Welcome to ManageWP.org

Register to share, discuss and vote for the best WordPress stories every day, find new ideas and inspiration for your business and network with other members of the WordPress community. Join the #1 WordPress news community!

×

5 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | wordimpress.com | 2 days ago

Google Plans to Punish Popups, Balkhi and Van Kooten are Not Concerned

Following Google's announcement that interstitial popups will be punished in search results, I tweeted Syed Blakhi and Danny Van Kooten. Basically OptinMonster and Boxzilla users have options to avoid this new rule from Google.

Google Plans to Punish Popups, Balkhi and Van Kooten are Not Concerned

Editorials | wordimpress.com | 2 days ago

Google is flexing it’s muscles again, leveraging it’s dominance in the search engine market to push it’s own idea of what website best practice looks like. They announced that popup “interstitials” will make your site have less relevance if they appear on mobile devices. In April of 2015, Google tweaked their search algorithm to make sites that were not mobile responsive have less relevant results on their search engine. Back then, I wrote this piece:
I’ll keep this pretty brief. Today Google’s search engine algorythym is being updated to give better rankings to sites that are “mobile-friendly”. What this means in finite detail is up for heavy debate, but your best bet is to stick your site domain into this tool (provided by Google themselves) and say HOORAY! if you’re good … Continue reading
I was heavily in favor of the move at that time. It seemed pretty obvious that sites that weren’t mobile responsive simply weren’t paying attention. This move I’m also in favor of, but it definitely feels a lot more in the realm of Google pushing their agenda rather than being some benevolent protector of the web.

3 min read M Asif Rahman
Plugins | wedevs.com | 17 hours ago

WP Project Manager: More Reports & Google Drive Like File Management

WP Project Manager just got some interesting updates. The overhaul brings Google Drive like file management, more advanced reporting. If you are not aware that there is an advance Project Manager for WordPress, check it out for free.

WP Project Manager: More Reports & Google Drive Like File Management

Plugins | wedevs.com | 17 hours ago

New feathers on the hat WP Project Manager is planned for regular updates with a target of complete overhaul by this year. So here is the newest addition to that upgrade road-map.
We are introducing better preset reports and a more intuitive document manager. Let’s dig in!
Reports look good as new
Completely a new design
We have added thematic icons and help texts with each report types. To generate the report, simply click on the icon. This experience is more like running a program on your computer.
6 report types to choose from
We have implemented 6 new reporting features for overall evaluation or project based evaluation. All of these reports are targeted generating statistics that will help you to increase the productivity of your team.
Check how the reports work on our demo site
Interactive and responsiveness
The new reports load instantly without reloading the page and also has animated effects that make the interface less boring. Yes, we know reports can be boring, so we jazzed it up!
Here is a little video
https://wedevs.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/cpm-reports.mp4
Overdue Tasks
Lists tasks from the project which have passed the due date but not completed yet. Now you

20 min read Steven Gliebe
Community | heropress.com | 1 day ago

A Minority Amongst Minorities

Uriahs Victor tells a story from the Caribbean of how a computer and internet connection led him to WordPress and plugin development.

A Minority Amongst Minorities

Community | heropress.com | 1 day ago

I’m a minority amongst minorities, but it doesn’t matter. Let’s get to know each other
Hi, I’m Uriahs Victor and I’m a Carib – bean from the island of St. Lucia. How many Black Developers do you know in the WordPress Community? 5? 20? How many of them are from the Caribbean? How many raised up in places like this:
I chose to write on this topic in hopes that there’s someone else like me reading this article someday who’s living in an area where it may seem like there aren’t many career paths.
It doesn’t matter where in the world you are or your complexion; anyone could code.
How my passion for programming began
I was fortunately raised up with both parents in a community on my island called Fond St. Jacques which is a part of a bigger town called Soufriere. I grew up doing everything a typical adolescent from my community would be doing: playing football, playing cricket and going to work on my parents farm and occasionally on other farms to earn some money to burn through by drinking with friends ( don’t think about it too hard ) and partying.
One day I came home to a used computer setup in my room and was extremely

14 min read David McCan
Community | chrislema.com | 3 days ago

There is always an "us" but not always a "them" - ChrisLema.com -

Chris Lema offers an amazing article on the dynamic and psychology of "Us" vs "Them" in relation to the WordPress project and community. His insights also apply more broadly to any group project, activity, or job. I think he nails it.

There is always an "us" but not always a "them" - ChrisLema.com -

Community | chrislema.com | 3 days ago

Let me get this out of the way – this is a post about another post about a dynamic that may or may not exist within a community of people around an open source software project that is undefined because anyone is free to participate at any level they want. Even if you dig WordPress, this may not be a post for you. If it’s not, feel free to come back tomorrow. Also, comments are turned off. Feel free to write your own posts and link back to this post as a response. Or tweet about it. Or subtweet about it. Or again, ignore it (that’s always a possibility, you know).
I spend my days as an outsider.
Sometimes by choice. Other times by fear and/or insecurity. And other times by things beyond my control (like ethnicity). And here’s the crazy part of my reality – it never matters what you think about how I think about being an outsider.
You can say that I’m an “insider” but it’s based on your perspective and opinion and it has no impact on me. If I feel like I’m an “outsider” then it’s likely to be my reality. Regardless of what you tell me, I will act like certain things are not available or right for me.
It is

7 min read WebDevStudios
Development | webdevstudios.com | 13 hours ago

Winning With Code Reviews

Developer lead Ben Lobaugh shares our code review process and how it helps our team produce their best possible work.

Winning With Code Reviews

Development | webdevstudios.com | 13 hours ago

Here at WebDevStudios we put a lot of emphasis on code quality. After handing off a product to a client, we never know who may be looking at and/or maintaining our code. We want to be proud and confident that the next person will not have an OMGWTFBBQ-head-smashing-into-keyboard moment, but one of delightful surprise. How do we consistently create and maintain a high level of quality code? Through peer code reviews.
All developers at WebDevStudios are encouraged to request code reviews and to provide their own feedback to others on their code review requests.
Peer code reviews have enhanced the code quality at WebDevStudios by leaps and bounds. Now instead of coding in a hole, all the developers are actively striving to write good, clean code that will pass a code review the first time. Instead of feedback coming in the form of correction from a (busy) lead it has become a game amongst the developers to see who can write the most elegant and bug free code the first time out the gate. As a result, the coding standards and practices at WebDevStudios have grown and enhanced.
This all sounds good, but how does it work in practice?
When we receive a new project, it goes through an architecting

6 min read Steven Gliebe
Community | foxland.fi | 16 hours ago

Justin Tadlock Interviewed by Sami Keijonen

An interesting and informative interview of Justin Tadlock on the history of ThemeHybrid, how he works and what direction he sees theming going.

Justin Tadlock Interviewed by Sami Keijonen

Community | foxland.fi | 16 hours ago

Many WordPress Theme Shops say that they offer great support. But it’s nothing compares to Theme Hybrid support by Justin Tadlock. It’s the best place to get themes, plugins, support, ideas, and learn. I’m honoured and lucky that I’ve been part of Theme Hybrid community for several years. It’s the place where I learnt how to build WordPress themes. It’s still the place where I get help and can follow the latest things in WordPress.
Who is behind Theme Hybrid and what is the history about Theme Hybrid?
It’s just me, Justin Tadlock.
Theme Hybrid started as a response to the “premium” theme movement back in 2008. At that time, these premium themes were usually under proprietary, non-GPL licensing and completely locked users away from the freedoms that they would normally receive. Users were paying money for fewer freedoms. While I didn’t completely understand open source at the time, I felt like the direction that these theme shops were going was not in the best interest of users.
I was barely out of college and had no clue what I was doing in terms of business (still don’t). There was huge support for the project, so I

6 min read David Bisset
Development | poststatus.com | 2 days ago

Static Site Generators vs. WordPress

Sonya Mann comparing WordPress advantages and drawbacks vs. static site generators.

Static Site Generators vs. WordPress

Development | poststatus.com | 2 days ago

WordPress is the dominant method to build and manage a website, but static site generators are surging in popularity amongst developers and for certain types of websites. The current state of affairs
In 2016, WordPress is far from the only choice for a new website. In fact, website owners have enjoyed a plethora of options (hosted and self-hosted) for many years. WordPress has remained the juggernaut solution for self-hosted websites, with 25% marketshare of the total web, and as the mainstay CMS for small-to-medium businesses with small or low budgets.
Amongst two groups — large institutions that need high scalability, and the ever-tinkering developer crowd — another option is trending positively: the static site generator, also known as a flat-file CMS.
Don’t get me wrong — the WordPress install base is huge, and the threat posed by static site generators is small. But it’s growing. Post Status editor Brian Krogsgard polled developers prior to Pressnomics, to assess the threat level posed by various CMSs and publishing platforms; Medium and static site generators were considered more of a threat than any others:
He also wrote in a newsletter to members

10 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Tutorials | kinsta.com | 18 hours ago

How to Speed up WordPress Comments - Kinsta Blog

Don't disable comments in WordPress, make them blazing fast with these strategies!

How to Speed up WordPress Comments - Kinsta Blog

Tutorials | kinsta.com | 18 hours ago

Have you ever noticed that your most popular blog posts – the ones that trigger an avalanche of comments – take a little longer to load? While it’s nice to watch WordPress comments roll in, if your commenting system is not carefully configured it can really slow down your website. Think about the resources that go into making comments work:
A database is queried to pull up existing comments,
Database entries are created for each new comment,
Comments and comment meta data are received and processed by a visitor’s browser,
External resources, such as Gravatars, are requested, downloaded, and loaded, and
In many cases, large JavaScript and jQuery resources have to be downloaded and processed to make the commenting system work the way it’s supposed to.
As a result, a busy comments section can add a significant load the web server, increase the overall size of the page, bulk up the number of required HTTP requests, and add additional JavaScript resources for browsers to contend with. Whether you’re using native WordPress comments or have plugged in a third-party commenting system such as Disqus or Facebook Comments, comments can be a drag on the speed

Development | tommcfarlin.com | 3 days ago

Josh Pollock, WordPress Development, and the REST API

Josh Pollock is keeping himself busy educating devs on WordPress development and using the REST API, among other things. This guy is awesome!

Josh Pollock, WordPress Development, and the REST API

Development | tommcfarlin.com | 3 days ago

This year, I’ve had the pleasure hearing Josh Pollock talk about WordPress Development with the REST API on several occasions. Earlier this year, our paths crossed at WordCamp Atlanta and then later, we spent a lot of time hanging out at WordCamp San Diego. During the latter, I had a chance to hear him give his talk to a rather large audience specifically on how to use the REST API.
And before any of that, I had a chance to read what Josh had written about the WordPress REST API for his eBook that was published on Torque.
To say that Josh knows his stuff is an understatement. I know – that sounds a little bit “sales-like.” Though, I don’t mean it to be.
When sharing resources with those of you who read this site, I try to make sure that I only sure things I use or that I promote things from people whom I know and who I trust.
With that said, Josh is getting ready to begin teaching a session on WordPress Development with the REST API. Specifically, he’s going to be talking about how to build plugins using the REST API.
Before his sessions and workshops begin, I wanted to make sure you’re aware of what’s to come.
WordPress Development With

WooCommerce Checkout Fields & Template Goes Public

Plugins | 2 days ago

Hello, my WordPress friends

Recent days, I'm quite busy to do the day job that I forgot I have a child to take care. It's WooCommerce Checkout Fields & Templates. This plugin was sold on Codecanyon for a while with almost 500 sales. Well, that brought me some money, at least.

But I do not good enough in coding as well as do not have much time to continue developing it alone, so I'm asking you guys for help, this will be a very big plugin where all WooCommerce's user can edit their checkout page with pre-built styles or built their own.

I decided to take it down on Codecanyon and make it goes public so all WooCommerce's user can benefit from it. All I want is contribute something to WordPress community.

So here's its Github: https://github.com/ossvn/woocommerce-checkout-fields-templates

The plugin still running fine on 80% of the site, the other must be fixed and I think the issue can be raised so we will go to involve and fix it. After it's good enough we will submit to WordPress.org repo.

My email: trantientoai@gmail.com

Please fork it on Github and do something better for WooCommerce users!

Any thought on this, please?

via Toai Tran
4 min read Matt Medeiros
Community | mattreport.com | 3 days ago

WordPress for Publishers and the REST API with Rachel Baker

I sit down and talk to Rachel Baker about the work her team at The Wirecutter does with WordPress. We'll also discuss the WordPress REST API, and why the project seemingly encounters a lot of challenges.

WordPress for Publishers and the REST API with Rachel Baker

Community | mattreport.com | 3 days ago

For me, and hopefully for you, this episode opens you up to two areas of WordPress interest: Learn what it’s like to be the Lead Engineer at The Wirecutter. Hear all the fancy things they do with WordPress.
Learn what the REST API is, what it can do, and kinda-sorta grasp why we don’t have it yet.
Let me get this out of the way first: If you’re interested in learning how high-traffic WordPress websites and larger publishers use the popular CMS — this episode is for you! How Rachel and her team bend WordPress to to their will is quite impressive. In fact, it was even more impressive to learn what WordPress doesn’t power at the popular review blog, and how they’ve solved those particular challenges.
Interview with Rachel Baker
Learning more about the REST API
The second part of this conversation is all about the REST API. Over the last year or so, some of you have asked me what the REST API is, what it can do, and how could you leverage it in your own WordPress business. Rachel helps define some of that for you, and debunks the myths surrounding it.
Again, if you’re here to learn about that, queue this up!
Why can’t we have the REST API?

7 min read Tom Zsomborgi
Pro | kinsta.com | 3 days ago

A Complete Guide on HTTP Status Codes

What do the different status codes mean? This can be helpful when you manage a lot of sites and servers.

A Complete Guide on HTTP Status Codes

Pro | kinsta.com | 3 days ago

HTTP status codes are like a short note from the web server that gets tacked onto the top of a web page. It’s not actually part of the web page. Instead, it’s a message from the server letting you know how things went when the request to view the page was received by the server. These sorts of messages are returned every time your browser interacts with the server, even if you don’t see them all that often. If you’re a website owner or developer understanding HTTP status codes is critical. Because when they do crop up, HTTP status codes are an invaluable tool for diagnosing and fixing website configuration errors.
This article introduces the most common server status and error codes and explains what they reveal about what’s happening on the server behind the scenes.
Where Do They Come From? Where Do They Go?
Every time you click on a link or type in a URL and press “Enter” your browser sends a request to a web server. The web server receives and processes the request, and then sends back the requested resources along with an HTTP header.
HTTP status codes are delivered to your browser in the HTTP header. While status codes are returned every

7 min read Matt Cromwell
Community | wptavern.com | 4 days ago

Polyglots Team Experiences Record Annual Growth, Expands WordPress’ Reach to Millions with New Translations

The Polyglots team and how they're using GlotPress is definitely the most exciting and impactful thing going on for the WordPress platform right now. This is why Wix and Squarespace really aren't "real" competition IMHO.

Polyglots Team Experiences Record Annual Growth, Expands WordPress’ Reach to Millions with New Translations

Community | wptavern.com | 4 days ago

WordPress 4.6 was released this week with support for 50 translations at 100%, a record number for the Polyglots. The volunteer team has grown 114% over the past year and a half. “On April 15th, translation contributors totaled 4,690 for all time, with a rate of 3 new per day,” Polyglots team member Petya Raykovska said. “We had 319 translation editor badges when we first introduced them in March 2015.”
As of August 2016, the total number of people who have contributed to WordPress translations is 10,059, with 1,247 translation editors (those who maintain translations for a single plugin or theme).
Raykovska cannot explain why the Polyglots team has caught fire during the past year, but she attributes some of the growth to the magnetism of the team.
“We are getting better at working as a team and helping each other,” she said. “I am almost tempted to say people can feel how much we enjoy the work that we do for the project and want to become a part of all that.”
Raykovska said during the past year Polyglots have focused on helping established teams improve the quality of their work, creating style sheets and glossaries to help new contributors

4 min read WebDevStudios
Plugins | pluginize.com | 2 days ago

Custom Post Type UI 1.4.0: Features, Updates, and More

CPTUI 1.4.0 is HEREEEEEE!!! We are stoked! Michael shares the new features.

Custom Post Type UI 1.4.0: Features, Updates, and More

Plugins | pluginize.com | 2 days ago

Posted on August 24, 2016 by Michael Beckwith It’s been a smooth and swift four and a half months since the last major release for Custom Post Type UI. During that time, we launched Pluginize, our premium product team from WebDevStudios. With Pluginize, we released our first product, Custom Post Type UI Extended. This product was dependent on Custom Post Type UI and what became version 1.3.0.
Now, the next major release of Custom Post Type UI, version 1.4.0, has dropped! Here’s an outline what to expect with the latest version, and what new features we’ve added to CPTUI!
Continued UI Evolution
Ever since version 1.0.0 in January 2015, we have continued tinkering and fine tuning the UI. It feels like a long evolution, and continues to get closer to feeling native to the WordPress admin. Version 1.4.0 is no doubt much closer–now more than ever.
When you are editing a post type or taxonomy, you will find three sections that each mimic metaboxes. This imitation includes the ability to toggle-collapse each section. The biggest exception is that we do not include drag and drop reordering.
Modified Slug Indicators
While it may be a minor detail, we provide an indicator

9 min read Puneet Sahalot
Editorials | mediatemple.net | 2 hours ago

Caching Your Way to a Faster Website - Media Temple

Eugene from Media Temple shares insights on Caching and Hosting solutions. He defines different types of caching in short and easy to understand statements along with features of different caching plugins.

Caching Your Way to a Faster Website - Media Temple

Editorials | mediatemple.net | 2 hours ago

Caching is one of those terms that has seemingly been around since the dawn of computer age. But what, exactly, is it and how can (should?) it be used when it comes to websites? Definitions and Performance
At its most simple definition, caching is a temporary storage space or memory that allows fast access to data. Caching often gets defined by its use case. There are at least five major cache location types utilized by web developers today.
First is object caching, which saves an application object locally so that it can be served for future requests without requiring retrieval from the origin server. Next, database caching allows you to cache query data in memory buffers to increase database performance. Bytecode caching, such as OPcache, improves PHP performance by storing precompiled scripts in shared memory, thereby removing the need for PHP to load and parse scripts on each request. Page caching stores action outputs as an HTML file that the web server can serve immediately without going back through the on demand (dynamic) retrieval of data. And finally, distributed content caching uses geographically distributed server memory to deliver content faster.
While the differences

7 min read David Bisset
Development | cogdogblog.com | 4 days ago

Archiving Old WordPress Sites as Static HTML

This isn't as straightforward as you might think, at least in the case study that Alan Levine talks about here. Good read!

Archiving Old WordPress Sites as Static HTML

Development | cogdogblog.com | 4 days ago

I have some old, usually forgotten WordPress sites. It happens like clutter in your office. These old sites, that will never be updated, still generate requests for updates, they get spam, if you have something like Wordfence installed, you get reminders, and they are potential holes for hackers (if you need o be scared to take action, nothing like fear, eh?). Still, I abhor just removing sites from the web, even if it is totally unlikely anyone will ever look for it, to me, it’s incumbent as a web content creator to not rip holes in the fabric.
After getting a few update nags from one of the old sites, I decided to do something- to convert them to standalone HTML, and remove the WordPress back end.
The first site I tried was one done for a few presentations in 2010 and 2011, maybe only 20 posts and 2 static pages. With some research, I experimented with the WP Static HTML Output plugin, billed as:
Produces a static HTML version of your WordPress install and adjusts URL accordingly
I opted when running to create a Zip file to download. It took less than a minute to generate, and I started testing the files locally.
It creates a directory structure that should work (my clever WordPress

3 min read Jim Walker
Tutorials | hackguard.com | 3 days ago

How To Clear Cron Jobs in WordPress

If you’ve noticed your website has grown slower over time for no apparent reason, scheduled tasks just may be the hidden reason why. This article explained how I fixed a slow loading website by removing the stale, not executed cron jobs.

How To Clear Cron Jobs in WordPress

Tutorials | hackguard.com | 3 days ago

If you’ve noticed your website has grown slower over time for no apparent reason, scheduled tasks just may be the hidden reason why. WordPress scheduled tasks use Cron, a time-based job scheduler in Unix. Stale, not executed Cron jobs may stack up, causing database bloat and slow loading of your website.
The reasons why this may occur are varied. Badly coded plugins, an improperly set up manual Cron job for wp-cron.php, and scheduled tasks left behind after deleting a backup or security plugin are just a few reasons why queued Cron events may stack up on you unexpectedly.
What are scheduled events in WordPress?
Scheduled events are tasks like those run by the Disqus plugin; security and backup plugins; and many others.
From the WordPress.org Codex, “Function Reference/wp schedule event“:
Schedules a hook which will be executed by the WordPress actions core on a specific interval, specified by you. The action will trigger when someone visits your WordPress site, if the scheduled time has passed. See the Plugin API for a list of hooks.
Do I have a problem with Cron events?
Luckily we have a plugin (or three) for that. Try any of the below:
If after checking your WordPress

2 min read Jim Walker
Tutorials | youtube.com | 3 days ago

How do I verify my site with Google Webmaster Tools

After a website has been cleaned of malware, I’m often asked, “how do I verify my website within Google Webmaster Tools in order to clear my reputation within Google search?” This video covers the reconsideration request process, with a link to the original article at HackRepair.com.

How do I verify my site with Google Webmaster Tools

Tutorials | youtube.com | 3 days ago

After a website has been cleaned of malware, I’m often asked, “how do I verify my website within Google Webmaster Tools in order to clear my reputation within Google search?” This video covers the article posted at HackRepair.com, "How do I verify my site with Google Webmaster Tools after clearing my website of malware?" located at https://hackrepair.com/articles/how-d...
Trivia:
Google Webmaster Tools is also known by the name Google Search Console. The Google Search Console name was unveiled on May 20, 2015, in an apparent effort to rebrand of the Google Webmaster Tools name. Though the term Google Webmaster Tools remains unchanged throughout Google's own website and how-to documentation.
The link to GWM or GSC is https://www.google.com/webmasters/too...
A few notes about this video, "How do I verify my site with Google Webmaster Tools after clearing my website of malware?":
* This video link below summarizes the Google ownership verification process, at https://youtu.be/wBAccFPnoeg
This video link below also nicely summarizes Google’s process for clearing one’s reputation in search, here at https://youtu.be/lc3UjnDcMxo
+++
Video prepared

6 min read Rahul DC
Plugins | enablingwp.com | 2 hours ago

Telegram Channels to increase Mobile readers for your WordPress Blog

Every WordPress blog offers Newsletters, RSS, Social Media. What’s next? Learn how Telegram Channel broadcasting help converting mobile readers into subscribers

Telegram Channels to increase Mobile readers for your WordPress Blog

Plugins | enablingwp.com | 2 hours ago

I am a budding blogger as you can see my post count is pretty low at the moment. I used to blog often, but I quit my blogging and went on to find a “real job” and 2 years later back to the WordPress, for obvious reasons. As I started researching,I found that lot of things changed and few didn’t. Have you heard about Telegram channels? What about reader psychology? It sure evolved. Bloggers use Social Media pages, Newsletters, RSS etc., to connect to their readers. They are great and works pretty good in most cases. As I was researching, I found a blog, which was boring, offering a telegram subscription. Few of you guys know Telegram app right? A fast growing alternative to Whatsapp messenger. It offers the same features as Whatsapp but it’s in the cloud. Every data you shared synced across all devices. Using the cloud for messaging was a big advantage for the Telegram and it’s users. I will come to the point.
As of February, 2016, Telegram has 100 Million active users. Now may be 120 Million. That’s a juicy thing to know for bloggers who interested who have so many mobile visitors.
Telegram offers a feature called Channel broadcasting. Sure, Whatsapp

7 min read Donna Cavalier
Plugins | donnafontenot.com | 4 days ago

Do You Need To Throw Money At A Geek To Test Site Form Conversion?

Attempt to convince client that testing web forms to see which converts better is quick, easy, and cheap

Do You Need To Throw Money At A Geek To Test Site Form Conversion?

Plugins | donnafontenot.com | 4 days ago

Putting Caldera Forms, Formworks, and Ingot To The Test Having come from a background of web marketing, it’s important to me to be able to engage users on a website, and ultimately, to convert them. So when I’m helping a client decide on web page copy or a Call To Action element, I always stress the need to test, test, test.
Clients usually balk at that suggestion because:
They think they know what their users want. (Hint: no one ever gets that right).
They think it will either be too expensive or too technical to implement or too time-consuming to test and analyze. (Hint: It doesn’t have to be any of those things).
So, when I was discussing a contact form with a client last week, I had that same conversation with him. Hopefully, this post will help him, and others like him, understand just how easy, affordable, and useful this concept of testing can be.
Now that I happily own Caldera Forms, Formworks, and Ingot*, I have all the components I need to demonstrate this. All 3 of these can be had for less than $100 at the time of this post, although there are also some premium addons that you might like as well.
(Note: I’ve had issues getting Formworks to work properly

8 min read Donna Cavalier
Business | wpcharitable.com | 4 days ago

Charitable: Year One in Review

Can really feel the emotional rollercoaster that happens with creating and releasing a plugin or product

Charitable: Year One in Review

Business | wpcharitable.com | 4 days ago

One year ago today, we released version 1.0 of Charitable on WordPress. As we turn a new page, I wanted to take some time to reflect on and share our experiences over this past year. The Background Story
The team behind Charitable consists of me, Eric, and Wes. We’ve been friends since the 90s; we were groomsmen in each other’s weddings; and we created our business together in 2013. Wes is the one who makes things look good; I type all the code.
Before Charitable, we had already launched a few other products, most of which were sold through the Envato Marketplace. One of those was a WordPress theme called Franklin. It was a crowdfunding theme, built on top of a plugin created by the talented guys from Astoundify. Things got complicated when the plugin, which had been acquired by IgnitionDeck, disappeared from the WordPress repository, but our experience with Franklin was a catalyst for the development of Charitable.
Supporting Franklin showed us that there was a genuine lack of good fundraising solutions in the WordPress space. People liked the way the Astoundify plugin extended Easy Digital Downloads. Most other WordPress donation plugins at that time were fairly simplistic

3 min read M Asif Rahman
Community | wptavern.com | 7 days ago

'US vs THEM' in WPTavern By Jeff Chandler

This article is now at Tavern from Jeff's personal .com blog. This going spike a lot of conversation for sure.

'US vs THEM' in WPTavern By Jeff Chandler

Community | wptavern.com | 7 days ago

photo credit: Greed Happiness & the Rest – (license) In the last two years, I’ve had many private conversations with people in the WordPress community about WordPress core’s leadership.
A phrase I’ve often heard during these conversations is, [I just don’t want to get crucified by insert name of core developer here.] It doesn’t matter who is saying or thinking it, it only matters that it’s occurring.
There’s this mindset that the people on the core team are able to walk all over anyone and there’s not a damn thing that person can do about it.
It’s disappointing that a growing subset of people are thinking and feeling this way and it’s preventing them from getting more involved with WordPress. At some point, there needs to be an open, honest, conversation about the culture, attitude, and mentality of the people at the top that are driving WordPress forward.
How and when did WordPress’ core leaders reach a point where they’re instilling fear into people? Why are people feeling this way?
On the surface, we discuss compassion, empathy, and understanding but down at a personal level, there are grudges, alliances,

8 min read Josh Pollock
Community | mattcromwell.com | 8 days ago

If You Don't Know what WP Release Day is, You're Already Doomed - Matt Cromwell

Matt has a little fun with the "OMG a WordPress update, how could I ever have seen this coming!" hysteria and offers practical tips for staying informed, tested and happier when WordPress update day comes.

If You Don't Know what WP Release Day is, You're Already Doomed - Matt Cromwell

Community | mattcromwell.com | 8 days ago

Yesterday was WP Release Day. If you manage WordPress websites and have no idea what I'm referring to, you're already doomed. OK. Maybe I’m being a little dramatic, but I was inspired by my previous post on Google’s Mobilegeddon to write about WP Release Days.
For the uninitiated, WP Release Days are days in which a new version of WordPress is pushed live. This week marked the launch of “Pepper” or version 4.6.
In the past, WP Release Days would cause less drama, but since WordPress now installs with auto-updates out-of-the-box, many people are caught off guard when they log in and notice things are all different (or… GASP! broken!).
Because I do WordPress support professionally, and moderate several heavily trafficked WordPress groups, I see a lot of the WP Release Day dramas played out live. It’s painful to hear about because often these folks are responsible for client sites, and their clients are the one’s suffering.
But what provokes this post is the blame that is always, inevitably placed. Without fail, every WP Release Day starts and ends with expletives thrown at “WordPress”. Here’s a laundry list of scapegoat statements:

6 min read David Bisset
Community | medium.com | 2 days ago

Principles of Team Leadership

Possible sequel of sorts of "US VS THEM" post. If you do any leading in the WordPress community, read this post.

Principles of Team Leadership

Community | medium.com | 2 days ago

John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley, Miles Davis, and Bill Evans I’ve learned a few things over the years mentoring teams at companies big and small, speaking at conferences around the globe, running a small company, fathering 5 kids, and leading a local non-profit org.
Here are a few of these principles.
Listen before leading
Listening is the great enabler of leadership. It fosters answering the right question, giving proper feedback, empathizing with those you lead, and so much more.
I’m a designer by trade. Design is fundamentally all about problem solving. Leadership is essentially the same thing, and it’s impossible to solve a problem without first defining it. Listening allows for definition, comprehension, and understanding. Pause to listen before leading.
Enable cross-mentorship
I’d be a fool to assume I have all the answers or that I alone could impart all the mentoring my teams need. Team members can be incredibly powerful mentors for each other. Sometimes their knowledge and experience resonates more profoundly among peers than the same coming from you as their leader.
One of the best decisions I’ve ever made in regards to cross-mentorship was