) {
$query->the_post();
echo '' . get_the_title() . '';
}
echo

4 min read Indexwp
Plugins | indexwp.com | 7 hours ago

Best Free Page Builder WordPress Plugins

A collection a some amazing free page builder WordPress plugins, this plugin will help you to create superb page layout without a single line of code

Best Free Page Builder WordPress Plugins

Plugins | indexwp.com | 7 hours ago

WordPress page builders are great tool to help you create unique layout for your WordPress site with drag and drop interface. The page builder makes life really easy for those who are not familiar with codes. There are number of amazing WordPress page builders, we have already written about a few premium page builders like Visual Composer WordPress plugin, FastLine Page Builder, Zoom Builder etc
Here, in this post we will discuss about the best free page builder WordPress plugin which you can use in your site and create unique layout and designs.
Page Builder by SiteOrigin
SiteOrigin page builder is one of the most popular free page builder plugins, it will help you to create responsive column layouts using the widgets for your page.
SiteOrigin page builder is widget based, it brings the widgets from your sidebar to the pages and help you create unique designs. The developer of this plugin also brings to some really useful ready to use widget to get you started.
The Default Widgets with this page builder plugin are
Gallery widget for inserting image galleries.
Image widget for inserting standard images.
Self hosted video widget for embedding your own videos.
Post Loop to display a list

16 min read Peter Nilsson

Ultimate Guide to Develop Your First WordPress Plugin

Would you like to develop and create a WordPress plugin? But it seems to be a difficult task to do. In this article, Joseph Herb walk you through how to develop WordPress plug-ins with few simple steps.

Ultimate Guide to Develop Your First WordPress Plugin

The best thing about WordPress is it can be customized and extended with plug-ins. Developing WordPress plug-in seems like a difficult task; however it is actually simpler than you may think. In this post, we are going to teach you how to develop WordPress plug-in with few simple steps. Before beginning with development task, I'm providing information about what actually WordPress plug-in is. Let me tell you something:
Actually WordPress' first plugin supported version was WordPress 1.2 Mingus. And the first plugin was developed on Monday 19 April 2004 by Dean Allen. The name of that plugin was This is Textile, A Humane Web Text Generator.
Ahead, WP plugin is a PHP script that customize and extend the native functionality of WordPress. Installing flexible Plug-in API in your WordPress, you will enjoy many advantages like:
● It makes your modularity of code for a particular project increases and make updates and maintenance easier than before.
● Develop separate Plug-in functionality from themes
● Extended code base
● Allows using same plug-ins with various themes and has some design-independent functionality
● Implementing modern programming techniques, OOP is easier with a PHP script;

1 min read Oli
Business | businessinsider.com | 3 days ago

A Pakistan-Based Developer Is Building A Huge House For His Family After Selling One WordPress Theme

A short video about the creator of the "Avada" theme on ThemeForest - the top selling theme.

A Pakistan-Based Developer Is Building A Huge House For His Family After Selling One WordPress Theme

Business | businessinsider.com | 3 days ago

Powered by MongoDB Hosted by Datapipe
Stock quotes by YCharts
Made in NYC

Community | wptavern.com | 1 day ago

WordPress 4.0 Adds Custom Icons to the Plugin Installer

Custom icons with the plugins making the page more colorful. Wow! Thanks to the core team for working on the better UI.

WordPress 4.0 Adds Custom Icons to the Plugin Installer

Community | wptavern.com | 1 day ago

The WordPress plugin installer page is about to get more colorful. The upcoming 4.0 release completely revamps the plugin search and installation process with plugin cards arranged in a new grid view. Andrew Nacin announced today that plugins will also have their own icons in the installer. Plugin authors are at liberty to create their own custom 128px square icons, as seen in the Akismet example above. Nacin outlines the specific criteria for custom icons in the announcement:
Plugin icons are 128 pixels square. HiDPI (retina) icons are supported at 256 pixels square. Like banners, these go into your /assets directory and can be either a PNG or JPG. So just create assets/icon-128×128.(png|jpg) and/or assets/icon-256×256.(png|jpg) and you have an icon.
You also have another option: SVG. Vectors are perfect for icons like this, as they can be scaled to any size and the file itself is small. For an SVG file, you simply need an assets/icon.svg file.
If a plugin does not have a custom icon in place, an auto-generated icon will appear in the installer instead. Default icons are created from a color sampling of your plugin banner (done via Tonesque) and generated using the Geo Pattern library.

7 min read Jean-Baptiste
Community | jeremy.hu | 2 days ago

7 months as a Ghost

Why Jeremy moved back to WP from an experiment with Ghost

7 months as a Ghost

Community | jeremy.hu | 2 days ago

Back in October of last year, Ghost was released to the public. I read a lot about this “WordPress killer”, and decided to give it a try. It is Just a Blogging Platform, so that’s exactly what I need for this site. After 7 months, I’m back on WordPress and I’d like the share my experiences with you. This blog is my playground: I started back in 2006 on Blogger, then switched to WordPress a few months later. In 2011, I tried Jekyll. In 2012, I moved to WordPress.com and then back to the self-hosted version of WordPress to play with Jetpack. And in December 2013, I decided to stop blogging here and start a brand new Ghost blog. Over the course of 7 months, I published 32 posts. Here is why I switched back to WordPress, and what I learned about both platforms in the past few months.
Ghost: it’s new, it’s shiny
The first step in creating your new blog is to install Ghost on your hosting plan. It can be quite difficult since most shared hosts don’t support node.js yet. Luckily there are quite a lot of node.js tutorials out there, and if you have shell access to your host you should be able to figure things out. Ghost also worked with a lot of hosts to create Ghost installation wizards, so

You broke it! Better Error Handling So Your Errors Don’t Suck!

Chris intros the proper error handling techniques for writing WordPress code.

You broke it! Better Error Handling So Your Errors Don’t Suck!

There you are. Face illuminated by the blue glow of the monitor. You’ve just finished passing the third of three sets of WP_Query arguments to a function that’s supposed to run a loop with the passed args. Except…arg is what you’re feeling right now because your loop…isn’t looping. It isn’t doing anything, actually. No function my_awesome_query expected 1 parameter, none given. No fatal error on line 11123. No unexpected if (T_IF), expecting }. Nothing. You’ll get past this. You always do. It’s probably something stupid. In fact, there it is — you’ve added some extra argument that doesn’t exist in these sets of posts you’re trying to display. You delete it and voila, it works.
This scenario should be pretty familiar. No matter what level of developer you are, at some point or another, you’ve stared at your code and said WHY ISN’T THIS WORKING??? Sometimes, a PHP fatal error saves you. But that assumes you have WP_DEBUG switched on (you do, right?). Debugging code is one of the hardest parts of writing code, and it gets exponentially harder as your plugin or theme gets bigger and does more things. Taking care to fail gracefully can not only save your bacon, it can help other people using

7 min read Jean-Baptiste
Plugins | premium.wpmudev.org | 2 days ago

The Best WordPress Caching Plugins and Why Testing Them is So Important

There are a lot of caching solutions available to WordPress users. Here are the 6 best ones.

The Best WordPress Caching Plugins and Why Testing Them is So Important

Plugins | premium.wpmudev.org | 2 days ago

Reducing the page loading time of your website pages improves your visitor’s user experience and reduces the chance of them hitting the back button on their browser. Search engines such as Google have also confirmed the speed of a website is a contributing factor in how they rank it in their search results, therefore it pays to have a fast loading website. There are a number of ways in which you can improve the speed of a WordPress website, however a caching plugin will make the biggest difference. Caching is the process of creating a static HTML page of every page on your website. This means that visitors don’t need to retrieve data from your database, or execute PHP code, in order to display your page.
As a result of this, the number of your requests from your server greatly decreases. This also lowers CPU load and reduces the risk of bottlenecking.
Caching plugins boast many other features that can improve your page speed. These include CSS, HTML, and Javascript file minification, deferring the loading of Javascript to the end of pages, and GZIP compression. Some caching plugins also offer support for content delivery networks (CDNs) so that you can reduce server response times.

4 min read Peter Nilsson

The Best Places to Find Free Stock Images for Your WordPress Site

As a WordPress blogger I know you (and me) always need images for our blogs! The wpmudev blog has an article with useful tips where to find free stock images to your WordPress website.

The Best Places to Find Free Stock Images for Your WordPress Site

Images can tell a story in a quick glimpse more than endless paragraphs on a page. This is even up by data that shows 90 per cent of information transmitted to the brain is visual, and [...]

Tutorials | codeinwp.com | 2 days ago

How to Put Together a Mobile First, Performance Orientated WordPress Theme [Part 1]

In its core, putting together a WordPress theme is a rather simple task. WordPress delivers a really friendly environment and makes it clear which PHP functions to use for what purpose along the way. However. Even though it’s simple, it’s far from easy, and especially if you want your theme to be mobile-optimized. There’s a range of unique issues that you ought to overcome if you want to end up with a quality product that loads fast, operates in a predictable way, and (what’s the most important thing) is user-friendly and accessible to people using different devices and screen sizes.

How to Put Together a Mobile First, Performance Orientated WordPress Theme [Part 1]

Tutorials | codeinwp.com | 2 days ago

In its core, putting together a WordPress theme is a rather simple task. WordPress delivers a really friendly environment and makes it clear which PHP functions to use for what purpose along the way. However. Even though it’s simple, it’s far from easy, and especially if you want your theme to be mobile-optimized.
There’s a range of unique issues that you ought to overcome if you want to end up with a quality product that loads fast, operates in a predictable way, and (what’s the most important thing) is user-friendly and accessible to people using different devices and screen sizes.
This two-part guide will walk you through the process in 10 steps, listing the most important things to take care of when building a mobile first, performance orientated WordPress theme.
1. Content comes first
There’s really not much room on mobile to showcase much design detail or to use nice looking elements just for the sake of it.
Even though modern devices are capable of displaying graphics up to 1136×640 pixel (iPhone 5s), let’s not forget that the screen is still only four inches across. This is not a lot of real estate to work with.
Things worth doing:
get rid of all extra design elements that are

5 min read Harsh Agrawal
Plugins | shoutmeloud.com | 1 day ago

This Free WordPress Plugin Will Drive Huge traffic from Whatsapp

Whatsapp sharing button can work wonder for many blogs and here is a free plugin which let you add Whatsapp button on your blog. Note: Whatsapp sharing button supports iOS platform only at this moment.

This Free WordPress Plugin Will Drive Huge traffic from Whatsapp

Plugins | shoutmeloud.com | 1 day ago

Few days back, I shared best Social media sharing plugins for WordPress, and most of these plugins are optimised for web-version of your blog. You must be aware of the fact that mobile usage is increasing every day and it’s important for you to optimise your mobile version of site for sharing and conversions. When it comes to mobile Apps, Whatsapp is one of the most popular messaging app in today’s date and I’m sure you must be having it right now on your phone. Have you ever thought of adding Whatsapp sharing button on your blog? Imagine what kind of immense traffic it can bring to your site as it will make sharing so easier. Your readers read an article and if they find it interesting they can quickly forward it to their friends/team view Whatsapp. Before I share the way to add Whatsapp button on your WordPress blog, let me quickly share some interesting stats with you.
Popular Website Buzzfeed added WhatsApp button sometime back and now Whatsapp button is generating more share than Twitter share button. In a conversation with Re-code, Buzzfeed President Jon Steinberg added “Every time we looked at WhatsApp’s numbers, it blew us away“.
After all it makes complete sense as What’sapp

8 min read Mickey Kay
Community | wpsitecare.com | 2 days ago

Why It's Important to Say No to Your Support Customers

WP Site Care share their thoughts on skillful ways to say no to customer support requests.

Why It's Important to Say No to Your Support Customers

Community | wpsitecare.com | 2 days ago

How do you politely say “teaching you CSS and PHP is outside the scope of theme support” without sounding rude/unhelpful? — carrie dils (@cdils) August 4, 2014
I saw this tweet from Carrie some time last week, and the myriad of replies that followed. Everything from LMGTFY to simply explaining it’s outside the standard theme support. The question was more about tone than anything, but it got me thinking about the importance of clear, friendly communication in support, without jeopardizing your core customer support values and policies.
There’s a lot of gray area and it’s a very fine line between delivering in a big way, and giving away your business.
At WP Site Care we walk that tightrope every single day, and it’s a constant balancing act. Here are a few thoughts I came up with regarding when to say “no” to your customers, and why it’s important.
Your Time is Valuable, and so is your Client’s
At the end of the day, support is a service role. It’s really important to respect that and know that the people who are paying to have their problems solved, deserve a great attitude on the other end of their communications. We can leave snarky replies up to the internal IT departments, but we

7 min read Olaf Lederer
Community | tommcfarlin.com | 2 days ago

Everything Is Bloated, Nothing Is Good

Developers are quick assert that everything is bloated. That is, they complain that certain utilities are too much. I don't think that's the case.

Everything Is Bloated, Nothing Is Good

Community | tommcfarlin.com | 2 days ago

One of the things that’s becoming more and more common place regarding front end frameworks, utilities, or applications is the use of the phrase “it’s bloated” followed by an argument as to why we should dismiss it. No, this isn’t something that’s new, but it’s something that’s becoming appears to be becoming more mainstream – at least as far as I can tell – in how people describe the tools, apps, frameworks, libraries, and other tools that they work with today, or have worked with at some point in the past.
Obviously, this isn’t to say that nothing is bloated – I mean, I’ve written enough articles on the idea on “decisions, not options” and on how things should be more focused on a single niche – but sometimes I think that we often write off certain utilities as being “bloated” when that’s not exactly the case.
Just because something has a number of features that you don’t use doesn’t make it bloated.
Everything Is Bloated
Before actually determining if something is bloated or not, it’s helpful to actually know what the term means, right? One such definition is:
excessive in size or amount.
If that’s the benchmark by which we’re evaluating software, then that’s a tough call.
How big

9 min read Marie Dodson
Community | torquemag.io | 22 hours ago

Why You Need Child Themes and How to Use Them

If you’re new to WordPress or the WordPress ecosystem — whether it be by being friends with someone who uses it or by attending your first WordPress meetup or WordCamp — there's a term that will come up that will in all likelihood confuse you. That term is ‘child theme.'

Why You Need Child Themes and How to Use Them

Community | torquemag.io | 22 hours ago

If you’re new to WordPress or the WordPress ecosystem — whether it be by being friends with someone who uses it or by attending your first WordPress meetup or WordCamp — there’s a term that will come up that will in all likelihood confuse you. That term is ‘child theme.’
I’ve taught numerous classes and workshops on WordPress, and as soon as we get to the section on Themes, someone always raises their hand and asks what a child theme is. For someone familiar with WordPress, a child theme makes sense, but for someone new to the wonderful world of WordPress, it is often confusing and frustrating.
This article, my friends, is for those of you not familiar with a child theme — what it does, and when and how to use one.
So What Is a Child Theme Anyway?
A child theme is a theme that inherits the functionality of another theme, called the parent theme. This then allows you to modify or add to the functionality of the parent theme in a safe manner.
We’ll talk more about the safety aspect in the next section on why to use a child theme.
Why You Should Be Using a Child Theme
The easiest explanation for why you should use a child theme is because it allows you to safely update the parent theme

Community | cloudways.com | 4 days ago

A Chat With Tavern Keeper: Jeff Chandler From WPTavern Talks With Cloudways

Jeff Chandler is in the eyes of everyone here. I'm proud to have a word with this WordPress champion blogger who have reviewed hundreds of WP themes and plugins. In this interview, he shared about his beginning and the success story.

A Chat With Tavern Keeper: Jeff Chandler From WPTavern Talks With Cloudways

Community | cloudways.com | 4 days ago

Name and fame is all around Jeff Chandler. He is the founder of the largest WordPress (WP) blog. It is none other than WP Tavern. Jeff has a vast experience of WordPress. He is a contributing writer at WP Tavern since 2007. He has written hundreds of reviews on WP plugins and themes. He is also very active on social communities of WordPress. He also hosts the WordPress weekly podcast.
In this interview, he discussed about his sudden and unplanned WordPress journey and how he becomes the most popular WP blogger. Jeff also shared his views about WordCamps and their importance.
Cloudways: You started with WP Tavern, which is now a giant in WordPress industry. Was it all planned or was it just a thought that triggered your mind? Why do you call yourself a Tavern Keeper?
Jeff Chandler: No, the success of WPTavern was never planned. I started the site as a way for me to express my opinions and thoughts on the progress of WordPress community and ecosystem. I maintained the site for a few years and I never thought that I’d one day end up having to sell it. I surely didn’t think the co-creator of WordPress would purchase the site, but he did. As far as being called a Tavern Keeper, it’s a fun

6 min read Oli
Community | wplift.com | 2 days ago

How To Write A Blog Post That Converts: 5 Tips for Success

Ariel and WPLift covers some simple tips to help you drive conversions via your blogging.

How To Write A Blog Post That Converts: 5 Tips for Success

Community | wplift.com | 2 days ago

Conversion is a concept that all website owners love, and yet, it alludes many. Creating content on your blog is an important part to boosting conversion, however, the reason why so many are struggling with converting traffic into customers or subscribers is because they aren’t really writing for it. What many blog owners fail to realize is that it takes more then simply pounding out some decent information and then clicking, Publish.
Blogging for conversion is a craft, and it takes some time and practice to get it right.
So just how do you write a blog post for conversion? Here are a few tips to help you in your conversion endeavours.
Is there more to blogging for conversion then just writing? Yes, there’s quite a lot actually.
The overall design of your blog is important, and writing informative content it a must, but what else should you be doing?
Consider these points.
1) Is It Even Worth Writing?
Before you even start writing your blog post, you need to ask yourself one question first:
Will this be something that my viewers will actually want to read?
If you want to write a conversion driven blog post, then you need to remember that conversion has to do with people; more specifically,

4 min read Oli
Community | wplift.com | 1 day ago

Happy Friday! Here is The Weekly WordPress News from WPLift #76

Our weekly news roundup of all the best WordPress related content from the past 7 days - enjoy!

Happy Friday! Here is The Weekly WordPress News from WPLift #76

Community | wplift.com | 1 day ago

This week we did a theme release over at ThemeFurnace, named “Exposition” its a clean blogging theme aimed at long-form writers and photographers. I designed something simple with a clean layout and typography as we had been receiving requests for more blogging themes. We will also be releasing this in the WordPress directory – just amending a few things and will be submitting next week. I have been impressed how the directory has been going – theme reviews are taking a lot quicker now, around 3 weeks and the selection of featured themes is really nice – they are now picked on merit rather than as a reward for the theme reviewers ( the featured themes used to be a bit ropey ).
Check out the theme here and grab yourself a membership for $49 which now includes 13 themes. ( Don’t forget we also have a 20% discount coupon here on WPLift. )
Have a good weekend ( bank holiday if in UK :) ) On with the news …
This is our weekly WordPress news roundup post, you can view previous news roundups on this tag. Join our 8000 followers on Twitter for more frequent WordPress news throughout the week, Facebook page or even on Pinterest.
WordPress News and Articles
Testimonials: increase your visitor’s

Companies partner to expand WordPress e-commerce capabilities

WooThemes And 2Checkout Partnership Seek To Enable WooCommerce merchants accept 26 different currencies

Companies partner to expand WordPress e-commerce capabilities

Online payment provider 2Checkout, and WooThemes, maker of the WooCommerce plugin for WordPress, today announced a partnership to offer 2Checkout's online payment technology to WooCommerce users, according to a press release. The integration allows WooCommerce merchants in nearly 200 countries to accept payments in 26 currencies, as well as increases conversion rates over a standard hosted form. WooThemes said in the announcement its for WordPress powers nearly 18 percent of all e-commerce websites, with 381,000 active online stores worldwide. WooCommerce users can integrate 2Checkout's payment form, which overlays on the merchant's website without redirecting visitors to a separate page and results in as much as a 20 percent increase in conversion rates over redirects to a standalone hosted payment form, according to the press release. From there, 2Checkout's payment form maintains the branded look and feel of the merchant's website design, and adapts the checkout page responsively for smartphones and tablets.
"2Checkout has been a pivotal product for WooCommerce merchants in enabling customers to check out in a variety of currencies. 2Checkout has changed the payments landscape for