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3 min read Donna Cavalier
Business | medium.com | 17 hours ago

Tailor Page Builder Under New Management – Tailor: Free Page Builder – Medium

Nice to see a company take over for a developer who is unable to manage the load. Best of luck to them all.

Tailor Page Builder Under New Management – Tailor: Free Page Builder – Medium

Business | medium.com | 17 hours ago

Tailor Page Builder Under New Management Tailor was launched by Andrew Worsfold in April 2016. Since then a lot of work has gone into it, resulting in many updates and new features. Currently Tailor has three extensions (all free) which each add further functionality and features. It has been acknowledged by some key players in the WordPress community and have received a lot of positive feedback overall.
Tailor needs more time and efforts!
Until now Andrew has been doing all of the work on Tailor, but moving forward Tailor needs more time, money and a bigger team to manage it. As a result of other commitments, Andrew has not been able to maintain the rapid pace of development that he desires (and the plugin demands), which is why the team at Enclavely has taken over. They will be dedicated to delivering bug fixes and new features, ensuring that Tailor has a bright future.
Who is the new management?
Tailor has been acquired by Enclavely, inc. Enclavely is a startup founded by two experienced and skilled friends Munir Kamal and Essa Mamdani. Both were early adopters of Tailor and have been supporting Tailor since the beginning. They’ve got the necessary skills and experience needed

Business | zachskaggs.com | 1 day ago

Ask Your Users These 3 Questions to Improve Your Customer Support

3 questions to make your Support inquiries crystal clear and easier to answer by Zach Skaggs, "Director of Happiness" at Ninja Forms

Business | zao.is | 2 days ago

The WordPress Economy is Changing

Justin Sainton shares his thoughts on the shifting WP economy and what it means for businesses moving forward.

zao.is |

The WordPress Economy is Changing

Business | zao.is | 2 days ago

Not too long ago, Post Status’ newsletter covering Rainmaker’s move from a SaaS product model to a service-only model served as the catalyst for a lot of conversation on Twitter. We saw the esteemed Brad Williams tweet this thought about the WordPress economy: Definitely seeing a slow-down in the WordPress economy this year, but not many people want to publicly admit it. From @post_status… pic.twitter.com/DdmDTWhLc8
And it sparked a conversation in the Zao Slack about the WordPress economy and how this impacts us, too.
Zao has been around for over a decade, and we’ve seen the WordPress economy grow and expand during that time. We’ve watched many amazing businesses pop up, incredible developers thrive, and observed the expansion of open-source software’s role in business and tech overall. So far, it has been a wild ride.
In some ways, the WordPress economy has slowed down, especially in the product space, and likely in the service space as well. More than anything, though, I believe this to be a correction, rather than a real dip in the WP economy.
WordPress has been booming for the last eight to ten years, with the last five being especially lucrative

Community | managewp.com | 2 days ago

Safe Updates now come with an automatic restore

ManageWP's Safe Updates feature just added the ability to automatically roll back an unsuccessful WordPress core/plugin/theme update.

Safe Updates now come with an automatic restore

Community | managewp.com | 2 days ago

Since we released the Safe Updates feature we have gotten a lot of positive feedback from you all. Making updates safer is something that we have been prioritizing recently, and right now we are back with an additional perk; the rollback option. In a nutshell, if we detect any type of issue during the update, you are now able to enjoy a fully automatic rollback to its original state. Safe Updates ensures your update of WordPress core, plugins and themes is safer than ever. Let’s quickly recap how Safe Updates are performed.
It’s a 7 step process:
Step one – creating a restore point for your website
Step two is sending HTTP requests to the website before the actual update to make sure everything is working smoothly on your website
Step three – creates a before screenshots of your website
Step four is running the updates
Step five we send a HTTP request again to check your website response after the update
Step six we take an after update screenshot of your website
Step seven is your option to go in and see the screenshot comparison
What’s the rollback option?
The rollback option is an automatic restore in case something goes wrong during the update. The

15 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 4 days ago

How to Stop a DDoS Attack in Its Tracks (Case Study)

DDoS attacks are getting more frequent, but what should you do when your WordPress site is under attack?

How to Stop a DDoS Attack in Its Tracks (Case Study)

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 4 days ago

In our last case study, we showed you how we cleaned up a negative SEO attack on Kinsta. Today we are going to show you some steps and troubleshooting we took to stop a DDoS attack on a small WordPress e-commerce site. DDoS attacks can come out of nowhere and smaller sites are usually even more vulnerable, as they aren’t prepared to deal with it when it happens. Let us ask you this question. If your site was attacked tomorrow, what would you do? If you don’t have any ideas, then perhaps you should bookmark and read this article. What is a DDoS Attack?
DDoS is short for distributed denial of service. The primary purpose of a DDoS attack is to simply overwhelm your web server and either cripple it or take it down. One of the frustrating things with these types of attack is generally the attacker doesn’t gain anything and typically nothing is hacked. The big problem with DDoS attacks is with the overwhelming load associated with it. Most likely you will also see your bandwidth spike to an incredible amount, and this could cost you hundreds or even thousands of dollars. If you are on a cheaper or shared host, this can easily result in a suspension of your account.
On October

24 min read Aline
Community | brinzan.com | 5 days ago

Inside WordPress.org Theme Review Team: Money, Abuse and Inconsistent Leadership

Dumitru Brînzan shares his experience with releasing free WordPress themes on WordPress.org while dealing with theme name collisions and other issues.

Inside WordPress.org Theme Review Team: Money, Abuse and Inconsistent Leadership

Community | brinzan.com | 5 days ago

This post is about the Team Review Team (TRT) at WordPress.org, which I am (still) a small part of. I would like to address some weird things that have been going on lately in this team and what it looks like from a distance. I might be burning some bridges with this post, but if someone needs to take “one for the team”, so be it.
The Basics of WordPress.org Theme Repository
With 4,860 of free themes (at the time of writing this), the official WordPress.org Theme Repository (short: “repository”) is the first thing that any WordPress adopter sees and is probably one of the main reasons why WordPress grew to what it is today.
You can sort the themes in the repository by 3 main filters: Featured, Popular, Latest.
Latest (Themes)
Latest is pretty straightforward: the newest themes are at the top, the oldest themes are at the bottom. I believe that this page is not very useful to end-users, as a theme’s usefulness doesn’t depend on how new it is, 1 week old or 3 months old.
Featured (Themes)
Featured is the starting page for the Themes Repository, this is what users see first.
Contrary to popular belief the themes are not screened or moderated in any way.

10 min read Ryan D. Sullivan
Business | wpsitecare.com | 2 days ago

Why We Use Google's G Suite For Email

For a lot of people here this is going to seem obvious, but there's a lot that goes into the decision-making process when you're thinking about an email provider. Here's why we chose G Suite and why we think it's a great option for small businesses.

Why We Use Google's G Suite For Email

Business | wpsitecare.com | 2 days ago

Last week I told you about the tools we use to run our business, and this week, I’m going to go in-depth to tell you all about G Suite and why we use it as the communication backbone for our business. G Suite has gone through a bit of an identity crisis over the years. The name has changed several times. However, the product remains rock solid even if the marketing team at Google struggles to make up their mind.
I’m not going to show you how to setup and use G Suite in this blog post. I’m going to explain why we use G Suite instead of the many alternatives out there. Check out our guide for configuring the proper Gmail SMTP settings if you’re looking for more of a technical guide.
Not a Bandwagon Decision
First, I feel it’s important you know that we don’t use G Suite because “that’s what everyone uses”. We looked into all sorts of email systems before deciding on G Suite five years ago, and ultimately landed on it for a number of reasons that we’ll get into below.
We’re a company that’s slow to drink the Kool-aid for things that are hip and new. We know that software impacts people so we really try and be deliberate

10 min read Iain Poulson

How to Develop a WordPress Plugin Using Webpack 3 & React (Part 1)

Have you ever wondered what all the Webpack fuss is about? Well we’ve got you covered! In this post Peter goes over how to configure Webpack 3 for WordPress plugin development and lay the groundwork for a React-powered wp-admin page.

How to Develop a WordPress Plugin Using Webpack 3 & React (Part 1)

If you’ve been working with JavaScript in the last couple years you’ve probably heard of Webpack. It’s pretty essential in today’s JavaScript workflow and has taken the spot of other build tools like Grunt and Gulp. The WordPress core team is planning to switch to Webpack, so I thought it was high-time to see how Webpack could be integrated into a plugin development workflow. In this article, we’ll go over how to build a React plugin interface using Webpack and all (well, most of) the bells and whistles. I’ve released the starter plugin on Github so you can follow along with a live example.
What is Webpack Anyway?
Ok so what the heck is Webpack anyway? In short, Webpack is an asset bundler, which means it bundles your JavaScript, CSS, images and other assets together into one file.
Wait, what?
Why would you want this? Well the purpose of Webpack really boils down to the concept of code splitting and application structure. With ES2015, you can import assets and dependencies quite easily and with Webpack and the appropriate loader, you can even import CSS/Sass/Less and images with your JavaScript.
For example, with the style and css loaders you can

15 min read Iain Poulson
Development | torquemag.io | 3 days ago

A Practical Guide to Unit Testing Your Code

I've read lots of articles about unit testing PHP code, but never really 'got it' until recently. I wrote this post as a practical guide for testing your code, how to test, what to test and what to do if you can't test.

A Practical Guide to Unit Testing Your Code

Development | torquemag.io | 3 days ago

I’ve lost count of the number of posts I’ve read about unit testing; how to set it up, why you should do it, and what tools to use. It’s something I’ve been pushing myself to do and get better at but I’ve always struggled to translate what I’ve read about testing into writing tests for my own code. However, recently I feel like the principles I’ve been reading about are finally clicking in my brain and I’ve actually been able to successfully write unit tests for my code, including legacy codebases that I had previously thought were untestable. Recently, I’ve been working on changes to the internal plugin that extends the WooCommerce API on the Delicious Brains site. Previously the plugin had no unit tests and was a large, messy class with all the functionality stored inside it. The plugin allows our premium products to communicate with WooCommerce on the site for licensing and subscriptions and therefore extremely critical to our business. Before making large changes I decided to get some tests written, as well as perform some necessary refactoring. This post will serve as a practical guide to writing unit tests – what to test

15 min read Codeinwp
Community | codeinwp.com | 5 days ago

2017 WordPress Hosting Survey - Here's What Users Actually Think

The most comprehensive WordPress hosting survey up to date - 4,750 end users chip in

2017 WordPress Hosting Survey - Here's What Users Actually Think

Community | codeinwp.com | 5 days ago

That being said, the way we host our sites and the way most “WordPress insiders” host theirs, isn’t at all what casual users do. As it turns out, most people host with GoDaddy, Bluehost, and HostGator. And you know what? … They’re loving it!
(At least that’s what they say.)
We’ve just concluded our 2017 WordPress hosting survey (a much larger survey than last year’s), and the results are quite stunning, or highly interesting, to say the least.
2017 WordPress hosting survey results:
Here’s what people say when asked two simple questions: “What hosting company do you use?” and “How likely are you to recommend it?”
Top rated mainstream WordPress hosting companies
Host
Rating
Votes
HostGator
8.02 / 10
456
Bluehost
7.93 / 10
450
GoDaddy
7.64 / 10
734
We’ve had more than 4,750 valid answers in this 2017 WordPress hosting survey, and these three companies have gathered the most votes by far. And, as you can see, the people using these platforms seem to be very happy with what they’re getting.
Of course, the survey wasn’t only about GoDaddy, Bluehost, and HostGator. The respondents actually mentioned

Community | react-etc.net | 6 days ago

React.js - Apache Foundation bans use of Facebook BSD+Patents licensed libraries like React.js

Apache Foundation has taken a stance against using React.js and other popular software using this license. This may be of relevance for projects like Gutenberg and Calypso that use React as I'm not sure that the license questions were ever addressed. The Apache Foundation asked Facebook if they would consider changing the license.

1 min read Ahmad Awais
Community | stateofjs.com | 3 days ago

The State Of JavaScript

If you JavaScript, then you should do this too! — JS State!

The State Of JavaScript

Community | stateofjs.com | 3 days ago

Last year, over nine thousand developers took part in the first ever edition of the State Of JavaScript survey. And now, we're doing it again: from React to Polymer, from Service Workers to Webpack, let's find out together which buzzwords are here to stay and which ones will soon fall to JavaScript fatigue!
Note: to improve results relevance, we keep track of anonymous information such as your referrer, location, device, browser, and OS.

2 min read Ahmad Awais
Development | ahmadawais.com | 8 days ago

Introducing Gutenberg Boilerplate!

Folks, I have released yet another open source project. A Gutenberg Boilerplate to build Blocks! I have written an extensive post about it, in the post I have also share my thoughts on the Gutenberg Editor, the dependency hell, license paradox, and stuff. — Have at it!

Introducing Gutenberg Boilerplate!

Development | ahmadawais.com | 8 days ago

Gutenberg is all that you hear about in the WordPress community nowadays. Everyone is writing articles on how they feel about Gutenberg. I was one of the early adopters and contributors in the Gutenberg project. I have had been writing about it (invitation to contribute) and covering the meeting notes for the project. When folks started writing about Gutenberg I wanted to do the same, but I was on vacations, visiting my parents, and enjoying Eid holidays. But that’s not all; I stopped myself from writing anything because I have been a bit confused.
I am still making up my mind with how Gutenberg will fit in the WordPress core. There are so many things which are both good and bad about it. So, instead of ranting about it, I wanted to do something more productive. And I went ahead, studied the source code, received a lot of help from Gutenberg contributors (Matias Ventura, James Nylen, Riad Benguella, Andrew Duthie, Joen, etc.) to finally build a Gutenberg Boilerplate project.

11 min read Iain Poulson

Create a Messenger Bot with a WordPress Backend

Chatbots are becoming more and more relevant these days, with large companies hopping on the bandwagon in an effort to cater to audiences who are more at home on Facebook Messenger than they are in Gmail. Well, Jeff jumped on the bandwagon as well and started hacking together bots using WordPress as their backend. He's even put together a plugin that will help you start writing bot code in just a couple of minutes without having to wrestle with Facebook’s APIs.

Create a Messenger Bot with a WordPress Backend

Bots are all the rage these days. They call us while we’re eating dinner, they merge our data for us, they take part in our elections, and they’re taking over Facebook Messenger. As a wannabe bot creator myself, I couldn’t resist the hype any longer, so I started tinkering with Facebook’s Messenger Platform to see what it would take to start chatting with my own code. Introducing WPFBBotKit
Messenger Platform is essentially just a JSON API and like many APIs, I found that there’s quite a bit of boilerplate–the digital equivalent of handshakes and small-talk–required to get started. So rather than put you through all of that, I decided to create WPFBBotKit, a WordPress plugin that will get your WP-backed bot ready to chat as quickly as possible.
One major caveat before we get started: We will not be creating “smart” bots. While it’s definitely possible with NLP and Deep Learning, we’re just going to make a simple bot that will try to drive traffic to our website by giving users something to read.
Setting Up
To get started, we’ll need a WordPress site with SSL support since the Messenger platform requires an HTTPS

Editorials | kevinmuldoon.com | 6 days ago

Hey WordPress Companies - Don't Forget About Your Customers

An interesting read about how the WordPress ecosystem is changing and companies such as WooCommerce and EDD are raising prices. How does this affect the consumer? Are they being left out of these decisions?

Hey WordPress Companies - Don't Forget About Your Customers

Editorials | kevinmuldoon.com | 6 days ago

I have been reviewing WordPress themes and plugins actively since 2007 and have always been aware of all the major players in the industry; however my experience at WordCamp Europe last month in Paris opened my eyes to so many WordPress companies I was never been aware of. There are so many new companies fighting for a piece of the WordPress pie.
One way to look at it is that the WordPress market is much more competitive today than it was just a few years ago. Others would argue that the market has become saturated.
With more people fighting for a share of the premium WordPress market, we are seeing many companies change the structure of their business in order to survive. Along the way, I believe many companies are forgetting about the customer.
Watch my video below to hear my thoughts on this issue.
Prefer to read my thoughts? Keep reading on

Community | kinsta.com | 6 days ago

Interview with Scott Bolinger of AppPresser

Check out this interview with Scott Bolinger; co-founder of AppPresser, a tool that lets you convert your WordPress website into iOS and Android mobile apps. "It used to be rare to have a 7 figure WordPress product business, but that is changing quickly." -- Scott

Interview with Scott Bolinger of AppPresser

Community | kinsta.com | 6 days ago

You can find Scott on LinkedIn or Twitter . This is our recent interview with him, as part of our Kinsta Kingpin series. Q1: What is your background, & how did you first get involved with WordPress?
I didn’t grow up coding like a lot of people, I was pretty late to the game. I actually got a degree in Music (Jazz Guitar) in college, and went on to sell boats after that. I started making the website for the boat dealership I worked for around 2005, and got interested in web and graphic design. I got a job as a graphic designer, which turned into web design pretty quickly, then I went off on my own and started doing client work. I got into WordPress as an easy way to put together websites for my clients, and have been diving deeper ever since. Around 2010 I started a premium theme company, and also created a SaaS website builder for fitness professionals.
Q2: What should readers know about all the stuff you’re doing in WordPress these days?
I started AppPresser in late 2013, we released the first version of our product in January of 2014. I’ve been doing that full time ever since.
Q3: What challenges did you face in getting to where you are now professionally?
When

Community | cssigniter.com | 3 days ago

Writing effective CSS for WordPress

While CSS looks simple and fairly straightforward, anyone who embarks on authoring styles for a medium to large product with a handful of intertwined components will quickly realize that it’s a rather complicated beast to tame.

Writing effective CSS for WordPress

Community | cssigniter.com | 3 days ago

WordPress is undoubtedly a great content management platform and for the many use cases it covers it brings a lot of developer benefits on the table. Among the benefits, however, there are a handful of thorns sticking out and one of the sharpest ones is arguably CSS authoring which unfortunately can’t be blunted by the core team because it’s not inherently a fault within WordPress itself. After authoring more than a hundred massively used themes and a number of fairly popular plugins, the struggles of writing CSS for WordPress are constantly evident. This piece will attempt to identify specific problems we face as design engineers, bad practices and code smells to look out for (some of which myself very guilty of), and some thoughts and patterns on how we can improve the landscape as a community.
CSS is nuts
While CSS looks simple and fairly straightforward, anyone who embarks on authoring styles for a medium to large product with a handful of intertwined components will quickly realize that it’s a rather complicated beast to tame. One piece of evidence supporting the previous claim is merely the large amount of proposed patterns and methodologies on how to organize

5 min read Matt Cromwell
Plugins | wordimpress.com | 5 days ago

WP Rollback Version 1.5 Introduces WordPress Multisite Compatibility and more

WP Rollback version 1.5 just released and boasts multisite compatibility, changelog preview and more.

WP Rollback Version 1.5 Introduces WordPress Multisite Compatibility and more

Plugins | wordimpress.com | 5 days ago

If you’re a Super Admin of a WordPress multisite, WP Rollback version 1.5 introduces several new features that we think you’ll love. You’re welcome. Since we created WP Rollback two years ago, we’ve maintained it well by making necessary fixes and tweaks as the WordPress theme and plugin screens were updated. But generally speaking, it’s the type of plugin that needs very little day-to-day maintenance or updates. We’re sure our 30K active installs and 60+ 5-star reviews like it that way. Few updates means you just keep on using it and it keeps doing its job as intended.
We felt it was time to give the plugin a little love and introduce some nice new features. Here’s a quick overview.
Multisite Compatibility
This is the biggest update to WP Rollback since launch. WP Rollback is now fully multisite compatible. Because mult-site handles activates and updates very differently from a standard single install we had to make some important decisions to implement this well without adding a new settings screen or anything.
The problem of Admins versus Super Admins: Firstly, just making rollback available for multisite installs introduces a problem. Because

Tutorials | catapultthemes.com | 5 days ago

WordPress plugin update hook - upgrader_process_complete

How to run an action when your plugin is updated by a user, with bonus free sample plugin

WordPress plugin update hook - upgrader_process_complete

Tutorials | catapultthemes.com | 5 days ago

I had a situation recently when I wanted to let plugin users know of a change I’d made since the previous version. The best way, I think, is to use admin_notices and create a notice at the top of the admin page. But I wanted the message to appear only to users who had just updated the plugin, not to appear to users who had just installed the plugin. It turns that there is a hook, upgrader_process_complete, that allows you to do exactly this. It fires when WordPress runs an upgrade / update for themes or plugins and provides us with data on which plugins or themes have been updated.
This means that you can add an action that will run when WordPress has processed an update and check which plugins have been updated. If yours is one of them, you can display a notice to your users.
To test this out, I made a short plugin that will display a notice to users when it’s installed then display a different notice when it’s updated.
<?php
/*Plugin Name: Upgrader Process Example
Plugin URI: https://catapultthemes.com/wordpress-plugin-update-hook-upgrader_process_complete/
Description: Just an example of using upgrader_process_complete
Version: 1.0.0
Author: Catapult Themes
Author

3 min read David Bisset
Development | daily.jorb.in | 5 days ago

BRAD Plugin: Better Responsibility Around Discoverability

Not just a nice little plugin to help with search engines, but also a nice example of how the WordPress community works.

BRAD Plugin: Better Responsibility Around Discoverability

Development | daily.jorb.in | 5 days ago

Last week, I saw a tweet that identified a challenge for the WordPress UI: I REALLY wish this was easier to spot on WordPress installs. So many sites are launching with privacy enabled https://t.co/X12J8tdYVy
I wasn't alone in seeing this as an issue that was worth solving:
Knowing that plugins are best when they are built and supported by teams rather than individuals, Norcross and
I started collaborating (though in the end, the majority of the code was written by him). What we came up with a plugin to improve the experience for site creators. As the responses to Mr. Williams tweet shows, It's very common to mark a site as inaccessible to search engines and then forget to uncheck that setting when it comes time to launch.
Download BRAD TODAY
BRAD aims to solve this by moving the notice about search engine discouragement to the top of the dashboard. It also becomes a recurring dismissable notification.
Every week, there is a check to see if the site is still hidden from search engines, and if it is the notice comes back
If you change the siteurl or home options, then the notice comes back (note, you need to change these via the UI or via wp-cli, directly changing the DB)
BRAD is already

8 min read Eric Karkovack
Security | wordfence.com | 4 days ago

The WPSetup Attack: New Campaign Targets Fresh WordPress Installs

It's not safe to upload WordPress without installing it. There's a new attack to worry about.

The WPSetup Attack: New Campaign Targets Fresh WordPress Installs

Security | wordfence.com | 4 days ago

At Wordfence, we track millions of attacks from a wide variety of sources every day. From this data we create a list of the worst-of-the-worst attackers and add those to our IP blacklist to protect our Premium customers. We also carefully monitor the activity that those known bad IP addresses engage in. In May and June, we saw our worst-of-the-worst IPs start using a new kind of attack targeting fresh WordPress installations. We also had our first site cleaning customer that was hit by this attack.
Attackers scan for the following URL:
/wp-admin/setup-config.php
This is the setup URL that new installations of WordPress use. If the attacker finds that URL and it contains a setup page, it indicates that someone has recently installed WordPress on their server but has not yet configured it. At this point, it is very easy for an attacker to take over not just the new WordPress website, but the entire hosting account and all other websites on that hosting account.
The graph below shows the campaign we tracked and the number of scans per day for /wp-admin/setup-config.php that we saw from several known bad IPs:
How the WPSetup Attack Works
There are several ways you can install WordPress.

2 min read Jim Walker
Editorials | plus.google.com | 1 day ago

The WordPress 4.8 text widget debacle - 4.8.1 Beta is ready

Back in mid-June, I joined a number of discussions regarding the WordPress 4.8 text widget debacle. One such discussion...

The WordPress 4.8 text widget debacle - 4.8.1 Beta is ready

Editorials | plus.google.com | 1 day ago

https://wordpress.org/support/t... - HackRepair.com | We Fix Hacked Websites - Google+

Business | justinjackson.ca | 6 days ago

Software and SaaS – why do people buy products?

Great lesson in product marketing for WP businesses. Make sure to check out the follow up video as well.

Software and SaaS – why do people buy products?

Business | justinjackson.ca | 6 days ago

If you’re a programmer building software, or a SaaS (Software as a Service), this post should help you answer the question: “What would make someone buy my app?” This is the story of why I bought software from a guy named Peter.
(Note: if you like this post, you’ll probably like my book.)
Imagine the following scenes in my customer journey:
Scene 1: “f*ck it, we’ll do it live!”
Over the past few years, I’ve been developing a WordPress theme called Brutal. It’s a simple site design based on the brutalist aesthetic.
Initially, I made all my theme changes inside WordPress. It’s not a client project, so I wasn’t too worried about making changes on my live site. I’d just log in to WordPress admin, edit my theme, and click “update.”
Eventually, I started making mistakes. I’d change some code, screw something up, and have no way of reverting to a previous version.
I needed some version control. So I created a git repository and hosted it on GitHub.
My new process looked like this:
Open the theme files locally in Atom, my text editor.
Make my changes.
Push the changes up to GitHub.
Transfer my files to