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Community | hackersmedia.com | 1 day ago

HHVM Now Faster than PHP 7

Just two weeks after PHP 7 beating HHVM in benchmarks, HHVM strikes back. Great to witness an exciting race for performance in the PHP world.

HHVM Now Faster than PHP 7

Community | hackersmedia.com | 1 day ago

After a two-week long lockdown, the HHVM team emerged from their self-imposed isolation with new improvements to their engine which now outperforms even the newly released PHP 7 alpha branch. A few weeks back, the Zend team announced serious speed improvements to the PHP 7 (PHPNG) engine which allowed it to considerably outperform HHVM in various setups.
Apparently, there was some truth to the original Zend report, but the HHVM team has responded with a benchmark of their own.
After putting their coders to work for two weeks, Facebook can now boast again that its HHVM technology, a JIT (Just-in-Time) compiler that converts PHP syntax to machine code, is faster than the default PHP engine, even in its newer 7.x branch.
WordPress, Drupal, and MediaWiki are faster on HHVM
According to the report, various setups were tested, with technologies like WordPress, Drupal, and MediaWiki used in a high-load server traffic environment.
The new HHVM branch managed to handle 1.8% more requests per second (RPS) for WordPress sites, and 19.4% more for MediaWiki, when compared to PHP7.
There was also a speed improvement for response times, of 10.2% for Drupal, 18.7% for WordPress, and 55.5% in the case

How We Built Our Blog [On Jekyll, not WordPress]

Really insightful article from a very reputable source, raising awareness and many questions.

How We Built Our Blog [On Jekyll, not WordPress]

Yesterday, we announced the redesign of our blog and the addition of our engineering channel. This is the first post related to engineering detailing a walkthrough of what we've built, and what better than to blog about rebuilding our blog on our new blog? How meta. It started with an engineering blog
A few months ago, I took up a de facto role heading up developer evangelism efforts at Stack Exchange. I say that with a caveat: we treat developer evangelism at Stack very differently than most other companies do. What we don't want to do is create a team of people that travel around, speaking at events, trying to sell something and code occasionally - that didn't make sense to us. Instead, what we really want to do is highlight the amazing public outreach work members of our engineering team are already doing. Most if not all of our developers are active members of not only Stack Overflow, but the larger technical community: writing blog posts, doing open source work, and speaking at conferences. We really want to shed some light on the individual public outreach efforts our engineering team is actively doing. Second, we want to make the philosophy that has made Stack Overflow so successful

16 min read Ahmad Awais
Community | tommcfarlin.com | 3 days ago

The WordPress Community (A Comedy of Drama, Ego, Oligarchies, and More)

Read thoughts of Tom McFarlin about The WordPress Community which he believes is a Comedy of Drama, Ego, Oligarchies, and More

The WordPress Community (A Comedy of Drama, Ego, Oligarchies, and More)

Community | tommcfarlin.com | 3 days ago

I don’t know why I feel compelled to begin a post like this, but this is going to be a lengthy as it covers quite of a bit of the state of the culture of WordPress right now. As someone who loves the software, makes a living off of it, and tries to follow along with everything going on with it, things have gotten really intense over the past few weeks – more intense than usual, that is – and it’s kind of a bummer to see.
Secondly, I’ve been told on a couple of occasions in the past that I don’t do a good job of staking my own claim in terms of how I perceive a given situation. That is, I’ve been told that I tend to hang out in the gray versus the black or white of a issue (so I try to weigh both sides of an issue – big deal :) – but I thought maybe I’d take this time to lean in one direction or the other a little harder than I usually do.
Like I said, I don’t know why I should preface what I opt to write about in this post (as it kind of enforces the point above), but I figured it was worth giving some background of where I’m coming from.
And my experience won’t be the same as yours and yours won’t be the same as mine or the next persons, but this is my take on what I’ve seen over the

3 min read Matt Cromwell
Community | happyjoe.org | 15 hours ago

Happy Joe Partners with WordCamp Tampa 2015 - Happy Joe

Happy Joe helps veterans get development skills to build a business using WordPress. They are partnering with WordCamp Tampa, FL to do a WP Bootcamp seminar. It's a creative way to partner with a WordCamp and for a really good cause.

Happy Joe Partners with WordCamp Tampa 2015 - Happy Joe

Community | happyjoe.org | 15 hours ago

, a non-profit focused on teaching the veteran community valuable skills in web technology, announces today that it will be partnering with to pioneer a new initiative that will change military veterans’ lives through WordPress and web technology. WordCamps are informal, community-organized events that are put together by WordPress users from around the world. This new veteran’s workshop provides exciting opportunities for patriotic sponsors to become engaged with our vibrant Tampa Bay veteran’s community. WordCamp Tampa is excited to provide a valuable experience to our WordCamp attendees and WordPress enthusiasts,” said Tom Townsend, a U.S. Navy Veteran and co-organizer of WordCamp. In addition to our vibrant Tampa military community, including those stationed at MacDill Air Force Base, the new lineup for WordCamp Tampa 2015 will offer incredible learning and mentoring opportunities you won’t want to miss!”
Happy Joe will team up with WordCamp Tampa 2015 to present its WP BootCamp curriculum on Friday, September 25th at the USF Marshall Student Center. The event is limited to 100 people, with 30 FREE TICKETS being offered to military veterans, military spouses, and military caregivers

10 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | torquemag.io | 3 days ago

Is Modular Code the future of WordPress?

Roy Sivan discusses why he got interested in BackPress and why it could be the future of WordPress. I've been lurking in all the BackPress chatter and moderating discussion here and there and I'll say that there's real merit to the idea. Worth reading and following for sure.

Is Modular Code the future of WordPress?

Editorials | torquemag.io | 3 days ago

This year at WordCamp Miami I had the pleasure of meeting John James Jacoby, or JJJ. Many of you may know him as the man behind BuddyPress, but I got to know him for another, older project, that he used to be involved with, BackPress. The more I learned about BackPress, the more I became intrigued. That’s when JJJ and I started talking about the revival of the BackPress project.
The BackPress Back Story
BackPress started its life as the foundational library of WordPress. It was more or less the wp-includes directory, which granted access to all of the php functions that everyone knows and loves in WordPress code, without the WordPress ecosystem.
No quick, five minute install. No easy-to-use CMS dashboard. Just a library of code. Unfortunately the project died out—and without anyone to maintain it and few pieces of code ever making its way back into WordPress, it was forgotten.
How I Got Interested and Involved
In early 2013, I started to learn AngularJS, and I immediately wanted to connect it to WordPress. I managed to get my first theme up and running using my own crude API.
That year, Ryan McCue introduced the WP-API project… and I was hooked.
About one year later I started to realize

4 min read Kevin Ohashi
Community | reviewsignal.com | 4 days ago

WordPress.org Revamping Hosting Recommendations

WordPress.org hosting recommendations may be changing soon, but how is unclear

WordPress.org Revamping Hosting Recommendations

Community | reviewsignal.com | 4 days ago

WordPress.org hosting recommendations may be changing soon, but how is unclear

1 min read Ahmad Awais
Plugins | wordpress.org | 15 hours ago

Plugin Grouper

Helps with management of plugins. Use this plugin and create groups of plugins installed in your WordPress site.

Plugin Grouper

Plugins | wordpress.org | 15 hours ago

Requires: 4.2.2 or higher Compatible up to: 4.2.2
Last Updated: 2015-6-19
Active Installs: Less than 10
Ratings
5 out of 5 stars

2 min read Steven Gliebe
Plugins | blog.vaultpress.com | 16 hours ago

Celebrating 5 Years of VaultPress

VaultPress will be five years old this month. It's interesting to see their logo changes throughout the years. Since launching, they've made more than 50,000,000 backups. I didn't realize VaultPress was that old, but then again, time flies in the world of WordPress...

Celebrating 5 Years of VaultPress

Plugins | blog.vaultpress.com | 16 hours ago

It’s VaultPress’ 5th birthday this week! In his post on June 29, 2010 — one of the first posts ever on this blog — Matt announced that we had sent out the very first Golden Ticket invites to VaultPress. In the beginning, we sent 30 invites a day, and grew gradually over the first several months. From those first Golden Tickets to the many users we support today, VaultPress has: Found 201,754 infected files
Made 50,100,955 backup snapshots.
Backed up 27,615 distinct plugins and 17,675 themes
Let’s take a look back at our first tweet and some early designs:
Our designs have changed over the years, but we’ve never wavered in our commitment to making the best product we can for the WordPress community. In a recent survey of 21 professionals on the best backup WordPress plugins, we’re proud that VaultPress came out on top as the clear winner. Feedback on our product is incredibly positive — it’s great to see people like Brin Wilson of WinningWP say that VaultPress is “basically effortless.” We’re so happy to see how far we’ve come.
To celebrate our 5-year anniversary and to say thank you and give back to our users, we’ve launched an extended 3-month trial. If you want to sign up, just visit

10 min read Steven Gliebe
Business | saint-rebel.com | 11 hours ago

Acquisition terms you may see when considering an offer - Joshua Strebel

Joshua Strebel, CEO of Pagely, provides a glimpse of how much you may or may not receive by selling your business. This is based on offers he has received for Pagely. And no, he is not selling.

Acquisition terms you may see when considering an offer - Joshua Strebel

Business | saint-rebel.com | 11 hours ago

Over the life of our business Pagely we’ve seen a few term sheets from potential acquirers (No, we are not selling). There are few things I’ve seen in all of them that as a founder stuck out to me. Cash is not really Cash until it is in your hand.
We’ll use some made up number’s here that make for easy math.
You are minding your business and someone comes along and ask’s to buy your company. You choose to entertain them and see what they are offering. You got a number in mind, let’s see how how it all shakes out.
The term sheet has this nice big number acquisition price that get’s your attention: $30 million. Hey $30million, that’s a lot of cheddar and in line with what you were thinking is a good price for your company. Okay, so you keep reading and the terms go on to spell out something like this.
$8m cash at closing
$2m at milestone 1
$5m at milestone 2
$5m at milestone 3
500,000 stock options
You think to yourself, hey that looks like only $20m, WTF? You keep reading and more details emerge.
$8m cash at closing
$3m of which will be held in Escrow for 24 months
$1m of which is written in as a clawback you repay if you or any important staff leaves prior to 24 months
$2m at milestone

Business | blog.wp-rocket.me | 4 days ago

WP Rocket Transparency Report #5 (May 2015)

This is the WP Rocket monthly report where they share their business insights as part of their transparency policy.

WP Rocket Transparency Report #5 (May 2015)

Business | blog.wp-rocket.me | 4 days ago

This is our monthly report where we share our business insights as part of our transparency policy. Updates
In May, we shipped one minor version and 2.6 Yavin which is a major update including better Lazy Load and smarter minification!
Revenue
$45 858 in revenue (+0,26%)
785 orders (+1,9%)
68 renewals (+9,7%)
651 new customers (+7%)
3127 websites added (-4,6%)
If you follow our monthly revenues you will notice that for the past 3 months our revenue has been very stable around $45 000. That’s a good amount but we don’t have the same growth as the few months before.
Let’s have a look at our customer acquisition strategy.
Since the beginning, our customer acquisition strategy has been very simple: having the best caching solution possible and fantastic customer service.
This leads to transforming our customers into brand advocates who recommend WP Rocket to others – this has been very effective for us.
In the meantime we had another customer acquisition channel which is blog reviews of WP Rocket.
It’s a hard job to get the number of reviews that we have. Reviews never come by being passive. So basically I contacted hundreds of bloggers to pitch WP Rocket to them and let them know I would

12 min read Ahmad Awais
Community | mor10.com | 1 day ago

On Trust and Opacity

"I was inspired by Tom McFarlin's article yesterday so I wrote a thing on Trust and Opacity. Would love to hear your thoughts." via Morten Rand-Hendriksen

On Trust and Opacity

Community | mor10.com | 1 day ago

Yesterday Tom McFarlin published an important article titled The WordPress Community (A Comedy of Drama, Ego, Oligarchies, and More). If you work with WordPress or the WordPress community, it is mandatory reading and worth some serious reflection. Tom shines a light on some of the darker parts of flat-structure communities and asks poignant questions about communication, language, and leadership among other things. There is a lot to latch onto here and I have no doubt there are many articles being written in response as I type this out. Here I want to focus in on a small part of this conversation and contribute my own perspective on something I think lies at the heart of much of the conflict Tom addresses: Trust and Opacity.
The Customizer and the Pyre
In WordPress, like any grassroots political organization, the level of conflict and partisan strife increases with its size and power. WordPress is now so big and powerful that I’m surprised we’re not starting to see breakout groups and organized factions trying to exert their will on the overall project. This is likely due to the spirit of Open Source, and we should count ourselves lucky that it has not happened. Yet.
However, there

3 min read Donna Fontenot
Community | wptavern.com | 2 days ago

WordPress 4.3 Beta 1 Now Available for Testing

If you can look past the controversial menus in customizer feature, you'll see the other features coming to 4.3, including a little bit of markdown in tinymce, which will be handy.

WordPress 4.3 Beta 1 Now Available for Testing

Community | wptavern.com | 2 days ago

WordPress 4.3 is right around the corner with beta 1 released and ready for testing. According to the 4.3 project schedule, there will be no more commits for new enhancements or feature requests from this point on. Contributors are now focusing on bug fixes and documentation ahead of August 18th, the target release date. With all the controversy surrounding WordPress 4.3’s inclusion of menus in the customizer, you may have missed a few other lesser known features that are on track to be included and need to be put through the paces. The new site icons feature was added to trunk this week, along with a text editor for the Press This posting interface.
WordPress lead developer Mark Jaquith has been working on making passwords more secure. As of 4.3, WordPress will no longer send passwords via email. The password strength meter is now more tightly integrated. It will warn users upon selection of a weak password and can also suggest a secure password.
One interesting new improvement added to the post editor is recognition of some basic markdown-esque patterns inside TinyMCE:
Certain text patterns are automatically transformed as you type, including * and – transforming into unordered lists,

3 min read Ahmad Awais
Community | tommcfarlin.com | 1 day ago

Officially Partnering with WPBeginner

Well, this looks pretty good. Tom McFarlin and Syed Balkhi partnering up to improve WPBeginner. That's awesome!

Officially Partnering with WPBeginner

Community | tommcfarlin.com | 1 day ago

As evidenced by this entire blog, one of the things that I enjoy most is writing about software development within the context of WordPress. That is, I enjoy writing about taking techniques learned in computer science, software engineering, object-oriented analysis and design, and so on and then applying them in the WordPress space.
I’ll also talk about front-end development, and web application development. Sure, I’ll occasionally cover things like databases, though that’s not really my strongest area and I try to leave that to those who are far more skilled than I am.
But one of the tough spots that comes with having a site like this is making sure that you’re able to make the information as accessible to those who are just starting out in WordPress. As much as I would absolutely love to help bring others up to speed on where to start, it’s really hard to do that without giving them a strong foundation off of which to build.
Hopefully, we can change that.
A Partnership with WPBeginner
Anyone who has been involved with WordPress for a significant amount of time is well-aware of WPBeginner; however, there are plenty of people who enter space every single day who have no idea where to

4 min read M Asif Rahman
Plugins | wptavern.com | 2 days ago

Ship: A New App for Shipping Plugins from GitHub to WordPress.org

This has a chance to bring tears of joy for all the SVN haters. So, with this application you could release plugin in Github, and "Ship" will push that code via SVN in WordPress.org, but obviously you have to have the configuration done already.

Ship: A New App for Shipping Plugins from GitHub to WordPress.org

Plugins | wptavern.com | 2 days ago

One of the small hurdles to hosting a plugin on WordPress.org is the fact that you have to use SVN to ship your updates. Most developers are far more familiar with Git. It’s not difficult to learn how to use SVN for the sake of WordPress.org plugins, but many find it to be inconvenient. Ship is a new application designed to eliminate this hassle by helping developers ship plugins directly from GitHub to WordPress.org. All you have to do is tag the release on GitHub and the app will automatically push updates to the plugin’s official SVN repo on WordPress.org.
The application was created by Jason Agnew and his team at Big Bite Creative, authors of the Herbert plugin framework. The team built the app in Laravel in just five days. It’s currently hosted on Digital Ocean, but Agnew plans to move it over to AWS once Ship has gained more users.
“We’ve reached a point where most developers are familiar with GitHub, and as a result, Git,” Agnew said in his announcement. “If you plan to do anything open source you’re likely to find yourself on there – even Apple has made the move. Unfortunately WordPress.org uses SVN, which most developers don’t use daily, or are even familiar with. It’s easy

2 min read Ryan Love
Plugins | lasso.is | 1 day ago

Lasso Adds Real Time Revision Restoring to WordPress

Lasso 0.9.6 allows users to restore revisions in real time while editing a post on the front end. - "Our goal is simple; be a front-end editor that negates the use of the WordPress post editor. One of the last areas to tackle in this endeavor was revisions, and we think you’ll like what we came up with."

Lasso Adds Real Time Revision Restoring to WordPress

Plugins | lasso.is | 1 day ago

We just released another significant update to Lasso, bringing us one step closer to the official Version One slated to be released in early Fall. With 0.9.6 we’re introducing an industry first; live revisions. Our goal is simple; be a front-end editor that negates the use of the WordPress post editor. One of the last areas to tackle in this endeavor was revisions, and we think you’ll like what we came up with.
When viewing a single post or page, a revision icon is shown in the toolbar. When you click this, a small modal will open showing up to the last six revisions. Hovering over the time will show you the date. Using the slider (or by clicking on a time) you can restore the revision live.
Is the modal in the way? Click and drag on the move icon (or on the entire modal), and move it out of the way so you can see your content. Restore by clicking “select” and the editor will open allowing you to continue editing. You save just like a normal post (hint CMD S hot key).
For hosts that have revisions disabled, you just won’t be able to benefit from this neat update. But for those with access to revisions, being able to see the post exactly as it looked, in the context that it live, should

Business | themehybrid.com | 4 days ago

ThemeHybrid Made All Its Themes, Plugins & Club Membership Free

In an experiment Justin Tadlock, creator of Theme Hybrid, made all his themes. plugins and even the club membership, that give access to support forum, all free. Its kind of pay if you want model. Interesting.

7 min read Codeinwp
Plugins | codeinwp.com | 2 days ago

Integrating Google Maps With WordPress (the How-To) - Intergeo Maps Plugin Review

Are you in need of a powerful Google maps UI builder inside WordPress ? This might be what you are looking for.

Integrating Google Maps With WordPress (the How-To) - Intergeo Maps Plugin Review

Plugins | codeinwp.com | 2 days ago

Detailed contact information is always important for a website owner, and especially if the website was built for a business purpose. The unfortunate fact is that we should never rely on the visitor’s “drive” to sniff around and find the contact data on their own. This is the kind of information that should always be directly right in front of them. It just makes it easy for the visitors to find you and communicate with you effectively. What are the main features of this plugin?
Firstly, let’s have a glance at the main features of this plugin:
A powerful UI builder that’s also user-friendly. With it, you can quickly change everything you need about the map. Here’s what can be done with the UI builder precisely:
set up an initial position and zooming level,
adjust controls and positioning,
set up map color styles by using predefined color schemes or custom color settings,
add overlays – markers, rectangles, circles, polylines, and polygons,
create routes from an address to another,
integrate AdSense, so you can display ads on the maps.
You can create Google maps using shortcodes. The standard shortcode form is [intergeo]Your address[/intergeo]. But you can add other attributes like height,

6 min read Nile Flores
Community | blondish.net | 3 days ago

WordPress Rockstar: Matt Cromwell

As part of my WordPress Rockstar series, I've gotten the chance to ask Matt Cromwell a few questions. Matt Cromwell is a talented WordPress developer that is part of the WordImpress team.

WordPress Rockstar: Matt Cromwell

Community | blondish.net | 3 days ago

There are quite a few people in the WordPress community that have contributed to it, and so my WordPress Series continues on with Matt Cromwell, a WordPress developer out of California. I’ve known Matt and have followed his progress online, as well as have enjoyed interacting with him on Facebook. He’s been a part of some great plugin projects, including plugins from my favorite company FooPlugins.
While he isn’t there anymore, he works with WordPressImpress, a company run by a team who love to create products exclusively for WordPress. One of the highlights on WordImpress is sharing the plugin called Give. This plugin allows people to be able to collect donations on their website. The plugin is free, but special payment gateways add-ons cost.
Outside of WordImpress, he blogs at MattCromwell.com, he has been a WordCamp Speaker, and he’s also a very active moderator at the Advanced WordPress group on Facebook.
I hope you enjoy my interview with Matt Cromwell. I really appreciate that he took the time to answer my questions.
Interview with Matt Cromwell
NILE FLORES: How did you first get into WordPress?
MATT CROMWELL: I started out freelancing when I was a much younger lad with an obscure

13 min read Ryan D. Sullivan
Business | wpsitecare.com | 3 days ago

9 Ways to Get the Most Out Of Your Blog Advertising

Do you run ads on your blog? Do you want to make more money with them? This article is for you.

9 Ways to Get the Most Out Of Your Blog Advertising

Business | wpsitecare.com | 3 days ago

I’d like to preface this article by saying that blog ads are one of many different ways that you can make money from your blog. Ad revenue can fluctuate a lot, and generally speaking the only way to increase your bottom line is to add more ads or get more creative with how you use them, which can be frustrating for your readers. We’re a lot more keen to things like affiliate marketing, selling a product or service, public speaking, or even building your own membership site. All that said, there are still a lot of bloggers using ads and making good money with them, so we asked Kristi to break down some of the ways to get the most out of the ads you do have running on your site. If the revenue generation model for your blog includes advertising income, then you need to get the most ad impressions possible from your visitors. If you browse marketplaces like BuySellAds, you can get a good idea of how much you could be making in your niche based on the number of impressions you can generate for your ad buyers.
In this post, we’re going to look at how you can optimize your blog ads to get more impressions from your blog readers and increase your income from ad buyers.
1. Place your ads site-wide.

12 min read Ahmad Awais
Plugins | chrislema.com | 22 hours ago

Membership Plugins Review: WP eMember

Chris Lema's review of a membership plugin called WP eMember.

Membership Plugins Review: WP eMember

Plugins | chrislema.com | 22 hours ago

Reviewing WP eMember In my first review, we looked at wpmu dev Membership 2 Pro. It had a free and a Pro version. You had to pay monthly if you wanted updates for the Pro version. The plugin we’re looking at right now isn’t like that at all.
Only one version. One time fee. Free upgrades and updates for life.
That alone might have you jumping over to check out WP eMember.
The Rating Criteria
As I scored the previous plugin, I looked at 8 different factors and I thought I would walk you thru some level of details on those factors before we dig into WP eMember.
Ease of Use & Speed to Configure
These two criteria almost sound identical but they’re not. Ease of use is all about the “predictability” of the plugin. Are the names of the different features and configuration easy to understand? Does the software work in a way you can predict? Are the screens well designed and easy for someone who isn’t an expert? How overwhelming is the settings page?
Speed to configure is something different, but related. The issue here is that even if you know how to do what you want to do, can you do it quickly? It presumes proficiency at the task and then inquires as to the velocity of the effort.
Multiple

Plugins | wpbeginner.com | 4 days ago

Switching Away from Disqus Increased Comments by 304%

I never liked Disqus ever since it has been found out that they are selling user data to 3rd parties, that's why I never created an account with them and commented on Disqus websites. I'm glad that I'm not the only one.

Switching Away from Disqus Increased Comments by 304%

Plugins | wpbeginner.com | 4 days ago

We switched away from Disqus about 2 months ago. Many of you noticed this change and asked us to write a Disqus review explaining why did we switch. After using Disqus for about a year, we noticed several drawbacks that forced us to switch back to WordPress comments. In this Disqus review, we will highlight the reasons why we switched and how it helped increase our comments by 304%. We started using Disqus in April 2014. We switched away several months ago. We really appreciate your patience and our apologies for taking so long to write about this. We know several of you have been asking about why we switched away from Disqus, so here goes our final Disqus review.
Why Did We Switch away from Disqus?
There were several reasons why we switched away from Disqus.
Inserting Affiliate Links without Permission
Disqus offers publishers ability to earn little extra $$ if you enable Promoted Discovery which shows sponsored stories in the related posts section that Disqus can add.
Since we didn’t want any advertisement from them, we had all the settings unchecked.
However we accidentally ran into what they called a “bug” where Disqus was inserting affiliate links in our blog post content without

14 min read Thomas Höfter
Business | wpscoop.com | 4 days ago

Growth Report: From 0 To 17,000 Monthly Visitors

The journey of how I built WPscoop, a WordPress resource site for premium plugin comparisons and user reviews, including both failure and success.

Growth Report: From 0 To 17,000 Monthly Visitors

Business | wpscoop.com | 4 days ago

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Income reports are all the rage right now. Since WPscoop does not generate any income yet I decided to call this post a growth report instead. It tells the story of how I built a WordPress resource site over the past 1.5 years with all its successes and failures. Mixed in are several of the lessons I have learned along the way.
So that you get a better understanding of where this site is coming from – and with the danger of boring you right away – I decided to start with…
A Short History Of WPscoop
I bought this site in early 2010 in an auction on the popular website marketplace Flippa. At this point WPscoop was a Reddit clone where users could submit, share and upvote WordPress related content. The site was nothing big but it had a small following of regular users and received a few thousand visitors per month.
I don’t remember the exact details but I probably had big plans for the site back then. And as happens so often I never found any time to carry them out, since I was completely focused on my WordPress products (which were earning me money). The site was left abandoned and turned into a spam-infested hell rather quickly, which caused it to lose all of its

Community | getoutpost.org | 2 days ago

Outpost: A PHP Framework for Decoupled Websites

Symfony-based PHP front-end tool with support for the WordPress REST API

Outpost: A PHP Framework for Decoupled Websites

Community | getoutpost.org | 2 days ago

Symfony-based PHP front-end tool with support for the WordPress REST API

8 min read Ahmad Awais
Community | carlalexander.ca | 4 days ago

DebOps for WordPress Give your WordPress client an Apple experience

You don’t have to find any more excuses. You can give yourself and your client a fast and secure server with: Nginx MariaDB (MySQL replacement) HHVM PHP-FPM (automatic fallback) Redis WP-CLI Varnish (optimized for WordPress)

DebOps for WordPress Give your WordPress client an Apple experience

Community | carlalexander.ca | 4 days ago

Hosting your WordPress site is an annoying problem. You can’t go far to see a discussion about it. Every week, someone asks who’s the best host. And each week, you never know if you’ll see conflicting answers or a consensus. It’s not like you can live without hosting either. That puts you at the mercy of hosting providers. This isn’t to say that hosting providers are evil. I think a lot of them are good and mean well.
It’s just that, regardless of their intentions, it doesn’t change things for you. Hosting is a critical part of your client’s experience with your service. They’ll call you if their site is slow, down or even hacked. They’ll question the quality of your work because of it.
But it’s more often than not a result of their decision. Clients skimp on hosting all the time. It’s one of the aspects of a project that your client tends to neglect the most. You know this. You’ve lived it many times.
Your client thinks: “Why should I pay $50/month (or $100/month with SSL!!) for premium hosting? I can get something for half or a quarter of the price.” Of course, it sounds great to them.
Except you’re left holding the bag when things go wrong.
You need your Apple experience
Apple likes