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Community | forbes.com | 11 hours ago

Tech Conferences Are Plentiful, But WordPress Conferences Are Perfectly Placed

Very good timing on this article as companies negotiate budgets for attendance, thanks Forbes...

Tech Conferences Are Plentiful, But WordPress Conferences Are Perfectly Placed

Community | forbes.com | 11 hours ago

According to Startup Sesame, an alliance of tech events and connectors, every year there are more than 53,000 tech conferences and meetups in Europe. From Trondheim to Moscow to Lisbon, that is a huge number of events; for those in the industry choosing the most relevant conference is one of the challenges of the age.
Sometimes, as there is in June this year, a bottleneck of these get-togethers and potlatches makes it even more congested than usual. For others, however, choosing the right conference is easy, especially for those in the WordPress community.
Last week, WordPress agencies, developers, bloggers, designers and end-users flocked to WordCamp London, a volunteer-based event that has been running since 2013. Over the two-day conference, a very enthusiastic crowd share and debated the open source platform
They will then reconvene in Paris in event-heavy June for WordCamp Paris, the biggest European event of its kind. Last year it hosted more than 2,000 attendees from 68 countries who watched 70 speakers espouse the so-called joy of WordPress.
This year the event will be bigger than ever before with delegates rising to 3,000 people, up 50% on last year. This increase in attendees

1 min read Ahmad Awais

Find Out Your WordPress Plugin's Age!

A few days ago, during a discussion with Maedah — I went ahead and built this cool little tool. Try it out.

Find Out Your WordPress Plugin's Age!

HINT: Simply type in a plugin’s slug into the search box and hit enter. Built by Ahmad Awais and Maedah Batool. The source code is licensed MIT.

Development | wptavern.com | 1 day ago

Adding Images to WordPress Sidebars Is About to Get a Lot Easier

A long awaited feature of adding images to WordPress sidebars may be ready in time for WordPress 4.7.4

Adding Images to WordPress Sidebars Is About to Get a Lot Easier

Development | wptavern.com | 1 day ago

Adding images to sidebars in WordPress is a cumbersome task that requires users to upload an image to the Media Library, find the URL, copy it, and paste it into a Text widget along with additional HTML. Nearly two years ago, Mel Choyce opened a ticket on WordPress Trac proposing that a media widget be added to core. This widget would allow users to easily add images to sidebars. Throughout the discussion, the idea of creating a catch-all media widget was brought up that would allow users to add images, audio, or video to a sidebar. After developers spoke to Matt Mullenweg about the direction of the project, the team decided to create three separate widgets to handle each media type. Choyce outlined the benefits this approach provides:
We can focus on creating more tailored experiences for each widget.
We’ll be able to launch new widgets without having to worry about constantly updating one central widget, or potentially breaking anything.
It’ll be easier for people to discover new media types since they won’t be buried within one widget.
This will more closely mimic the approach we’re taking to content blocks in the future, which should provide an easier transition.

8 min read Luca Fracassi

Why large companies acquire small companies

Really excellent article from Jason Cohen, CTO & founder at WPEngine, about why big companies buy small ones

Why large companies acquire small companies

Large companies don’t acquire small companies for their financials. Revenue multiples, profit multiples, premium over the previous financing — these are metrics used by sellers to help determine a minimum acceptable price. That’s the price that “pays for” enough foreseeable upside that it’s not worth rolling the dice against future troubles or the unlikelihood of an exit.
Large acquirers don’t care about small-company financials because mathematically those won’t affect the growth or value of the acquirer. A company with $100m/yr in revenue growing 30% annually won’t go through the effort, risk, and distraction of buying a company with $1m/yr in revenue growing 100% annually, because that’s only a piddly 1% or maybe as much as 2% of additional growth.
Rather, buyer behavior is rooted in their strategy — a combination of product thesis, their theory of their market’s evolution, how they need to position for customers and against competitors, their long-term brand development, geographic expansion plans, and so on.
From this foundation, they’re constantly asking: “How can we execute our existing strategy,

Community | prnewswire.com | 4 days ago

GoDaddy Acquires Sucuri

Congratulations Tony, Daniel, Dre and the team at Sucuri! Excited to see the security technology leveraged to millions of websites. Official PR: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/godaddy-acquires-sucuri-to-advance-digital-security-for-customers-300427537.html

GoDaddy Acquires Sucuri

Community | prnewswire.com | 4 days ago

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz., March 22, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- GoDaddy Inc (NYSE: GDDY), the world's largest cloud platform dedicated to small, independent ventures, today announced it has entered into an agreement to purchase Sucuri, a leading provider of website security products and services. Financial details of the transaction were not disclosed. Sucuri is a security platform offering business owners a suite of security tools designed to protect website owners from emerging online threats. Nearly 75 percent of all legitimate websites have unpatched vulnerabilities1, and websites that have been blacklisted due to a hack can experience an 80 percent reduction in traffic for more than 48 hours2. Sucuri's suite of tools provide website owners the solution they require to respond to hacks when they occur, while also virtually patching vulnerabilities.
Sucuri is deeply involved in the WordPress community. The company provides an industry-leading security plug-in for the WordPress platform, and actively works to advance the security awareness and management of WordPress websites.
"The vast majority of our customers aren't website security experts, nor should they need to be to secure their websites,"

20 min read Donna Cavalier
Business | pippinsplugins.com | 5 days ago

Reflection on a price increase - Pippins Plugins

"You see, EDD is seen around the WordPress community as this great plugin that is wildly successful and a model to look up to in the commercial plugin ecosystem. While this is a reputation that we take great pride in, the honest truth of the matter is our team has struggled with EDD for months because in many ways it has felt like a sinking ship."

Reflection on a price increase - Pippins Plugins

Business | pippinsplugins.com | 5 days ago

On December 14, 2016, my team and I pushed a significant change to our Easy Digital Downloads products: we increased the price on all extensions by 50-250%. Yes, you read that right: up to a 250% price increase on certain plugins. This change was done for a number of reasons, which I will get into shortly, and has resulted in a very interesting last three months. Since I have always been very open with my company’s financials, I would like to now share some reflections on the change that we made and to also share some of the aftermath of the change. The backstory
Since the beginning of Easy Digital Downloads, and I imagine many products, customer support has always been our biggest challenge. Taking care of customers is hands down the most difficult job in the company. It is ripe with challenging problems to solve, long hours, relentless flows of new tickets, on-going conversations that spread not only over days but even weeks and months. Providing good and, when possible, great customer support is, to put it simply, exhausting.
There have been many times over the last 5-7 years where I thought to myself I’m sick of this; I just can’t keep taking care of these people,

11 min read Iain Poulson

Dependency Management and WordPress: A Proposal

Dependency management is a problem for WordPress because there is no dependency management at all! In this week’s article I outline why that is such a big issue and go through a proposal I’ve put together for a Composer based solution.

Dependency Management and WordPress: A Proposal

‘Dependency hell’ is a problem faced by all software, and it has been rearing its ugly head in the WordPress space over the last few years with more and more plugins using third-party libraries of code. We come across this issue every couple of months with our Amazon S3 plugin WP Offload S3. It’s a very real problem for Delicious Brains and can serve as a good concrete example of the issue.
The Problem
Our plugin transfers media to Amazon S3 when you upload to the WordPress media library, and to do that we make use of the AWS SDK (bundled as the Amazon Web Services plugin). The SDK went through some major changes between versions 2 and 3, resulting in the SDK bumping its minimum required version of PHP from 5.3 to 5.5. With 42.7% of all WordPress installs running on servers with PHP 5.2, 5.3 or 5.4, stipulating a minimum of PHP 5.5 just wouldn’t work for our plugin.
When customers use Offload S3 along with another plugin that relies on and bundles the AWS SDK, unless that plugin is using v2, we encounter an issue of incompatible libraries. WordPress loads plugins in the order they were activated, and PHP loads files as they are required and classes as they are

Community | thehackernews.com | 2 days ago

Google Chrome to Distrust Symantec SSLs for Mis-issuing 30,000 EV Certificates

Be careful, if you plan to install Symantec SSL certificates on your WordPress sites.

Google Chrome to Distrust Symantec SSLs for Mis-issuing 30,000 EV Certificates

Community | thehackernews.com | 2 days ago

Google announced its plans to punish Symantec by gradually distrusting its SSL certificates after the company was caught improperly issuing 30,000 Extended Validation (EV) certificates over the past few years. The Extended Validation (EV) status of all certificates issued by Symantec-owned certificate authorities will no longer be recognized by the Chrome browser for at least a year until Symantec fixes its certificate issuance processes so that it can be trusted again.
Extended validation certificates are supposed to provide the highest level of trust and authentication, where before issuing a certificate, Certificate Authority must verify the requesting entity's legal existence and identity.
The move came into effect immediately after Ryan Sleevi, a software engineer on the Google Chrome team, made this announcement on Thursday in an online forum.
"This is also coupled with a series of failures following the previous set of misissued certificates from Symantec, causing us to no longer have confidence in the certificate issuance policies and practices of Symantec over the past several years," says Sleevi.
One of the important parts of the SSL ecosystem is Trust, but if CAs

Business | wp-rocket.me | 3 days ago

WP Rocket Is Now WP Engine Approved!

Big news! WP Rocket is now a WP Engine preferred caching plugin. You can now speed up your website with EverCache and WP Rocket.

WP Rocket Is Now WP Engine Approved!

Business | wp-rocket.me | 3 days ago

We have some big news! These past few weeks, we’ve been working with the wonderful folks over at WP Engine toward a one-of-a-kind partnership. WP Engine has an incredible EverCache layer that helps your load time performance on the server side. Coupled with WP Rocket this setup makes most WordPress websites load FAST. That’s great news for you, for your visitors, for us, for WP Engine and even for Google! We know the search engine has been trying to make the web faster for a long time.
Entering The WP Engine Preferred Plugin Program
WP Rocket is now part of the WP Engine Preferred Plugin Program. Previously, WP Engine was known to ban caching plugins because these plugins created caching conflicts with the EverCache layer.
We discussed earlier on our blog that one of the biggest lessons we learned as a company is that you have to play nice with others. For WP Rocket, it means being compatible with many other service providers, themes, plugins, hosts out there.
We optimized our plugin to be compatible with the WP Engine platform. Some parts of the caching is deactivated to make sure that it does not create any issues with the EverCache technology. This way, we can ensure

3 min read Donna Cavalier
Business | blog.sucuri.net | 4 days ago

GoDaddy+= Sucuri: Building a Security Platform For Every Website Owner

I don't even have words for this. GoDaddy is becoming an unstoppable behemoth, and that is scary. (And yes, I know where I'm saying this).

GoDaddy+= Sucuri: Building a Security Platform For Every Website Owner

Business | blog.sucuri.net | 4 days ago

Authored by Daniel & Tony We are happy to announce that as of today Sucuri will be joining the GoDaddy family.
This acquisition will bring the best of both worlds. It will allow us to expand our product-line to all GoDaddy customers, while also remaining true to our foundation supporting all our current and future customers.
History
Since our inception our goal was simple: protect our customers websites – at all costs. This was built on the premise that every website owner should be able to deploy enterprise-grade security, without the enterprise-grade costs. Our approach to achieving this was to build things that delivered real value, while simultaneously staying ahead of the emerging threats.
Joining GoDaddy allows us to achieve this goal at a much larger scale than the one we are currently at. As a product company, this is the greatest challenge!
What Does this Mean for Sucuri?
We will continue to operate as is. What you can expect however are improvements to our processes and more resources to enable us to continue to invest in the things we love – our team, our customers and our product.
What Does this Mean for Sucuri Customers?
There are no changes to our customers.

Business | premium.wpmudev.org | 2 days ago

27 Reasons Why WordPress Crushes Squarespace Every Time

There are a lot of great points here. I never looked at the terms from Squarespace, but good to know that downside to its service.

27 Reasons Why WordPress Crushes Squarespace Every Time

Business | premium.wpmudev.org | 2 days ago

If you’ve landed on this post because you’re deciding whether to go with WordPress or Squarespace, let me make your decision easier for you: choose WordPress every time. While both provide a platform for you to build a website, they are vastly different. WordPress is used by more than 27% of all websites on the internet while Squarespace, on the other hand, powers 1.2 million websites. WordPress is available both as hosted and self-hosted options (we’ll dig into that further down), while Squarespace is available only as a hosted version.
In this post, I’ll go through the 27 reasons why self-hosted WordPress is the clear winner over Squarespace every time.
Reason #1: Free to Download
The WordPress software is open source and free to download for use on the web host or server of your choosing.
On the other hand, Squarespace isn’t flexible – you’re stuck with their hosting, which is strictly on Squarespace’s servers.
Reason #2: Build Upon the Software
WordPress has a GPL 2.0 license, which means you’re free to poke around the code and make changes that suit your needs, so long as you’re willing to share your changes with others

3 min read Ahmad Awais
Community | stackoverflow.com | 2 days ago

Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2017

The results are in guys, have at it. Been waiting for this one.

Stack Overflow Developer Survey 2017

Community | stackoverflow.com | 2 days ago

Overview This year, over 64,000 developers told us how they learn and level up, which tools they’re using, and what they want.
Each year since 2011, Stack Overflow has asked developers about their favorite technologies, coding habits, and work preferences, as well as how they learn, share, and level up. This year represents the largest group of respondents in our history: 64,000 developers took our annual survey in January.
As the world’s largest and most trusted community of software developers, we run this survey and share these results to improve developers’ lives: We want to empower developers by providing them with rich information about themselves, their industry, and their peers. And we want to use this information to educate employers about who developers are and what they need.
We learn something new every time we run our survey. This year is no exception:
A common misconception about developers is that they've all been programming since childhood. In fact, we see a wide range of experience levels. Among professional developers, 11.3% got their first coding jobs within a year of first learning how to program. A further 36.9% learned to program between one

Community | newlungsfor.me | 4 days ago

Jesse Petersen needs our help

If you don't know Jesse, I'll sum him up in one word: awesome. He's an active member of the WordPress community, a good person, and his lungs are failing. He needs $20,000 for the lung transplant, since his have dropped to just 22% capacity. So please skip a domain purchase or an online t-shirt purchase, and help a community member in need. He deserves it, and his family deserves it.

Jesse Petersen needs our help

Community | newlungsfor.me | 4 days ago

Update: Jesse is officially active on the lung transplant waiting list with a lung allocation score (LAS) of 38.859 Jesse’s family was planning on 2017 being a year to rebuild and bond as a family of four after 5 years of fostering and two years of back-to-back legally contested adoptions drained us mentally and financially. Plans changed when a January clinic visit showed his lung function at 22% and he missed the better part of 5 weeks of work with a hospital stay, home IVs, and many doctor’s appointments.
They were hesitant to open up this donation campaign after they received hundreds of peoples’ generous gifts in 2016 for their second adoption, but were encouraged to do so by family who is also willing to assist.
The family currently has a small emergency fund and they fully expected that their work-from-home business would allow him to work right up until transplant. That no longer seems to be a reasonable expectation, as the decline to reach transplant status has made concentrating and doing the actual work much more of an effort than Jesse ever imagined.
They felt that they were entirely prepared for a quick medical leave after surgery but not any decreased

9 min read Ahmad Awais
Community | torquemag.io | 3 days ago

Why Startups Should Use WordPress

I wrote an extensive article with Maedah's help about why Startups should use WordPress. I think it will serve as a good ref. to your friends.

Why Startups Should Use WordPress

Community | torquemag.io | 3 days ago

Working on the first official pitch for your startup can be nerve-wracking because you’re asking people to take a chance on you. The only way to get your company off the ground is to start working. Part of that is having a professional website. There are some disheartening statistics surrounding startups. 50 percent of the new businesses fail in the first five years.
95 percent of the startup owners have at least a bachelor’s degree.
Raising capital is the hardest thing to do
These numbers are pretty daunting, but that doesn’t stop from thousands of people from starting their own business every day. One of the easiest places to start is online. WordPress allows you to make a beautiful website that you can easily maintain for little to no money.
Let’s see how.
Startups Need a Solid Website
A startup needs a website. Period. A well managed and consolidated website is a must. However coding a site from scratch isn’t always easy, especially when you’re trying to start your own business.
A startup’s website should:
Be easily managed.
Cost very little.
Integrate well with search engines and for social marketing.
Have proper navigation, organized content,

4 min read David McCan
Community | yoast.com | 4 days ago

Yoast SEO 4.5: update your PHP version • Yoast

WordPress has not updated the minimum required version of PHP and still supports PHP 5.2, despite the fact that it is no longer maintained. Rather than wait for WordPress to take the lead, Yoast decided to start urging users to upgrade to PHP 7 via a notice on the admin. The programming for the PHP version detection and notice was made available for other plugin authors to use as well. Is it a revolution?

Yoast SEO 4.5: update your PHP version • Yoast

Community | yoast.com | 4 days ago

This is a rather special release, as it’s a project that’s close to my heart. It’s not a full-featured release, however, it is just necessary as a regular release. In Yoast SEO 4.5, we are urging site owners whose sites run on servers with an outdated version of PHP to update to a more recent version. To move the web forward, we need to take a stand against old, slow and unsafe software. Updating to PHP 7 will give your site an enormous speed boost. In this post, you’ll find out why we’re showing this notice in WordPress and what you can do to upgrade PHP. Why this move?
WordPress is built on PHP. This programming language takes care of the heavy lifting for the CMS. WordPress was always built with backward compatibility in mind, but we’ve reached a point where that’s just not feasible anymore. WordPress needs a minimum of PHP5.2 to function, but that version will not get updates, fixes or patches. This makes it inherently insecure. If you are on an old version, Yoast SEO 4.5 will show you a message in the backend. Please update to at least 5.6, but rather PHP 7 to take advantage of all the awesomeness of this new version. Not just for you as

7 min read Alex Denning
Community | wpzoom.com | 3 days ago

Should Premium Themes Automatically Renew Licenses? Data from Thousands of Theme Sales

Automatic updates are all the range, but WPZOOM aren't doing them – this post looks at the data supporting the decision.

Should Premium Themes Automatically Renew Licenses? Data from Thousands of Theme Sales

Community | wpzoom.com | 3 days ago

When we first started selling WordPress themes in 2009 it was industry best-practice to offer “lifetime” support and updates. At the time everyone selling WordPress themes was offering unlimited support requests and updates and we were happy to do the same. All was well for a couple of years, but eventually questions about sustainability started: if you purchased a WordPress theme once for $60, is it a fair deal to both parties to offer unlimited support requests and significant updates for years to come? As popular themes started receiving huge updates years after their original release, questions about sustainability started arising.
WooThemes made the first significant move, ditching their unlimited model in favour of one year of support and updates with each purchase. At the time, WooThemes provoked outrage by invoking their right to unilaterally change their terms and conditions and make the change for all customers. This was quickly changed to an option to opt out of the change in terms, but arguably this was an attempt to damage limitation.
Despite the negative reaction to WooThemes’ move, the business argument made sense. Unlimited support and updates could

1 min read Donna Cavalier
Plugins | torquemag.io | 3 days ago

Torque's 2017 Plugin Madness

It's essentially March Madness for plugins, with plugins moving through the brackets in the competition. Kinda neat idea.

Torque's 2017 Plugin Madness

Plugins | torquemag.io | 3 days ago

WordPressers, get ready! We’re back with Torque’s 2017 Plugin Madness, where 64 WordPress plugins compete against each other for total plugin domination! Come back each week to vote for your favorite plugins. The winner will be announced on April 18!
Modeled after the NCAA college basketball tournament March Madness, we use a bracket-based voting system to pit plugins against one another each week.

I am Tammie Lister, an Experience Designer at Automattic, Ask me anything

AMA | 4 days ago

Hi

I am really excited to be around today to answer your questions. A little bit about me...

I currently live in the middle of England and work at Automattic as an Experience Designer in the Theme Division. I have a varied background including psychology, design, front end development and user experience. I even once upon a time studied art; its been an interesting path I've followed through freelance to Automattic. Before joining I was for several years focused as a community designer, helping design communities for BuddyPress.

I am a long standing WordPress contributor, committer for core themes and design team rep. I am involved in a lot of different contribution areas and have also organised several WordCamps. My open source journey has seen me be part of a lot of different areas, allowed me to see lots of different parts of the world and helped me be the person I am today.

When not at a computer I spend time doing yoga, with my dog and husband and I still enjoy creating art.

Ask me anything :)

Hi Tammie,

I hope your day is going great.

Thanks for taking the time for AMA.

What is the biggest danger to WordPress in your opinion?

How to improve the User Experience for newbies in WordPress?

Thanks :)

via Aleksandar

Hey Tammie,

Thanks for coming on to AMA.

I have a few questions for you. I am a designer myself and at the moment I am looking to expand my skills to front-end development. Do you find it useful to know both, and how did you go from design to front-end?

You did a great talk on WordCamp London about the importance of knowing your user. I agree entirely that it's essential to incorporate UX research in everything you do. But, how do you convince others to invest time in this?

Thanks,
Milica

via Milica Spasojević

Hi Aleksander,

Two very good questions, thanks for asking.

In WordPress I think the biggest danger is the bias of experience, being clouded by and accepting the 'WordPress way' of doing things. It is crucial to step outside that headspace, its also incredibly difficult to do. We are not our only users, yet we create often like we are.

As far as improving the user experience for new users in WordPress goes, I think right now any step on that path is a big improvement. I feel we need to iterate, test those changes and then bit by bit move the gauge. One thing I feel really does this is looking at the language we use in our interfaces - we don't always do that and we need to.

We need to acknowledge our post install experience is not great for a lot of users. Starter content helps this a bit, but we should be guiding and supporting a lot more.

via Tammie Lister

Hello Tammie,

Thanks for taking out time from your busy schedule.

I have just a few questions:
- Page builders slow down the site? If not, any plan to integrate into the core?
- Do you keep human psychology while structuring the design?

Looking forward to your answers.

Thanks!
Mustaasam Saleem

via Mustaasam Saleem

Hi Milica

That is awesome you are looking to expand your skills.

I actually have gone both ways in my career - I studied software engineering (of all things) right as the web became a thing (feeling super old saying that). After a while being a starvingish artist I wanted to actually get a career that paid well. I was though always a tinkerer in code, so it fit. I had since a child poked around computers, despite my education being psychology and art focused.

I have found for me doing creative code helps me. I can highly recommend exploring Processing JS for example: processingjs.org/.

As a designer I do value knowing how the bricks work in sense of code. If you are interested in the WordPress world I think themes are a great in road for that. Hope you have fun exploring code. Seeing code like a paint brush to create with helps.

Thanks so much for your compliment on my talk. As far as convincing others to invest time, that's not always easy. I would say though, user research doesn't have to take time, or much time. When it feels like a chore or gets in way of process.. thats when its a problem.

Think of lean, low friction and cheap cost (time is a cost) ways. Just doing cheap research also means you can prove what a little bit does and then build on that. Nothing like proof on a small scale to lead a client to invest in a bigger amount. Same goes to making it part of the process you work in. I used to have it as part of that for clients.

via Tammie Lister

Congratulations on getting the theme review queue below 100! When I browse the theme repository I don't usually think about the possible path it took to get a theme up in front of me. Thank you for your contributions to the review process.

via David McCan
5 min read John Locke

How to Properly Add jQuery Scripts to WordPress

Something I was looking up for show notes on the podcast: how to reference jQuery in WordPress without using the straight dollar sign, to avoid conflicts or your code not working. Exactly what I was looking to share.

How to Properly Add jQuery Scripts to WordPress

Despite the fact WordPress has been around for a while, and the method of adding scripts to themes and plugins has been the same for years, there is still some confusion around how exactly you’re supposed to add scripts. So let’s clear it up. Since jQuery is still the most commonly used Javascript framework, let’s take a look at how you can add a simple script to your theme or plugin.
jQuery’s Compatibility Mode
Before we start attaching scripts to WordPress, let’s look at jQuery’s compatibility mode. WordPress comes pre-packaged with a copy of jQuery, which you should use with your code. When WordPress’ jQuery is loaded, it uses compatibility mode, which is a mechanism for avoiding conflicts with other language libraries.
What this boils down to is that you can’t use the dollar sign directly as you would in other projects. When writing jQuery for WordPress you need to use jQuery instead. Take a look at the code below to see what I mean:
/* Regular jQuery */
$('.hideable').on('click', function() {
$(this).hide();
})
/* Compatibility Mode */
jQuery('.hideable').on('click', function() {
jQuery(this).hide();
})
The good news is that with

27 min read Tim Nash
Community | timnash.co.uk | 5 days ago

Who is afraid of the big bad talk... by Tim Nash

We don't always get things right, if your giving a talk thats a very public place to not get it right.

Who is afraid of the big bad talk... by Tim Nash

Community | timnash.co.uk | 5 days ago

So at the weekend I gave a talk at WordCamp London on “Who’s afraid of the big bad host”. WordCamp London is the largest WordPress event in the UK a great conference and one I have had the pleasure speaking at several times on the trot. I was disappointed with the talk and how it went and unfortunately let that disappointment show, both during and after the talk.
If you talk regularly, you get use to the fact sometimes stuff doesn’t work and if its a new talk it’s always a bit of a risk is it going to work? Rarely do you completely break down in the middle of a talk or try to rewrite it midway through. I was doing both on Sunday and for the first time in years I found myself being far from my confident self.
For me this talk didn’t work at any point and it was disappointing because I feel I let people around me down and wasted what was a perfect opportunity to do my bit for a brilliant conference.
I’m not exactly the most overtly emotional chap but I had to avoid people. When I needed to go get the car to take down the 34SP.com stand, I more or less ran out of the venue for fear I would lash out at someone.
It meant I didn’t really get

4 min read Donna Cavalier

Clarification of Guideline 8 – Executable Code and Installs

The hair-splitting things a plugin can and cannot do in regards to executing code and installing stuff. Basically, it comes down to if your plugin is doing it or if your service is doing it.

Clarification of Guideline 8 – Executable Code and Installs

Since Jetpack announced it installs themes, a number of people have asked if this is a violation of the 8th guideline: The plugin may not send executable code via third-party systems.
And in specific, these two items:
Serving updates or otherwise installing plugins, themes, or add-ons from servers other than WordPress.org’s
Installing premium versions of the same plugin
The short answer is no, it’s not, and yes, you could do this too.
The longer answer involves understanding the intent of this guideline, which initially was to prevent nefarious developers from using your installs as a botnet. In addition, it’s used to disallow plugins that exist only to install products from other locations, without actually being of use themselves (ie. marketplace only plugins). Finally it’s there to prevent someone silly from making a plugin that installs a collection of ‘cool plugins’ they found from GitHub and want to make easier to install. Which actually did happen once.
Plugins are expected to do ‘something’ to your site. A plugin that exists only to check a license and install a product, while incredibly useful, is not something we currently allow

12 min read Codeinwp
Business | codeinwp.com | 5 days ago

Transparency Report #25 - Zerif Lite Back ... What's the Impact on Zerif Pro?

Learn more about how things changed, how many people stick with a theme and our further plans.

Transparency Report #25 - Zerif Lite Back ... What's the Impact on Zerif Pro?

Business | codeinwp.com | 5 days ago

Welcome to the 25th edition of our monthly transparency report (for February 2017). In this series, I try to cover everything that’s been going on at CodeinWP and ThemeIsle – from a business point of view, plus all things related (marketing, management, behind the curtains stuff). Click here to see the previous reports. Getting out of my comfort zone … with some outside help
Every now and then, I like to spend some quality time talking with other entrepreneurs and business owners in the online realm. Regardless if WordPress-related or not.
And I don’t mean stuff like, “hey, how’s it going?” -kind of talks. I mean deep and sometimes lengthy conversations about strategies, visions, plans, projects, everything. The more in-depth the better.
Just imagine, the person you’re talking with has lived with their business for X years, they have learned and experimented a lot, they have made their mistakes, they have come to conclusions that you couldn’t have come to unless you had clocked in your hours with the business. So now into the picture come you, and you can get the highlight reel of all those hours in mere 1/100th or 1/1000th of the

Community | hmn.md | 9 days ago

Mike Little joins Human Made

Really interesting news. Congratulations Mike! I might also add - thank you for WordPress!

hmn.md |

Mike Little joins Human Made

Community | hmn.md | 9 days ago

It’s with huge excitement that I can announce that Mike Little is joining Human Made. Mike is the co-founder of the WordPress project, having forked a small blogging script, b2, with Matt Mullenweg. He has a long history with the project and brings with him unparalleled knowledge and experience of it. Mike will be joining Human Made as a WordPress Specialist; in addition to doing development on our client projects we’re exploring ways for Mike to use his extensive talents in training and outreach, where we think he can have a big impact both on Human Made and on the wider community. He’s a massive asset to the team, an old friend to many of us, and we’re honored that he will call Human Made his home. I am excited to join the Human Made family. I’ve known many of the team for quite some time and have worked with the company in the past, so I feel most welcome.
I’m looking forward to being able to work on larger projects. Something I couldn’t manage in my one-man company. I’m anticipating being able to hone my skills and take them to a new level.
Anyone who knows me knows I am passionate about free software and the GPL. I admire Human Made’s

16 min read Rod Austin
Community | smallwoorld.com | 3 days ago

Laziness lands WooCommerce entrepreneurs on Shark Tank

One group's recipe for entrepreneurial success: laziness + beer + WooCommerce = Shark Tank appearance.

Laziness lands WooCommerce entrepreneurs on Shark Tank

Community | smallwoorld.com | 3 days ago

How could a moment of laziness lead to an appearance on Shark Tank and an expanding business that has become more work than an actual full-time job? Friday Beers can answer that question. About 18 months ago, Lee Mathers just wanted a cold beer on a Friday afternoon, and set about solving his own problem. His story is an example of how quickly entrepreneurship can get out of hand when you hit on a good idea. Lee is one of the founders of Friday Beers, an Australian company that will deliver a selection of cold craft beers right to your desk in Brisbane or Sydney. Its success is proof that cubicle life is thirsty work.
Friday Beers is a full time gig for Lee, and also keeps his cofounders on the hop. They appeared on Season 2 of Shark Tank in July of 2016, and were successful in their bid for a Shark (Steve Baxter) as a partner.
I’d love to say we caught up over a couple of cold ones, but the reality was still a pretty interesting Skype conversation between Lee and myself. As far as I know, neither of us were drinking anything stronger than coffee at the time.
Ali: I’ll start by asking you to tell me a little bit about the catalyst for starting Friday Beers.
Lee: This all