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2 min read Ahmed Kaludi
Plugins | theskin.io | 5 hours ago

How to Enable Google's AMP Project on WordPress

Google recently announced AMP project to make the mobile websites faster, AMP is short for Accelerated Mobile Pages. We have been working on this plugin as a side project for a while and it recently got accepted in WordPress Plugin repository.

How to Enable Google's AMP Project on WordPress

Plugins | theskin.io | 5 hours ago

Google recently announced AMP project to make the mobile websites faster, AMP is short for Accelerated Mobile Pages. We have been working on this plugin as a side project for a while and it recently got accepted in WordPress Plugin repository. On the side note, I have also created this icon for AMP, I would love to hear your thoughts on it! It makes me really happy to contribute back to the WordPress community, I hope it will help the WP users.
Please let us know your thoughts, we will appreciate if you could help us get the word out to the community.

8 min read M Asif Rahman
Business | torquemag.io | 1 day ago

Plugin Distribution on WordPress.org in a New Generation of WordPress

This is a very interesting discussion about Plugin Support at WordPress.org. Here Josh Pollock highlighted few important aspect of plugin distribution and models around WordPress.org. This is not a brand new post if you look at the date, but the discussion is still very fresh, and never been shared here.

Plugin Distribution on WordPress.org in a New Generation of WordPress

Business | torquemag.io | 1 day ago

A few weeks ago there was a lot of drama around the WordPress Theme Review team’s decision to require all themes in the WordPress.org theme repository to use the customizer for theme options. Personally I think this is great, and I’ve actually been looking forward to it since last year, when the idea was first presented. It’s a great example of how the leadership in the WordPress project have used their influential positions to help improve the platform. WordPress.org fills a lot of roles, one of the biggest is distributing code in the form of plugins, themes, and even WordPress itself. Any change in how that role is fulfilled is going to be controversial, whether the decision to do so is right (as this recent change clearly was) or wrong. Due to the inherent controversy and the impact that these changes will have, caution must therefore be applied.
While I believe that caution is a necessary component to any major change, however, I also believe that it shouldn’t stand in the way of progress. The plugin repository, in its structure, assumes a lot of things about the state of the WordPress ecosystem that may have once been true, but are no longer applicable.
Barriers to Ubiquity
My

6 min read Ahmad Awais
Development | wptavern.com | 2 days ago

WP REST API Delayed, Contributors Facing Gridlock

While some delay makes sense but converting everything in the wp-admin before merging doesn't. IMHO that's not the core purpose of WP REST API. Progressive enhancement makes more sense.

WP REST API Delayed, Contributors Facing Gridlock

Development | wptavern.com | 2 days ago

The WP REST API team met yesterday in the #core-restapi Slack channel to discuss the status of the existing post, term, user, and comment endpoints. There are a few outstanding issues with these four core objects, which the team wants to tackle via a feature plugin approach instead of holding the API back from merge. These outstanding items include things like password-protected posts, autosaves and post previews, and meta handling. “For now, we’re not going to support them, and will be working on them in a separate feature plugin instead,” WP REST API project lead Ryan McCue said. “Again, this will be an enhancement to the API in the future, and doesn’t block compatibility here.”
In September 2015, McCue and contributors outlined a merge plan for the REST API which brought the infrastructure into the 4.4 release with the endpoints on deck to follow one release later in 4.5. Contributors to the REST API believe that the project is still on track for this goal.
“Our proposal is that we ​merge the four core objects​ in the REST API with full read, create, update, delete support, with the more peripheral features to come ​when they’re ready,” McCue said.
Several WordPress contributors,

Tutorials | scalewp.io | 3 days ago

WordPress at Scale

Interesting resource for running a high trafficed WordPress site to scale.

WordPress at Scale

Tutorials | scalewp.io | 3 days ago

No Description

1 min read Kishore Sahoo
Plugins | github.com | 18 hours ago

Gravity Forms: WooCommerce Cart Capture

This helps capturing cart while Gravity Form Submission. For using it set gravity form to pre-populate a field set the key as woocommerce_cart.

Gravity Forms: WooCommerce Cart Capture

Plugins | github.com | 18 hours ago

* Description: Automatically capture the contents of a users cart when they submit a gravity form. To use Set gravity form to pre-populate a field. Set the key as woocommerce_cart. The cart contents at the time of submission will automatically be captured.

2 min read Matt
Tutorials | mattgeri.com | 3 days ago

Backbone and Underscore in WordPress by example – a simple todo application

In this video tutorial, I take you through one way on leveraging the built in Backbone.js and Underscore.js libraries to build a todo application

Backbone and Underscore in WordPress by example – a simple todo application

Tutorials | mattgeri.com | 3 days ago

This is the longest video tutorial that I’ve done so far and in it I walk you through building a simple todo application in Backbone.js using a little bit of Underscore.js and then embedding that application in to WordPress using a shortcode. There are multiple different ways in which you can use Backbone.js and Underscore.js in a WordPress project and this is just one way. You can even go as far as building a single page application. But that’s for another day.
I hope you learn from this tutorial and get inspired to include these libraries in your own WordPress projects.
Let me know if you have any questions or comments.
Lastly, you can find the source code on Github.

Community | journal.rmccue.io | 2 days ago

Progressive Enhancement with the WordPress REST API

Clarifying the meaning of progressive enhancement with the WP REST API.

Progressive Enhancement with the WordPress REST API

Community | journal.rmccue.io | 2 days ago

In a REST API discussion today, we discussed the future of the REST API. Something I touched upon briefly in that meeting is the concept of progressive enhancement with the REST API. Since this topic hasn’t been brought up much previously, I want to elaborate on how progressive enhancement works. Progressive enhancement is our key solution to a couple of related problems: forward-compatibility with future features and versions of WordPress, and robust handling of data types in WordPress. Progressive enhancement also unblocks the REST API project and ensures there’s no need to wait until the REST API has parity with every feature of the WordPress admin.
For instance, custom post types can do basically whatever they want with their data, so we wanted a robust system for indicating feature support via the REST API. For example, post types which don’t have the editor support flag won’t have content registered, similar to how the admin doesn’t show the content editor for those post types. In addition, plugins can do even crazier stuff like conditionally changing post types. The system in the REST API can handle these cases with ease, providing clients the ability to adapt on-the-fly to the

10 min read Omaar Osmaan
Community | medium.com | 3 hours ago

What Success Really Looks Like in Open Source

"From far away, successful Bazaars look like moneyless anarchic systems, but up close, the bulk of responsibility falls on a couple of people, who are usually being paid to do the work." Interesting read.

What Success Really Looks Like in Open Source

Community | medium.com | 3 hours ago

And how we can support them When we talk about successful open source projects, we imagine big, thriving, participatory communities, where many people share the burden of contribution.
Where did this idea come from?
Open source as a community model can be traced back to nearly 20 years ago, when Eric Raymond wrote an essay called “The Cathedral and the Bazaar”, outlining two models for software development.
The essay centers around a then-new software project, Linux, as a “subversive” example of how software can be built more openly, a “great babbling bazaar of differing agendas and approaches” (Bazaars) rather than “small bands of mages working in splendid isolation” (Cathedrals).
Raymond believed Bazaars were a more resilient and sustainable approach to software development. More people = more resources. To describe this, Raymond coined the famous line, “Given enough eyes, all bugs are shallow”, which he dubbed “Linus’s Law”.
“The Cathedral and the Bazaar” defined an entire generation of open source. But some people remained skeptical of Bazaars, questioning whether it was feasible for all projects to aspire to.
Bazaars are rhetoric, not reality
From the outside, projects like Linux

10 min read Josh Pollock
Community | mattcromwell.com | 3 days ago

On Plugin Expectations - Matt Cromwell

Matt makes a great case for why, to meet user's expectations, you must never lose focus on your plugin's core role.

On Plugin Expectations - Matt Cromwell

Community | mattcromwell.com | 3 days ago

I recently tried out a handy WordPress plugin called Activity Log. I liked it so much that I reached out to the author to suggest some more features. He kindly said “no”, and he was totally right. Here’s why. There’s a tendency in all of us to latch onto a specific plugin, love it, and then immediately start thinking of all the magical things that it could also do for us. We’ve seen this author’s work and we love it so much that we want to see more of it so it can improve our lives even more!
But just because an author can add the feature doesn’t mean they should. And like the folks behind Activity Log, it’s most often better for the plugin to NOT add that fancy new feature than to add it.
The Single Purpose Philosophy
The main reason why an experienced and wise plugin author will reject a new feature is because of what I call the Single Purpose Philosophy.
A good plugin of any size or complexity should always abide by this one philosophy:
A plugin should have one central purpose, no matter how great or small and never deviate from that purpose no matter how vociferously users may request it to be “enhanced” beyond its core purpose
You won’t find that emblazoned anywhere — except on

4 min read Josh Pollock
Community | codepen.io | 2 days ago

REST API Maybe 2: Moving The Goal Posts

I did a quick round up of some of the things that were said about the latest REST API debate and made sense.

REST API Maybe 2: Moving The Goal Posts

Community | codepen.io | 2 days ago

REST API Maybe 2: Moving The Goal Posts
Or Matt Mullenweg states an unpopular opinion
A Short Summary by Josh Pollock

TL;DR
Matt Mullenweg stated an unpopular opinion about the REST API yesterday. He said that before merge, it should do everything that wp-admin does. Many people, including me, think this is the wrong way to define if the API is complete.
Adam Silverstein posted a good summary of the meeting, with the a link to the slack archives on make/core.
At this point, nothing has been decided.

Notable Responses

Drew Jaynes replies to WPTavern
Ryan McCue On Progressive Enhancement With the WordPress REST API
I don’t think it’s intentional, but the unrealistic expectations

8 min read M Asif Rahman
Tutorials | asif.im | 2 days ago

[How-To] WordPress + NGiNX + HHVM + HTTP/2 + Let's Encrypt SSL = Free Super-Fast HTTPS Website

This is not exactly for Advance User. You need basic Linux Server skill, with advance WordPress skill. This is super easy, at the end you get an advance modern infrastructure with NGiNX Server with HHVM, HTTP/2 configured with Let's Encrypt SSL and WordPress site already configured for best performance. And all free, OpenSource.

[How-To] WordPress + NGiNX + HHVM + HTTP/2 + Let's Encrypt SSL = Free Super-Fast HTTPS Website

Tutorials | asif.im | 2 days ago

As you could see now this blog of mine has SSL Certificate and 100% PCI-Compliant, rated A+. Here I will share how it’s super easy to get HTTPS for your WordPress website, it’s free and should not take more than few minutes to set up. Google announced HTTPS is now a signal for SEO rank, and now everyone is pushing to get secured and get your site faster. Few years back you have to spend at least hundred dollar per year to get SSL certificate for your root domain, wildcard will costs even more. The price has since dropped down a lot. Like in the year 2015 it was possible to get a simple SSL Certificate as cheap as $4 USD. But now in the year 2016, when Let’s Encrypt is out of beta, anybody could have a SSL Certificate for free.
Let’s Encrypt is an initiative by non-profit/ public benefit corporation Internet Security Research Group (ISRG). This project is sponsored and promoted by tech-giants like Facebook, Mozilla, Google and many more companies. Learn more about them at – https://letsencrypt.org/
Faster Web:
Your site need to load fast, that for giving good user-experience, for good rank, to say up to the curve. Here in this tutorial I will use top-notch technology like HHVM, HTTP/2

1 min read David McCan

Underscores Components

Components is a library of shareable, reusable patterns for WordPress themes. It allows you to build different types of starter themes based on Underscores.

Underscores Components

Components is a library of shareable, reusable patterns for WordPress themes. Instead of starting from scratch, mix and match from a collection of pre-made components to build your own custom starter theme. If you’re just starting out, it’ll get you booted up without needing to reinvent the wheel or write a lot of custom code. If you’re an experienced theme developer, you’ll find well-organized, easy-to use code that you can remix to your heart’s delight!

14 min read David McCan
Tutorials | sitepoint.com | 2 days ago

Publishing a Plugin to the WordPress Plugin Directory

This tutorial by Ben Shadle shows you how to prepare and submit your plugin to the WordPress plugin repository. It is a very nice walk-through that discusses each step up to and including your first commit.

Publishing a Plugin to the WordPress Plugin Directory

Tutorials | sitepoint.com | 2 days ago

In 2001, a blog tool called b2/cafelog was launched by Michel Valdrighi. Matt Mullenweg and Mike Little forked b2/cafelog and created WordPress in 2003. According to WordPress.org, “WordPress was born out of a desire for an elegant, well-architectured personal publishing system built on PHP and MySQL and licensed under the GPL”. In 2004, plugins were introduced to extend WordPress’ core functionality. Here’s what the WordPress Plugin Directory looked like in November 2004: At that point in 2004, there were 46 plugins available for WordPress. In just under eleven years, there are now over 42,697 plugins available in the WordPress Plugin Directory and there have been over 1,161,033,914 plugin downloads. Here’s what the WordPress Plugin Directory looks like in January 2016:
All of the plugins that appear in the WordPress Plugin Directory are free to use and distribute. They are licensed under the General Public License (GPL). Many pioneers have published plugins in the WordPress Plugin Directory and my brother and I wanted to be a part of this exclusive club. We’ll give you an inside look at the WordPress Plugin Directory submission process by sharing our experience on deciding to create,

7 min read Ahmad Awais
Development | poststatus.com | 3 days ago

The first WordPress REST API conference, in review

Post Status reviewed the day of REST conference. A must read I must add.

The first WordPress REST API conference, in review

Development | poststatus.com | 3 days ago

I had the privilege to attend and be the media partner at A Day of REST, the world’s first conference devoted to the WordPress REST API. Here’s my initial review, and some pictures, from the event. January 28th and 29th of 2016 marked the first ever A Day of REST, a conference devoted to the WordPress REST API. It’s also, to my knowledge, the first ever conference completely about a single feature of WordPress.
Put on by the Human Made team, there were definitely risks: maybe not enough people would sign up, maybe the content would be too dense, or not dense enough for the audience that showed, maybe the API wouldn’t be in core yet, and more. Yet, none of these things happened, and the conference was a success.
I had the privilege to cover the event as the media partner, and I had an excellent time. It wasn’t a small conference, with over 220 attendees, but it was intimate, utilizing a single track setup, and had a small hack day reserved for 40 people.
It was also a bit of a risk to host the first A Day of REST in London, where it was quite accessible to the European community, but out of reach for much of the American market. Nonetheless, those of us that came from the US, Asia, and

11 min read Matt Cromwell
Plugins | wpkube.com | 3 days ago

Optimize Your Contact Form Conversion Rate With FormWorks

Nice review of a new product called Formworks. Allows you to more clearly evaluate how effective your forms are in converting. Applies to EDD, Gravity Forms and others.

Optimize Your Contact Form Conversion Rate With FormWorks

Plugins | wpkube.com | 3 days ago

As website owners, we usually run our sites to with a certain goal in mind, whether that’s lead generation, collecting email addresses or making sales. The magic word here is conversion. It describes getting visitors to do exactly the thing we would like them to do.
Many people spend a lot of time A/B testing different site elements to optimize their conversion rate, be it site copy, calls to action, images, colors, positioning, button sizes, you name it.
However, an element that often gets neglected are forms, despite the fact that form conversion rates are one of the most important success factors for any site.
Think about it. Forms are usually at the very end of our conversion funnel. Collecting email addresses? Use a sign-up form. Inviting people to ask for a quote? Offer a contact form. Running an e-commerce site? Can’t do without a checkout form.
However, do you know how well your forms are performing? Or why?
Most people don’t. Me included. Yet, from what we have seen earlier, we really should.
Usually all we know is our overall conversion rate, meaning how many of our visitors not only use the form but also click the submit button.
What we don’t know is how many people even

Editorials | medium.com | 3 days ago

The Genius of WordPress (and why it’s doomed)

Although Jason is a bit biased (runs a static website related service) he has some good points.

The Genius of WordPress (and why it’s doomed)

Editorials | medium.com | 3 days ago

By any reasonable measure, WordPress is a phenomenon. Altogether, WordPress-enabled sites power 25% of the Internet, and WordPress has a 59% market share of all Content Management Systems (CMS). WordPress has spawned a truly incredible ecosystem of plugins (more than 40,000), themes (at least 10,000), hundreds of thousands of “WordPress developers”, and thousands of hosting providers, most notably WPEngine that’s raised > $41MM and boasts more than 23,000 customers and 200,000 sites.
As of 2012, Automattic, the commercial hosting company that supports the open-source WordPress project, hosted more than 70MM sites and had > $45MM in revenue, with over $317MM raised at a > $1B valuation.
WordPress.com has numerous sources of revenue; hosting, Google AdSense, WordPress themes, premium accounts, web hosting referrals, support, guided transfers, vaultpress (backups), videopress, akismet, etc.
So, with this much momentum, and an ecosystem that’s bigger than the population of Iceland invested in its success, why would we ever have reason to believe that WordPress won’t continue to be the dominant web hosting platform of the future?
An Unlikely Competitor
On this list, there are of course well-funded

Community | wordexpress.io | 7 days ago

WordExpress: Replacing PHP with JavaScript in WordPress development

WordExpress is an open-source experiment that aims to provide a better development experience in WordPress using Javascript instead of PHP.

Plugins | narrowem.com | 3 days ago

Increase your website page speed with WP Performance Score Booster

Here is a detailed review of WordPress plugin WP Performance Score Booster. This plugin speed-up page load times and improve website scores in services like PageSpeed, YSlow, Pingdom and GTmetrix.

Increase your website page speed with WP Performance Score Booster

Plugins | narrowem.com | 3 days ago

Detailed Review of WP Performance Score Booster – Increase your website page speed with a push of a button The bar has been raised.
Writing great content with step by step instructions on specific topics isn’t enough anymore. If you want to get to the first page of Google, and stay there.
Today, only the content won’t help you get more traffic to your site, you will also need to provide great user experience to your audience. But how can you do this?
Aside from designing your website to ease your visitors navigation, you will also need to make it load fast.
There are a lot of free and paid plugins that are created to speed-up your website, but few of them are getting the job done.
In this detailed review I am going to test one really simple, but yet powerful WordPress plugin designed to increase web page loading speed and grant better user experience to your visitors. The name of the plugin is WP Performance Score Booster. Let’s begin:
What does this plugin actually do?
WP Performance Score Booster will significantly increase web page loading speed of your WordPress site improving the overall performance and user experience. Like you probably know, website speed is one of the Google

4 min read Josh Pollock
Community | joshpress.net | 4 days ago

More Data, Less Anxiety - Josh Pollock

Anyone who has ever made a product knows how hard it is to make the right decisions to describe, sell and price their product. That's been my life for too long now. This year, I'm making data driven decisions.

More Data, Less Anxiety - Josh Pollock

Community | joshpress.net | 4 days ago

Categories Articles, Business, WordPressTags a/b testing, ingot, wordpress There are a lot of ways my business causes me anxiety. This is an unescapable part of being an entrepreneur.
The biggest inducer of anxiety is decisions with no clear answer. Nothing makes this happen more than when trying to figure out the best way to describe my product.
I have a few different slogans I use for Caldera Forms, and I’ve never been sure what was the best one to use. It’s a source of constant worry for me if I’m using the wrong one, or if it doesn’t matter at all.
One slogan is descriptive, one says it’s different and one says it’s easy.
I’ve spent a lot of time debating over which one is best and I can make a good case for each. Without any data, I can’t know for sure, and honestly it’s been driving me a bit nuts.
Split Testing FTW
So, the other night I installed Ingot, on CalderaWP.com and started testing the three slogans. I’m using the new “destination test” feature we added in the last version. This allows me to drop a shortcode into my content, where I normally would use the slogan, and track a conversion when a product is added to the cart.
I might find that the slogan has no effect on conversion

5 min read Jonathan Wold

Proposal to store widgets in a custom post type instead of options

A Trac ticket covering the issues of the current options-based implementation and the advantages of switching to a custom post type as a storage mechanism for widgets.

Proposal to store widgets in a custom post type instead of options

Widget instances are stored in options. For a multi-widget (WP_Widget) the widget instances of a given type (id_base) are stored in a serialized array of instance arrays. A widget ID is comprised of a widget's id_base followed by a number which is the array index for that widget instance. For example, the third-created Text widget would have the ID text-4 (note that multi-widget numbering starts at 2). Old single widgets do not include the numeric index after the id_base, and technically they could be stored anywhere (see #35656 for suggestion to deprecate old single widgets). Issues
There are several problems with how widgets are currently stored as options.
Scalability: For sites with a large number of widget instances, the entire collection of widgets must be unserialized with each request to access only one widget of a given type. (Note #23909 for how all widget instances get registered with every request.) For sites that use Memcached as an external object cache where cache buckets have a 1MB limit, since all widget instances of a given type are stored in a single option, sites with a huge number of widgets will overrun this limit. What's more is that widget options get registered

Development | medium.com | 6 days ago

How the WordPress REST API is changing the way we tell stories

Great article from Chris Hutchinson, Newsroom Developer at The Times & The Sunday Times.

How the WordPress REST API is changing the way we tell stories

Development | medium.com | 6 days ago

These two real examples illustrate how easy it is to get going Before I go on, if you’re not familiar with the WordPress REST API, take a second to read my summary from January 2015, take a look at the white paper from Human Made, and have a skim through the documentation. Prepare for a revolution.
Over the past twelve months I’ve written (and spoken) about the massive potential the new WordPress REST API brings developers, writers, and readers. As of WordPress 4.4, it’s now part of core, meaning you can use it right now.
In recent months, discussion has moved away from “When will it be in core?” and “How will it work?”, towards “What can I do with it?” and “How are developers and organisations using it?”.
WordPress’ contributing organisation Automattic are keen to see real world examples of the REST API in use, and there’s even an entire event about it on January 28 — A Day of REST. Here at The Times and The Sunday Times we’ve been experimenting with the REST API throughout 2015, and have recently launched two new reader-facing projects this month that take full advantage of what the API has to offer.
David Bowie: 1947–2016
On Monday 10 January, David Bowie sadly passed away. In recognition

Pro | matthewbarby.com | 3 days ago

Hacking Competitive Pricing Analysis with Scraping

Excellent guide for site owners to easily do competitive analysis on an ongoing basis. This stuff is hard to do in most cases, so any time someone can make the process easy...that's cool.

Hacking Competitive Pricing Analysis with Scraping

Pro | matthewbarby.com | 3 days ago

Est. reading time: 12 minutes Ever wanted to find out what price your competitors are charging for all of their products? Perhaps you want to monitor changes to their pricing so that you can adapt quickly or just monitor trends.
Well, I’m going to show you a hack that I’ve used in the past and continue to use (especially within e-commerce projects) to monitor all of my competitors’ pricing, and it’s automated.
Not only will you be able to avoid extremely expensive and largely inaccurate ‘competitive intelligence’ software, but you’ll have complete control over what data you want to pull through, when you want it, and there’s absolutely no limit to how often you do it. Sounds good, right?
What You’ll Need
There are a few things that you’re going to need to be able to do this – nothing big or expensive, and all the knowledge you need will be within this post:
Subscription to URL Profiler ($15.95 per month).
Microsoft Excel.
Very basic knowledge of HTML/CSS (I’ll walk you through what you need to know).
That’s it.
Hacking Competitive Pricing Analysis
Before I get into the technical side of running the competitive pricing analysis, I’m going to quickly outline each of the steps. Don’t worry

3 min read Matt Cromwell
Security | siteground.com | 5 days ago

Let’s Encrypt certificates available at SiteGround

Siteground announces free SSL certificates through LetsEncrypt. It may not be ideal for ecommerce purposes but getting more sites on some form of encryption is a great step in the right direction.

Let’s Encrypt certificates available at SiteGround

Security | siteground.com | 5 days ago

In December 2015 the new certificate authority Let’s Encrypt entered Public Beta and caused a wave of excitement. The groundbreaking news meant that website owners can obtain security certificates for their websites for free instead of paying for traditional SSL certificates and install them much easier. Naturally since then many of you have asked us when we would introduce the certificates on our hosting platform. For all of you who have been eagerly awaiting this moment, we are happy to say that Let’s Encrypt certificates are now available at SiteGround! What you should know about Let’s Encrypt
is a free, automated, and open certificate authority (CA) that issues domain-validated security certificates. The main goal of the project, which SiteGround proudly sponsors, is to make encryption ubiquitous on the web so that all web browsing becomes safer.
The key benefits of the Let’s Encrypt certificates are:
cost-free
easy installation
no validation emails are sent
no dedicated IP required (which is extra money)
trusted by all major browsers
auto renewable
How to install Let’s Encrypt at SiteGround
You can install Let’s Encrypt certificates for free through the cPanel of your hosting account.

14 min read Matteo Duò
Community | codeable.io | 4 days ago

How Codeable changed my life with Alex Belov

Each month we sit and talk with one of our WordPress developers to hear their story during our "Changing lives" segment. This time is all about Bogdan Belov's unique story. Enjoy :)

How Codeable changed my life with Alex Belov

Community | codeable.io | 4 days ago

In this new episode of Changing lives, we'll meet with Alex Belov an experienced WordPress developer who's specialized in several areas like Woocommerce, jQuery, custom post type, responsive design, PSD to HTML, just to name a few. During the interview, he'll share with us his insights and thoughts about:
freelancing and what's good/bad about it
his past working experiences
why he decided to go freelance (and apply for Codeable)
what type of clients he works with
how being a Codeable expert changed his life
Hire Alex Belov or just post your task and have one of our other experts take care of it immediately.
Changing lives #1: Spyros Vlachopoulos.
Changing lives #2: Nathan Reimnitz.
Changing lives #3: Alexandra Spalato.
Changing lives #4: Raleigh Leslie.
Subscribe to our newsletter and never miss a new episode of "Changing lives"!
Matteo: Hi everyone! This is Matteo, from Codeable. Today we are here with Alex Belov who will share with us his story and experience working as a freelancer. He will also tell us more about working as a Codeable expert, letting us know how this experience changed his life as a freelancer. Hey Alex, thank you for joining us in this episode of Changing Lives.