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Hi, I'm Michael Torbert, lead developer of All in One SEO Pack

AMA | 5 hours ago

Most of you know me as the lead developer for All in One SEO Pack, but to my wife I’m just a Star Trek geek. I currently live in North Carolina, but am originally from Virginia. I’ve had a variety of work experiences before WordPress, including a network operations center engineer, working for a SAAS forms company (before there was Gravity Forms), and then my own Semper Fi Web Design (http://semperfiwebdesign.com), before I launched a variety of commercial plugins, most of which are on http://semperplugins.com (some are hosted elsewhere, and others were sold).

I started playing with WordPress in 2007, but really got into the community in 2008. I started traveling all over to go to WordCamps, and have been organizing the Raleigh WordPress meetup group and WordCamp Raleigh since 2009 and 2010, respectively. You’ll find me often in the .org forums, helping out where I can.
I’ve even gotten my wife into the WordPress world lately. She’s a project translation editor for Tibetan and Chinese on translate.wordpress.org.

Feel free to ask me any questions you have about WordPress stuff, but there is a lot more to me than just WordPress. Outside the office, I love to travel, fly my DJI quadcopters, eat foods from all over, Audis, college football, my Nikon, and so much more.

Hello Michael, and Welcome!

Do you have a secret plan to release a new plugin or will the All in one SEO remain the flagship in your plugin fleet?

Kind Regards

via Aleksandar Savkovic

Hi Alek,

At the moment, All in One SEO is going to remain the flagship. We have a handful of other plugins (not all are related to SEO), and will be coming out with more in the not too distant future, in addition to some more for SEO.

via Michael Torbert

Hi Michael, was great chatting with you at PressNomics! I didn't have the chance to ask you how did you start with All in One SEO. What's the story behind the plugin?

via Vova Feldman

Hi Vova,

It was great talking to you at PressNomics this year as well. That’s what I love about that conference, meeting smart people doing innovative things. :)

The first developer of All in one SEO Pack was a developer who went by the name of Uberdose, launched in early 2007. About a year later I took the project over, and eventually built a team and community around it. The Pro version launched in late 2009, and helped paved the way for the commercial plugin industry. Then in 2011, we launched semperplugins.com as its new home.

via Michael Torbert

Hello Michael, nice meeting you- :)

What is your biggest pain points, if any, for running All in one SEO Pack that may bother you time to time?

Thank you.

via Omaar Osmaan

Thanks for the details. I'll hit you with another two if you don't mind :)

- What is your favorite thing in running a product in the WP ecosystem vs. other environments?
- On the contrary, what you don't like in running a WP product?

via Vova Feldman
Tutorials | woorkup.com | 19 hours ago

Speed Up WordPress - How I Went From 1.52s to 276ms

Brian Jackson takes us through the steps he took to maximize the efficiency of his WordPress site and reduce load time.

Speed Up WordPress - How I Went From 1.52s to 276ms

Tutorials | woorkup.com | 19 hours ago

Ever since I joined the team over at KeyCDN, I have become obsessed with web performance. Part of my job as an inbound marketer is to write about ways to improve the speed of your site. I thought I would share some of my WordPress tips with you on how I improved this site. So I will be honest, I got a little lazy this last year on performance. My site slowly climbed over a second and a half load time and I was not happy. So I decided to deconstruct everything piece by piece, HTTP request by HTTP request. And here is what I did. Feel free to copy away. You can see my final speed comparison results at the bottom of this post.
1. Changed from ThemeForest Theme to MyThemeShop
Many of you might not have even noticed, but I actually just changed WordPress themes. Yes, I skinned the new one to match my old design, but the coding behind it is much cleaner. I saw a 250ms decrease simply by changing themes, without anything else! Kudos to the team over at MyThemeShop because they know how to code properly, keep things lightweight, and still include schema markup and rich snippets, which are things most competitors don’t.
I went from MyThemeShop to ThemeForest, and am back on MyThemeShop. Yes,

Business | freemius.com | 1 day ago

The 5 Biggest Mistakes That Will Kill Your Plugin Business Profits

This post is a result of 14 interviews with the most successful business owners in the WordPress space. Apparently, making these mistakes will kill your plugin business.

5 min read Matt Cromwell
Tutorials | thisisvisceral.com | 21 hour ago

Protecting Your Website Users with an SSL Certificate

Austin does a great write-up on the why's and how's of implementing SSL on your website. It's 2016 folks, no more excuses.

Protecting Your Website Users with an SSL Certificate

Tutorials | thisisvisceral.com | 21 hour ago

If you have ever owned a website or used the internet for online purchases, you might know that some site URL’s begin with “https” instead of “http”, and that they are usually accompanied by a little green lock or shield. This means that the site has an SSL certificate and is therefore trustworthy. What you may not know is that EVERY site should have SSL
What does an SSL certificate do?
The short answer is, it certifies that your website is actually the site it claims to be. In other words, because Amazon has an SSL certificate, when you go to https://amazon.com you know that you are actually seeing Amazon’s website.
The other great thing SSL certificates do is encrypt any data passing between the client (your browser) and the server (Amazon’s website). Care for a demonstration?
EnCt28d9a57025c0dccf2e5a03240eabc5d4393197bf48d9a57025c0dccf2e5a03240Yn/IMeIi+wE4dPAAIFeKffhHQcHedVtbrmUGPGCQnS264qBdKuk=IwEmS
Can you tell me what this text means? Of course not, no one can, it’s encrypted. However, if you were to take that text over to https://encipher.it, you can decrypt it using my super secret password: visceral
Pretty neat huh? Makes you feel a bit like James Bond?
What makes SSL so important?

7 min read Iain Poulson

Examples of Refactoring PHP Code for Better Readability

Gilbert's latest article covers practical examples of PHP code refactoring.

Examples of Refactoring PHP Code for Better Readability

Refactoring code is when you restructure existing code without changing its external behavior. Basically your aim is to make “bad” code better without changing the underlying functionality. There are plenty of guides out there on refactoring your code. However, I find many of them talk about the ideology of well written and structured code without actually showing you what it looks like to refactor your “bad” code into “good” code. They might talk about high-level concepts like readability, extensibility, maintainability, testability, reduced complexity etc., which are all valid aims of the refactoring process, but they often fail to show examples of what this looks like in reality.
In this article I’m not going to talk about when you should refactor (personally I believe you should do it whenever you come across bad code), neither am I going to talk about why you should refactor (it reduces technical debt). Rather I want to look at some common, practical principles you can apply when refactoring and give examples of what they look like with real code examples. For the purposes of this article I’ll be using PHP code (as WordPress is written in PHP) but these principles will apply to

Pro | techcrunch.com | 1 day ago

The Money In Open Source Software

An interesting opinion piece on TC showing you can definitely make money with open source. Nice quote "Keep in mind that even open-source software is always owned by someone."

The Money In Open Source Software

Pro | techcrunch.com | 1 day ago

It’s no secret that open-source technology — once the province of radicals, hippies and granola eaters — has gone mainstream. According to industry estimates, more than 180 young companies that give away their software raised roughly $3.2 billion in financing from 2011 to 2014. Even major enterprise-IT vendors are relying on open-source for critical business functions today. It’s a big turnaround from the days when former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer famously called the open-source Linux operating system “a cancer” (and obviously a threat to Windows).
Despite the growing popularity of open-source software, though, many open-source companies are not financially healthy. Just like eyeballs didn’t translate into actual online purchases during the first dot-com era in the late 1990s, millions of free-software downloads do not always lead to sustainable revenue streams.
Make no mistake, open-source software is a brilliant delivery model to drive user adoption, and it’s poised to drive increasing market value in the coming years. But it’s not a business model on its own.
Just how challenging is it to build a big, profitable open-source business? Consider this: Besides the ongoing success of

2 min read M Asif Rahman
Community | wordpress.org | 2 days ago

WordPress 4.5.1 Maintenance Release

Version 4.5.1 released to fix multiple bug. It will auto-update if you have that option turned on (default btw).

WordPress 4.5.1 Maintenance Release

Community | wordpress.org | 2 days ago

After about six million downloads of WordPress 4.5, we are pleased to announce the immediate availability of WordPress 4.5.1, a maintenance release. This release fixes 12 bugs, chief among them a singular class issue that broke sites based on the Twenty Eleven theme, an incompatibility between certain Chrome versions and the visual editor, and an Imagick bug that could break media uploads. This maintenance release fixes a total of 12 bugs in Version 4.5. For more information, see the release notes or consult the list of changes.
Download WordPress 4.5.1 or venture over to Dashboard → Updates and simply click “Update Now.” Sites that support automatic background updates are already beginning to update to WordPress 4.5.1.
Thanks to everyone who contributed to 4.5.1:

10 min read Matt Cromwell
Business | wordimpress.com | 22 hours ago

What can Franchising Teach Us About Improving the WordPress Community?

A very unique perspective on how the Franchising industry does things very similarly to the WordPress business community and how we can learn from that.

What can Franchising Teach Us About Improving the WordPress Community?

Business | wordimpress.com | 22 hours ago

At first glance Franchising and WordPress seem to be in two different worlds. They have more overlap that you’d first think. WordPress gets me excited! 18 months ago I started participating in WordCamps, reading WordPress blogs and owning a WordPress Plugin development shop. Yet, I wasn’t schooled in development or tech administration; I originally got to know about WordPress in 2007 through Franchising.
More specifically, by representing Franchisors like The UPS Store, Massage Envy, Ace Hardware, CertaPro Painters, and Budget Blinds as their Integrated Marketing Agency.
Leave WordPress to Make it Better
I appreciate and agree with the point of view that Roy Sivan recently shared at WordCamp Los Angeles in 2015. You can watch the whole video below:
In short, he shared that developers should take breaks from the WordPress community, learn other coding languages, and then return to benefit the WordPress Way of getting things done.
In addition to codebases, it’s important that our community of developers, site admins, freelancers and marketing agencies move through business associations, too.
One industry you might consider learning more about and participating in is franchising.
So what

Pro | medium.com | 2 days ago

Being A Developer After 40

I soon qualify :) A fun read to end the day at work.

Being A Developer After 40

Pro | medium.com | 2 days ago

(This is the talk I have given at App Builders Switzerland on April 25th, 2016. The slides are available on SpeakerDeck and at the bottom of this article.) Hi everyone, I am a forty-two years old self-taught developer, and this is my story.
A couple of weeks ago I came by the tweet below, and it made me think about my career, and those thoughts brought me back to where it all began for me:
I started my career as a software developer at precisely 10am, on Monday October 6th, 1997, somewhere in the city of Olivos, just north of Buenos Aires, Argentina. The moment was Unix Epoch 876142800. I had recently celebrated my 24th birthday.
The World In 1997
The world was a slightly different place back then.
Websites did not have cookie warnings. The future of the web were portals like Excite.com. AltaVista was my preferred search engine. My e-mail was kosmacze@sc2a.unige.ch, which meant that my first personal website was located in http://sc2a.unige.ch/~kosmacze. We were still mourning Princess Lady Diana. Steve Jobs had taken the role of CEO and convinced Microsoft to inject 150 million dollars into Apple Computer. Digital Equipment Corporation was suing Dell. The remains of Che Guevara had

5 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | mediatemple.net | 22 hours ago

You Should Probably Blog in Markdown - Media Temple

I like the sentiment behind this. It helps keep a more semantic article overall and much cleaner markup overall. But it's almost like teaching another language to beginner users.

You Should Probably Blog in Markdown - Media Temple

Editorials | mediatemple.net | 22 hours ago

Maybe you’ll read that title and think: Damn, Chris. Little dogmatic isn’t it? There are lots of ways to do things, especially on the web. Why be all prescriptive?
You’d be right. What I actually want is for everyone creating content on the web to create that content in a clean way that will serve them long into the future. Markdown, I feel, highly encourages that.
Let us explore some of those ways.
If you have no idea what Markdown is, it’s a “text-to-HTML conversion tool for web writers”. It’s root is here and there are many implementations.
This is #1 for a reason. I overflow with sadness when I hear of someone dealing with legacy content that is full of ancient markup.
I bet you know what I mean.
Things like around seemingly random sentences. wrapping every single blog post because it was just “what you did”. Images force-floated to the right because that made sense three designs ago. Headers with class names on them that don’t even exist anymore. Tables of data spit into content with all the whitespace stripped out and weird alignment attributes you barely recognize. An about page

7 min read Iain Poulson

WP Migrate DB Pro 1.6 Released

Big news, WP Migrate DB Pro is 3 years old and we've just released version 1.6 with a major overhaul of the UI.

WP Migrate DB Pro 1.6 Released

Refactoring code is when you restructure existing code without changing its external behavior. Basically your aim is to make “bad” code better without changing the underlying functionality. There are plenty of guides out there on refactoring your code. However, I find many of them talk about the ideology of well written and structured code without actually showing you what it looks like to refactor your “bad” code into “good” code. They might talk about high-level concepts like readability, extensibility, maintainability, testability, reduced complexity etc., which are all valid aims of the refactoring process, but they often fail to show examples of what this looks like in reality.
In this article I’m not going to talk about when you should refactor (personally I believe you should do it whenever you come across bad code), neither am I going to talk about why you should refactor (it reduces technical debt). Rather I want to look at some common, practical principles you can apply when refactoring and give examples of what they look like with real code examples. For the purposes of this article I’ll be using PHP code (as WordPress is written in PHP) but these principles will apply to

3 min read Matt Cromwell
Editorials | wordimpress.com | 20 hours ago

Leveling Up as a Developer

A fun and engaging chat with Roy Sivan, Carl Alexander, Josh Pollock, and Matt Cromwell on improving your skills as a developer no matter your skill level.

Leveling Up as a Developer

Editorials | wordimpress.com | 20 hours ago

Leveling up as a developer is more complex than one would think. Recently, our very own Matt Cromwell appeared on The WP Crowd’s episode about this very topic. Leveling up as a developer is more complex than one would think. The process has layers like an onion — sometimes sweet, sometimes causing tears.
You can level up by learning a coding language but developing your troubleshooting and problem skills are just as important.
It’s true. Problem solving skills are an important part of development. Sometimes leveling up is about learning how to ask questions. And it seems obvious, but often you need to talk to the duck so to speak to really formulate in your mind where you’re having trouble.
“Tone is really important [when asking for help].” Matt Cromwell
Often people are frustrated, wanting code to be simple or the fix to be simple.
When troubleshooting, Jesse Petersen says,
“You have to really start at the beginning… You have to locate what version they’re running on.”
He also suggests sorting out the issue in a local environment as Genesis Framework can be a bit tricky. Also, consider joining a membership site for handy resources.
Other times you learn to whom the question should

7 min read David Bisset
Community | tommcfarlin.com | 1 day ago

Three Reasons For Attending a WordCamp

Really? You need reasons? Ok, at least listen to Tom's reasons at least. :-)

Three Reasons For Attending a WordCamp

Community | tommcfarlin.com | 1 day ago

As I’m decompressing from the whirlwind that was WordCamp San Diego, I’ve been going through notes and bookmarked posts on the topics for many of the things that were discussed. But my mind is also drifting to several emails, messages, and notes I’ve received this year about those who are interested in attending a WordCamp but have yet to do so for one reason or another.
Though I’m considering writing several posts over the course of this week all related to the material covered at the conference, I thought it might be worth sharing some of the reasons that I enjoy going to WordCamp.
Each time someone publishes a post like this, it’s always going to be through the filter of their experience.
I’m certainly not naive to that, but after attending several WordCamps over the last few years, I’d like to think that I’ve had enough experiences that fall on the spectrum of being “Man, that wasn’t very good” to “I’m glad I attended that conference.”
Furthermore, I’m also going as a developer. I’m wasn’t attending through the persona of a designer (because I’m not one), a blogger, or as a business-person (though I will say that my interested in business tracks has increased over the last few years).

Development | carlalexander.ca | 3 days ago

A look at the modern WordPress server stack

Morning full of great dev posts. Carl Alexander covers a full range of options available to the modern WordPress developer.

A look at the modern WordPress server stack

Development | carlalexander.ca | 3 days ago

I gave a talk at WordCamp San Diego 2016 on the modern WordPress server stack. This is the companion article that I wrote for it. If you’re just looking for the slides, click here. Do you remember when you could run a “fast” WordPress site with just an Apache server and PHP? Yeah, those were days! Things were a lot less complicated back then.
Now, everything has to load lightning fast! Visitors don’t have the same expectations about loading times as they used to. A slow site can have serious implications for you or your client.
As a consequence, the WordPress server stack has had to evolve over the years to keep up with this need for speed. As part of this evolution, it’s had to add a few gears to its engine. Some of the older gears have had to change as well.
The result is that today the WordPress server stack looks quite different from a few years ago. To better understand it, we’re going to explore this new stack in detail. You’ll see how the various pieces fit together to make your WordPress site fast.
Before we dive in, let’s zoom out and look at the big picture. What does this new WordPress server stack look like? Well, look no further!
Click for full size
The diagram above gives

5 min read Brian Jackson
Plugins | wphostingspot.com | 16 hours ago

Cache Enabler VS Redis Object Cache Speed Comparison

Great write up on a comparison of the free WordPress Cache Enabler vs Redis Object caching. Glad to see more mention of WebP as well :)

Cache Enabler VS Redis Object Cache Speed Comparison

Plugins | wphostingspot.com | 16 hours ago

Today’s internet is all about speed and performance. There are a TON of plugin options for WordPress that will help with the loading time of your websites pages. Awhile ago, we ran a test the included 4 of the major players in the WordPress caching arena; Cache Enabler, WP Super Cache, WP Rocket and WP Total Cache. In our testing, Cache Enabler was the winner by a very close WP Rocket. However, Cache Enabler is FREE where WP Rocket is paid. So I would rather choose a FREE plugin that can do just as good, if not better, then a paid plugin can do. We wanted to run a test on how well Cache Enabler stacked up to Redis Object Caching. Redis is a persistent, in-memory data structure object caching system used to cache database queries and the front-end of your blog/site and stores the information in RAM similar to what Varnish does. Cache Enabler is strictly a front-end caching plugin.
We first setup both environments on a separate VPS from Vultr in NY with 768MB ram and 1 CPU core. Each VPS was installed with PHP7, nginx v1.9.10, php-fpm, Memcached, Opcache and MariaDB 10x. We installed the X Theme with the demo data “Restaurant demo” for each install and only the required plugins for each

9 min read Codeinwp
Business | ionutn.com | 2 days ago

You Aren't Bad at Marketing, Your Product Is Not Good Enough!

Focus on your product first. And second. And third. Examples of popular products/articles with no marketing involved.

You Aren't Bad at Marketing, Your Product Is Not Good Enough!

Business | ionutn.com | 2 days ago

Just like your kid, your product is probably no special. Well, sorry if you’re offended … or, you know what, actually I’m not sorry at all.
But why am I even saying this anyway?
Let’s start at the beginning:
I have met a lot of people lately, both in the WordPress community and outside of it. All trying to build their businesses/products and asking for my advice on various things, but also complaining that they can’t get the marketing cracked for their products, blog posts, courses, etc.
My main observation is that – and I’m guilty of this too at times – people generally tend to believe that their product is great, and that the only reason they can’t get enough eyeballs on it is because they lack the money or the marketing skill to promote it effectively.
Bollocks!
At least 90% of the time.
But let’s talk examples. Here’s my quick analysis of 4 things/products/articles of ours that got popular, and the role that marketing played in that:
Our transparency reports over at the CodeinWP blog.
The Zerif Lite WordPress theme.
The Revive Old Post WordPress plugin.
1. Transparency reports – why they worked
To be completely honest with you, I haven’t spent more than a couple of hours promoting

10 min read Chris Burgess
Development | sitepoint.com | 44 mins ago

The Ultimate WordPress Development Environment

Matt Geri from XWP talks about the various WordPress development tools he uses, with some of his personal favorites.

The Ultimate WordPress Development Environment

Development | sitepoint.com | 44 mins ago

WordPress development has come a very long way in recent years when it comes to tooling. In the past, developing a WordPress website required some sort of MAMP/WAMP localhost setup and almost always, a rather painful headache. Maybe you’re even one of those developers who developed their website on a live environment – I was. Luckily, times have changed and there are now tools that help take the headache and repetitiveness out of building WordPress sites on your computer.
In December last year, after 3 years of being almost completely devoid of any WordPress development, I became a full time WordPress developer again. Before that 3 year stint in the payments industry, I was a full time WordPress contractor.
Being out of an industry for 3 years, gave me a unique perspective on how fast things change in computing and more specifically, web development. WordPress development is no exception.
You see, when I returned to WordPress development in December last year, I decided to look at setting up the perfect WordPress development environment. I was pleasantly surprised to see that the tooling around WordPress had advanced so much that it was much like trading in a Ford for a Ferrari.
I was

Next on the ManageWP AMA: Michael Torbert

Community | 3 days ago

As we all know the one of the most important things for the blog or a website is SEO or Search Engine Optimization. To make your life easier WordPress is offering various plugins that should help you out in this not so easy job. Therefore, it is not surprising that the next WordPress developer on our AMA will be Michael Torbert.

Michael is an author of 14 plugins and the flagship of the fleet is All in one SEO. He is also in the WordPress translation team and WordCamp Raleigh organizer and sponsor.

All in one SEO has more than one million active installs and the 4,4 rating which puts it high on the SEO plugins and the plugins in general list.

AMA with Michael Torbert will take place on April 28th, from 12 pm to 6 pm East Coast time. He will be happy to answer any questions regarding WordPress, entrepreneurship, the first WordPress Audi S4 Edition and more.

Check out the AMA in your time zone:
http://goo.gl/7qrKKz

Find out more about Michael Torbert here:
http://michaeltorbert.com/
http://semperfiwebdesign.com/
http://semperplugins.com/

8 min read Mason James
Community | adamwwarner.com | 2 days ago

Adam W. Warner - What WordPress Evangelism Means to Me

This article shares Adam's personal views and insights into what a 'WordPress' Evangelist is. I've known Adam for several years and also worked with him - he's the real deal. His journey is real and will resonate with anyone who's in the WordPress "Community". I think we'll see more companies taking steps like this and choosing the right person is critical. Congrats to Adam and the SiteLock Team!

Adam W. Warner - What WordPress Evangelism Means to Me

Community | adamwwarner.com | 2 days ago

Last week I boarded a plane in Florida and left my family behind for the first time in 4 years. I’m writing this post from a hotel room in Scottsdale, Arizona. I’ve just spent 5 days at the offices of SiteLock.com, my new employer.
My job title is WordPress Evangelist and it’s one that explains not only my core values and my personality, but also my role in contributing to the WordPress project as a whole.
A Summary of the Past 4 Years
…or why I would start working for someone else when I’ve been running a successful WordPress-focused business from home.
In January of 2012 I learned that the company I had been with for 4 years was closing their local office. This was a decision made by the parent company, based in Sweden with additional locations in Kansas and Canada.
I was proud of the work I did there, transforming a 20 page static HTML website into a WordPress Multisite install and differentiating the brand and it’s offerings into 8 separate sites focusing on Residential and Commercial markets as well as creating and managing a Digital Asset Management system.
It also included Intranet portals for Marketing and Sales Reps, custom developed tools for both of these teams and adding

4 min read Lazar Travica
Development | lazartravica.com | 2 days ago

MariaDB and WordPress explained – Lazar's blog

In my extensive search for the tech-stack that suits WordPress best, MariaDB showed significant performance increases among it’s competitors…but will it work in the WordPress ecosystem?

MariaDB and WordPress explained – Lazar's blog

Development | lazartravica.com | 2 days ago

In my extensive search for the tech-stack that suits WordPress best, MariaDB showed significant performance increases among it’s competitors. …but will it work in the WordPress ecosystem?
First thing to check when testing a new database engine with WordPress is compatibility.
WordPress officially supports only MySQL, though there are some database layer-abstraction techniques which are too complex to execute to be offering any performance increases.
MariaDB, on the other hand, is 100% compatible with MySQL.
All the goodies that increase performance and offer new features are tucked under the hood of the familiar MySQL.
Compatibility – check!
Caching
Unlike MySQL, MariaDB comes with query caching on by default. What this means is that every query that is being sent to the database engine is first looked up in the cache to see if the user can get what he wants without even running a query on the database.
Performance increases on a WordPress site, which always has a much larger number of database reads than writes, are significant.
Subquery caching
Another form of caching which MariaDB offers is subquery caching.
If we have two queries run one after another:
Query 1:
SELECT COUNT(*) FROM

Pro | rationalconspiracy.com | 3 days ago

Dark Patterns by the Boston Globe

It's the world of marketing deception that we live in. I hope none of your WordPress businesses employs any of the 'dark patterns' described here.

Dark Patterns by the Boston Globe

Pro | rationalconspiracy.com | 3 days ago

After years of falling revenue, some newspapers have resorted to deception to boost their subscription numbers. These dishonest tactics are sometimes called “dark patterns” – user interfaces designed to trick people. For example, this is a Boston Globe story on Bernie Sanders:
Before you can read the article, there is a pop-up ad asking you to subscribe. By itself, this is annoying, but not deceptive. The real dark pattern is hidden at the top – the ‘Close’ button (circled in red) uses a very low contrast font, making it hard to see. It’s also in the left corner, not the standard right corner. This makes it likely that users won’t see it, causing them to subscribe when they didn’t have to.
One the ‘Close’ link is clicked, deception continues:
At the bottom, there’s a non-removable, high-contrast banner ad asking for a paid subscription. Again, this is annoying, but honest. However, the circled text “for only 99 cents per week” is not honest. It’s simply a lie, as later pages will show.
Clicking the “Subscribe now” button brings up this page:
Here, it becomes obvious that $0.99 per week isn’t the real price. It’s common for companies to have initial discounts, which isn’t itself a dark

Pro | symfony.fi | 3 days ago

PHP-PM grows up to be a credible option for high performance PHP

If the momentum from the early months of 2016 continues, PHP-PM could well become the defacto standard of running PHP applications in this novel way - similar to how PHP-FPM became the current gold standard for high performance PHP.

2 min read Donna Cavalier
Development | wptavern.com | 3 days ago

WordPress 4.6 to Update Theme Filter Tags in the Admin

Kind of unreal how long this has taken to happen. Happy to see it, even if it only helps a little. At least it shows they care.

WordPress 4.6 to Update Theme Filter Tags in the Admin

Development | wptavern.com | 3 days ago

The admin themes browser has been updated and modernized in recent years to make it easier to search through the 3,800+ themes available on WordPress.org. One aspect of the interface that has lagged behind, however, is the list of tags for filtering themes. The tags have gone untouched since back in the day when users would search themes by color. The WordPress Theme Review Team’s proposal to overhaul the outdated tags/filters is making it into WordPress 4.6. All of the color tags will be removed, which makes sense since many modern themes are customizable when it comes to accent colors. The update will also remove fixed, fluid, and responsive layouts and will add ‘Grid Layout’ to the list. In the list of miscellaneous features, Blavatar will be removed and Footer Widgets will be added.
The Subject section will be completely revamped by removing the all the previous tags and replacing them with a new list of general theme categories:
Blog
E-Commerce
Education
Entertainment
Food & Drink
Holiday
News
Photography
Portfolio
The tags will also be updated on the WordPress Theme Directory in cooperation with the meta team.
The WordPress theme landscape has changed so much over the years, especially

Development | cedaro.com | 3 days ago

Structuring WordPress Plugins

Brady Vercher shares his approach to starting a new WordPress plugin.

Structuring WordPress Plugins

Development | cedaro.com | 3 days ago

One of the great things about WordPress plugins is that it’s fairly easy to get started and build something functional without a ton of effort. However, once you get beyond a simple concept, have to maintain a growing codebase, or find yourself repeating similar steps, structure becomes essential. A recent discussion on Post Status and some nudging from Nate Wright convinced me to write a bit about my approach to building plugins.
In most cases, I prefer to build standalone plugins that don’t rely on external libraries if possible due to the lack of dependency management in WordPress (projects where Composer is available is another story). I value simplicity and the ability to re-use code despite my tendency to over-engineer and abstract more than is always necessary.
Autoloading
Autoloading classes allows your code to be loaded automatically when it’s needed instead of having to litter your code with a bunch of calls to include() and require(). Basically, when PHP encounters a class it doesn’t know about, it runs through a list of registered autoloaders until it finds one that knows how to load it.
An autoloader is just a callback function, similar to a WordPress filter, that takes