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Community | poststatus.com | 10 hours ago

Andrew Nacin has joined the White House's U.S. Digital Service

Big news for the WordPress core leadership team: Andrew Nacin has joined the United States Digital Service.

Andrew Nacin has joined the White House's U.S. Digital Service

Community | poststatus.com | 10 hours ago

Andrew Nacin now works at the U.S. Digital Service, the federal government service that aims to “redefine public service for a new generation.” Nacin continues his role as WordPress lead developer, but is stepping back from working on the project full time. Andrew Nacin hasn’t worked at Audrey Capital since January. At Audrey, he has worked for more than four years for WordPress co-founder Matt Mullenweg, exclusively on the WordPress project. He has joined the White House’s new U.S. Digital Service.
The U.S. Digital Service is a new organization that operates from the White House, with an aim to modernize and transform the way the federal government operates digitally.
When I was approached, I have to admit that I was nervous to step back from the day-to-day buzz of WordPress because I’ve invested so much. But the community stepped up, in most cases not even knowing about my life change. That’s the beauty of open source, and the fantastic WordPress community in particular. WordPress continues to play an important role in my life. With Matt Mullenweg’s support and encouragement, I’m taking time away from Audrey, where I’ve worked since 2010. I’m still actively involved in the project,

Business | theregister.co.uk | 14 hours ago

$23m to a WordPress biz? Why top-end hosting is big money

WP Engine nails another investment as I wonder if there is space for another player in the market.

$23m to a WordPress biz? Why top-end hosting is big money

Business | theregister.co.uk | 14 hours ago

Analysis Website hosting may not be the first thing you consider when looking at tech industry growth, but venture capitalists North Bridge are betting different. This week, the investment biz sank $23m (£15.4m) in WP Engine, a hosting company in Austin, Texas, that specializes in the WordPress open-source online publishing software. North Bridge gave WP Engine $15m (£10m) just over a year ago.
Why? Because it sees nothing but opportunity. "We believe that we're looking at 'gross compression' here," explains North Bridge partner Jim Moran, "where the only thing keeping the company from going beyond its current 100 per cent growth is an ability to step on the accelerator."
The money will be largely spent on sales and marketing and expanding outside the US, with some going on "fortifying" the company's feature-rich platform so sudden growth doesn't become sloppy service.
With single-digit turnover in customers, it's all about getting new customers in. "The faster we can convert, the faster we can go," Moran enthuses. The company will launch first in the UK and then into Europe.
So where are these new customers going to come from? "The market is as much green field as it is plain takeover,"

Plugins | wpide.net | 2 days ago

WP IDE

Cloud based integrated WordPress code editor. This could be fun!

WP IDE

Plugins | wpide.net | 2 days ago

Cloud based integrated WordPress code editor. This could be fun!

3 min read Ahmad Awais
Plugins | yoast.com | 4 days ago

WordPress SEO 2.0: focus on what matters • Yoast

This has been in the works for quite a while, check out WordPress SEO 2.0

WordPress SEO 2.0: focus on what matters • Yoast

Plugins | yoast.com | 4 days ago

We’re proud to announce the availability of WordPress SEO 2.0. This release adds new features for Google’s Knowledge Graph and improves the design, layout & usability of the WordPress SEO plugins admin screens in many ways. Google Knowledge Graph
Google recently introduced new features for their knowledge graph, allowing you to highlight yourself in the search results as either a company or a person. This includes you or your company’s name, if your site is for a company, the logo:
And it includes your social profiles (this is the list of social networks Google supports in their social markup):
If Google has picked this all up and shows a Knowledge Graph block for you or your company (note that we can’t force it to do that), it would look like this:
Simplified the admin menus
We’ve decided to move several admin pages under one “Advanced” page, and several tools to a new “Tools” page. This makes our entire admin structure a lot cleaner (note the screenshots are for WordPress SEO premium), compare the old (left) versus the new (right):
While this might seem mostly a superficial change, it’s very important in how we think you should perceive our plugin. The most important thing you can

8 min read Tom Harrigan
Community | linkedin.com | 2 days ago

My Journey: WordPress and Community - Waseem Abbas

Wasseem Abbas has been bringing the stories of those in the WordPress community to us over the past year, now we finally get to hear his story.

My Journey: WordPress and Community - Waseem Abbas

Community | linkedin.com | 2 days ago

My name is Waseem Abbas. I am a 22 year old boy currently working with Cloudways as WordPress Community Manager. Cloudways is a European Cloud Hosting Platform provider. It is a great exposure to work with the best marketers and developers of industry. I write content, interview WordPress folks, make SlideShares & infographics, follow WordCamp events virtually, join podcasts, attend webinas & hangouts, and do loads of fun with my colleagues and friends. When I started making websites and get to know about WordPress, I found it an easy approach to impress my clients with the amazing content management system. Everything is ready within a few clicks. You can get a reliable plugin for any functionality required by your clients. Anyhow the theme related to your project is available online. WordPress made my life easy.
A customer once demanded me to integrate Nigerian Payment System for their fund collection website in Nigeria. I never thought about it. Paypal was my only options. But, in a few minutes I am able to do it with the help of a plugin. Life is much simpler when you are making websites with WordPress. These tricks are self-taught and they gave me the confidence to accept any kind

Plugins | johnblackbourn.com | 3 days ago

WordPress Developer Plugins

A collection of development oriented plugins by John Blackbourn. Would like to know if you use any of them or have your own debug/profile stack?

WordPress Developer Plugins

Plugins | johnblackbourn.com | 3 days ago

Here’s a list of the developer-oriented plugins for WordPress that I use on a regular basis. (Alternative title: 9 WordPress Plugins You Can’t Live Without. You’ll Never Believe What Number 4 Does!) Invaluable if you’re working with rewrite rules. Not only lists all the current rewrite rules on your site, but also lets you query a URL to see which rules it matches.
This plugin is an under-appreciated gem. It lets you specify simple tests for your rewrite rules to avoid problems such as missing or clashing rules. Just give it an array of paths and the expected corresponding query for each, and the plugin will let you know if any of them fail.
Query Monitor
My own plugin which provides debugging and performance information on database queries, hooks, conditionals, HTTP requests, redirects, scripts & styles, transients, and lots more. A modern-day replacement for Debug Bar.
Deprecated notices in WordPress can slip by, especially if they’re happening some place that you don’t look. This plugin logs these notices and provides a simple admin list screen with the call count and information about the alternative function or function arguments.
Pig Latin and RTL Tester
Combined, these plugins

Editorials | aaron.jorb.in | 3 days ago

Auto Activating WordPress Plugins is the right choice

Should WordPress plugins be auto activated upon install? For me the answer is obvious but seems that even this question still rises a lot of controversy.

Auto Activating WordPress Plugins is the right choice

Editorials | aaron.jorb.in | 3 days ago

Auto Activating WordPress Plugins is the right choice During the WordPress 4.2 cycle, one of the goals was to do some work aimed at improving the experience of users when updating and installing plugins. While the decision was ultimately made to scale back to just updating for this release, the code that installed plugins also automatically activated plugins when a user installs them. This generated a lot of controversy, but is ultimately what we should be doing for users.
The End User
Most end users of WordPress doesn’t have a staging site, doesn’t keep there site in version control, and doesn’t install plugins to activate them later on. When they install a plugin, they start using it right away. When they install a plugin, they want to either play with it to see if it works for them, or they set it up and start using it.
One of WordPress’s biggest strengths are it’s philosophies. One of them is that WordPress designs for the majority:
Many end users of WordPress are non-technically minded. They don’t know what AJAX is, nor do they care about which version of PHP they are using. The average WordPress user simply wants to be able to write without problems or interruption. These are

Business | poststatus.com | 5 days ago

Happytables 3 is taking on Squarespace and Wix for restaurant websites with a brand new platform

Impressive work on the new Happytables from Human Made. A great highlight of WordPress as a platform.

Happytables 3 is taking on Squarespace and Wix for restaurant websites with a brand new platform

Business | poststatus.com | 5 days ago

The new Happytables is a slick setup, and they’ve invested more time and energy into a hosted WordPress solution than perhaps anyone but Automattic on WordPress.com. The difference here is they are going after a niche, and it’s a huge one with a big need: restaurants. The Human Made team has been hard at work preparing Happytables 3, an all new platform for the restaurant website builder.
Happytables was one of the first major hosted initiatives after WordPress.com, and launched in early 2012. You can see the post I wrote about them then. They’ve matured a lot since that time, investing more into products, finding their footing from a sales perspective, and expanding their team.
Human Made has a products team of six people, including some WordPress back-end development heavyweights. The new Happytables 3 is built using a custom REST API to make it unrecognizable from WordPress, though it’s built completely on WordPress. Ryan McCue, who is leading the official WordPress REST API project, is lead on the Happytables API as well.
The new Happytables dashboard is catered directly to restaurant owners. It simplifies much of the decision making for theming, utilizing a single standard template

Plugins | wptavern.com | 4 days ago

Shortcake Is Now a WordPress Feature Plugin

WP Tavern announces the Shortcake Feature plugin. It basically provides a UI for shortcodes and they can be previewed in the visual tab of the text-editor. Looks pretty cool.

Shortcake Is Now a WordPress Feature Plugin

Plugins | wptavern.com | 4 days ago

Shortcake, a plugin that adds a UI to make shortcodes more user friendly, is now an official WordPress feature plugin. The project is led by Daniel Bachhuber, currently the interim director of engineering at Fusion, the company where Shortcake originated. The plugin is being developed on GitHub but is also now available for download on WordPress.org. Developers who want to utilize Shortcake can register a UI for their shortcodes alongside add_shortcode, which will expose Shortcake’s user-friendly interface.
Shortcake transforms your ordinary shortcode to render a preview in a TinyMCE view:
It also supplies a user-friendly UI to add shortcodes via the “Add Media” button. After selecting your shortcode, you’ll have the ability to edit its content and attributes.
Version 0.2.0 enhances the post element interface in the following ways:
Shortcodes are sorted alphabetically, making it easier to skim and find shortcodes.
Shortcodes can be filtered by name using the “Search” field, reducing complexity when a site has many dozens of shortcodes.
The “Insert Element” button is disabled until a post element is selected, providing a visual cue to the user.
This release also makes a number of significant

Business | wpchat.com | 2 days ago

Disrupting the WordPress experience

Matt Medeiros asks a good question. For me the answer is clear - user experience is a top priority and whenever you can improve on it, you should do so even if that meant redoing the WordPress core. In fact I can't wait to re-do the plugin management screen in ManageWP as I think that WordPress default leaves a lot to be desired.

Disrupting the WordPress experience

Business | wpchat.com | 2 days ago

A lot of the press/discussion I've read around the current flurry of page builders doesn't dive into segmentation. I think that's a really critical part of the question you're raising. I mentioned this a bit with you, @MattMedeiros, after I tried out Conductor1, but I'll expand a bit on how this relates to your question regarding building core or independent experiences. I think the WordPress ecosystem is too diverse for WP core to have the right experience for all needs. Even for just a few of the largest use-cases. I see page builders filling a few niches which are actually quite distinct:
High-impact blogging and publishing. These builders are designed for writing and drafting articles with rich markup (blockquotes, photos, videos, etc). Front-end editing makes the most sense in this niche because it is focused on individual units where there is strong parity between the drafting process and the final result. The writer is writing a single article and wants to edit for a primary experience (single.php). Lasso by Aesop Interactive is making an explicit bid for this niche. The front-end editor for WP was an attempt to provide something similar for regular bloggers.
Landing pages. The

Community | cloudways.com | 4 days ago

What to Expect in WordPress 4.2 (Review and Feature)

Drew Jaynes releases the first 2 beta versions for WordPress 4.2. There are several predictions for the new coming release. WP Beginner written a post displaying the features and explained them. Ahsan Parwez also mentioned those features in his own style.

What to Expect in WordPress 4.2 (Review and Feature)

Community | cloudways.com | 4 days ago

At Cloudways, we are always excited for the new upcoming versions of WordPress. It is always fun to test out new features in the beta versions. It gives us a chance to see the direction of progress for WordPress development. The best thing is that the core development seem to have something for everyone from newbies to hardcore developers. The final version of WordPress 4.2 will be launched somewhere in April, but beta versions are now available for testing. It is not recommended to use a beta version on your live sites.
Before we jump into the detail about the features of this new version, I would like to introduce the lead of WordPress 4.2, Drew Jaynes. He is currently a web engineer at 10up.com. James can be found at Twitter where he often tweets about his work and appreciates others along the way.
I will try to cover most of the features WordPress 4.2 has to offer, but I know as we go along you might be interested in testing it out yourself. Don’t worry, you can easily setup your testing environment on staging URLs that Cloudways Cloud Platform provides. There are a few steps you need to follow:
Sign up for Cloudways
Launch a server with WordPress.
Sign in to your WordPress admin

6 min read Donna Fontenot
Editorials | heropress.com | 4 days ago

Finding Your Place

Started out wondering if I would like the article, but by the end, I was certain it was an important read in regards to the WordPress community

Finding Your Place

Editorials | heropress.com | 4 days ago

Started out wondering if I would like the article, but by the end, I was certain it was an important read in regards to the WordPress community

6 min read Eric Karkovack
Community | jenmylo.com | 6 days ago

Defending Drupal

Jen Mylo defends Drupal as a CMS, but trashes their anti-WordPress t-shirt design. Really, can't we all just accept each other?

Defending Drupal

Community | jenmylo.com | 6 days ago

The last 7 years of my life have been all WordPress, all the time. In that time we went from powering around 2 million sites to many tens of millions. Today, W3Techs says: WordPress is used by 23.6% of all the websites, that is a content management system market share of 60.8%.
I wish that sentence had a semicolon instead of a comma, but wow. Drupal, by comparison:
Drupal is used by 2.0% of all websites, that is 5.1% of all the websites whose content management system we know.
Sometimes, people like to pit WordPress and Drupal against each other, as if we are fighting each other, rather than fighting proprietary software. At WordCamps, meetups, or any professional gathering where someone asks a question (or makes a snarky comment) about Drupal, I point out that we are far more similar than we are different. “Open source CMS built with PHP” describes us both, as does any description of the contributor model, or even the economic models — how many times have I heard Acquia is to Drupal as Automattic is to WordPress? (A lot.) We’ve even shared booth space at the OSCON expo.
To drive the point home I often say that if you were stuck in an elevator/sitting next to someone on a plane, how

5 min read Donna Fontenot
Tutorials | themereview.co | 4 days ago

Prefix all the things

When to prefix, what to prefix, when to use underscores or dashes, and well, just all the things! :)

Prefix all the things

Tutorials | themereview.co | 4 days ago

When to prefix, what to prefix, when to use underscores or dashes, and well, just all the things! :)

21 min read Ryan D. Sullivan
Editorials | wpsitecare.com | 5 days ago

How Much Does a Website Cost for a DIY WordPresser?

We have a lot of people ask us what they should expect to pay for a WordPress website, so we went DEEP to give a comprehensive overview of all the costs associated with a DIY WordPress website.

How Much Does a Website Cost for a DIY WordPresser?

Editorials | wpsitecare.com | 5 days ago

If you’re thinking about starting a WordPress website or blog, one of the first questions you’ll probably ask yourself is “how much does a website cost?”. It’s an important question! Figuring out the best way to start a website early on can save you a ton of money in the long run. If you want to hire a designer, developer, or web agency, to do the work for you, the price can get pretty steep. While there’s nothing wrong with that, you do have some other options. Because WordPress is free, open source software, you can build your own cost-effective website if you don’t mind a bit of work. So, how much will creating a WordPress website actually cost if you’re doing it yourself?
The real answer is that it depends on how you go about choosing the products and services you’ll need to create an effective site. In this post, we’re going to look at what costs you can expect as a DIYer and help you make well-informed choices to get the best bang for your buck.
First Up: How Much Does a Domain Name Cost?
The first thing you will need (if you don’t have it already) is a domain name. Your domain name is the URL (like wpsitecare.com) that people will type in to find your website.
There are two free

3 min read Matt Cromwell
Plugins | wptavern.com | 5 days ago

WordPress 4.2 Radically Improves The Plugin Install and Update Process

Really happy to see these improvements in the Plugin installation and update process. In some ways though, I wonder if it will just encourage plugin bloat... of course nothing can stop that with some end-users, but still, rapid fire installs might be a little dangerous.

WordPress 4.2 Radically Improves The Plugin Install and Update Process

Plugins | wptavern.com | 5 days ago

One of the features I’m looking forward to in WordPress 4.2 is the improved plugin install and update process. Gary Pendergast and a team of volunteers have spent the last six months collaborating on shiny updates. When you update or install a plugin in WordPress 4.1, you’re taken to a screen that shows its progress. When it’s done, you can either activate it or navigate back to the plugins screen.
Here’s what it looks like when you update a plugin in WordPress 4.2.
Last but not least, here’s what it looks like when you install plugins in WordPress 4.2. It’s important to note that when a plugin is installed, it’s automatically activated.
At the March 11th developer chat, the team decided to scale back shiny updates to focus on plugins for 4.2. Fancy updates for themes will be added in a future release and will continue to use the classic update/install routine. You can follow the progress by watching tickets 31529 and 31530.
During testing, I was able to install 10 plugins in under a minute. Removing friction from the update and install process not only saves mouse clicks, but it’s a great user experience. In fact, the process is so quick, it might make sense to add a visual indicator

17 min read Ryan Love

WordPress: It Ain’t Perfect – but Neither Are the People Who Use It

Daniel Pataki shares his thoughts on the "common criticism WordPress receives and apply a dose of clarity to each issue."

WordPress: It Ain’t Perfect – but Neither Are the People Who Use It

WordPress has become a behemoth in the past 6-7 years. As with any huge project, it receives plenty of praise and lots of criticism. The platform does indeed deserve the praise it receives, but no system is perfect – a lot of the constructive criticism is well-founded.
In this article I want to focus on the criticism WordPress receives and apply a dose of clarity to each issue. The goal is to help you better understand the problems within WordPress, why they are there and what we and WordPress contributors can do to make things better.
General Guidelines
Before we get into specific issues, let’s take a little detour into two general issues. I think every criticism of WordPress has three sides.
Most issues can split the blame between three areas:
Plugin/Theme issues
Subjective reasoning
User laziness
Plugins and Themes
Many of the issues below will be completely, or in-part caused, by bad plugins and themes. While the direct blame lies with the authors of these products it would be unfair not to point out WordPress’ role in this.
WordPress has the ability to monitor and regulate plugins and themes in its repositories. It is impossible to weed out every single problem, but stricter policies

19 min read David Rashty
Tutorials | plugins.cminds.com | 4 days ago

The Ultimate List Of Resources For WordPress Users & Developers

A shortlist of valuable WordPress resource which are valuable for both user and developers. We would be happy to get new resources submitted so we can add them to the guide

The Ultimate List Of Resources For WordPress Users & Developers

Tutorials | plugins.cminds.com | 4 days ago

There’s no disputing the fact that WordPress is by far the most prominent content management system out there. Whether you are new to WordPress or have been using it for some time, you’ll know that it is an incredibly powerful platform. What started out as just a basic blogging platform, is now evolved and used by more than 74.6 million sites. There are thousands of websites out there for WordPress, dedicated to sharing tips, tricks and information about the latest resources available to help you move beyond the basics, towards becoming a fully fledged WordPress pro, but it’s not always easy to know which resources are the most up-to-date and relevant for you. New themes and plugins are produced nearly every single day, with constant developments and improvements. With all of this going on, trying to keep up with WordPress can seem daunting so we’ve done all the hard work for you and picked the most influential and useful WordPress resources that are available on the web. You may think you already know about all the resources WordPress has to offer, but think again. Here’s the ultimate list of resources for WordPress users and developers:
A WordPress/Joomla hosting company that provides

Community | kinsta.com | 3 days ago

How to Manage Your Projects in WP With Project Panorama

Manage your small project or portfolio with Project Panorama WordPress plugin and How to use it?

How to Manage Your Projects in WP With Project Panorama

Community | kinsta.com | 3 days ago

Either running a small blog or a profitable online business, managing your projects is of utmost priority in order to keep it organized and fruitful, and save yourself from being chaotic. Fortunately WordPress offers endless possibilities for that. By using a project management plugin, you’ll be able to keep on track of the deadlines and manage projects on schedule. Now I will review one of the most popular plugins for this purpose, and show you how to use it. Plugin Overview
Project Panorama is one of the most beloved project management plugins out there, with a Lite version that can be found in wordpress.org, but also on the plugin’s official website along with the premium versions of the plugin. I’m going to review the free version, as it allows you to use the most important features like tracking the progress of projects, defining milestones, assigning start and finish dates to the projects, and discussing projects.
(The paid version has some additional features for instance upload and store documents, protect projects with passwords and assign phases.)
One of the most outstanding features of the plugin is visualization: the overall look of the projects makes your tasks easily trackable

Community | wpdailythemes.com | 4 days ago

Weekly WordPress Roundup #2 - WP Daily Themes

Over the week there were a lot of happenings in the WordPress community. WP Daily Themes collected all the master pieces at one place. You don't have to look here and there but directly check all the insights at one place. Do let me know if anything missed. I would love to give it a read.

Weekly WordPress Roundup #2 - WP Daily Themes

Community | wpdailythemes.com | 4 days ago

We initiated the weekly roundup of WordPress articles. Last Wednesday, we published the Weekly Roundup #1 for our readers. We have shared several resources and the response was massive. We are grateful to our readers for sharing it all over the internet. With your generous support, we are able to write the roundup again for this week.
WordPress isn’t stopped in making efforts. We as a family breaking records each day. It feels great for us to share the stories we read over the week.
We light the candelabra to read the review post from WPBeginner about WordPress 4.2. Most of these features were announced in the 2 beta releases by WordPress.
These articles are chosen from WP Daily Themes and other selected WordPress blogs. We tried our best to give you a taste of all great WordPress content available. Let’s take a look into the write-ups for past week.
WordPress 4.2 Beta 2
With the continuous efforts, Drew Jaynes delivered the second beta version for WordPress 4.2. It was delivered on the time promised by the lead for this release. Peter Nilsson reviewed the major changes for this release. Good news for the FTP and SSH users. Cross browsing support added for emoji and much more.
Magnus

Plugins | lasso.is | 6 days ago

Lasso Front Editor Plugin

Nick Hastings announces the new Lasso front end editing plugin.

Lasso Front Editor Plugin

Plugins | lasso.is | 6 days ago

Imagine how many times you go back and forth between the WordPress administration area and the post or page just to make sure it looks good. That quickly adds up. If you preview a post 20 times before publishing, and you blog three days a week, that’s 24 hours a year spent previewing and reviewing. Blog daily? Double that figure. We can save you that time, and make the process incredibly fun by moving past the post editor completely, and instead editing content directly on the front-end. We can do this using a new, hyper-minimal editor that’s acts as a layer on top of your existing post or page content. No more wasting time previewing the post. Everything happens in real-time, right before your eyes.
This new editor is called Lasso, and after nearly six months of development, it’s finally available.
Lasso together with Aesop Story Engine provides an amazing front-end editing and story building experience.
Lasso is a front-end editor and story builder plugin for WordPress. It’s designed to remove the friction created in the writing workflow, in addition to making content creation fun and entirely visual.
The best part, is that it’s engineered to work with most WordPress themes, and their

Community | wordpress.org | 3 days ago

WordPress 4.2 Beta 3

We are too close to the final release. Drew Jaynes announced the third beta version for WP 4.2.

WordPress 4.2 Beta 3

Community | wordpress.org | 3 days ago

No Description

8 min read Matt Cromwell
Themes | wordimpress.com | 7 days ago

Tips on Getting Started with WordPress Theme Development

Devin Walker gives some great tips for anyone interested in getting into Theme Development. Whether you're just learning, or already a Pro, Walker provides great insight, resources, and tips for planning and building a great theme.

Tips on Getting Started with WordPress Theme Development

Themes | wordimpress.com | 7 days ago

So you want to get started developing WordPress themes? Here’s what you need to know to be a successful WordPress theme developer. What kind of chops do you gots? If you have never developed a WordPress theme and are looking to get started there are many ways to learn… but it largely depends on your current knowledge, expertise and skill-level.
A Little Background
Today was WP Watercooler Episode #69: Getting Started in WordPress Theme Development. This topic is awesome to discuss because when I was starting off with developing themes I went down a number of wrong roads. If one person learns how to code WordPress themes more efficiently after watching the episode then mission accomplished.
… You can watch the Watercooler Episode Here:
Who was on the show? Awesome people. Here’s who attended the show:
Steve Zehngut @zengy – Awesome guy, always gives great talks at WordCamps and runs the kick-ass agency Zeek
Carrie Dils @cdils – A super smart Gal who spoke at WCSF13 and was great. She’s in love with Genesis (and her dog).
Suzette Franck @Mt_Suzette – World record holder for most WordCamps attended (and probably spoken at). Nuff’ said.
Sé Reed @sereedmedia – A regular around the WordPress

16 min read Iain Poulson
Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | 10 days ago

A Developer's Guide to Contributing to WordPress Core

A great guide to getting started with contributing to WordPress core as a developer

A Developer's Guide to Contributing to WordPress Core

Tutorials | deliciousbrains.com | 10 days ago

Every month the team here at Delicious Brains have a “WP Core Contrib Day”, a day to give back to Core. This is an important day for us as we make our living from premium WordPress plugins. Using our skills to help keep WordPress core awesome just feels right. Also, all of us contributing a work day per month to WordPress Core is very close to the 5% contribution that Matt Mullenweg talks about in his 5 for the Future post. In this article I’ll discuss the basics for finding things to work on, how to handle the WordPress source code, how to submit your work and what you might expect to happen from there. This article is very much targeted towards PHP developers that already know how to set up a normal WordPress installation, but are looking to dive in and contribute back to WordPress Core.
As we’re all developers at Delicious Brains, on our WP Core Contrib Days we endeavour to find tickets for WordPress Core that we can contribute to by committing code. I’ll be focusing on that type of contribution, but there are many other ways to contribute and anything you can do is appreciated.
Where To Find Tickets
When we first started our contrib days last November the first big hurdle we encountered