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11 min read David Bisset

Rebuilding a Dying Product (Pippin Williamson)

Details on Pippin's journey of bringing back Restrict Content Pro to what it is today.

Rebuilding a Dying Product (Pippin Williamson)

I continued to let Restrict Content Pro dwindle for nearly two years before making a decision. I had several options. I could let it die a slow, drawn out death, I could sell it, or I could work to bring it back to life and let it kick ass again.

8 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 1 day ago

How to Fix the Leverage Browser Caching Warning in WordPress

How to fix this annoying warning in WordPress just by following the steps listed in this tutorial.

How to Fix the Leverage Browser Caching Warning in WordPress

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 1 day ago

If you have ever run your WordPress website through Google PageSpeed Insights or Pingdom then you have probably seen that big yellow Leverage Browser Caching warning. And that is probably why you ended up at this post. Today we will dive into what this warning means, how it affects you, and what your options are as it pertains to your WordPress site. What is the Leverage Browser Caching Warning?
The leverage browser caching warning, as shown below in the screenshot, is referring to your browser cache. Whenever you visit a website, it downloads assets, such as HTML, CSS, JavaScript and images into your browser’s local cache. This way it doesn’t have to retrieve them on every page load. The warning itself is returned when your web server, or a third party server, doesn’t have the correct HTTP cache headers implemented. Or the headers might exist, but the cache time is set to short.
Fix the Leverage Browser Caching Warning in WordPress
When it comes to fixing the leverage browser caching warning there are a couple different scenarios that are usually encountered by WordPress users. Obviously the most common one is that your web server is not correctly configured. The

3 min read M Asif Rahman
Community | wptavern.com | 1 day ago

New Plugin Adds Changelog Support to WordPress Themes in the Admin

This is nifty plugin, adds support for Theme Change Log for WordPress.org hosted themes.

New Plugin Adds Changelog Support to WordPress Themes in the Admin

Community | wptavern.com | 1 day ago

photo credit: Luis Llerena When a WordPress plugin has an update available, it comes with a “View Details” link where users can read the changelog before updating. Clicking the details link launches the changelog section of the readme.txt file in a modal window.
Themes, on the other hand, do not have a link to view details, because WordPress.org doesn’t currently support the display of theme change logs.
A new plugin called WP Theme Changelogs adds support for changelogs to WordPress.org-hosted themes by parsing the theme’s readme.txt file. After installing the plugin, theme updates will have a “View details” link similar to plugin updates.
The plugin requires two things in order to be able to accurately display version update details: a valid readme.txt and a changelog section inside that file. Unfortunately, not many theme authors are writing changelogs along with their updates.
In February 2016, the Theme Review Team recommended that authors start keeping a changelog in recognition of the benefits for users and the likelihood that it will become a requirement in the future.
The team is slowly working towards adding changelog support, but several

9 min read David McCan
Tutorials | sitepoint.com | 6 hours ago

The Complete Guide to Using WordPress Embeds

This is a very thorough and easy to follow guide on embedding external content using WordPress embeds. More than that, the author, David Attard, shows what is happening behind the scenes so that the reader has a good understanding of this feature.

The Complete Guide to Using WordPress Embeds

Tutorials | sitepoint.com | 6 hours ago

When you’re writing frequent posts on your WordPress website, you know that many times you’ll need to embed external content. Whether that is a video from YouTube or Vimeo, a music clip from SoundCloud or Spotify, a Tweet or a Vine, a Flickr on an Instagram, there is not much to be done. You simply copy and paste the URL you want to embed into your WordPress article and that’s it.
This article will go through all of the details related to the WordPress embed and oEmbed functionality.
Why Does WordPress Need an Embed Feature?
One of the things which WordPress does really nicely when compared to other CMS’ I’ve used, is its ease to embed external media.
Without mentioning any names, embedding a simple a YouTube video into an article using one of the most popular CMS’s out there (other than WordPress) can be a nightmare of epic proportions.
Side note: this is a plea, not a dig. Embedding a YouTube video into an article should be a breeze in any CMS.
Why does this happen?
In reality, embedding external content is typically a potential security issue. Content is typically embedded using iFrames. An iFrame is simply a new “window” which is allowed

5 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | wordimpress.com | 3 days ago

Google Plans to Punish Popups, Balkhi and Van Kooten are Not Concerned

Following Google's announcement that interstitial popups will be punished in search results, I tweeted Syed Blakhi and Danny Van Kooten. Basically OptinMonster and Boxzilla users have options to avoid this new rule from Google.

Google Plans to Punish Popups, Balkhi and Van Kooten are Not Concerned

Editorials | wordimpress.com | 3 days ago

Google is flexing it’s muscles again, leveraging it’s dominance in the search engine market to push it’s own idea of what website best practice looks like. They announced that popup “interstitials” will make your site have less relevance if they appear on mobile devices. In April of 2015, Google tweaked their search algorithm to make sites that were not mobile responsive have less relevant results on their search engine. Back then, I wrote this piece:
I’ll keep this pretty brief. Today Google’s search engine algorythym is being updated to give better rankings to sites that are “mobile-friendly”. What this means in finite detail is up for heavy debate, but your best bet is to stick your site domain into this tool (provided by Google themselves) and say HOORAY! if you’re good … Continue reading
I was heavily in favor of the move at that time. It seemed pretty obvious that sites that weren’t mobile responsive simply weren’t paying attention. This move I’m also in favor of, but it definitely feels a lot more in the realm of Google pushing their agenda rather than being some benevolent protector of the web.

5 min read Ben Gillbanks
Editorials | binarymoon.co.uk | 12 hours ago

My WordPress Wishlist

Some of the things I'd like to see worked on in the next version(s) of WordPress

My WordPress Wishlist

Editorials | binarymoon.co.uk | 12 hours ago

WordPress 4.6 has recently been released, and now plans are being made for WordPress 4.7. At the start of each new version the WordPress team ask for ideas and suggestions for areas people would like them to focus on. This time I thought I’d write my thoughts down in a blog post. Import and Export
I make WordPress themes for a living, and I offer my customers the content export for the theme, however there’s a lot of data missing. It would be great if the content export let you export more than just posts and pages. Adding widget and customizer settings would mean that users can reproduce demo sites exactly just by importing the demo xml file.
It would also be nice if the import system was made more robust. At the moment there can be lots of problems with imports, especially for large sites. Since I don’t work for clients I’ve only had to do a few imports in my time but every time something went wrong – often with PHP timing out, or running out of memory.
There’s a team (mostly from Human Made) who have made a start on a really nice new WordPress Import Export system.
Post Editing Experience
There’s two things I’d like to see with the

14 min read David McCan
Community | chrislema.com | 4 days ago

There is always an "us" but not always a "them" - ChrisLema.com -

Chris Lema offers an amazing article on the dynamic and psychology of "Us" vs "Them" in relation to the WordPress project and community. His insights also apply more broadly to any group project, activity, or job. I think he nails it.

There is always an "us" but not always a "them" - ChrisLema.com -

Community | chrislema.com | 4 days ago

Let me get this out of the way – this is a post about another post about a dynamic that may or may not exist within a community of people around an open source software project that is undefined because anyone is free to participate at any level they want. Even if you dig WordPress, this may not be a post for you. If it’s not, feel free to come back tomorrow. Also, comments are turned off. Feel free to write your own posts and link back to this post as a response. Or tweet about it. Or subtweet about it. Or again, ignore it (that’s always a possibility, you know).
I spend my days as an outsider.
Sometimes by choice. Other times by fear and/or insecurity. And other times by things beyond my control (like ethnicity). And here’s the crazy part of my reality – it never matters what you think about how I think about being an outsider.
You can say that I’m an “insider” but it’s based on your perspective and opinion and it has no impact on me. If I feel like I’m an “outsider” then it’s likely to be my reality. Regardless of what you tell me, I will act like certain things are not available or right for me.
It is

6 min read Steven Gliebe
Community | foxland.fi | 2 days ago

Justin Tadlock Interviewed by Sami Keijonen

An interesting and informative interview of Justin Tadlock on the history of ThemeHybrid, how he works and what direction he sees theming going.

Justin Tadlock Interviewed by Sami Keijonen

Community | foxland.fi | 2 days ago

Many WordPress Theme Shops say that they offer great support. But it’s nothing compares to Theme Hybrid support by Justin Tadlock. It’s the best place to get themes, plugins, support, ideas, and learn. I’m honoured and lucky that I’ve been part of Theme Hybrid community for several years. It’s the place where I learnt how to build WordPress themes. It’s still the place where I get help and can follow the latest things in WordPress.
Who is behind Theme Hybrid and what is the history about Theme Hybrid?
It’s just me, Justin Tadlock.
Theme Hybrid started as a response to the “premium” theme movement back in 2008. At that time, these premium themes were usually under proprietary, non-GPL licensing and completely locked users away from the freedoms that they would normally receive. Users were paying money for fewer freedoms. While I didn’t completely understand open source at the time, I felt like the direction that these theme shops were going was not in the best interest of users.
I was barely out of college and had no clue what I was doing in terms of business (still don’t). There was huge support for the project, so I

20 min read Steven Gliebe
Community | heropress.com | 3 days ago

A Minority Amongst Minorities

Uriahs Victor tells a story from the Caribbean of how a computer and internet connection led him to WordPress and plugin development.

A Minority Amongst Minorities

Community | heropress.com | 3 days ago

I’m a minority amongst minorities, but it doesn’t matter. Let’s get to know each other
Hi, I’m Uriahs Victor and I’m a Carib – bean from the island of St. Lucia. How many Black Developers do you know in the WordPress Community? 5? 20? How many of them are from the Caribbean? How many raised up in places like this:
I chose to write on this topic in hopes that there’s someone else like me reading this article someday who’s living in an area where it may seem like there aren’t many career paths.
It doesn’t matter where in the world you are or your complexion; anyone could code.
How my passion for programming began
I was fortunately raised up with both parents in a community on my island called Fond St. Jacques which is a part of a bigger town called Soufriere. I grew up doing everything a typical adolescent from my community would be doing: playing football, playing cricket and going to work on my parents farm and occasionally on other farms to earn some money to burn through by drinking with friends ( don’t think about it too hard ) and partying.
One day I came home to a used computer setup in my room and was extremely

7 min read WebDevStudios

Winning With Code Reviews

Developer lead Ben Lobaugh shares our code review process and how it helps our team produce their best possible work.

Winning With Code Reviews

Here at WebDevStudios we put a lot of emphasis on code quality. After handing off a product to a client, we never know who may be looking at and/or maintaining our code. We want to be proud and confident that the next person will not have an OMGWTFBBQ-head-smashing-into-keyboard moment, but one of delightful surprise. How do we consistently create and maintain a high level of quality code? Through peer code reviews.
All developers at WebDevStudios are encouraged to request code reviews and to provide their own feedback to others on their code review requests.
Peer code reviews have enhanced the code quality at WebDevStudios by leaps and bounds. Now instead of coding in a hole, all the developers are actively striving to write good, clean code that will pass a code review the first time. Instead of feedback coming in the form of correction from a (busy) lead it has become a game amongst the developers to see who can write the most elegant and bug free code the first time out the gate. As a result, the coding standards and practices at WebDevStudios have grown and enhanced.
This all sounds good, but how does it work in practice?
When we receive a new project, it goes through an architecting

3 min read M Asif Rahman
Plugins | wedevs.com | 2 days ago

WP Project Manager: More Reports & Google Drive Like File Management

WP Project Manager just got some interesting updates. The overhaul brings Google Drive like file management, more advanced reporting. If you are not aware that there is an advance Project Manager for WordPress, check it out for free.

WP Project Manager: More Reports & Google Drive Like File Management

Plugins | wedevs.com | 2 days ago

New feathers on the hat WP Project Manager is planned for regular updates with a target of complete overhaul by this year. So here is the newest addition to that upgrade road-map.
We are introducing better preset reports and a more intuitive document manager. Let’s dig in!
Reports look good as new
Completely a new design
We have added thematic icons and help texts with each report types. To generate the report, simply click on the icon. This experience is more like running a program on your computer.
6 report types to choose from
We have implemented 6 new reporting features for overall evaluation or project based evaluation. All of these reports are targeted generating statistics that will help you to increase the productivity of your team.
Check how the reports work on our demo site
Interactive and responsiveness
The new reports load instantly without reloading the page and also has animated effects that make the interface less boring. Yes, we know reports can be boring, so we jazzed it up!
Here is a little video
https://wedevs.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/cpm-reports.mp4
Overdue Tasks
Lists tasks from the project which have passed the due date but not completed yet. Now you

7 min read Nevena Tomovic
Community | managewp.com | 2 days ago

Productivity Tips & Tricks With ManageWP

Here are a few tips & tricks on how you can be more productive daily. Share with us your ways of staying efficient.

Productivity Tips & Tricks With ManageWP

Community | managewp.com | 2 days ago

ManageWP is all about efficiency, time saving and productivity. The idea behind our dashboard is to make your days more interesting, fulfilling and manageable, by shifting your focus on things that matter for your business and letting us do the legwork for all of the other stuff. But, did you know that you can get productivity tips on a productivity tool? I wanted to make sure you were using ManageWP to its full potential, and making the most out of the little perks. As John Wooden, the “Wizard of Westwood” said;
Little things make big things happen.
There are lots of little things in our dashboard that can save you more time, leaving you time for the big things.
Let’s get started.
Use Tags To Be More Efficient
Tags are a great way to quickly find exactly what you are looking for. The Orion tags are an upgraded version of our groups in the Classic, just with more flexibility. Are you on the look out for all of your development websites? Are you looking for all websites that are in progress or your test websites? Tags can be as complex (and changeable) as you make them, and although it might seem overwhelming seeing lots of different colored dots on your websites, when

6 min read David Bisset
Development | poststatus.com | 4 days ago

Static Site Generators vs. WordPress

Sonya Mann comparing WordPress advantages and drawbacks vs. static site generators.

Static Site Generators vs. WordPress

Development | poststatus.com | 4 days ago

WordPress is the dominant method to build and manage a website, but static site generators are surging in popularity amongst developers and for certain types of websites. The current state of affairs
In 2016, WordPress is far from the only choice for a new website. In fact, website owners have enjoyed a plethora of options (hosted and self-hosted) for many years. WordPress has remained the juggernaut solution for self-hosted websites, with 25% marketshare of the total web, and as the mainstay CMS for small-to-medium businesses with small or low budgets.
Amongst two groups — large institutions that need high scalability, and the ever-tinkering developer crowd — another option is trending positively: the static site generator, also known as a flat-file CMS.
Don’t get me wrong — the WordPress install base is huge, and the threat posed by static site generators is small. But it’s growing. Post Status editor Brian Krogsgard polled developers prior to Pressnomics, to assess the threat level posed by various CMSs and publishing platforms; Medium and static site generators were considered more of a threat than any others:
He also wrote in a newsletter to members

Development | tommcfarlin.com | 4 days ago

Josh Pollock, WordPress Development, and the REST API

Josh Pollock is keeping himself busy educating devs on WordPress development and using the REST API, among other things. This guy is awesome!

Josh Pollock, WordPress Development, and the REST API

Development | tommcfarlin.com | 4 days ago

This year, I’ve had the pleasure hearing Josh Pollock talk about WordPress Development with the REST API on several occasions. Earlier this year, our paths crossed at WordCamp Atlanta and then later, we spent a lot of time hanging out at WordCamp San Diego. During the latter, I had a chance to hear him give his talk to a rather large audience specifically on how to use the REST API.
And before any of that, I had a chance to read what Josh had written about the WordPress REST API for his eBook that was published on Torque.
To say that Josh knows his stuff is an understatement. I know – that sounds a little bit “sales-like.” Though, I don’t mean it to be.
When sharing resources with those of you who read this site, I try to make sure that I only sure things I use or that I promote things from people whom I know and who I trust.
With that said, Josh is getting ready to begin teaching a session on WordPress Development with the REST API. Specifically, he’s going to be talking about how to build plugins using the REST API.
Before his sessions and workshops begin, I wanted to make sure you’re aware of what’s to come.
WordPress Development With

4 min read Matt Medeiros
Community | mattreport.com | 4 days ago

WordPress for Publishers and the REST API with Rachel Baker

I sit down and talk to Rachel Baker about the work her team at The Wirecutter does with WordPress. We'll also discuss the WordPress REST API, and why the project seemingly encounters a lot of challenges.

WordPress for Publishers and the REST API with Rachel Baker

Community | mattreport.com | 4 days ago

For me, and hopefully for you, this episode opens you up to two areas of WordPress interest: Learn what it’s like to be the Lead Engineer at The Wirecutter. Hear all the fancy things they do with WordPress.
Learn what the REST API is, what it can do, and kinda-sorta grasp why we don’t have it yet.
Let me get this out of the way first: If you’re interested in learning how high-traffic WordPress websites and larger publishers use the popular CMS — this episode is for you! How Rachel and her team bend WordPress to to their will is quite impressive. In fact, it was even more impressive to learn what WordPress doesn’t power at the popular review blog, and how they’ve solved those particular challenges.
Interview with Rachel Baker
Learning more about the REST API
The second part of this conversation is all about the REST API. Over the last year or so, some of you have asked me what the REST API is, what it can do, and how could you leverage it in your own WordPress business. Rachel helps define some of that for you, and debunks the myths surrounding it.
Again, if you’re here to learn about that, queue this up!
Why can’t we have the REST API?

10 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 2 days ago

How to Speed up WordPress Comments - Kinsta Blog

Don't disable comments in WordPress, make them blazing fast with these strategies!

How to Speed up WordPress Comments - Kinsta Blog

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 2 days ago

Have you ever noticed that your most popular blog posts – the ones that trigger an avalanche of comments – take a little longer to load? While it’s nice to watch WordPress comments roll in, if your commenting system is not carefully configured it can really slow down your website. Think about the resources that go into making comments work:
A database is queried to pull up existing comments,
Database entries are created for each new comment,
Comments and comment meta data are received and processed by a visitor’s browser,
External resources, such as Gravatars, are requested, downloaded, and loaded, and
In many cases, large JavaScript and jQuery resources have to be downloaded and processed to make the commenting system work the way it’s supposed to.
As a result, a busy comments section can add a significant load the web server, increase the overall size of the page, bulk up the number of required HTTP requests, and add additional JavaScript resources for browsers to contend with. Whether you’re using native WordPress comments or have plugged in a third-party commenting system such as Disqus or Facebook Comments, comments can be a drag on the speed

5 min read Jim Walker
Tutorials | hackrepair.com | 1 day ago

BUMMS - Website Security Preparation for Today

While it’s true that good password management and security plugin, if you are using WordPress, and even a distributed denial (DDoS) protection service are reasonable things to do, none of these will prevent your website from being compromised; any more than bars on your home’s windows will prevent a burglar from breaking in to steal your stuff. Website security in our open source coding environment is more about preparation and less about prevention.

BUMMS - Website Security Preparation for Today

Tutorials | hackrepair.com | 1 day ago

Back in ancient times, 2014, I wrote the article, Is Your Mom Missing Her BUMM? which included a simple to remember acronym along with a fun little video presenting practical WordPress security planning. Since then, I’ve learned a thing or two about security planning and preparation.
Today’s Security Reality
Website security in our open source coding environment is more about preparation and less about prevention.
While it’s true that good password management and security plugin, if you are using WordPress, and even a distributed denial (DDoS) protection service are reasonable things to do, none of these will prevent your website from being compromised; any more than bars on your home’s windows will prevent a burglar from breaking in to steal your stuff.
Guarding against bad actors, whether for your home or website requires both preparation and vigilance.
So let’s discuss website security.
B
Start by preparing your website against catastrophe by creating a Backup.
Your backup is the first line of defense against both accidental or malicious damage to your website files and databases. An external cloud backup is key. Your backups should be stored “offsite”

11 min read Ivan Jurisic
Community | pressupinc.com | 12 hours ago

What Are SEO Keywords and How to Use Them

It’s important to be aware of the keywords relevant to your business. Lear what SEO keywords are and how to use them more efficiently.

What Are SEO Keywords and How to Use Them

Community | pressupinc.com | 12 hours ago

In the previous articles in this series on search engine optimization (SEO), we’ve briefly touched on SEO and how it can help your business online. Today’s post takes a deeper look at the role of keywords in SEO.
What are SEO Keywords?
Most simply, keywords are the individual words or phrases users enter into search engines like Google to find what they are looking for. They can be one word (“snowplows”) or, more commonly, a multiple-word phrase (“Used snowplows Duluth MN”).
It’s important to be aware of the keywords relevant to your business.
Different businesses and products will have their own sets of keywords that are relevant to what they offer their audience. It’s important to be aware of the keywords relevant to your business—that’s the first step in competing for them in the search engine results pages.
Which Keywords to Aim For
If you have a website selling jewelry, getting your site to rank in Google for the keyword “jewelry” could result in thousands of new visitors every day. However, as “jewelry” is a very popular keyword, getting searched for many times each day, the big brands in the jewelry

WooCommerce Checkout Fields & Template Goes Public

Plugins | 4 days ago

Hello, my WordPress friends

Recent days, I'm quite busy to do the day job that I forgot I have a child to take care. It's WooCommerce Checkout Fields & Templates. This plugin was sold on Codecanyon for a while with almost 500 sales. Well, that brought me some money, at least.

But I do not good enough in coding as well as do not have much time to continue developing it alone, so I'm asking you guys for help, this will be a very big plugin where all WooCommerce's user can edit their checkout page with pre-built styles or built their own.

I decided to take it down on Codecanyon and make it goes public so all WooCommerce's user can benefit from it. All I want is contribute something to WordPress community.

So here's its Github: https://github.com/ossvn/woocommerce-checkout-fields-templates

The plugin still running fine on 80% of the site, the other must be fixed and I think the issue can be raised so we will go to involve and fix it. After it's good enough we will submit to WordPress.org repo.

My email: trantientoai@gmail.com

Please fork it on Github and do something better for WooCommerce users!

Any thought on this, please?

via Toai Tran

Too busy with my day to day routine, otherwise this would've been an excellent opportunity to help. But I want you to know, I truly appreciate your gesture and hope that you find a worthy partner.

via Ahmad Awais
9 min read Puneet Sahalot
Editorials | mediatemple.net | 2 days ago

Caching Your Way to a Faster Website - Media Temple

Eugene from Media Temple shares insights on Caching and Hosting solutions. He defines different types of caching in short and easy to understand statements along with features of different caching plugins.

Caching Your Way to a Faster Website - Media Temple

Editorials | mediatemple.net | 2 days ago

Caching is one of those terms that has seemingly been around since the dawn of computer age. But what, exactly, is it and how can (should?) it be used when it comes to websites? Definitions and Performance
At its most simple definition, caching is a temporary storage space or memory that allows fast access to data. Caching often gets defined by its use case. There are at least five major cache location types utilized by web developers today.
First is object caching, which saves an application object locally so that it can be served for future requests without requiring retrieval from the origin server. Next, database caching allows you to cache query data in memory buffers to increase database performance. Bytecode caching, such as OPcache, improves PHP performance by storing precompiled scripts in shared memory, thereby removing the need for PHP to load and parse scripts on each request. Page caching stores action outputs as an HTML file that the web server can serve immediately without going back through the on demand (dynamic) retrieval of data. And finally, distributed content caching uses geographically distributed server memory to deliver content faster.
While the differences

7 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Pro | kinsta.com | 4 days ago

A Complete Guide on HTTP Status Codes

What do the different status codes mean? This can be helpful when you manage a lot of sites and servers.

A Complete Guide on HTTP Status Codes

Pro | kinsta.com | 4 days ago

HTTP status codes are like a short note from the web server that gets tacked onto the top of a web page. It’s not actually part of the web page. Instead, it’s a message from the server letting you know how things went when the request to view the page was received by the server. These sorts of messages are returned every time your browser interacts with the server, even if you don’t see them all that often. If you’re a website owner or developer understanding HTTP status codes is critical. Because when they do crop up, HTTP status codes are an invaluable tool for diagnosing and fixing website configuration errors.
This article introduces the most common server status and error codes and explains what they reveal about what’s happening on the server behind the scenes.
Where Do They Come From? Where Do They Go?
Every time you click on a link or type in a URL and press “Enter” your browser sends a request to a web server. The web server receives and processes the request, and then sends back the requested resources along with an HTTP header.
HTTP status codes are delivered to your browser in the HTTP header. While status codes are returned every

7 min read Matt Cromwell
Community | wptavern.com | 5 days ago

Polyglots Team Experiences Record Annual Growth, Expands WordPress’ Reach to Millions with New Translations

The Polyglots team and how they're using GlotPress is definitely the most exciting and impactful thing going on for the WordPress platform right now. This is why Wix and Squarespace really aren't "real" competition IMHO.

Polyglots Team Experiences Record Annual Growth, Expands WordPress’ Reach to Millions with New Translations

Community | wptavern.com | 5 days ago

WordPress 4.6 was released this week with support for 50 translations at 100%, a record number for the Polyglots. The volunteer team has grown 114% over the past year and a half. “On April 15th, translation contributors totaled 4,690 for all time, with a rate of 3 new per day,” Polyglots team member Petya Raykovska said. “We had 319 translation editor badges when we first introduced them in March 2015.”
As of August 2016, the total number of people who have contributed to WordPress translations is 10,059, with 1,247 translation editors (those who maintain translations for a single plugin or theme).
Raykovska cannot explain why the Polyglots team has caught fire during the past year, but she attributes some of the growth to the magnetism of the team.
“We are getting better at working as a team and helping each other,” she said. “I am almost tempted to say people can feel how much we enjoy the work that we do for the project and want to become a part of all that.”
Raykovska said during the past year Polyglots have focused on helping established teams improve the quality of their work, creating style sheets and glossaries to help new contributors

6 min read Rahul DC
Plugins | enablingwp.com | 2 days ago

Telegram Channels to increase Mobile readers for your WordPress Blog

Every WordPress blog offers Newsletters, RSS, Social Media. What’s next? Learn how Telegram Channel broadcasting help converting mobile readers into subscribers

Telegram Channels to increase Mobile readers for your WordPress Blog

Plugins | enablingwp.com | 2 days ago

I am a budding blogger as you can see my post count is pretty low at the moment. I used to blog often, but I quit my blogging and went on to find a “real job” and 2 years later back to the WordPress, for obvious reasons. As I started researching,I found that lot of things changed and few didn’t. Have you heard about Telegram channels? What about reader psychology? It sure evolved. Bloggers use Social Media pages, Newsletters, RSS etc., to connect to their readers. They are great and works pretty good in most cases. As I was researching, I found a blog, which was boring, offering a telegram subscription. Few of you guys know Telegram app right? A fast growing alternative to Whatsapp messenger. It offers the same features as Whatsapp but it’s in the cloud. Every data you shared synced across all devices. Using the cloud for messaging was a big advantage for the Telegram and it’s users. I will come to the point.
As of February, 2016, Telegram has 100 Million active users. Now may be 120 Million. That’s a juicy thing to know for bloggers who interested who have so many mobile visitors.
Telegram offers a feature called Channel broadcasting. Sure, Whatsapp

4 min read WebDevStudios
Plugins | pluginize.com | 3 days ago

Custom Post Type UI 1.4.0: Features, Updates, and More

CPTUI 1.4.0 is HEREEEEEE!!! We are stoked! Michael shares the new features.

Custom Post Type UI 1.4.0: Features, Updates, and More

Plugins | pluginize.com | 3 days ago

Posted on August 24, 2016 by Michael Beckwith It’s been a smooth and swift four and a half months since the last major release for Custom Post Type UI. During that time, we launched Pluginize, our premium product team from WebDevStudios. With Pluginize, we released our first product, Custom Post Type UI Extended. This product was dependent on Custom Post Type UI and what became version 1.3.0.
Now, the next major release of Custom Post Type UI, version 1.4.0, has dropped! Here’s an outline what to expect with the latest version, and what new features we’ve added to CPTUI!
Continued UI Evolution
Ever since version 1.0.0 in January 2015, we have continued tinkering and fine tuning the UI. It feels like a long evolution, and continues to get closer to feeling native to the WordPress admin. Version 1.4.0 is no doubt much closer–now more than ever.
When you are editing a post type or taxonomy, you will find three sections that each mimic metaboxes. This imitation includes the ability to toggle-collapse each section. The biggest exception is that we do not include drag and drop reordering.
Modified Slug Indicators
While it may be a minor detail, we provide an indicator