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7 min read Tom Harrigan
Business | thomasharrigan.com | 18 hours ago

The WooThemes Acquisition through the Eyes of a Former Ninja

The aftermath of this highly covered acquisition through maybe a slightly different perspective. Looking at what happens now and how the results effect the future of the ecosystem

The WooThemes Acquisition through the Eyes of a Former Ninja

Business | thomasharrigan.com | 18 hours ago

On Tuesday afternoon I was rushing out the door to meet with Vova Feldman, a WordPress developer and founder of Freemius. During LoopConf we exchanged a few tweets back and forth but didn’t end up getting to connect, so we figured out a time to meet up once we were both back in New York. I was running late and about to run out the door when a few tweets caught my eye, followed by messages in the Post Status Slack channel that WooCommerce had been acquired by Automattic. WooCommerce had been acquired by Automattic?! A dozen questions raced through my mind as I raced out the door. What about the rest of WooThemes? What would happen to all of the ninjas? What about the rest of the products? Was only WooCommerce acquired, or was WooThemes in its entirety now part of A8C? The initial posts on the topic, as well as Matt’s own blog post stated ‘WooCommerce joins the Automattic team‘, which caused confusion for me since WooCommerce makes up the majority of WooThemes revenue. It would seem illogical for a company to get rid of its largest revenue generating product. I’m now underground in the subway with no internet and endless questions popping into existence.
The subway is now above ground

Business | scottbolinger.com | 17 hours ago

2015 WordPress Business Revenue Statistics - Scott Bolinger

A compilation of revenue statistics of WordPress product businesses, based on publicly released data.

2015 WordPress Business Revenue Statistics - Scott Bolinger

Business | scottbolinger.com | 17 hours ago

A lot of people in the WordPress community have published transparency reports in the last year, and I wanted to gather them all in one place. It’s mostly for statistical data for presentations, and to analyze what business models people are using. I also have some knowledge that isn’t public information (from my own businesses, and people I know) that gives me a little extra insight.
Personal note to all my fellow business owners: don’t compare yourself and feel bad because you aren’t making what some of these businesses are. There is a lot of back story to these that you don’t know about, none of these people were overnight successes. If that’s you, read this post by Matt Medeiros.
There are lots of people I left out, if you want to be included in this list or update your numbers please leave a comment or shoot me a tweet.
WordPress Products
Ultimate Member
Business model: Free + Paid extensions
Description: WordPress Membership Plugin, Paid Extensions
Revenue: $12K/mo
Aesopinteractive
Business model: Free + Paid extensions
Description: WordPress Plugin/Themes
Revenue: $5K+/mo
AffiliateWP
Business model: Premium
Description: WordPress Affiliate Marketing Plugin
Revenue: $30k/mo
GravityView

3 min read Josh Pollock
Community | joshpress.net | 19 hours ago

Was The #WooMattic Deal About The People? - Josh Pollock

If Automattic just bought WooThemes for a WooCommerce-powered eCommerce offering, they could have just installed the plugin and saved themselves what is rumored to be $30 million dollars. If that is true, as everyone assumes, no one can ever complain about spending a few hundred or thousand on WooCommerce add-ons.

Was The #WooMattic Deal About The People? - Josh Pollock

Community | joshpress.net | 19 hours ago

There has been a lot of speculation and analysis about the WooMattic deal — why it happened, what it means for the future of WordPress.com and the ecosystem as a whole. A lot of people have assumed Automattic bought WooThemes, so they could use WooCommerce to power a WordPress.com eCommerce offering. That seems like a funny reason to spend what is rumored to be $30 million. If they just wanted to use WooCommerce, they could have just installed the plugin. If that’s why, then no one can ever complain about spending a few hundred or thousand on WooCommerce add-ons.
I think the real value here, besides a new revenue stream, is the people. Automattic is growing rapidly and finding employees who can thrive in a distributed company has to be a constant challenge for them. They just got fifty-some new employees, all of which are used to working remotely.
And yes, a lot of those people are experienced in building a WordPress eCommerce platform. WooCommerce-powered or built from scratch, a hosted eCommerce platform would be a very smart thing for Automattic to branch out into.
In addition, the leadership of WooCommerce is used to managing and planning a retail product-based business. Automattic

3 min read Michael Beil
Community | make.wordpress.org | 2 days ago

New committers for 4.3!

Cheers goes out to three new committers: Ella Van Dorpe, Konstantin Obenland, and Weston Ruter!

New committers for 4.3!

Community | make.wordpress.org | 2 days ago

Cheers goes out to three new committers: Ella Van Dorpe, Konstantin Obenland, and Weston Ruter!

17 min read Brian Krogsgard
Business | poststatus.com | 3 days ago

Automattic has acquired WooThemes, makers of WooCommerce

I've done an extensive take on the WooThemes acquisition by Automattic.

Automattic has acquired WooThemes, makers of WooCommerce

Business | poststatus.com | 3 days ago

Matt Mullenweg announced today that Automattic has acquired WooThemes, whose flagship product is the popular eCommerce plugin, WooCommerce. All 55 team members at WooThemes will join Automattic, swelling ranks at Automattic by around 18%. This acquisition is an important milestone for Automattic, validation for the bootstrapped WooThemes, and will be hugely impactful on the WordPress economy as a whole.
The history of WooThemes and WooCommerce
WooThemes was started in 2008 as one of the first commercial WordPress theme shops. It quickly became popular and paved the way for hundreds of shops to follow in their footsteps.
With the leadership of Adii Pienaar and co-founders Mark Forrester and Magnus Jepson, WooThemes did a ton of interesting things over the years, and dominated the market with a handful of other shops. They launched WooCommerce in September 2011, in the middle of the commercial theme heyday.
WooCommerce’s origins are a hot mess and a long story. WooThemes worked for a long time to develop, with partners, their own eCommerce solution. After numerous failed attempts and false starts, they hired Mike Jolley and Jay Koster full time, and forked JigoShop after acquisition negotiations

4 min read Donna Fontenot
Business | woothemes.com | 4 days ago

WooThemes Joins Automattic

Huge news! Wow, this came as a big surprise, but congrats to them, and best of luck to all.

WooThemes Joins Automattic

Business | woothemes.com | 4 days ago

Today marks the beginning of the next exciting chapter in our journey as WooThemes. The short and sweet of it – we are joining the Automattic family! Read more about this from WooThemes co-founders, Mark and Magnus and from Matt Mullenweg of Automattic. What does this mean for our customers? If you’re using WooThemes products (extensions, themes, or other) your licenses and experience will continue as before and there is no reason to worry. In the coming weeks and months you can expect business as usual from WooThemes, now with the added power of Automattic behind everything we do. For support, continue to reach out to us in the same way you always have done.
What does this mean for our team? The Woo ninjas are not going anywhere! They’ll continue working all around the world, with exciting opportunities for learning and growth through the cross-pollination of Automattic’s and our engineering, support and marketing teams.
In 2008, as three strangers in three countries, we set out on a quest to pioneer WordPress commercial theming, never dreaming of the rocket-propelled voyage into the self-hosted eCommerce unknown that lay ahead. It’s been an incredible ride, backed by a unique community,

6 min read Luis Godinho
Business | gravityview.co | 3 days ago

GravityView has passed $100k in sales

For a premium plugin, it is quite amazing to get this in less than 1 year: the numbers and the lessons learned!

GravityView has passed $100k in sales

Business | gravityview.co | 3 days ago

GravityView went on sale July 24, 298 days ago. Yesterday, GravityView passed $100,000 in sales. I’d like to go over a few numbers and take a look back over the past 10 months and share some of what I’ve learned. Here’s the $100,000 number broken down:
$100,850 in sales
1,172 sales
66 refunds
32 affiliate referral sales (with $1,150 in payouts)
The plugin’s been doing well: April was the second-best month yet after the launch month, and May is on track to be our best month ever.
Plugin support
We moved support desks in January, so the stats may be a bit inaccurate, but here they are:
1,323 resolved support requests
3,780 responses
98% happiness rating (from 105 rated replies)
Average first response time: 16 minutes 47 seconds
Average support resolution time: 11h 13m
Average support requests per day: 6
Busiest day: Tuesday (it is Floaty’s favorite day, after all!)
Busiest time: 12-3pm Mountain
We’re working on improving our documentation and adding video tutorials. I hope this will help streamline our support process.
Code & Updates
We’ve been feverishly working on improving the plugin. Over the life of the project, we’ve released:
32 plugin updates
1,819 code commits from 6 contributors

13 min read Ahmad Awais
Community | carlalexander.ca | 2 days ago

Thoughts on WordPress and the MVC pattern

Each attempt took the MVC pattern and tried to shoehorn it into WordPress. They didn’t take in consideration how WordPress works. It isn’t something that you can neglect or ignore. Does WP API changes this?

Thoughts on WordPress and the MVC pattern

Community | carlalexander.ca | 2 days ago

Getting proficient with object-oriented programming can feel like falling down a rabbit hole. You break down problems into more and more classes. You feel like it’s neverending and that you could go on forever. You need guidance to make sense of it all. This is where architectural patterns come in. They’re similar to software design patterns which you use to solve a specific problem. In contrast, you use an architectural pattern to address a set of them at once.
This confers certain benefits to architectural patterns. You get a higher level view of how your classes interact with each other. You then have an easier time piecing everything together.
This is why it’s not uncommon for developers to skip over software design patterns. Instead, they start looking into architectural patterns right away. This is even something I’m guilty of doing (insert audience gasp).
One of the most important architectural patterns is the “model-view-controller” (known as MVC). It’s used by most modern frameworks from Rails to Angular. But does it have a place in WordPress?
So what is the MVC pattern?
The MVC pattern divides your application into three broad components: Models, Views and Controllers. These

4 min read Matt Cromwell
Business | ma.tt | 4 days ago

Woo & Automattic

Matt's announcement really drives home how big this news is. The video production, the data. Automattic is taking Shopify head-on and with gusto.

ma.tt |

Woo & Automattic

Business | ma.tt | 4 days ago

For years, we’ve been working on democratizing publishing, and today more people have independent sites built on open source software than ever before in the history of the web. Now, we want to make it easy for anyone to sell online independently, without being locked into closed, centralized services — to enable freedom of livelihood along with freedom of expression. It’s not a new idea: at a WordCamp a few years ago, someone stood up and asked me when we were going to make it as easy to create an online store as we’d made it to create a blog. Everyone applauded; there’s long been demand for better ecommerce functionality, but it’s been outside the scope of what Automattic could do well.
That changes today — drum roll — as WooCommerce joins the Automattic team to make it easier for people to sell online. Along with Woo’s announcement, here’s a short video explaining more:
In the past few years, WooCommerce really distinguished itself in its field. Just like WordPress as a whole, it developed a robust community around its software, and its products meet the needs of hundreds of thousands of people around the world.
Woo is also a team after Automattic’s own distributed heart: WooCommerce

Business | managewp.com | 2 days ago

ManageWP Orion Client Reports and the road ahead

A preview of the client reports tool in ManageWP Orion as well as some pretty cool new tech we are building for automatic plugin recoveries.

ManageWP Orion Client Reports and the road ahead

Business | managewp.com | 2 days ago

Clients love reports when they are done right. Most of your clients don’t care about the gritty details; they just care about the sense of security you give them. It doesn’t matter whether you store backups in two different geographical locations or whether you check malware on a daily or weekly basis. What matters is that you hold up your end of the bargain. The client report is a perfect way to impress your clients by going above and beyond their expectations. The old ManageWP client report lacked the depth and visual appeal it needed to impress users. When Orion went into development, we decided that the Orion client report would be beautiful and highly informative and that it would give you the “wow” factor to justify the cost of your service.
The Client Report: What We’ve Done So Far
Orion testers are already familiar with the client report because it’s been included in the closed beta from the start. This is how one of the pages looks:
Just like the Orion dashboard, everything is clean, functional, and appealing. We’ve also made creating the client report as simple as possible:
Pick the website you want in your report
Pick the report content (such as backups, updates, analytics,

8 min read Josh Pollock
Plugins | torquemag.io | 20 hours ago

Using the Visibility API to Optimize Dynamic WordPress Development

Learn how to run JavaScript only when the page is active, a major bonus for UX and reducing server load when using AJAX.

Using the Visibility API to Optimize Dynamic WordPress Development

Plugins | torquemag.io | 20 hours ago

It isn’t uncommon for people to have multiple windows open (each with multiple tabs) while browsing the Internet. In fact, they may even have multiple browsers running. As web developers, we tend to do a lot of things when a page first loads—animations, starting videos, opening modals, starting slide shows, etc. We know that when a page loads, and when it is actually viewed are not often the same event. For example, if a link to your site is opened to a new tab it could be minutes, hours, or even days until it is actually viewed.
This creates two problems. A good example of one of these problems is a video that you want to automatically play. This is very easy to do on page load, but if someone opens the page in another tab, they might not actually open the tab until the video is over.
The other problem this creates is when a page needs to make an AJAX request back to a server on a regular interval. If the page is open in an unused tab, a hidden window, or an inactive browser, it could result in a lot of unnecessary server requests. This was the exact issue I faced when working with Postmatic on their new live templating plugin, Epoch.
Every fifteen seconds, Epoch automatically counts

8 min read Matteo Duò
Editorials | codeable.io | 2 days ago

What to do when you need help with WordPress

You just don’t shoot some keywords on forums and wait for people to bring up all the answers. You need to do your part as well.

What to do when you need help with WordPress

Editorials | codeable.io | 2 days ago

It happened to everyone, at least once: you're experiencing an issue on your WordPress website. A new plugin you installed that conflicts with your installation, a custom code your wrongly added in the functions.php file. Whatever could go wrong, it did. At that moment, we find ourself sweating bullets because we think we've broken our website (or at least a part of it). Novices to development and WordPress may even freak out a little. Inevitably everyone does what's best in these case: they look for help.
WordPress has no phone number to call to get help, nor a plugin to install and fix everything instantly. As in many activities, there’s always a bad (poor) and a good (effective) way to do things. And asking for help with WordPress is no exception. Let's see how.
Think about what you did
Something went wrong, and you're experiencing some issues. Before looking for help immediately, you should try to understand what caused the problem and try to think backward to what you did right before it occurred. Most common problems can fall under one of these categories:
WordPress fail update
Plugin conflicts with other plugins or themes
Incorrect syntax or missing part of code
Trying to understand

5 min read Eric Karkovack
Editorials | speckyboy.com | 2 days ago

Standing Tall in the Face of WordPress Security Scares

Some thoughts on the security scares, and easy things you can do to harden your site.

Standing Tall in the Face of WordPress Security Scares

Editorials | speckyboy.com | 2 days ago

If you’ve paid any attention at all to WordPress related news over the past month or so, you know that there have been some security vulnerabilities discovered (like this, this, and this and yeah, this too.). Not only did they affect WordPress itself, but a large number of plugins as well. Sure, it’s serious stuff. Maybe even a little bit scary. At the end of the day, all of these security issues reflect the world we live in. The information age is wonderful, but it also means that there’s probably some bot out there trying to hack into your internet-connected toaster. Even large, expensive government networks get the same mistreatment.
That being said, is it any surprise that a website, regardless of which software platform it’s on, has vulnerabilities? I recently had an interesting conversation with a colleague about someone who created their own rudimentary content management system (CMS) to run their client’s sites. While that home-grown CMS might not necessarily be the target of as many botnets as WordPress, there’s no doubt there’s a security flaw in there somewhere.
My point is, everything and everyone is vulnerable to some degree. But here’s the thing: In large part, both the

12 min read Roy Sivan
Community | roysivan.com | 3 days ago

Level up, or get out of the WordPress bubble before it pops

WordPress has been attracting all sorts of consultants for years. As the average price point drops to account for the influx of all the new consultants who want to build websites as cheap as possible, is it time to move on from WordPress in order to still be lucrative? Can you still make a good living with WordPress?

Level up, or get out of the WordPress bubble before it pops

Community | roysivan.com | 3 days ago

I was having a conversation a few days ago about WordPress, primarily revolving around Brandon Y’s article about service rates being lowered for WordPress work. I have written my personal opinion of developer vs. programmer/implementor and tend to agree, but what does the future hold for WordPress? I talked about the WordPress divide, as it moves more towards people using it for higher end web applications and even mobile applications. However, what I want to look at is the big picture, will WordPress continue to be a viable CMS to make a living? Warning: This is an opinion piece if I can’t share it on my own blog, what is the point?
The pay rate gap between high and low-end quality work will narrow
When you are looking to get a website for your business built, you have a few options when it comes to hiring a consultant. I did some research and as a case study used 1 project. It is a simple business website with about 10 unique pages of static content and 2 areas for regularly updated content (news/blog and tips). Here are the options I had:
Large Agency – usually has 20+ employees, office space (if not multiple offices) – $20,000+
Medium Agency – usually has 2-5 employees, small or

5 min read Tom Harrigan
Community | wptavern.com | 4 days ago

Automattic Acquires WooCommerce

Can't express how excited I am for the Woo team today. This picture, with so many I respect and have learned from over the years, brought a smile to my face and I can't wait to see WC as a service on .com and growing with the power of A8C driving it.

Automattic Acquires WooCommerce

Community | wptavern.com | 4 days ago

Automattic CEO Matt Mullenweg announced today that the company has acquired WooCommerce, WordPress’ most popular e-commerce platform. The plugin recently passed seven million downloads and stats from BuiltWith show that WooCommerce is dominating global e-commerce platforms, powering roughly 30% of all online stores. This is Automattic’s largest acquisition to date, bringing 55 new employees into the company from 16 countries for a total of 370 Automatticians. Mullenweg confirmed that the acquisition includes Woo, Sensei, and all of the other plugins and themes.
Given WooCommerce’s extensive adoption on the web, Automattic will not be re-branding the newly acquired products. WooThemes and WooCommerce will continue to be sold via their dedicated websites.
“We’re planning on retaining (and growing) the WooCommerce brand,” Mullenweg told the Tavern. “The plan is to keep what has been working going.”
Mullenweg has spoken frequently over the years about growing Automattic’s reach into global commerce, but few could have predicted that the company would acquire Woo as opposed to building its own in-house commerce platform.
“They have a full team that goes to bed every night and wakes up in

3 min read Vova Feldman
Business | buytaert.net | 22 hours ago

Why WooMattic is big news for small businesses

Interesting read about the recent acquisition of WooThemes from the perspective of Dries Buytaert, the founder of Drupal.

Why WooMattic is big news for small businesses

Business | buytaert.net | 22 hours ago

Earlier this week Matt Mullenweg, founder and CEO of Automattic, parent company of WordPress.com, announced the acquisition of WooCommerce. This is a very interesting move that I think cements the SMB/enterprise positioning between WordPress and Drupal. As Matt points out a huge percentage of the digital experiences on the web are now powered by open source solutions: WordPress, Joomla and Drupal. Yet one question the acquisition may evoke is: "How will open source platforms drive ecommerce innovation in the future?".
Larger retailers with complex requirements usually rely on bespoke commerce engines or built their online stores on solutions such as Demandware, Hybris and Magento. Small businesses access essential functions such as secure transaction processing, product information management, shipping and tax calculations, and PCI compliance from third-party solutions such as Shopify, Amazon's merchant services and increasingly, solutions from Squarespace and Wix.
I believe the WooCommerce acquisition by Automattic puts WordPress in a better position to compete against the slickly marketed offerings from Squarespace and Wix, and defend WordPress's popular position among small businesses.

7 min read Donna Fontenot
Community | wptavern.com | 2 days ago

Hookr Enters Beta with New UI and Support for 800+ Plugins and Themes

I think I saw Hookr a while back, but now it's memorable. This could be very useful for working with plugins, especially.

Hookr Enters Beta with New UI and Support for 800+ Plugins and Themes

Community | wptavern.com | 2 days ago

Last April, Christopher Sanford launched Hookr, a WordPress hook/API reference for developers. He initially wrote the parser/indexer for his own use, to improve efficiency in his work, and was inspired to make it a public resource. “I have been professionally working with WordPress since 2.8, but most of which I would describe as ‘superficial development,'” Sanford said. “It wasn’t until later, roughly WordPress 3.5, that a large-scale WordPress project came along.
“I found myself spending an obscene amount of time either digging through code within my IDE, or performing countless Google searches, in order to uncover/understand various hooks, functions, constants etc. So, I wrote a plugin that would index the application/site it was installed within– this was the first iteration of Hookr.”
As a developer whose career is not based in the WordPress ecosystem, Sandford didn’t know what to expect when he tested the waters with his new public resource for developers. After several months in alpha, the traffic and feedback were enough to convince him to invest in performance improvements and an overhaul of the UI.
“The alpha version of the site was truly alpha – the UI was a complete afterthought,

5 min read Oli Dale
Business | wplift.com | 4 days ago

Transparency in WordPress: Public Income Reports Roundup May 2015

A roundup of different WordPress companies and bloggers who share their income statistics publicly.

Transparency in WordPress: Public Income Reports Roundup May 2015

Business | wplift.com | 4 days ago

I have previously looked at WordPress companies and Bloggers who publicly share their stats and income reports and those posts did really well – people love to read posts with this information as it is rare for people to share this publicly usually. I also find these posts fascinating and inspiring so decided to make this a regular feature where I roundup these income stats posts and share with our readers. I would like to add more sites to this roundup so please let me know if I have missed any companies or bloggers and I will include them in the next post.
CodeinWP
CodeinWP are the company behind Themeisle, in their first income report they posted revenue of $32k in February. They released their second report where they have smashed that are recorded incomes of over $60k between march 1st and april 1st – an impressive increase of 85% over the previous month. In their report they detail that the majority of income is from one theme which is doing really well on the WordPress directory and they talk about some A/B testing they carried out which improved conversions for them.
WPRocket
WPRocket are a WordPress cache plugin, in their latest report post they say that they shipped 10 new

Business | wpsitecare.com | 4 days ago

Why Blog Comments Still Matter (Perhaps) More Than Ever

This is an awesome guest post from Jason at Postmatic, talking about the importance of blog posts not only for discussion, but also as a marketing opportunity. Check out his thoughts and leave a comment of your own ;)

Why Blog Comments Still Matter (Perhaps) More Than Ever

Business | wpsitecare.com | 4 days ago

This is a guest post from Jason Lemieux over at Postmatic, and we’re totally onboard with his message. Blog comments do still matter in a big way. Check out his thoughts and share your own after you’ve had a chance to read through this awesome post People in the content marketing space often talk about “content being king”. While it’s true content delivers the opportunity to promote a product, service, launch, company news, event or more – it’s one way. You’re still broadcasting – and wasn’t the goal of social media and, by association, content, to move away from the bad old days or broadcast media and into two-way dialogue with your customers?
Enter blog comments. Specifically, enter WordPress blog comments. Why? Simple. Commenting in WordPress is an untapped opportunity. Increased blog engagement raises SEO performance, strengthens your brand, and builds a community around your ideas. And that’s just for starters.
And yet, still the argument is there for switching off blog comments. A lot of blogs have gone ahead and implemented this move recently. Comments become disabled, and desperate-looking boxes jump at you to ask for your email address – without wanting your opinion.
While

Community | wpdailythemes.com | 2 days ago

WP Daily Themes Weekly WordPress Roundup #10

This week in WordPress took by the current acquisition of WooThemes by Automattic. Further, a Content SEO book by Yoast, customizing WordPress theme, HTML to WordPress and more.

WP Daily Themes Weekly WordPress Roundup #10

Community | wpdailythemes.com | 2 days ago

Today, I woke up with the big news in my feed saying Automattic acquired WooThemes. Makers of the biggest e-commerce platform (WooCommerce) were enjoying the announcement blowed up on the internet with the co-founder of WordPress, Matt Mullenweg.
Matt also shared some pictures for the jolted moments.
Being a part of the WordPress community, many questions were raised in my mind when I read about this acquisition. In the meantime, I received an email from WP Tavern sharing the statements of Matt Mullenweg on the news.
It answers all my concerns. I noted down both the questions and their answers here:
1 – Is it about WooCommerce or all the products of WooThemes?
“Mullenweg confirmed that the acquisition includes Woo, Sensei, and all of the other plugins and themes.”
2 – Does WooCommerce will be rolled in Jetpack?
“Jetpack could definitely complement WooCommerce (and WooThemes), but not the other way around.”
3 – What will happen with the members of WooThemes?
“This is Automattic’s largest acquisition to date, bringing 55 new employees into the company from 16 countries for a total of 370 Automatticians.”
4 – What would be the expected cost of this acquisition?
“Sources say Automattic

Business | wpengine.com | 4 days ago

Working With WordPress

Interesting charts and graphics about the WordPress-related job market in the US.

Working With WordPress

Business | wpengine.com | 4 days ago

An Industry of Millions, Built on One Platform WordPress is the most dominant content management system on the web today. It has a diverse user base comprising personal bloggers, Fortune 500 companies, and all types of businesses in between. WordPress’s flexibility makes the platform capable of meeting almost any business’s needs. When companies rely on WordPress for their blogging and content management system needs, they’re looking for competent professionals to handle the day-to-day operations. These roles can range from theme designers and software developers to writers and system administrators.
There are so many ways to work with WordPress. What does the WordPress economy look like? Just how large is the WordPress job market, and where is it the most prominent? We wanted to find out. Using online job listings on Indeed.com for WordPress-centric positions in the U.S., we analyzed which jobs are most in demand, which states and cities are hubs of professional interest in WordPress, and which salaries are the most common. Read on to discover the nation’s hotspots for WordPress activity.
A Massive Market Share
When it comes to popular online publishing platforms, WordPress is by far

3 min read Tim Nash
Plugins | github.com | 5 days ago

royboy789/wp

Quite nice to see a WP-API example that is not theme related.

royboy789/wp

Plugins | github.com | 5 days ago

WP-API SOCIAL LOGIN We can do many awesome things with WP-API, when building CodeCavalry we needed a way to get people signed up logged in using social networks. While trying some existing plugins were not happy with the outcome and how the flow worked with our application. We created the start to a social login utilizing WP-API to more seamlessly integrate the login and registration.
This is v2 of our routes and plugin that includes a new table since some social API's don't respond with information you need to check if a user exists or create a user.
Supports GitHub Updater
API SETUP
You will need to go to Settings > Social API to configure the API's you want to use. As of now we are only supporting Facbeook, Twitter, and GitHub.
Do you want us to support more? Go to hellojs and create an issue in this GitHub repo with any supported social network and we will add it in.
USAGE
Creation of 2 endpoints for WP-API each accepts a data object array, make sure you are passing in an object named data:
var data = { user_id: XXXXXXX, user_email: XXXX@YYY.com }
LOGIN ENDPOINT
/social_login - use this to login an existing user, will do a check if user exists and return WP Error if no user found

22 min read Mark Gavalda

Why Learning to Code is So Damn Hard

Although not strictly WordPress related, I think this is a great resource to get at a least a general understanding of a developer's "life", how tough it is to get really good and why you should (need to?) pay well for a job well done.

Why Learning to Code is So Damn Hard

Quincy Larson was just a "guy in a suit in an office" and decided he wanted to learn how to code. So he asked around. He started by picking up a bit of Ruby then found himself skimming through other languages like Scala, Clojure and Go. He learned Emacs then Vim and even the Dvorak keyboard layout. He picked up Linux, dabbled in Lisp and coded in Python while living on the command line for more than half a year. Like a leaf in a tornado, the advice Quincy received jerked him first one way and then another and then another until he'd finally taken "every online course program imaginable". By the end of it all, despite having ultimately landed a software development job, Quincy:
... was convinced that the seemingly normal programmers I ran into were actually sociopaths who had experienced, then repressed, the trauma of learning to code.
Ouch. Does that sound familiar?
Phase I: The Hand-Holding Honeymoon
It's really hard to blame anyone for coming into the programming industry with outrageous expectations.
On the one hand, you've heard rumors of how difficult programming is since you were young, like old wives tales meant to scare children into studying social sciences instead.
On the

Business | medium.com | 5 days ago

Why every new employee should do customer support

Great insights by Mel. This is the best way to onboard any employee whether an engineer or manager.

Why every new employee should do customer support

Business | medium.com | 5 days ago

I was recently hired at Automattic as a Design Engineer. All new hires are required to spend three weeks as a Happiness Engineer, answering support tickets for WordPress.com. No exceptions. I know what you’re thinking — a designer, doing support? I wasn’t hired for this! That’s not my job, this is pointless!
That’s where you’d be wrong. Do you know why? Doing support is awesome. It’s probably the best thing you could have your new hires do. It’s been tremendously more effective in introducing me to Automattic than any new hire orientation I’ve gone through, and here’s why.
You learn your product faster
Part of any new job is fumbling around, trying to figure out the ins-and-outs of your product or service. Only now, guess what — now you get to do it for someone else! And you’d damn well better do it right!
After two days of training with full-time Happiness Engineers, new employees are thrown right into the fire of support forums and tickets and oh god I don’t know anything about domains, I better figure that shit out asap. No sir, I have no idea why your theme isn’t working, guess I should set up a test blog and try it out for myself.
I’m going to be honest: when I started, I had only