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2 min read David McCan
Community | wptavern.com | 1 day ago

Obama Foundation Launches New Website Powered by WordPress

It's nice to see such a high profile site using WordPress. There is not a ton of content yet, but I imagine more will be added as time goes on.

Obama Foundation Launches New Website Powered by WordPress

Community | wptavern.com | 1 day ago

The Obama Foundation launched its new WordPress-powered website today. The future presidential center, which will be located in Chicago, will manage projects both in the city and other places around the world. “More than a library or a museum, it will be a living, working center for citizenship,” President Obama said. “That’s why we want to hear from you. Tell us what you want this project to be and tell us what’s on your mind.”
The website integrates the Typeform service for collecting feedback from citizens on their hopes and dreams, as well as the people and organizations that inspire them.
WordPress developers were excited to see that the former President is using the WP REST API introduced in WordPress 4.7.
Oh hai WP REST API pic.twitter.com/EBGDexNwRA
— Daniel Bachhuber (@danielbachhuber) January 20, 2017
The custom theme for the Obama Foundation is built using ZURB’s Foundation as its front-end framework. It integrates the jQuery Cycle Plugin for galleries.
The website was created by Blue State Digital, an agency that got its start on the campaign trail and now focuses on serving causes and brands.
President Obama is the first president

3 min read M Asif Rahman

Discussion: Should We Pay for Speaker Travel

This is good discussion of very old topic, if we should pay WordCamp Speaker. Look specially at the comments, here Josepha just started the discussion, participate if you are involve with foundation or organizing team.

Discussion: Should We Pay for Speaker Travel

It’s been many years since we last openly discussed the question of whether or not to pay for the travel and expenses of out-of-town speakers for WordCamps. I’ve seen a few discussions around (and have had quite a few with people, myself), so I thought it was time to have a post about it. The Background Info
Speaking at a WordCamp has always been considered a volunteer contribution. In the same way that developers donate their time writing a patch for core, speakers donate their time sharing knowledge with the greater WordPress community. If a speaker chooses to submit their talks to WordCamps where travel would be required, the expectation is that they will cover their own expenses.
The global community team stresses a local focus for WordPress events, to not only keep costs manageable, but also to foster that sense of community that makes our project so unique. We ask organizers to do the following things:
Focus on having primarily local speakers at your event
Choose high quality speakers (and presentations) over quantity
Crowdsource potential speaker suggestions from your Meetup members
The Current Info
The conversations I’ve been seeing/having lately often are

Editorials | themeisle.com | 2 days ago

PageSpeed Insights Score: Faster WordPress Hosting is More Important

Google PageSpeed Insights scores should be taken with a grain of salt. They are helpful as guidelines for optimization, but sometimes simply choosing faster WordPress hosting can be more important.

PageSpeed Insights Score: Faster WordPress Hosting is More Important

Editorials | themeisle.com | 2 days ago

You want your WordPress site to load lightning-fast. And if you’re like most of us, when you think of improving your site’s page load times to get that “lightning-fast” designation, you think of your Google PageSpeed Insights score. For many website owners, it’s their white whale. Getting a perfect score on PageSpeed Insights is the impossible quest that will magically solve all of their page speed woes.
But is a high PageSpeed Insights score the be-all and end-all of fast page load times? Sorry, but no. If your focus is on improving your site’s page load times, finding a better host will often take you further.
In this post, I’m going to run a real test to show you that high-performance hosting will do more for your page load times than endlessly striving to improve your PageSpeed Insights score.
What is Google PageSpeed Insights? Should you care?
If you’re not already familiar, PageSpeed Insights is a Google-offered tool that helps you both analyze and optimize your website’s performance for desktop and mobile visitors. Before I get into what exactly that entails, let’s talk about what PageSpeed Insights is not:
It’s

1 min read David Bisset

Theme Developer Handbook Released!

The WordPress Theme Developer Handbook has finally been released. Congrats to the almost 100 involved. Feedback welcomed.

Theme Developer Handbook Released!

Weekly Meetings As well as discussing docs issues here on the blog, we use Slack for group communication.
Individual teams have their own regular meetings – you can find details of those in the sidebar.

13 min read David Bisset
Development | blog.sucuri.net | 2 days ago

Sucuri's WordPress Performance Optimization Guide

This guide is basic, but well rounded: it should help the thought about performance and which areas to focus on.

Sucuri's WordPress Performance Optimization Guide

Development | blog.sucuri.net | 2 days ago

Since launching our website performance testing tool we have been getting a lot of questions about how to improve the speed and performance of WordPress websites. Many website owners are not aware how slow their sites are, so we are excited to help shed some light on the matter. There are a number of different resources available to help you dive into the world of performance optimization. In this article, I want to create a proper foundation for any website owner to start thinking about performance optimization.
This basic guide should help website owners understand how to think about performance and which areas to focus on. This information is designed as a high-level overview, but it is structured so that if you were interested in more data, you can follow the links provided for additional research, details, and tutorials online that help you optimize your website at every layer.
Performance – Core Domains
First, we have to understand that website performance can be divided into three domains. These areas each affect the speed of your website in different ways.
The basic performance principles for each domain can be delineated as follows:
Networking: Reduce distances
Software:

12 min read David McCan
Community | wptavern.com | 19 hours ago

Wix Removes GPL-Licensed WordPress Code from Mobile App, Forks Original MIT Library

Rather than just correcting its licensing mistake, Wix over-compensated and introduced other issues when it created a new license. The process is turning out to be a learning experience for Wix. Good reporting and analysis by Sarah Gooding.

Wix Removes GPL-Licensed WordPress Code from Mobile App, Forks Original MIT Library

Community | wptavern.com | 19 hours ago

In October 2016, Matt Mullenweg called out Wix for using GPL-licensed code from the WordPress mobile app and distributing it in its proprietary app. After identifying a path for Wix to comply with the license, Mullenweg confirmed he would be willing to go to court to protect the GPL. Wix CEO Avishai Abrahami’s response to the allegations failed to address the issue of licensing, dodging the question with references to other open source contributions. Abrahami seemed to indicate that Wix would open source its mobile app but was not clear whether it would be GPL licensed:
“We always shared and admired your commitment to give back, which is exactly why we have those 224 open source projects, and thousands more bugs/improvements available to the open source community and we will release the app you saw as well,” Abrahami said.
The Wix Twitter account also gave the impression that the entire app would be released under the GPL:
@yairwein We'll release the code on Github, where we also shared our previous projects: https://t.co/FBhp2Kd5wn
— Wix.com (@Wix) October 30, 2016
Publicly communicating these intentions bought the company time to educate its developers on the

10 min read Adi Spiac
Business | cozmoslabs.com | 3 days ago

Is business growth the best metric to focus on? Our 2016 year in review.

Some of the success, challenges and lessons learned from running our WordPress plugin business in 2016. If you're a WordPress business owner, I hope you'll find some valuable insight.

Is business growth the best metric to focus on? Our 2016 year in review.

Business | cozmoslabs.com | 3 days ago

In 2016 our plugin business had a 28% growth in revenue over the previous year. During the end of the year break, I took some time to analyze what this number really means and if this metric should be the most relevant one to focus for the years to come.
To put things in perspective, during the last 4 years, since we’ve focused on building and selling WordPress products, we saw a yearly growth with values ranging from 28% to over 100%. This came mostly due to us constantly improving our plugins, offering great support, as well as taking advantage of the growing WordPress market share.
That being said I think we tend to not appreciate enough what just went by, and simply rush to set targets for the new year. I feel this makes it more about the destination, not the journey.
That’s why I’ve decided to look back at how 2016 unwinded, in our first “year in review” post.
Plugin development
Our company revenue comes from three plugins, all of them using a freemium business model:
At the beginning of last year, shortly after launching Paid Member Subscriptions, we decided that in 2016 our main focus will be on improving and consolidating these three plugins.
I’m

10 min read Iain Poulson

Performance Best Practices in the HTTP/2 Era

It’s been an exciting couple of years for the web, with the widespread adoption of HTTP/2 and Let’s Encrypt. Not only is the web becoming faster and more secure, but it’s easier than ever for developers and site owners to implement performance and security best practices. In this article Ash takes a look at what’s new in HTTP/2 and what that means for performance best practices going into 2017.

Performance Best Practices in the HTTP/2 Era

Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) has been around since 1991, and we haven’t seen a major update since 1999, when HTTP/1.1 was released. During this time a lot of performance best practices have been passed around the web to try and circumvent some of the shortcomings in HTTP/1.1. Sites such as Pingdom and GTmetrix are the de facto when it comes to measuring a site’s performance and for the most part they’re excellent tools. However, some of their recommendations aren’t relevant in the era of HTTP/2.
What’s New?
Let’s take a look at what’s new in HTTP/2 and what that means for performance best practices going into 2017.
Fully Multiplexed
This is arguably the flagship feature of HTTP/2, which fixes one of the biggest problems with HTTP/1.1, namely head-of-line blocking. In layman’s terms it means that only one request can be outstanding on a connection at a time, resulting in latency. This is because the next request is only issued once the response to the current request has been received, resulting in a “queue” of assets to be downloaded from the server.
In an attempt to circumvent this issue a browser may open multiple TCP

6 min read Matt Medeiros
Business | plugintut.com | 2 days ago

7 Easy Digital Download add-ons that complete your e-commerce platform -

These EDD add-ons will help shape your store into a complete platform. Learn from customers, keep them coming back, and keep them buying.

7 Easy Digital Download add-ons that complete your e-commerce platform -

Business | plugintut.com | 2 days ago

Platform building is serious business. As we progress our trend of e-commerce tutorials, specifically Easy Digital Downloads, we’ll uncover why EDD should be at the heart of your own platform. Wether you’re selling one-time purchase e-books, or recurring payment to software products, choosing EDD positions you for long-term success. Couple that with the flexibility of WordPress, and you’ve got the horsepower to compete with the big boys.
Let’s dive in.
What is a platform?
Facebook, Medium, and Google — to an extent.
These are all platforms that want you to exist within their walls, contributing in-app time and content, only to see their own stock values increase. Without going crazy, the bottom line is, you don’t own the full customer experience. If you want to sell your product on Facebook, which arguably has the most eyeballs right now, you have to pay to play. Sure they have handy pixel advertising features you can harness, but ultimately, you’re in their sandbox. If you want to reach all of your hard-earned followers, ante up.
Every product company should be thinking about building their own platform to own the end-to-end customer experience.

13 min read M Asif Rahman
Editorials | poststatus.com | 1 day ago

Shaping a vision for a successful WordCamp • Post Status

This is a nice article about organizing large WordCamps. The growth and challenges.

Shaping a vision for a successful WordCamp • Post Status

Editorials | poststatus.com | 1 day ago

With the next edition of WordCamp Europe on the horizon, Jenny Beaumont finds herself thinking about event growth past and present, and about what success might look like for all of us in this new year. Editor’s note: This guest post is written by Jenny Beaumont, a co-organizer of WordCamp Paris and WordCamp Europe. She’s spent the last two decades building things in and around the web, writes a terrific newsletter, and lives in France.
One of the highlights of my year, and a fitting end to 2016 as my sabbatical drew to a close, was attending the 2nd annual WordCamp US, held December 2-4 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
The trip met my expectations in every way, from the warm-hearted nature of the locals to the super-sized portions at every delicious meal, and from the diversity of attendees to all of the extraordinary conversations I had during that short week I was in town.
“You might have noticed that this year’s programming at WordCamp US had some more of a human side, in addition to just the technical that we’ve had before,” said Matt Mullenweg, co-founder of WordPress and CEO of Automattic, during his much-anticipated State of the Word.
“I

5 min read David Bisset
Editorials | tommcfarlin.com | 4 days ago

WordPress Versus Medium: Does It Really Matter?

Shower thoughts from Tom McFarlin: when it comes to competition should we limit ourselves to a single player in publishing segment of the web?

WordPress Versus Medium: Does It Really Matter?

Editorials | tommcfarlin.com | 4 days ago

This past weekend, I spent time closing a bunch of sites, exporting content from one service to another, preparing to consolidate a couple of sites, and even shutting some sites down. But the number one thing that has resulted in a weird bit of feedback is the idea that I opted to archive my data from Medium in preparing to move it to a WordPress-based site. This resulted in some weird WordPress versus Medium points from others.
Truthfully, I know this kind of argument will never die. But I digress for now.
And, I suppose, the reason this is weird is that I – like many who use WordPress – want the control that comes with owning your data. Perhaps it’s also about playing in someone else’s sandbox, too, right?
But there’s an inherent problem with sticking only with one CMS and neglecting what the rest of the industry is doing.
WordPress Versus Medium
I don’t know anyone who considers themselves a web developer and works with WordPress and doesn’t like the extensibility that the platform offers.
But take a step back and look at WordPress from 150,000 feet. This piece of software does a lot. And that’s great, right? Even the new [good-looking]

3 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Community | marketingland.com | 2 days ago

Wix Super Bowl LI campaign comes out strong with Jason Statham

It seems that Wix is spending tons of money to advertise their platform.

Wix Super Bowl LI campaign comes out strong with Jason Statham

Community | marketingland.com | 2 days ago

Wix has released the first of its teaser ad series for Super Bowl LI, coming out strong with actors Jason Statham and Gal Gadot in an action-packed fight scene. The spot is a departure from the brand’s Super Bowl 50 ad which was a joint campaign between the web development platform and the “Kung Fu Panda” movie franchise (although both campaigns do contain a certain element of martial arts).
Wix launched the campaign on Facebook and YouTube Live last night at 6:00 p.m. ET — releasing the video simultaneously on both platforms. According to an announcement from Wix, its Super Bowl LI campaign will include a series of teaser ads leading up to its official 30-second Super Bowl spot.
“We are so excited about this campaign because this time we are telling our own story,” says Wix CMO Omer Shai in the announcement.
The CMO says the campaign is about more than just the commercial, “It is an ongoing narrative about Wix and our customers, and our message about always enabling our users in a world that is often disruptive so that they can be heroes.”
The ads are directed by Louis Leterrier, the same director behind the “Transporter”

9 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 4 days ago

Lowdown on the Google Mobile Popup Penalty for WordPress Users

Google recently penalized sites using pop-ups on mobile pages. Traffic can drop by 30% or even more.

Lowdown on the Google Mobile Popup Penalty for WordPress Users

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 4 days ago

We realize that many of you don’t keep up with the latest Google trends and updates. How can you? Many of you are busy running businesses and there is only so much time in a day. Another large portion of you might outsource work on your website to an agency or WordPress maintenance company. But they too are juggling lots of clients. As of January 10th, 2017, the Google mobile popup penalty went into affect across the web. If you are seeing a major dip in mobile traffic lately, you might want to check your WordPress site to ensure you are using popups correctly. Read more about what what this penalty entails below and what you can do about it. January 10, 2017 update: Starting today, pages where content is not easily accessible to a user on the transition from the mobile search results may not rank as high. As we said, this new signal is just one of hundreds of signals that are used in ranking and the intent of the search query is still a very strong signal, so a page may still rank highly if it has great, relevant content. – Google Webmaster Team
Google Mobile Popup Penalty
Google gave us plenty of time, as they originally announced the mobile popup penalty back in August

8 min read Matt Medeiros
Tutorials | plugintut.com | 3 days ago

How to design a WordPress website to sell an e-book

I recently launched an e-book, and this tutorial document outlines the steps that went into building the sales page on WordPress.

How to design a WordPress website to sell an e-book

Tutorials | plugintut.com | 3 days ago

I know I’m late to the e-book game, but I just published The Podcast Starter Kit, a Q&A e-book to help you launch your first podcast. Selling digital products is a great way to open up new streams of revenue for your business. Years ago, when someone jumped into selling info (digital) products, it was spurred on by the dirty little phrase: passive income.
Well, that game is a lot harder now. Some of the lessons I share with you today, will help you position your offering a little better than your competition.
Let’s dive in!
This WordPress tutorial is all about designing & developing a WordPress website to sell your e-book. The same routines I outline here could also be used for any other digital product or marketing website.
E-book website crash course
Back in the day, building products and putting the technology together to handle the transaction, wasn’t exactly beginner friendly. Early adopters who invested in this market were seemingly crushing it, while appearing on every popular podcast to give us their tips for success — and revenue reports.
Now it’s your turn! WordPress has become more powerful, tools have gotten easier, and payment gateways

13 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | wpshout.com | 3 days ago

Mastering the Unix Terminal: Working With Permissions, Networking, and Other Key Concepts

Great overview of Unix commands for new learners to WP CLI and Command Line in general.

Mastering the Unix Terminal: Working With Permissions, Networking, and Other Key Concepts

Tutorials | wpshout.com | 3 days ago

Last time we covered Unix commands, we talked about how you can move around the filesystem from the command line. These ideas are crucial; if you don’t understand the basics of navigating files and folders from the terminal, there’s not a lot you can do on the command line. If you’ve not mastered that, start with this on file-manipulation from the command line. Once that’s under control, you want to understand the commands that change the way files and folders act. In this article we’ll cover the rest of the stuff I regularly do on the command line. We’ll explain permissions on the command line, networking from the terminal, and other concepts that can change your CLI game. This is more a tour of important concepts than a UNIX command list, but I think that’s more valuable. Let’s get to it!
Dealing with User Permissions
User file permissions are one of the first very-foreign concepts many WordPress developers encounter. Rather than the simple act of creating a new PHP or CSS file, this is an extra level of complexity. It requires some understanding of how Unix thinks about user permissions.
The short version is that a computer has many

4 min read David Bisset
Community | ghost.org | 3 days ago

Ghost for Journalism: $45,000 Journalism Development Program

Interesting: Ghost is offering $45k journalism development program to "build exciting, sustainable publications”. Although not as "big" as Medium, it's an interesting move in the same space as WordPress.

Ghost for Journalism: $45,000 Journalism Development Program

Community | ghost.org | 3 days ago

We believe journalism and its role in creating an informed society is one of the most important ideas in the world. It impacts everything from what we think, to what we buy and who we vote for. Ghost is a fully open source platform for independent publishers, founded three and half years ago after a runaway $300,000 Kickstarter campaign.
Since then it has been downloaded over 1.2million times by thousands of publishers from Square, Tinder and Zappos, to Vevo, Mozilla and many others. Last year, Sir Richard Branson called it "incredible" and "a very important idea".
Now, as our technology has grown and been successfully used by so many personal and company blogs, we’re turning our primary focus to where our heart and our mission has always really been: Journalism.
Our goal for this year is to find three fantastic new publishers to work with and help them grow their audiences throughout 2017, as we build out these features (and others) explicitly around their needs.
In addition, we'll be offering up $45,000 in Ghost(Pro) credit, along with access to our internal tools, data, and technology partners.
We care deeply about making a difference. Our greatest ambition

Business | managewp.com | 2 days ago

Save time, not money

Everybody talks about saving time & money, but more often than not people in the WordPress ecosystem mess up by making decisions based solely on the price point.

Save time, not money

Business | managewp.com | 2 days ago

We humans are inherently flawed when it comes to money. If it’s a new iPhone or a pair of sunglasses, we’ll dish out $500 in a heartbeat. But if you ask $40 for a year of managed WordPress hosting, a lot of people will look at you like you’ve just insulted their grandma’s crochet skills. WordPress is fantastic because you can find so much for free, but at the same time it spoiled us. We expect fully functional themes and plugins to be free, with stellar support that has nothing better to do than to solve our every inane issue.
I do understand your side of business but still the wp market needs #opensource solution and not services that cost you more money
― An actual tweet to a WordPress SaaS with a functional free tier
It’s bad for the developers because they need to pay the bills. And it’s bad for you, because you’re sabotaging yourself with this mindset.
Why time and not money?
TL;DR answer: time is finite, money isn’t.
Let’s say you’re making $20/hr as a WordPress developer. You occasionally need to migrate a website for a client. You’ve got 3 options:
Do it manually in an hour
Use a quirky free migration plugin (instant,

4 min read David Bisset
Development | rarst.net | 5 days ago

WordPress APIs Developer Satisfaction Survey Results

Andrey publishes results of a WordPress API survey from developers: their development experience with WordPress and how would they rate WordPress APIs.

WordPress APIs Developer Satisfaction Survey Results

Development | rarst.net | 5 days ago

When you spend a lot of time with it you get a distinct feel about WordPress developer experience. Some parts get job done and other are synonymous with trouble. Yet there is rarely organized conversation about this. Which WordPress APIs perform well and why? How do we get more to that point?
I had run WordPress APIs Developer Satisfaction survey to get some measured insights.
Responses
Survey asked two questions of participants:
Their development experience with WordPress — on the scale from 1–Novice to 5–Expert.
How would they rate WordPress APIs on the list of 30 — with possible ratings of: Horrible, Bad, Normal, Good, Excellent.
The results are summarized in following chart.
You can see raw responses and processed results as a spreadsheet. Thank you to everyone who participated!
Survey attracted responses from experienced developers. 62.7% rated their WordPress experience level 5/5 and 31.3% — 4/5.
The distribution of API ratings was:
40.3% positive (Good or Excellent)
33.1% Normal
26.6% negative (Bad or Horrible)
Familiarity
Most familiar
Admin Menus, Ajax (100%)
Admin Pages, Custom Post Types, Query (97%)
Custom Taxonomies, Database, Plugin (hooks),

4 min read David McCan
Community | wptavern.com | 4 days ago

SiteGround Auto-Issues Let’s Encrypt Certificates for New Domains

SiteGround was one of the first hosts to offer Let's Encrypt SSL certificates with their shared hosting plans. It is very easy to setup if you are starting a new site. Now they pushing forward plans to make it even easier.

SiteGround Auto-Issues Let’s Encrypt Certificates for New Domains

Community | wptavern.com | 4 days ago

SiteGround is now auto-issuing Let’s Encrypt certificates for every domain hosted on its shared servers. The company has also begun issuing and installing certificates on new accounts automatically after customers register domains or direct new domains to SiteGround’s servers. This also includes add-on domains added in cPanel. The certificates are also auto-renewed as long as the domains are pointed to the host’s servers. “Since the launch of Let’s Encrypt our customers have installed nearly 40,000 such certificates,” said Hristo Pandjarov, WordPress specialist at SiteGround. “This is less than 10% of the 500,000 domains we host. Together with the paid certificates we may say that 15% of the domains we host were using the HTTPS protocol before we started the auto-issuing procedure.”
SiteGround is a sponsor of Let’s Encrypt and one of the first to auto-issue certificates to self-hosted WordPress customers. Let’s Encrypt passed 20 million active certificates in 2016 and the pressure is on for more sites to adopt SSL in 2017 with Google marking insecure sites in Chrome and using HTTPS as a ranking signal.
“What prompted

1 min read Joe Casabona
Security | howibuilt.it | 3 days ago

Episode 19: Dre Armeda and Sucuri - How I Built It

Dre and I talk the history of Sucuri and the future of internet security.

Episode 19: Dre Armeda and Sucuri - How I Built It

Security | howibuilt.it | 3 days ago

It’s early in the year and something to think about is security! Dre Armeda is here to tell us all about that – the full history of his company, Sucuri, where they’ve been and why they are kicking it up a notch. Super informative and important to anyone doing business on the web! Show Notes
Sponsored by:

14 min read Maor Chasen
Tutorials | GenerateWP.com | 4 days ago

Automation in WordPress: A Practical Guide (Part II)

Want to know more on automation? Check out my new post on how to automate your WordPress projects, themes AND plugins, and clear your time for the stuff that matters!

Automation in WordPress: A Practical Guide (Part II)

Tutorials | GenerateWP.com | 4 days ago

In this new post in the series I’ll go through practical about Automation in WordPress the concepts of automation are explained, as well as actionable instructions on how to start automating ASAP! So… Why Should I Learn Automation?
In the previous article in this series, Automation: The Future of WordPress Development, I explained how you can leverage automation in WordPress (with Gulp) to help you cut down development time.
Due to the good feedback and support I got from you guys, I decided to write up a detailed guide of how I use Gulp in my development process. I’m sure many of you will find the practical concepts described here super useful.
Your aim should be to leverage Gulp to do a bunch of automated tasks for us while you’re busy developing, so that you don’t have to constantly stop for menial, annoying tasks and instead have deep focus on the product you’re developing, be it a theme or a plugin. I’m going to introduce a bunch of areas where Gulp is going to save your ass, for real. Hold it tight!
Setting Up Prerequisites
As mentioned in the previous part, there are a handful of good automation tools, but for the sake of simplicity,

5 min read Neil Murray
Community | make.wordpress.org | 4 days ago

Editor Technical Overview

As we start looking at the editor from a technical perspective it’s important we identify the main obstacles and requirements we face before we start conjecturing solutions.

Editor Technical Overview

Community | make.wordpress.org | 4 days ago

Wow, that’s quite an essay on the content editor. We’ve been doing this for a long time and know the lay of the land. We even built a WYSIWYG editor we can’t give up (we tried for two years). First in praise of the WordPress editing experience: the Media Library has grown to be very powerful and easy to use. It’s awesome. We were delighted to retire the original image editing module we were using last year and fully integrate the Media Library. Still what are the issues with WordPress content editing which drive us to maintain a separate WYSWIYG editor?
Hint, it’s not the money, thousands of hours have gone into this purely GPL and non-commercial product. It’s not boredom. We have too much to do in three lifetimes and very short weekends already.
It’s not shortcodes. Shortcodes are great and reliable ways to easily and visibly add content to posts. As soon as you start trying to hide the pieces, reliability falls through the cracks. It’s why lawyers still use WordPerfect.
Why were we unable to give up our own FCK WYSIWYG editor? Code and javascript mangling. The WordPress TinyMCE editor does not reliably maintain paragraphs and linebreaks.

4 min read David McCan
Community | wordfence.com | 4 days ago

Imminent: Non-HTTPS Sites Labeled "Not Secure" by Chrome

Google is pushing forward with its plans to promote SSL. This article discusses what WordPress site owners can expect and what users might see in their browsers.

Imminent: Non-HTTPS Sites Labeled "Not Secure" by Chrome

Community | wordfence.com | 4 days ago

On approximately January 31st of this month, version 56 of the Chrome web browser will be released. There is a significant change in the way it displays websites that are not using HTTPS, also known as SSL. This change may confuse your site visitors or surprise you if you are not expecting it. Starting with the release of Chrome 56 this month, any website that is not running HTTPS will have a message appear in the location bar that says “Not Secure” on pages that collect passwords or credit cards. It will look like this:
This is the first part of a staged rollout that encourages websites to get rid of plain old HTTP.
In an upcoming release Google Chrome will label all non-HTTPS pages in incognito mode as “Not secure” because users using this mode have an increased expectation of privacy.
The final step in the staged rollout will be that Chrome will label all plain HTTP pages as “Not secure”. It will look like this:
So, once again, starting on approximately January 31st of this month, any page on your website that is non-HTTPS and has a password form or credit card field will be labeled as “Not secure” in the location bar by Google Chrome.

Community | cssigniter.com | 2 days ago

A quick interview with Justin Tadlock (Theme Hybrid)

Founder of Theme Hybrid. Co-author of the book Professional WordPress Plugin Development. An active WordPress community member.

A quick interview with Justin Tadlock (Theme Hybrid)

Community | cssigniter.com | 2 days ago

I started messing around with WordPress back in 2007. Justin Tadlock was already an active member of the, way less crowded back then, WordPress community. 10 years later, I asked Justin if he’d be interested in answering 10 questions. These are his answers. Hi could you tell us a little about yourself and background?
I grew up in Alabama and am now currently living here. I earned a B.A. in English from Auburn University with primary concentration in creative writing and a secondary concentration in journalism. I’ve worked all sorts of jobs like grocery store stockboy, field hand who picked watermelons and baled hay, English teacher in Korea, and all kinds of other things.
My interests are far and wide. I garden and hope to run my own farm one day. I plan to publish at least one best-selling novel. I’m currently relearning how to write using the Spencerian Cursive method. I’m also just starting to use fountain pens, which are a joy to write with (no idea why ballpoints ever became more popular).
When did you first stumble upon WordPress?
I first started using WordPress in 2005. I had given it a try once before that. Primarily, I was looking for something easy