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2 min read David Bisset
Community | ma.tt | 9 hours ago

Matt Mullenweg: WordPress 14th Anniversary

Today is WordPress's 14 anniversary. First release occurred May 27th, 2003. Matt Mullenweg takes a brief look back and notes the progress for the future.

ma.tt |

Matt Mullenweg: WordPress 14th Anniversary

Community | ma.tt | 9 hours ago

Today is 14 years from the very first release of WordPress. The interface I’m using to write this (Calypso) is completely indistinguishable from what WordPress looked and worked like even a few years ago. Fourteen years in, I’m waking up every day excited about what’s coming next for us. The progress of the editor and CLI so far this year is awesome, and I’m looking forward to that flowing into improvements for customization and the REST API. Thanks as always to Mike for kicking off this crazy journey, all the people chipping in to make WordPress better, and Konstantin and Erick for surprising me with the cool cake above.

9 min read David Bisset

NEW Media Widgets for Images, Video, and Audio

NICE! WordPress 4.8 includes media widgets for not only images but also video and audio, on top of an extensible base for introducing additional media widgets in the future, such as for galleries and playlists.

NEW Media Widgets for Images, Video, and Audio

As first introduced in the Image Widget Merge Proposal, WordPress 4.8 includes media widgets (#32417) for not only images (#39993) but also video (#39994) and audio (#39995), on top of an extensible base for introducing additional media widgets in the future, such as for galleries and playlists. To quote [40640]: The last time a new widget was introduced, Vuvuzelas were a thing, Angry Birds started taking over phones, and WordPress stopped shipping with Kubrick. Seven years and 17 releases without new widgets have been enough, time to spice up your sidebar!
Since widgets are a very old part of WordPress (since 2.2), widgets in core have been very much entirely built using PHP with some Ajax sprinkled on top. In the time since WP_Widget was introduced in 2.8, WordPress has made dramatic shifts toward developing interfaces in JavaScript, including with the Customizer in 3.4 and the Media Library in 3.5, and more recently with the focus on the REST API and the editor (Gutenberg).
Given that the media widgets are naturally interfacing with the media library JS, it is necessary that the media widgets make use of JavaScript to construct their UI instead of relying on PHP. The media widgets

7 min read Donna Cavalier
Business | wpbeginner.com | 17 hours ago

25 Interesting Facts About WordPress (Infographic)

Did not know that Christine Selleck Tremoulet came up with the WordPress name.

25 Interesting Facts About WordPress (Infographic)

Business | wpbeginner.com | 17 hours ago

Want to know some cool WordPress facts? WordPress turn 14 years old today, so we thought what best way to celebrate the world’s most popular website building software than to create a top 25 facts about WordPress infographic. Here are 25 most interesting facts about WordPress that you may not know. You can click on the image below to view the infographic or keep reading the text version
1. WordPress is Older Than Twitter and Facebook
The first version of WordPress was released on May 27, 2003. This makes WordPress older than both Facebook and Twitter.
2. The Name – WordPress
Christine Selleck Tremoulet, a prolific blogger and a friend of Matt Mullenweg (co-founder of WordPress), suggested the name WordPress.
3. WordPress Powers Nearly 27% of All Websites
According to W3Techs web technologies surveys, WordPress currently powers nearly 27% of all websites.
4. WordPress Dominates 76.4% of CMS Market Share
According to Wappalyzer, WordPress dominates the content management software usage with 76.4% market share.
5. WordPress is Open Source and Free
WordPress is released under GNU GPL license, which allows anyone in the world to download and use it. The source code is freely

10 min read Omaar Osmaan
Development | wptavern.com | 4 hours ago

JSON Feed Creators Aim to Revitalize Interest in the Open Web with RSS Alternative

“The premise was simple: the time is right for a JSON-based approach to feeds”. And there is a JSON Feed plugin for WordPress. JSON Feed Creators Want to Inspire More Developers to Create Apps for the Open Web.

JSON Feed Creators Aim to Revitalize Interest in the Open Web with RSS Alternative

Development | wptavern.com | 4 hours ago

JSON Feed, a project created by Manton Reece and Brent Simmons, launched last week. It’s a syndication format similar to RSS and Atom but built with JSON. “The premise was simple: the time is right for a JSON-based approach to feeds,” Reece said. “We hope that JSON Feed is straightforward enough to be implemented quickly, and capable enough to push the next decade of blogging software forward. We love RSS too and tried to learn from its success.”
Version 1 of the spec was published last week and the intro includes a very simple example. Publishers can further extend their feeds by creating custom objects.
The team has also developed a JSON Feed plugin for WordPress, which is now available in the official WordPress Plugin Directory. They are also working on a JSON Feed Parser for Swift.
If you want to see some example JSON Feeds on the web, check out Daring Fireball, Allen Pike, and Flying Meat. Reece’s Micro.blog project also supports JSON Feed for its Twitter-like timeline.
JSON Feed Creators Want to Inspire More Developers to Create Apps for the Open Web
Reece and Simmons decided the time was right to build an updated syndication format, as more

3 min read David Bisset

Future JavaScript Frameworks for WordPress

It might come down to React vs. Vue.js. Important to monitor this and future discussions, since it impact WordPress core in a major way.

Future JavaScript Frameworks for WordPress

Below is a summary of the discussion from yesterday’s JavaScript chat (agenda): Introducing a JS module pattern to WordPress
@omarreiss helped lead the discussion and kick-started the conversation by opening a detailed and thoughtful ticket in trac (#40834) which introduces modules, their goals and how we could go about using them in core. The discussion was around considerations specific to WordPress and a need for modularity was mentioned – @westonruter called out this need for the Customizer, see #30277. Ideas for code that could be extracted into modules included quickedit, core date utilities and wp.media.view.FocusManager.
The decision was made to move in the direction of using Webpack (and ES6 imports) as our bundler of choice, and to work first on switching out browserfy in our current build chain.
Choosing a future JavaScript framework
Discussion started on choosing a new framework for use in core. The main frameworks discussed so far were React and Vue. Attendees shared their hope, goals and criteria for choosing a new framework and mentioned: stability, longevity, mature, well-adopted, proven in a WordPress context, accommodating to accessibility requirements,

6 min read Dave Warfel

WordPress 4.8 Field Guide

The official field guide from WordPress, with links to all the individual changes in 4.8.

WordPress 4.8 Field Guide

WordPress 4.8 is officially the best WordPress 2017 has seen! Users will receive new and refined features focused on Editing and Customizing their sites while developers will be able to take advantage of 109 enhancements and features added. Let’s look at the many improvements coming in 4.8… Media Widgets
Not one, not two, but three new media widgets make their way into core. It’s like the AV crew just showed up and now the party can really begin. You get an audio widget. You get an image widget. You get a video widget. Check under your seat, media widgets for everyone!
Media Widgets for Images, Video, and Audio
As first introduced in the Image Widget Merge Proposal, WordPress 4.8 includes media widgets (#32417) for not only images (#39993) but also video (#39994) and audio (#39995), on top of an extensible base for introducing additional media widgets in the future, such as for galleries and playlists. To quote [40640]: The last time a new widget was introduced, Vuvuzelas … Continue reading Media Widgets for Images, Video, and Audio
Make WordPress Core
3 Comments
WordPress Embed
HTML Embed
Copy and paste this URL into your WordPress site to embed
<blockquote

12 min read David Bisset
Community | 10up.com | 2 days ago

How to Become a WordPress Core Contributor With One Line of Code

Derrick shares his experience making his first code contribution to WordPress. If you were always wanting to contribute but felt intimidated, definitely read this post.

How to Become a WordPress Core Contributor With One Line of Code

Community | 10up.com | 2 days ago

[To better illustrate our core value of community service, we are sharing an internal post from Senior Front End Engineer Derrick Koo, who recently made his first code contribution to the WordPress project. We hope his story encourages more people who are “on the fence” about contributing to take the plunge and start giving back to the WordPress community. —Jake Goldman, President & Founder] Contributing code to WordPress Core can be intimidating for a first-timer. With thousands of tickets out there, it can be hard to know where to begin. With development out in the open, it takes a lot of courage to submit a first WordPress patch.
For the benefit of new and aspiring contributors, I’m sharing my experience making my first code contribution to WordPress. Starting with little knowledge of the Core contribution process, I embarked on a journey that resulted in one line of CSS, and my first Core props.
Find a ticket
One day, WordPress lead developer (and fellow 10upper) Helen Hou-Sandí asked me to investigate a relatively straightforward browser bug in the Twenty Seventeen theme.
Tickets are just bug reports (or potential enhancements) in the WordPress

13 min read Jonathan Wold
Community | torquemag.io | 2 days ago

How to Extend the WordPress Customizer

A great overview of the Customizer and a number of ways to extend it, including existing plugins and custom development.

How to Extend the WordPress Customizer

Community | torquemag.io | 2 days ago

Way back in 2013, the WordPress 3.4 Green release introduced the Customizer to the masses. If you’re up for a trip down memory lane, here’s the announcement post over on Make WordPress. Not without its fair share of naysayers, the Customizer looked to, and still does, bring accessibility and instant feedback to visual changes you make on your WordPress site. Its humbler beginnings focused on smaller things like changing your site background color or changing your site title, but to anyone who really understood what it represented, it meant WordPress users would have:
The ability to preview changes before making them go live on their site.
A foundation for plugin and theme developers to deliver settings and options according to WordPress best practices.
Needless to say, the underlying value of the Customizer has helped it navigate its teething pains and become a feature that is both meaningful and good to use.
In this post, we’re going to have a look at different ways anyone can leverage the power of the Customizer to extend their WordPress site. We’ll touch here and there on a few development techniques, but rather than give you play-by-play tutorials, we want

7 min read Donna Cavalier
Tutorials | wpintense.com | 3 days ago

Migrating huge WordPress sites reliably

This one might come in handy at some point. Definitely bookmarkable for future use.

Migrating huge WordPress sites reliably

Tutorials | wpintense.com | 3 days ago

None of the WordPress migration or backup and restore plugins can handle huge sites reliably – you’ll run into timeout issues etc. Here’s how to migrate your huge sites reliably. The guide below presumes you have an origin WordPress server and a destination WordPress-ready (PHP+MySQL+Nginx) server. Use SSH and Screen
You need to be able to SSH onto your server to do this reliably. You also need to be able to rely on the process completing, even if you switch your computer off or your session gets terminated (like if your network connection drops). Screen is what we need for that purpose – it creates a detachable screen inside SSH that will keep running even when we disconnect from the server.
To use screen, just run:
screen
(then hit enter a few times)
You can then run commands then hit CTRL+A CTRL+D and it will disconnect from the ‘screen’.
You can reattach detached screens using:
screen -r
If there’s more than one detached screen, it’ll instead list the detached screens like this:
And you can reconnect by copying one of the session identifiers into a command like this:
screen -d -r 4674.pts-3.p1
Create a MySQL backup reliably
This technique

25 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 2 days ago

Analyze Your WordPress Site with GTmetrix and Make it Faster

When you run your WordPress website through GTmetrix it generates a performance report. But what does it exactly mean?

Analyze Your WordPress Site with GTmetrix and Make it Faster

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 2 days ago

There are a lot of options you have as a website owner when it comes to running speed tests to check performance. Previously we took an in-depth look at the Pingdom tool. Today we want to dive into how to better use and understand the data from the popular website speed test tool GTmetrix. Tools like this rely on grading systems and scores, along with warnings of what might be wrong on your site. Sometimes these can be downright confusing, and so taking some time to interpret what they actually mean, can help you not just increase your scores, but also the performance of your site, which is what really matters. GTmetrix
GTmetrix was developed by GT.net, a company based out of Canada, as a tool for their hosting customers to easily determine the performance of their site. Besides Pingdom, it is probably one of the most well known and used speed testing tools on the web today! In fact, the reason we are writing this is that we have a lot of Kinsta customers that are always asking us how to follow the advice they see on their GTmetrix reports. Compared to other developer tools, GTmetrix is pretty easy to use and the beginner can pick it up pretty quickly. It uses a combination of Google

2 min read Donna Cavalier
Editorials | siteground.com | 2 days ago

14 Years of WordPress Playlist

Siteground made a playlist featuring a track by every musician that's ever had a WordPress release named in their honor. Really cool!

14 Years of WordPress Playlist

Editorials | siteground.com | 2 days ago

It's that time of the year when we're getting ready to celebrate another WordPress anniversary. Tomorrow, May 27th, WordPress turns 14! To mark the occasion the SiteGround way, we made a playlist featuring a track by every musician that's ever had a WordPress release named in their honor. The mix did wonders for our productivity in the office, so we decided to share it. We hope it makes your day better, whether you had to spend it working on your website or celebrating. Enjoy and a Happy 14th Birthday to the whole WordPress community! Enthusiastic about all Open Source applications you can think of, but mostly about WordPress. Add a pinch of love for web design, new technologies, search engine optimisation and you are pretty much there!

10 min read Rod Austin
Community | pagely.com | 3 days ago

Narrowing WordPress Search

Examples of how to go deep on the WordPress search, helping developers avoid angst, poor sleep and skin lesions.

Narrowing WordPress Search

Community | pagely.com | 3 days ago

Narrowing WordPress Search One thing you should know about me is that while I’m pretty savvy when it comes to building things for the web today, I’m still pretty new to it. I spent my childhood building theme parks in Roller Coaster Tycoon, not Flash games for Newgrounds.
Rather, I gravitated toward web development during the final year of college and because of that, I am a bit of a superstitious developer.
That is, I tend to fall into the trap of thinking any code I don’t understand backwards and forwards must be written with black magic. In particular, the PHP function sprintf held sway over my soul for quite some time before I bothered to learn what it did.
It’s my belief that there are a lot of developers like me out there, with the mindset of: “This thing works pretty well without me learning about it, so I’ll just leave it alone.”
What I’ve found is that as soon as I take a good look at an intimidating piece of code, it starts to make sense. But instead of learning from that, I go and get petrified over some other piece of code the very next week.
If you get nothing else from this article, remember this: don’t be a superstitious

15 min read David Bisset
Community | ma.tt | 5 days ago

Matt Mullenweg: What’s in My Bag

2017 edition, always interesting to see what Matt is carrying around... sometimes sparks me to upgrade or buy my own new gear.

ma.tt |

Matt Mullenweg: What’s in My Bag

Community | ma.tt | 5 days ago

I am a road warrior who has racked up several million miles over the past decade, and since I’m also working more-than-full-time running Automattic (a totally distributed company) and leading WordPress I need the ability to be productive wherever I can find a comfortable place to sit. I carry a backpack with me almost all the time and obsessively tweak and iterate what’s in it, which lead to posts in 2014 and 2016. This is the latest edition, and I hope you enjoy it. This is a grey wool buff, which works as a scarf, a hat, or an eye cover if I’m trying to sleep. I tried this out because of one of Tynan’s also-great gear posts.
Theraband resistance band, which I aspirationally carry around to help stretch in the morning. Hat tip: Jesse Schwartzman of this blog post fame.
Some generic Maui Jim polarized sunglasses with rubber nose pads, which I like for running or hiking because they don’t move around or slip even when you’re hot.
Tzukuri “Ford” + charger, a super-cool Audrey company that is like a combination of a Tile and cool sunglasses. They connect via bluetooth to your phone and can notify you when you leave them behind, or use the

12 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Community | kinsta.com | 4 days ago

How Codeable is building a community of amazing WordPress developers - Interview with Per Esbensen

Codeable is one of the best resources if you are looking for a WP developer. Per Esbensen shares the story building a fast growing WordPress business.

How Codeable is building a community of amazing WordPress developers - Interview with Per Esbensen

Community | kinsta.com | 4 days ago

You can find Per on LinkedIn or Twitter. This is our recent interview with him, as part of our Kinsta Kingpin series. Q1: What is your background, & how did you first get involved with WordPress?
I’ve actually had quite a turbulent career before starting Codeable, having all kinds of jobs that were mostly related to sales and marketing. In all honesty, I wasn’t the best employee and got fired a number of times due to my low tolerance for bad ideas and people – you could say I’m not good with authority, especially when I think said authority is lacking in leadership skills and knowledge.
The last 9-5 job I had before Codeable was being a client director of a small online agency in which we used another CMS called TYPO3 – a very popular platform for enterprise clients in north Europe. We were building and maintaining massive websites (most over 2000+ “pages”) for all kinds of corporations.
I’m not a developer myself, so the area I shine the most is in starting and discussing projects, then making sure they get done with high quality and on time. This, of course, isn’t easy, but I have learned a couple of tricks in my career, which

We are Tina Todorovic and Dejan Markovic, Co-Founders of Social Web Suite and HYPEStudio. Ask Me Anything X 2!

AMA | 4 days ago

Since we are closing the season 4 of Ask Me Anything series and as we are partners in business and life, it just made sense to us to give all of you something extra, so we will both be here today answering your questions. Our story with WordPress goes like this:

Dejan has been following WordPress from its early beginnings, but he has started getting more involved with the WordPress development in 2010. The first WordCamp he attended was in Toronto in 2013 where Dejan fell in love with the WordPress community. Deciding then to become more active and give back, Dejan became a co-organizer of WordCamp Toronto 2014, 2015 and a lead organizer in 2016, and he has been helping to organize WordPress Toronto meetups ever since.

Dejan wrote a book "WordPress Responsive Theme Design" https://www.packtpub.com/web-development/wordpress-responsive-theme-design in 2015., where he explains how to properly create a responsive WordPress theme. He was also a technical reviewer for the book "Learning Yeoman" https://www.packtpub.com/web-development/learning-yeoman in 2014.

Because of Dejan's love for WordPress, he persuaded Tina to go with him to WordCamp Montreal in 2014 where Tina quickly discovered why everyone keeps talking how awesome and welcoming WordPress community is. Meeting there some serious WordPressers like Carl Alexander (https://managewp.org/members/3698/carl-alexander), Kathryn Presner, Elida Arrizza and Chris Bavota, Tina started sharing Dejan's passion for WordPress and its community and has been involved ever since. Besides volunteering and co-organizing Toronto WordPress meetups and WordCamps (2014, 2015 and 2016), Tina enjoys meeting new fellow WordPressers and spreading the word about WordPress.

As they both share an entrepreneurial spirit they've founded several WordPress-focused businesses that provided WordPress development services, plugins, and the latest one being a SaaS startup.

While Dejan is involved in the technical aspects of their businesses, Tina does everything except development. However, they both have a strong interest in marketing and growth hacking, so they never miss Chris Lema's (https://managewp.org/members/483/chris-lema) talks at WordCamps and they enjoy reading the latest books and listening to several podcasts about marketing and growth hacking.

Dejan is a drummer and likes electronic music from ambient to drum and bass and psychedelic trance! Tina used to play Classical music on her piano and besides occasional trip to rock, pop and soul, that is the music she enjoys the most.

Extra points to anyone who knows of a chocolate that Tina hasn't tried and to anyone who set up a jamming session with Dejan:-).

We love everything WordPress & we have our laptops, chocolate, and water ready!

Ask Me Anything X 2!

Hey friends, great to have you here :) A couple of questions from my side:
- How do you envision WordPress three years from now?
- If you had a magic wand, what is the one thing that you would change immidiately in WordPress?
- WordPress & the community influenced your lives a lot, can you share with others what are the secret ingredients of that change?
- Dejan, what is the electronic drum set that you suggest for beginners?
- Tina, what is your favorite chocolate?
- Do we see each other in Paris? When can we expect you in Belgrade? :)

via Atanasovski Petar

Hey Guys! Love to see you doing an AMA here! What has been the biggest challenge in building what's essentially a social media platform on top of WordPress?

Also - Dejan I didn't know you played the drums - we'll have to set up a dueling drums session at WCUS ;-)

via Joe Casabona

Hey guys,

It is always cool to see a couple that is together bound in work and in life :)

I have few questions:

- As an organizers of WordCamp Toronto, what is your main challenge during planning and realisation of such big event?
- How much is WordPress a part of your life during one day session?
- Since You both play instruments, do You play along together occasionally? :D

Thanks :)
Nikola

via Nikola Kirincic

Hi you two! Good to see you doing an AMA on here. :)

What's the experience been like switching from client services to product development? Any advice for others considering the same pivot?

And with Social Web Suite, what have some of your biggest learnings been?

via Andy McIlwain

Hi Petar,

Thanks for stopping by.

1. It is really hard to envision the future of WordPress, so I can only say what I would hope the future will bring. I would like to see everyone from the WordPress community stepping up and explaining that WordPress is not just for blogging and that can scale. I would also like to see better (stricter) rules for submitting a plugin to repo and more plugins and themes using API calls.

2. From what I've already mentioned, perhaps the stricter rules for plugin submissions and more openness to submitting WordPress themes to repo are the things I would like to see implemented soon.

3. I can't mention here all the awesome WP peeps we've met during our journey and who has influenced our lives a lot (as we don't have enough time nor space for it:-)) but I just want to say that we've made some wonderful long lasting friendships along the way that we cherish a lot (for example, with you:-)). I believe the secret ingredients for a change are just to be yourself, be open to embracing new things, be willing to learn, and most importantly, don't be a jerk.

4. Now I know we will stay here forever as you've opened Dejan's favorite subject:-).

5. My favorite chocolate is (not-so-well -known) Ragusa chocolate (https://ragusa.swiss/ch/en/our-chocolates/), the Swiss chocolate named after the city of Dubrovnik. Although, I am known not to refuse a chocolate ever:-).

6. Unfortunately, we are not coming to Paris. It is simply not in the cards for us this year. Regarding Belgrade, not sure yet, but I promise we will let you know as soon as we buy the plane tickets.

Hope this answers your questions, as I have to run and answer other questions, too.

Cheers,

Tina

via Tina Todorovic

Hi Petar,
- How do you envision WordPress three years from now?
I think it's going to rock maybe more in the way of JS and API's

- If you had a magic wand, what is the one thing that you would change immediately in WordPress?
1. Open wordpress.com to plugins and themes (not only to selected people).
2. Open wordpress.com or something related as a PRO marketplace it can be another source of income to developers, agencies and Automattic too! :)
3. PAID REVEWS for plugins and themes and WordPress.org as an option, meaning free can still be option there but paid can be for developers and companies who don't want to wait 3 months for approval (plugin approval are faster though but there are only a few people who are doing that and they are swamped with work). In order to make WordPress more PRO we can't have only volunteers that will donate their time. We have to commercialize those services same as all other marketplaces.

- WordPress & the community influenced your lives a lot, can you share with others what are the secret ingredients of that change?
I used to be .NET developer and I was going to those meetups and conferences which were boring and people were there just to grab something and leave. Then I came to WordCamp Toronto in 2013 and it was totally opposite. Everybody was sharing everything, even how to become successful and all that kind od stuff and I said to myself this is a community for me (where I feel at home). I think Tina has the same opinion :)

- Dejan, what is the electronic drum set that you suggest for beginners?
Everything depends on the budget. I recommend Yamaha's for beginners and intermediate players and Roland more to Pro peoples :).
Budget kits from Alesis are OK too for the start :).

via Dejan Markovic
13 min read Vova Feldman
Business | managewp.com | 5 days ago

How to Start Streaming Recurring Income for your WordPress Agency

Many WordPress agencies attest they would love to pick & choose the projects they work on. This is a recipe for how they can do that by turning client work into recurring revenue.

How to Start Streaming Recurring Income for your WordPress Agency

Business | managewp.com | 5 days ago

WordPress agencies (and WordPress freelancers) are creative business entities that help provide online solutions and presence for their clients – other businesses. If you are the owner of such a WordPress agency or are employed by one, you know that in order to stay profitable a WordPress agency must have a constant flow of customers and projects, running back to back. Many agencies attest that they would love to be able to allow their team a little breathing buffer between one client’s project and the next. Or, maybe even be able to pick & choose the clients they want to work with by simply saying “No, thank you.” to the pesky ones.
Sure, you could stretch the agency to the very limit and try to finish 400+ WordPress projects in 7 months and then take a looooong vacation, but, have you ever tried thinking about a different, less exhausting, way of running a successful WordPress business?
Let’s dive into some viable options:
Recurring income in WordPress via services
One increasingly common way agencies and freelancers are embracing recurring income is by having their clients sign a “WordPress retainer” agreement. That sort of agreement

10 min read Donna Cavalier
Development | 18f.gsa.gov | 2 days ago

From launch to landing: How NASA took control of its HTTPS mission

Although WordPress isn't mentioned in the article, we know that NASA uses WordPress across numerous of sites, including blogs.nasa.gov, so they definitely had to include WP in the planning and implementation phases.

From launch to landing: How NASA took control of its HTTPS mission

Development | 18f.gsa.gov | 2 days ago

https security Editor’s note: This is a guest post by Karim Said of NASA. Karim was instrumental in NASA’s successful HTTPS and HSTS migration, and we’re happy to help Karim share the lessons NASA learned from that process.
In 2015, the White House Office of Management and Budget released M-15-13, a “Policy to Require Secure Connections across Federal Websites and Web Services”. The memorandum emphasizes the importance of protecting the privacy and security of the public’s browsing activities on the web, and sets a goal to bring all federal websites and services to a consistent standard of enforcing HTTPS and HSTS.
HTTPS is important for a federal agency like NASA, whose presence on the web is a critical part of achieving our mission of sharing knowledge and information.
But NASA is big!
Moving to full HTTPS deployment for NASA represented a significant challenge. We host well over 3,000 public-facing websites and services across 12 geographically dispersed and managerially distinct centers. Communication across such a diverse workforce is difficult and required the concerted effort of a core team in the Office of the Chief Information Officer (OCIO),

5 min read Donna Cavalier

Tag Cloud widget changes in 4.8

Accessibility changes come to tag clouds, and we say Bye, Felicia to title attributes in tag clouds.

Tag Cloud widget changes in 4.8

The Tag Cloud widget is still pretty popular and for a number of years, it has used title attributes to visually display the number of posts using a specific tag. WordPress 4.8 removes these title attributes and replaces them with aria-label attributes with optional counts displayed in plain text.
Why it matters
Title attributes aren’t very accessible. Depending on the specific assistive technology and on user settings, they might be completely ignored. On touch devices, title attributes are a bit pointless.
The best option is not to rely on title attributes to convey important information to users. Information that is important enough should be available to all users.
In the last few releases, WordPress has been progressively removing many title attributes used in the admin screens (see: #24766). The same principle applies to the front end. The Tag Cloud widget is another step towards the progressive removal of title attributes in the front end where they’re used inappropriately.
What plugin or theme authors should know
There are no visual changes by default, other than the removal of the title attributes. There is a new option for developers though: tag counts can be displayed

2 min read David Bisset
Development | wordpress.org | 5 days ago

WordPress 4.8 Beta 2

Over 50 bugs were fixed since Beta 1 - grab a download to test and see the new media widgets and the improved visual editor experience.

WordPress 4.8 Beta 2

Development | wordpress.org | 5 days ago

WordPress 4.8 Beta 2 is now available! This software is still in development, so we don’t recommend you run it on a production site. Consider setting up a test site just to play with the new version. To test WordPress 4.8, try the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (you’ll want “bleeding edge nightlies”). Or you can download the beta here (zip).
For more information on what’s new in 4.8, check out the Beta 1 blog post. Since then, we’ve made over 50 changes in Beta 2.
Do you speak a language other than English? Help us translate WordPress into more than 100 languages!
If you think you’ve found a bug, you can post to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. We’d love to hear from you! If you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, file one on WordPress Trac, where you can also find a list of known bugs.
WordPress four point eight
One step closer to release
Please test Beta 2!

6 min read Ben Pines
Plugins | elementor.com | 4 days ago

Elementor Introduces Cards: A Layout for Material Design Blogs

Elementor has launched Cards skin, a card-like layout for designing blogs, portfolios and other post type archives.

Elementor Introduces Cards: A Layout for Material Design Blogs

Plugins | elementor.com | 4 days ago

Today, we’re excited to share a brand new way to display your posts. We call it Cards, and it allows you to create beautiful card-like layouts. Your blog is where you display most of your content, so it has to look its best. Today, we are introducing the Cards skin, a new layer of design that sits on top of the Posts widget, allowing you to upgrade your blog design with the latest material design trend.
A cards layout is a dynamic grid that displays content in card-like boxes. It helps organize large amounts of data in an ordered, minimalist and stylish way.
This foundation of this style is derived from Google's material design. Pinterest was the first to incorporate it as an innovative way to lay out content on the web. Since then, cards have become extremely popular and were mentioned as one of the leading design trends of 2017. It is currently used by top brands like Dribbble, Google, and UXPin.
See how much better a blog looks with the Cards skin:
☞ Hover to reveal cards skin ☜
The importance of the new Cards feature lays not only with providing you with another design layout. It represents an evolution in Elementor, the evolution into skins.
Cards is not a separate widget,

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 5 days ago

How to Create a WordPress Widget From Scratch

With a basic knowledge of PHP and WordPress development, you can quickly learn how to build your own WordPress widgets. Follow this in-depth tutorial on how to create a WordPress widget from scratch.

How to Create a WordPress Widget From Scratch

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 5 days ago

WordPress Widgets are blocks of static or dynamic HTML content that can be added to specific areas of the front-end pages (widget areas or sidebars). WordPress provides a good number of built-in widgets, like Archives, Categories, Tag Cloud, Search, Recent Posts, Calendar, and more. Moreover, as I’m going to explain in this post, plugin developers can easily create a WordPress widget from scratch, add custom features and specific content to any theme supporting this amazing feature. You can find tons of WordPress widgets in the Plugin Directory (currently over 50,000), in WordPress markets and vendor websites, and you’ll probably find any widget you may need. Anyway, occasionally you will not find the widget you’re looking for, and you’ll need to build your own.
How to Create a WordPress Widget
The good news is that you can create a WordPress widget even if you’re not a professional developer. You just need a very basic knowledge of OOP in PHP, and a general understanding of WordPress plugin development. This post will drive you through WordPress widgets development, explaining how to build a widget that allows site admins to select a list of posts to be

9 min read OceanWP Theme
Community | elementor.com | 2 days ago

How to Build a Blog in WordPress with Elementor Pro and OceanWP

Elementor and OceanWP make a powerful duo in the WordPress world. You can use them for a variety of different purposes, that includes blog posts and blog archive pages.

How to Build a Blog in WordPress with Elementor Pro and OceanWP

Community | elementor.com | 2 days ago

Brenda Barron wrote another helpful guide for us, providing you with a step by step tutorial on how to build a blog with Elementor Pro and OceanWP. Elementor and OceanWP make a powerful duo in the WordPress world. They allow you to build a well-designed website from scratch with a few simple clicks, as we demonstrated in our How to Build an Architecture Site with OceanWP and How to Create a WordPress Site with Elementor and OceanWP guides. Make sure you check out those posts if you have yet to build your site.
Elementor is a powerful plugin, and you can use it for a variety of different purposes. That includes blog posts and blog archive pages. This can completely change the way you approach the process you use to create new blog posts, and it can allow you to go beyond a simple style of using text and images.
Let’s take a look at how to build these types of pages using Elementor, Elementor Pro and the OceanWP theme.
How to Build a Blog Post with Elementor & OceanWP
Elementor and page builder plugins like it make it incredibly simple to build custom web page designs without needing to know how to code. Naturally, users began wanting to use these capabilities to build aesthetically-pleasing,

14 min read Matteo Duò
Community | codeable.io | 5 days ago

The Business Playbook To Adding New Features To Your WP Website

What should you do at first when looking for custom WordPress development? How much is it going to cost you? Here are all the answers you've always looked for.

The Business Playbook To Adding New Features To Your WP Website

Community | codeable.io | 5 days ago

If I had to pick one and only thing that led me to using WordPress is the abundance of plugins. In the official WordPress repository, as of today, you can find more than 50k of such “chunks” of software you can add to your website and eCommerce store. And if you add premium ones (paid plugins) on top of that number, there’s no shortage of ways for you to extend your website/store functionality.
Do you need a more convenient way to edit your metadata info for your on-page SEO activity?
Do you need to add PayPal as a payment method to your eCommerce?
Do you need better ways to manage your cache?
Thanks to plugins, you’re (almost) covered!
But what if nothing on the market addresses your current needs?
What happens when your needs are so specific that go beyond what a given plugin can provide you with?
Each business has its own needs and, based on them, its own path to being successful and profitable. That’s why the very same plugin can be good enough as is for a business website, while in need to be further customized for another. Or maybe none of this is even slightly applicable in some cases and only a brand new, developed from scratch plugin would make

Tutorials | wedevs.com | 2 days ago

The Best WordPress File Manager to Get Your Projects Done!

Google Drive like File Management for Project Management in WordPress. This is a detail article shows how to do it, and also how it could be beneficial.

The Best WordPress File Manager to Get Your Projects Done!

Tutorials | wedevs.com | 2 days ago

There are plenty of project management solutions all over the internet. Many of them may appear feature rich and user-friendly, but you never know, looks can be deceptive. At some cases, you might think you are getting a great value for your money. Then after you start using it, you might find out this solution does not provide some of the features very essential to get your projects done. At this stage, you have probably started to feel confused. What should you look for when you are considering to buy a project management solution? Let me share my two cents before I move onto other segments. In terms of functionality, I believe a project management solution should cover C-R-T attributes. If any of these elements go missing, you are probably wasting your money on the solution.
Here is the Magical Elements!
NO, it’s not the CRT of Cathode Ray Tube monitors